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Kids


  • Bad advice about having a baby I’m glad I followed (51 comments)

    This article is by staff writer Holly Johnson. Last week I was out walking with a friend when she admitted she was scared she would never have kids. “We’ll never be able to afford them,” she said as we made our way around the block and up the next street. She and her husband are about our age (and not getting any younger), and I could tell she was worried. “Oh, I’m sure you’ll figure…

  • Bird leaves nest: Equipping your graduate with wings (20 comments)

    This article is by staff writer Lisa Aberle. About one month after I graduated from high school, I moved out of my parents’ home for the first time. Freedom! No curfew! No rules! I had been waiting for this day for years. “When I graduate from high school, I am so outta here!” Shortly after moving out, though, I realized I wasn’t quite as well-prepared as I thought I was. One of my similarly immature…

  • The daycare debate: A double-edged sword (120 comments)

    This article is by staff writer Holly Johnson. As many of you know, my husband had a career crisis that left him unemployed for several months last summer. It was scary, but we learned a lot from the experience — including the fact that the grass isn’t always greener and that we really needed to learn to be happy with what we had. And, beyond that, we now feel blessed that he found a new job…

  • Saving your sanity (and your budget) this summer vacation (40 comments)

    This article is by staff writer Lisa Aberle. I am writing this article in silence, thanks to my kids’ 7 pm bedtime. And tonight is the last early bedtime night because – sob! – tomorrow is the final day of school. While I love my children, I admit to some qualms about summer vacation. How do I keep them entertained (that means out of trouble)? How do I keep the lid on my grocery budget?…

  • Teaching life skills to your children (22 comments)

    This article is by staff writer Lisa Aberle. While I’ve tackled many kid-centered topics, like how to save on kids’ clothes, should you buy your kid a car, or pay for your child’s college, you know what is really important to me? Helping them learn to be responsible and self-sufficient, so they don’t need me (except for moral support, of course). So while I often hear that I am a mean mom, and no other kids have to…

  • Giving kids money to manage (26 comments)

    This article is by staff writer Lisa Aberle. We’ve slowly started our children’s financial education. I thought the easiest way to start would be opening a savings account. I suppose I was correct, but it was met with more resistance than I expected. When we actually opened a savings account for them, I explained that we would deposit their money into their accounts. Then the bank would pay them interest. First, my son was horrified…

  • Why we aren’t saving for our children’s college educations (142 comments)

    This article is by staff writer Lisa Aberle. For a few years, I got to skip Dave Ramsey’s Baby Step 5. Save for our children’s college education? That was an easy one…since we didn’t have children, that answer was NO! But now we have two kids (soon to be three), which means our days of delaying that decision are over. And since our oldest child is ten, we’ve already missed out on a decade of compounding….

  • Things that babies just don’t need (152 comments)

    Just the other day, I was grocery shopping with my husband and kids when we made an interesting discovery. We were in the baby aisle picking up some diapers for our youngest when my four-year-old picked up a small package and asked me what it was. “What’s this, Mommy?” I picked it up and looked. And looked. And got really confused. “Ummmm…..pacifier wipes?” According to the packaging, they were food-grade pacifier wipes. “What do you do with…

  • Making memories without breaking the bank (41 comments)

    Even though Christmas is still more than a couple of months away (so sorry if you weren’t ready for a reminder), I am trying to think of ways to create meaningful family traditions for our first holiday season together as a family of four. It’s true that my husband and I have celebrated eight years together, but we didn’t do gifts most of the time (usually we paid for a house project), so I feel like…

  • Ask the Readers: What are the most important money lessons that parents should teach their children? (58 comments)

    This guest post is from Sumitha who blogs at A Fine Parent, a unique personal development blog exclusively for parents. Can parents really protect their children from making big money mistakes? There’s no straightforward answer to this question. Consider our own story, for instance. Both my husband and I come from financially conservative families where debt is frowned upon. And still, during our first two years in the U.S., we raked up a sizable chunk…

  • The first step to teaching our kids about money (28 comments)

    This post is from staff writer Lisa Aberle. By the time you read this, my husband and I should be in the middle of hanging out on a different continent for eight weeks — with our kids. Allow me to digress for a few sentences before I get to the point of this article. We started the adoption process two years ago. In October, 2012, we were matched with our children, and the weeks and months…

  • Minimalist parenting: The frugal choice (77 comments)

    This post is by staff writer Sarah Gilbert. The woman on the radio sounded panicked. She lived in Los Angeles, and because of her neighborhood (weird homeless guy on the corner; busy streets all around) she didn’t trust her kids to play outside. So she spent her time driving them to activities where they would get… physical activity. It sounded a little awful, and it sounded expensive. I had been interviewed for this piece (my…

  • Reader Story: Teenagers and money (aka Debunking the Mom-Is-an-ATM myth) (45 comments)

    This guest post is from Anna Weisend. Anna is a self- employed pastry chef and sugar artist with multiple streams of income, but her favorite job is the one that she doesn’t get paid for: being a mom! Some reader stories contain general advice; others are examples of how a GRS reader achieved financial success or failure. These stories feature folks with all levels of financial maturity and income. Want to submit your own reader…

  • Ask the Readers: How can you help children appreciate delayed gratification? (35 comments)

    This post is from Ollie Geiger, a personal finance writer who contributes to MoneyRates.com. I had it pretty good as a kid. While I didn’t get everything I wanted for birthdays or Christmas, my parents always gave it a good shot, and most importantly, they were always there when I opened the boxes. Still, in the instances I wanted a big-ticket item from my parents, I had to be patient. Coming from a single-income family…

  • Foster kids “age out” without a financial education (33 comments)

    This post is by staff writer April Dykman. When Eddye was a senior in high school, her goal was to save money to buy a car. “I wanted to make sure I had reliable transportation for college,” she says. That’s a pretty common goal for someone her age. But Eddye faced more hurdles than the average kid. Eddye was “aging out” of the foster care system, which meant she would soon be on her own….

  • Reader Story: A Pre-College Spending Frenzy (73 comments)

    This guest post from Preserved Sanity is part of the “reader stories” feature at Get Rich Slowly. Some stories contain general advice; others are examples of how a GRS reader achieved financial success or failure. These stories feature folks with all levels of financial maturity and income. Want submit your own reader story? Here’s how. My son recently graduated from high school. Our family and friends generously contributed to his college fund and provided him…

  • Reader Story: Financial Advice for a Five-Year-Old (46 comments)

    This guest post from Neil Wyn-Jones is part of the “reader stories” feature at Get Rich Slowly, and a perfect post for Father’s Day. Some stories contain general advice; others are examples of how a GRS reader achieved financial success or failure. These stories feature folks with all levels of financial maturity and income. Want submit your own reader story? Here’s how. Having recently completed my journey out of debt, I now have a new…

  • Financial Education for Fifth Graders (80 comments)

    I’ve finally overcome my fear of speaking in public (though speaking in front of 1000 people at next month’s World Domination Summit may bring that fear back) and have actually found that I enjoy talking to various groups about money. I think the key is not to over-prepare. In early May, for instance, I made a presentation for Adelante Mujeres, a group working to strengthen the local latina community. I spoke to about 25 immigrant…

  • Ask the Readers: How Much Do You Spend on Kids? (271 comments)

    The “Ask the Readers” feature has always been popular at Get Rich Slowly. It’s a great way for people like you to ask questions about money, and, best of all, it’s a chance to help others solve their problems. But there’s no doubt that the “how much do you spend?” questions get the most responses. Maybe that’s why Kate wrote recently to ask a question that hadn’t ever occurred to me. She wants to know…

  • 5 Unusual Ways to Raise Successful Children (105 comments)

    This is a guest post from Natalie Peace of PeaceAndProfit.com. She is the author of 30 Keys to Building a Multi-Million Dollar Business: What They Didn’t Teach Me in Business School. Natalie is an entrepreneur, business coach, and she’s currently writing a book on how to start a wildly successful business. Looking at the businesses I’ve built, managed, and sold (worth $2 million) by the age of 30, I’ve been reflecting lately on what set…

  • Ask the Readers: How Much Money Do You Need Before You Have Kids? (268 comments)

    For the most part, this site reflects my values and my experiences. That’s natural. One of the first rules of writing is to “write what you know”. This is one of the main reasons I’ve brought staff writers aboard here at Get Rich Slowly — their experiences are different than mine, and they bring different perspectives into play. Sometimes I have big blind spots in my life (financial and otherwise). One rather large blind spot…

  • An Early Education in Financial Literacy (58 comments)

    This post is from staff writer April Dykman. Last week J.D.’s wife, Kris, e-mailed me about an NPR story on a recent Girl Scout badge overhaul, specifically about merit badges for financial literacy. On the October 12 episode of Today on All Things Considered, host Guy Raz talks to Alisha Niehaus of the Girl Scouts of the USA about the update, the first major restructuring of the badge system since 1987: “…we’re really a girl-led,…

  • Reader Story: The High Cost of Kids’ Sports (92 comments)

    This guest post from Kay Lynn Akers is part of the “reader stories” feature at Get Rich Slowly. Some stories contain general advice; others are examples of how a GRS reader achieved financial success — or failure. Kay Lynn writes about money and life at Bucksome Boomer. More and more children are participating on travel or elite sport teams. Having your child invited to join a travel sports team is an honor but there are…

  • Frugal Back-to-School Shopping (115 comments)

    This post is from GRS staff writer Donna Freedman. Donna writes a personal finance column for MSN Money. She also writes about frugality, intentional living, and life in general at her own blog, Surviving And Thriving. According to the National Retail Federation, we’ll spend $68.8 billion outfitting our students for school this year. Yes, I said $68.8 billion. Sounds like a lot of money, right? But the NRF actually considers this “flat.” More than 80%…

  • Reader Story: Money Lessons for Kids from Captain America (64 comments)

    This guest post from Dustin Riechmann is part of the “reader stories” feature at Get Rich Slowly. Some stories contain general advice; others are examples of how a GRS reader achieved financial success — or failure. These stories feature folks from all levels of financial maturity and with all sorts of incomes. Dustin blogs about maintaining a happy marriage at Engaged Marriage and at Fit Marriage. Previously at GRS, Dustin wrote about strengthening your family…

  • The Tiger Mother and You: Are We Preparing Our Kids for a Better Financial Future? (120 comments)

    This is a guest post from Robert Brokamp of The Motley Fool. Robert is a Certified Financial Planner and the adviser for The Motley Fool’s Rule Your Retirement service. He contributes one new article to Get Rich Slowly every two weeks. Those of you who are parents — and those of you who came from them — may have already read the Wall Street Journal article by Amy Chua (which is an excerpt from her…

  • Allowance: For Learning or Reward? (46 comments)

    This is a guest post from Gail Vaz-Oxlade, the host of the popular Til Debt Do U$ Part on CNBC (Saturday nights at 10 and 10:30). Gail is a columnist for Yahoo Canada, Chatelaine, and Zoomer Magazine and blogs daily at her website, where she also offers terrific tools people can use to dig themselves out of the hole. Gail’s latest book is Debt-Free Forever. Children receive mixed messages about money. At home they hear…

  • Capitalist Kids: Encouraging Young Entrepreneurs (72 comments)

    Saturday, I posted what I thought was an amusing anecdote. I told how I’d bought some treats from a young girl’s bake sale, but she’d been woefully unprepared to take my money and give me change. I meant the story to be comic relief, but quite a few GRS readers found it unamusing — and, in fact, thought I came off as something of a jerk. Oops. In retrospect, many people raised valid concerns (though…

  • Kids These Days (106 comments)

    Kris and I took a stroll through the neighborhood today to visit the weekend garage sales. First we walked down to Lane’s house to browse his books and knick-knacks. (Lane is a GRS reader, and when we showed up, he said, “J.D., this is all capital-S Stuff!”) Then we hit other sales on the way home. At the last house, Kris got side-tracked looking at unused vintage postcards. (“They have spots for one-cent stamps!” she…

  • Ask the Readers: How to Talk About Money with Teenagers? (66 comments)

    Most readers here at Get Rich Slowly have their own tale of a financial turnaround. Many of us were just plain dumb with money when we were younger, and it took us years (or decades!) to realize the error of our ways. But what if somebody had cared enough to intervene before we got into serious trouble? Corinne wrote yesterday looking for help. She’d like to help steer her younger sister in the right direction…

  • Win $500 in the 2010 Get Rich Slowly Video Contest (21 comments)

    For a long time, I’ve wanted to host another contest here at Get Rich Slowly. Not a “leave a comment to win” contest (those bring hordes of random people from across the internet, which means the winners aren’t usually actual GRS readers), but a contest that rewards folks for doing something cool. Well, now seems to be the time. To celebrate the upcoming fourth anniversary of Get Rich Slowly and the imminent release of my…

  • What Did Your Parents Teach You About Money? (122 comments)

    February was National Parent Leadership Month, which highlighted the role parents play in shaping the lives of their children. As a sort of tie-in, the most recent poll in the Get Rich Slowly sidebar asked: “Did your parents prepare you well for financial independence?” Over 1000 GRS readers responded; the results surprised me: 17% of you said, “Yes, they did a great job in preparing me.” 17% said, “They did well — I learned the…

  • Munny Journey: A Journal for Your Child’s Financial Development (16 comments)

    I have some financial blind spots. For one thing, Kris and I do not have children. It’s difficult for me to write about the concerns of parents. So when the publisher sent me a copy of Munny Journey, “a keepsake journal for baby’s first money”, I recruited a new mother to help me evaluate the book. Here are Chrystal’s thoughts about this unique publication. This article is part of National Save for Retirement Week. At…

  • Personal Finance on Film: The Up Series (28 comments)

    “Give me the child until he is seven, and I will give you the man.” — attributed to Ignatius Loyola, founder of the Jesuit order Though there are many fine books about money available for the general reader, I’ve always been disappointed that there are so few movies about money. Anything directly about finance tends to be sensationalist in one way or another. Despite this, I think that excellent films about money do exist —…

  • The Great Piggy Bank Adventure (29 comments)

    “If we’re going to have a free-market capitalist society, we’ve got to give people the tools to not be victims” — John Cammack, T. Rowe Price I get a lot of e-mail from PR firms. I ignore most of it, but occasionally something stands out. One recent message invited me to make a trip to Orlando for the debut of The Great Piggy Bank Adventure, a new financial literacy exhibit at Walt Disney’s EPCOT Center….

  • Mother Knows Best: 5 Ways to Teach Your Kids About Money (56 comments)

    For Mother’s Day, I invited blogger Amanda Steinberg of DailyWorth to write a guest post for moms. DailyWorth offers daily personal-finance tips for women. Recession talk is everywhere, even on Mother’s Day. At work, at home, at the supermarket, at the library, at soccer games, and on play dates. Everyone hates this recession, and most everyone is being affected by it. Especially mothers. Why? Because we are on the front line of the budget wars….

  • Ask the Readers: How Do Children Affect Financial Priorities? (90 comments)

    When you’re on your own (or even with a partner), money decisions are generally straight-forward. You set personal goals and you work toward them. But what happens when you add children to the mix? How do you plan for them and for yourself at the same time? Kat is expecting her first child this month, and needs advice on how to prioritize her finances: My partner and I are just finishing the first phase of…

  • Kids Who Are Smart With Money (38 comments)

    I sometimes like to highlight my favorite reader comments. That’s difficult because there are so many great ones to choose from. But in a recent discussion about kids and cash, Mick left this absolute gem. Here’s a slightly edited version: I wonder what the tweens and teens think of money. How many parents ask their kids what the kids themselves want to know? i.e. Goal-setting with your kids from a kid’s point of view, no…

  • Cat and Girl on Halloween (13 comments)

    Cat and Girl is one of my favorite webcomics. It’s cynical, postmodern, and smart. I admit that not everyone finds it amusing (Kris, for example), but I do. I particularly liked yesterday’s strip, and am grateful that artist Dorothy Gambrell has granted me permission to re-post it here: Cat and Girl often features commentary on class, money, and consumerism. Mostly it’s just delightfully strange. Have a safe and happy Halloween.

  • When Is It Okay to Give? (30 comments)

    This is a guest post from my friend Kris, an American writer living in India. She and her husband recently arrived in New Delhi to participate in an educational exchange program. The juxtaposition of cultures has been interesting for Kris and Jeff: every day, their hosts bring ample meals to their rooms, but just a few blocks a way, people go hungry. Kris comments, “We’re from a small, rural community in the United States. Poverty…

  • The Last Word on Kids and Cash (48 comments)

    This is a guest post from Lisa, a mother of two small children. Lisa’s always on the lookout for practical suggestions for teaching kids about money. I figured a recent Kiplinger’s article was right up her alley. Kiplinger’s Personal Finance recently published an article called “The Last Word on Kids and Cash” by Janet Bodnar. The article is divided into seven age-appropriate sections, each with its own specific suggestions for teaching kids about money. (Ages…

  • Using an Allowance to Teach Kids About Money (40 comments)

    This is a guest post from Nickel, who writes about personal finance at Five Cent Nickel. Since that and his four kids don’t keep him busy enough, he’s launched another site more narrowly focused on credit card offers. Though small was your allowance, you saved a little store; and those who save a little shall get a plenty more. — William Makepeace Thackeray Just over three years ago, we decided to start paying our kids…

  • Young Entrepreneurs: Encouraging Children With Kid-Sized Businesses (36 comments)

    This is a guest post from my wife, and features a story I’ve come to look forward to updating every summer: the tale of two entrepreneurial girls. Last weekend I explored Portland’s beautiful Eastmoreland neighborhood during its annual 140-family garage sale. In the past, I’ve come away with major bargains, but this year I had to be content with enjoying the first day of summer with a couple of friends. We admired the homes, gardens,…

  • Saving with Albert: Teaching a Four-Year-Old the Value of Money (33 comments)

    My friend Albert — age four — loves electricity. Ever since he was young (ha!) he’s been fascinated by the stuff. His parents have carefully nurtured his hobby. Now that Albert’s older, they’ve decided this might be a good way to teach him about money. In this guest post from my friend Lisa, she describes how they’re helping Albert take the financial plunge. My son Albert loves his collection of colored light bulbs with all…

  • How to Inoculate Your Children Against Advertising (91 comments)

    This is a guest post from Lisa Tiffin, a freelance writer who covers food, lifestyle, business, and green living. I have a confession to make: I like commercials. Even though they can be boring, insulting, and just plain bothersome, on some level they intrigue me. I often wonder why certain ads fail miserably while others succeed in catapulting a brand to the forefront of store shelves. I like commercials because I enjoy guessing which will…

  • How to Prepare for a Baby (Without Going Broke) (90 comments)

    This is a guest post from Lynnae of beingfrugal.net, a blog about frugal living and getting out of debt. Preparing for a baby doesn’t have to cost a lot of money.  Magazines and TV ads will tell you that you need to spend a fortune in preparation for your little darling’s arrival, but it’s simply not true.  When my husband and I were expecting our first child, my husband was working at a small radio…

  • Weekend Update: Kids, Risk, and Gift Cards (11 comments)

    This weekend is a flurry of activity: book group, office party, family Christmas. Somehow I need to find time to write about personal finance! The last couple weeks have been crazy, but I’m focusing on January. I know that in a few weeks, things will have calmed down and I’ll be able to devote my attention to writing again. Here are some articles from around the way: At Consumerism Commenteray, Flexo discusses overspending for kids….

  • The Unbranded Kid: Thoughts on Marketing to Children (70 comments)

    Kris and I are childless by choice. We love our friends’ kids, but we’ve elected not to have any of our own. As a result, we’ve never had to face the financial challenges that come with parenting. One topic our friends often discuss is the marketing barrage children face from infancy onward. “Even diapers are branded,” one friend told us recently. “Especially diapers,” said her husband. This is no accident. Marketers know that forging brand…

  • Ads I Hate: Barbie Shopping Boutique (23 comments)

    Russell Heimlich passed along the following ad that seeks to plant the seeds of consumerism in our children, making the task of financial literacy more difficult further down the road. “You never run out of money!” Indeed? Here’s what The Consumerist had to say when they wrote about this toy last Monday: Fashion Fever Shopping Boutique, the correctly named Barbie toy, features a built-in credit card swiper and a life-size credit card for young children…

  • Money-Saving Ideas for Working Parents (18 comments)

    Over at The Dollar Stretcher, Pamela wrote looking for money-saving ideas that won’t burden an overfull schedule: I need some tips from women who work outside the home and drive to a workplace everyday then have to come home after a long work day and take care of house and family. I often can’t use tips from women who stay home because they require too much time. For instance, I don’t have time for gardening….

  • Baby Boom: The Shockwaves of a Lifestyle Change (32 comments)

    This is a guest post from Amanda, a Colorado tech writer and an activist for children with congenital heart disease. I’ve been following Get Rich Slowly and Wise Bread lately, and I find myself fascinated by the reasons people have changed their lifestyles. If karma hadn’t kicked my butt, I wonder if I would have ever moved away from the consumerist culture in which I once reveled.   Once upon a time, my husband and…

  • Ads I Hate: Good Parents Buy (28 comments)

    Like everyone, I see a lot of ads. Some are obnoxious, but I try not to let them bother me. I was reading an article at USA Today earlier in the week, though, and the following ad made me blow a gasket: I’ve obscured the advertiser’s logo. This message is followed by one that reads: “Bad parents don’t.” Yes, I know the ad is trying to be funny. Yes, I know it’s trying to pretend…

  • Sammy the Rabbit Teaches Kids to Save (3 comments)

    Financial literacy is best taught at a young age. Some of us are just coming to terms with basic financial skills at 38 — what if we’d managed to start on these habits when we were eight? The goal of the It’s a Habit Company (IAHC) is to “change children’s lives one dime at a time”. To meet this objective, the company has developed a character named Sammy Rabbit to better reach kids. IAHC (and…

  • Personal Finance for Nine-Year-Olds: How to Save for a Backhoe (18 comments)

    The youngest reader of Get Rich Slowly might just be C.J., who is nine-and-a-half (“almost a teenager”). C.J. recently started his own fiscal fitness journal in the Get Rich Slowly discussion forums. He writes: I want to get rich so I can buy a backhoe. A real one, because that’s the job I want to do. After I finish college I want to build big buildings and be an inventor. I want to be on…

  • PAYjr: A Web-Based Chores and Allowance Tool (13 comments)

    Last week I highlighted the Money Savvy Pig, a savings bank “for the twenty-first century”. But really, what 21st-cenury kid wants a plastic pig? Today’s youth are all about web 2.0. PAYjr wants to be your web-based solution for chores and allowances. According to the site: The PAYjr Chore & Allowance System provides free financial education and an online chore and allowance system for your kids to be able to track their chores and be…

  • The Problem with the Bank of Mom and Dad (39 comments)

    An anonymous poster at AskMetafilter wonders should parents finance grad school? Should parents help their children pay for grad school if they can afford it? My parents are divorced, but both are in households considered in the top 1% of the US in terms of income and net worth. After limited financial assistance from them during undergrad, I am getting no help at all for grad school. Am I out of line to expect that…

  • How One Father Taught His Son About Money (27 comments)

    An anonymous reader e-mailed a story about the financial education he received from his father. Something my dad did for me when I was a kid — after I got my first job (delivering papers) at the end of the year, he gave me a gift.  He wrote a check for my annual salary ($650) and told me to pick a brokerage firm and open an IRA.  I didn’t have any idea what an IRA…

  • ING Direct (now Capital One 360) Financial Literacy Writing Contest and Grants (3 comments)

    Chris wrote to tell me that ING Direct has launched two programs designed to increase financial literacy. One of the programs targets writers, the other targets teachers: The Adventures in Saving writing contest invites aspiring authors of all ages to create a children’s story with a savings theme for the chance to win $1,000 and be published. The Planet Orange Financial Literacy Awards will offer $100,000 in grants to kindergarten through eighth grade teachers to…

  • Mary Poppins on Compound Returns (7 comments)

    After writing about Time is Money last night, I climbed into bed and began to read John Bogle’s new The Little Book of Common Sense Investing. In the introduction, Bogle raves about the magic of compound returns. I turned to Kris, who was reading about birds, and said, “This reminds me of that bank song from Mary Poppins.” I paused. “I wonder if it’s on YouTube.” Of course it is. Everything is on YouTube. This…

  • Allowances for Kids: Teaching Children the Value of Money (21 comments)

    While browsing de.lico.us for stories about animal intelligence [blatant plug], I stumbled upon a financial anecdote at A Room of My Own: Sarah has been eager to earn some money; she has a Jones for a new video game and her “account” (where we keep track of deposits — her allowance — and withdrawals) is into negative integers. I gave her a job to earn $5+. It was nothing onerous. She was enthusiastic at first….

  • Financial Education: Are Schools Doing Enough? (63 comments)

    I read a lot about the lack of financial education in the United States. It’s a popular topic among personal finance bloggers and in media interviews. But I wonder how widespread the problem really is. At my high school during the mid-eighties, juniors were required to take a semester of personal finance. I thought the class was lame. It wasn’t challenging. I never did any of my homework, and so earned an F on every…

  • Tax Tips for Tykes (6 comments)

    Here’s some end-of-the-year advice from new GRS-reader W.C. Varones, a finance professional from San Francisco. Varones writes that if you have investments for your children, now is the time to maximize them. If you have stocks or mutual funds in investment accounts for your children, don’t let December pass without taking the opportunity to step up the cost basis of the investments. Every year, a child is allowed $800 of investment income without having to…

  • How Do You Teach Kids the Value of Money? (35 comments)

    At the grocery store yesterday, I passed a man and his daughter in the snack aisle. She was maybe ten or eleven, a little overweight, and begging for cookies. He was tall and muscular, a blue-collar type, clearly exasperated with her. “You have no conception of how hard your mother and I work to earn money, do you?” he said. There was desperation in his voice. This brief encounter has been in my mind ever…

  • Reader Comment: Teaching Children to Save (7 comments)

    My wife and I don’t have children, but many of our friends do. It’s fun to watch them grow. Most of these children are in school now, and beginning to develop an understanding of money. For example, my young friends Harrison and Antonio are excited about entering a particular model-building contest. (For K’NEX, maybe?) The prize for creating the best model — which these two boys are sure they will do — is $10,000. They’ve…

  • Get 10% Off New Books While Helping Charity (0 comment)

    Last month, Get Rich Slowly readers pledged $964 for First Book, a charity that gives children from low-income families the opportunity to read and own their first new books. First Book wrote to share another way to help: Thank you very much for raising money for First Book in the Blogathon! I was wondering if you would be willing to help First Book again by promoting our current fundraiser on your blog. August 26 and…

  • Some Thoughts on Discouraging Materialism in Children (17 comments)

    Does your infant sport clothes from Baby Gap? Does your three-year-old carry a Gucci handbag? Does your first-grader have a Playstation, an iPod, and $80 shoes? What sort of message does it send to children when parents give them these sorts of expensive things? What sort of attitude toward money does this foster? Lynn writes with some thoughts on encouraging sound financial habits in children at an early age: So many people focus on the…

  • Workshop for Kids (0 comment)

    52 woodworking projects kids can build (or middle-aged woodworking novices like me!)

  • Free Video eCards Through July (0 comment)

    Jalapenyo, a new video ecard service, is free until the end of July. [via Parent Hacks]

  • Check Your Local Library for Summer Reading Activities (0 comment)

    Parent Hacks encourages you to take advantage of your public library to foster learning and fun for your children.

  • Parent Hacks (1 comment)

    Are you frugal? Do you have young children? Could you use some tips on how to make parenting less work and more fun? Parent Hacks is a “collaborative weblog of practical parenting wisdom”. In other words, it’s like Lifehacker for moms and dads. Parent Hacks is a collaborative weblog that collects parents’ tips, recommendations, workarounds, and bits of wisdom — their hacks — in a single pot so we can all partake. Here’s the stuff…