I’ve been swamped lately. I know it’s a temporary thing, and that soon I’ll have all the time I need to maintain this site, but in the short-term it’s frustrating. I have grand plans, but am unable to do anything about them for a month or two. Meanwhile, here are some great articles from elsewhere:

My favorite post last week came from Simplicity in Kansas. The author interviewed his 84-year-old mother about her first-hand memories from the Great Depression. She shared dozens of ways that she had learned to save money: growing and canning food, living without utilities for five years, re-using everything. We Americans have lived with plenty for so long that it’s difficult for us to imagine having to do some of this stuff as a matter of course.

Not all Americans live with plenty, though. A GRS reader pointed me to a pair of articles from science fiction author John Scalzi. The first is called “Being Poor” and lists 50+ examples of what it’s like to be poor. My family was relatively poor when I was a boy, so a few of these are familiar. But only a few. Scalzi’s second post, “Out of Poverty”, features his five tips for charting a course out of poverty:

  1. Get an education.
  2. Take responsibility.
  3. Get help.
  4. Learn patience.
  5. Filter out the stupid and ignorant.

Several readers sent me a Michael Shermer article from the L.A. times about why people believe weird things about money. This story demonstrates again that money is more about mind than it is about math. “When it comes to money, as in most other aspects of life,” Shermer writes, “reason and rationality are trumped by emotions and feelings.”

Finally, No Credit Needed recently shared his debt cures for living debt-free. NCN has been debt-free for two years now, thanks in part to the strategies he lists here.

This article is about Spare Change