Monday’s interview with Adam Shepard was the first installment of an irregular series here at Get Rich Slowly. Since starting the site, I’ve wanted to interview people about money. Not just money gurus, but average people, people like you and me. As I move closer to blogging full-time, this dream can become a reality. If you have some suggestions for future interview subjects, please let me know.

In the meantime, my second interview will be with Tim Ferriss, author of the phenomenally successful The 4-Hour Work Week: Escape 9-5, Live Anywhere, and Join the New Rich. When I reviewed the book last August, I wrote that Ferriss’ ideas were “like a kick in the head”. I meant that in a good way. Though there were sections of the book I didn’t like, the good far outweighed the bad. The book challenged me, and continues to provide inspiration as I pursue non-traditional work.

If you have have a question about early and semi-retirement, geographic arbitrage, or any of the other things Ferriss writes about, please leave a comment on this post. Tomorrow night, I’ll compile a list of questions and pass them on. (I have many questions of my own, too.)

Speaking of non-traditional work, here’s an old article that I only discovered today. On Halloween 2004, Penelope Trunk listed 7 ways to decrease your hours without harming your career. Her top advice? Concentrate on quality of work over quantity. “The person who builds a career on doing the most work commits to living on a treadmill…Quality is what matters.”

Elsewhere, Free Money Finance recently explained how the game of life teaches personal finance.

Given all of the various learnings (both favorable and unfavorable) in The Game of Life, my wife and I spend much of the game talking our kids through the various money issues we’re confronted with. We’re careful not to be over-bearing (it’s a game after all — we’re trying to have fun)…As such, we’ve seen that Life can be a great way to teach kids (or anyone else) about personal finance issues.

Finally, Re-Nest has a fun article describing how to make a one-pot indoor herb garden. Kris and I love to grow our own food. We’ve never tried container gardening, but this $30 project is a great way for the uninitiated to give home gardening a shot.