It’s a busy week for me. I’ve been writing and editing like mad, trying to prepare for my upcoming trip to South Africa. Things are going well, but there’s still lots more work to do.

In the meantime, I realized there are a handful of housekeeping points I need to mention:

  • I’ve changed how I’m responding to comments. I’ve begun to reply “in-line” (for lack of a better term), when I have time. That is, if somebody asks a question or makes a point I want to address, I add a “J.D.’s note” to that specific comment instead of leaving a separate comment. I’ve always liked how this works at other blogs, and want to try it here. Please let me know if you have feedback (pro or con) on this method.
  • I’m actively recruiting follow-ups to past questions and stories. People are constantly e-mailing me to find out what happened to so-and-so, who asked a question in 2007. Or what about the fellow who told his story last June? Well, I want to know, too. So, if you’ve shared a question or story in the past and want to let us know how things turned out, please drop me a line. I’ll start sharing these (short) follow-ups on Friday and Sunday afternoons.
  • We’re experimenting with tweetchats. As most of you know, I’m lame with social media. I know how to blog, but when it comes to Facebook and Twitter, I’m as bad as your parents. That’s why Get Rich Slowly has a team of social-media elves. I pop in on these accounts from time-to-time, but it’s the elves who keep the Twitter and Facebook content fresh, and one thing they want to do is hold a tweetchat every couple of weeks.

The first Get Rich Slowly tweetchat will take place today (Wednesday) at 4pm Pacific (7pm Eastern). What the heck is a tweetchat? Great question, and one I had myself. Here’s what the Andrew, the head social-media elf, had to say:

A TweetChat is a multi-user conversation on Twitter where tweets are tied together through the use of a predefined hashtag. Here’s a really good, thorough article about them. By using a hashtag (such as #moolah, as we’ve chosen for the GRS tweetchat), participants can use their preferred method to track and participate in the conversation (such as using the search feature on twitter.com, a search column in TweetDeck, HootSuite or similar Twitter application) so there’s no need to follow everyone participating (since tracking and following everyone participating on an individual basis would be a nearly impossible feat!).

The other way — which is how we like to do it — is through the TweetChat website. It’s similar to any of the above outlined methods, except, as TweetChat explains, “[We] help put your blinders on to the Twitter-sphere while you monitor and chat about one topic,” and a little easier to read that twitter.com search results due to its wider layout; you can see more posts per page.

We’ll lead the conversation via the @GRSblog account through topical questions or soliciting general money-saving tips. We’ll be hosting TweetChats every two weeks around specific topics or general money-saving tips and we’ll announce the Tweetchat topic a day or two in advance. Topics will come from what is popular in the personal finance blogosphere, as well as GRS posts with significant reader feedback in order to extend the conversation among readers.

Today’s TweetChat topic for #moolah will be what specific actions or tools you’ve started or plan to use to take control of your personal finances in 2011.

I hope to join the tweetchats from time-to-time using my @jdroth Twitter account. I’m not sure if I’ll make it this afternoon, but I’ll try. Even if I don’t make it, Andrew will keep the discussion lively from 4pm – 5pm Pacific (7pm – 8pm Eastern)

As always, if you have feedback about anything related to Get Rich Slowly, please let me know. My team and I are always doing what we can to improve the site, to make it more useful for folks who want to learn about money.

GRS is committed to helping our readers save and achieve their financial goals. Savings interest rates may be low, but that is all the more reason to shop for the best rate. Find the highest savings interest rates and CD rates from Synchrony Bank, Ally Bank, GE Capital Bank, and more.