Whew! It took a long time — nine days instead of the scheduled seven — but I finally finished the frugality chapter for my book. Do you know how difficult it is to compress that topic into a single chapter? It’s worth an entire book by itself!

The version I just submitted to my editor is 11,643 words and includes April’s should I buy it? flowchart. I expect the published version to be significantly shorter, but we’ll see.

How much is 11,643 words? It’s about 39 printed pages. It’s also the equivalent of 12-15 major blog posts. If you wonder why I’m so quiet around here, it’s because I’m pouring so much into the book. I appreciate your patience.

Though I’ve been writing nearly non-stop for the past week, I have managed to collect more articles than usual to share. Rather than provide extended commentary, I’m just going to bullet-point the good stuff today:

  • The Consumerist has a story how Radio Shack charges 24 times more for the same product than the dollar store next door. You should comparison shop whenever possible, folks.
  • The Art of Manliness (still one of my favorite blogs) explains how to change your motor oil. This is something of a lost art. I used to do this on my first two cars, but haven’t done it myself in 15+ years. Have you?
  • The Simple Dollar just celebrated its third blogiversary. To mark the occasion, Trent listed ten things he’s learned about money and life since he started the site. Good stuff.
  • Baker doesn’t just write for Get Rich Slowly. He also has his own blog. Or does he? Over at Man vs. Debt, guest author Jenny Newcomer posted a great story about how she paid off $15,000 in nine months by selling stuff on eBay.
  • Did you know Goodwill offers on-line shopping? ShopGoodwill.com features the good stuff donated to Goodwill thrift sores. You can browse and bid on art, antiques, and collectibles. Cool beans.
  • Wojciech from Fiscal Fizzle seems to have a permanent spot on these round-ups! This week, he’s written about how to send the SWOT on your money, where SWOT stands for strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats. Wojciech explains how to use this framework to tackle your personal finances.
  • Lastly, I wanted to point out that Kiplinger.com has finally re-vamped their website. It’s no secret that I hated their previous layout. It was an abomination. The new site is much more user-friendly.

Before I start on the next chapter of my book (Chapter 6: Boosting Income), here are some recent personal finance carnivals. These round-ups are great ways to explore other money blogs:

Have a good evening everyone. I’ll see you in the comments of April’s post tomorrow morning…