This is a guest post from my wife, who thinks the following story is simply hysterical.

J.D. and I are fairly good at eating our leftovers. I often intentionally create leftovers for my sack lunches or an easy weeknight dinner. J.D. has improved at remembering we have them since instituting his leftover list on the fridge. But last night he returned to his evil ways, and I thought I’d share it with his readers.

For several weeks, we’ve had a half-jar of homemade marinara sauce in the fridge. Made with last summer’s garden tomatoes, it’s Good Stuff. Thinking I ought to use it soon, I added a roll of pre-made polenta to last weekend’s grocery list, envisioning some northern Italian goodness.

On Sunday afternoon I actually had the ingredients on the kitchen counter, moments away from fixing dinner. The oven was preheating. My stomach was growling. Then J.D. came into the room and mentioned that he had a hankering to pick up take-out from DaVinci’s, a local Italian place. That sounded good to me, too. Plus it was his birthday, so he deserved a treat. I put the sauce and polenta away.

We ordered way too much food from the take-out place, but it was good, and I dutifully packed half of my leftovers for lunch the next two days. Having had pasta and sauce for lunch, however, I’ve been in no mood for sauce and polenta for dinner. But in the back of my mind I’ve kept a picture of the half-filled jar, front and center on the top shelf of our fridge.

Tuesday night rolled around and J.D. decided to have his take-out leftovers. This, in itself, is a good thing. However, the next thing I knew he had gone to the pantry and opened a BRAND NEW JAR of tomato sauce to add to his dinner. I let out a long wail of despair. My anguish deepened as he used only about two tablespoons of sauce. Argh!

I guess I know what I’m having for dinner tomorrow! And I have warned J.D. that more pasta is in his future.

On a related note, I found this year-old NYT piece on how to train your spouse both informational and amusing. I’m e-mailing it to Kris!

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