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  • How Can You Earn Residual Income Through Real Estate? [Sponsored Post] (2 comments)

    A notoriously lucrative asset class, real estate—both residential and commercial—has become one of the most popular ways to secure residual income. Traditionally, building a residual income stream through real estate has required a large, up-front investment of both time and money; but thanks to new investment vehicles, those interested in earning passive income through real estate have several options from which to choose. Different Ways to Build Residual Income through Real Estate New Technology Platforms…

  • Improve your negotiation skills with BATNA (21 comments)

    This article is by staff writer Sam. Sam spent 13 years working in Equities on Wall Street and discusses financial independence strategies on Financial Samurai. Sam is also the founder of the Yakezie Network, the largest personal finance blog network on the web. If you want to know how to get the best deal possible, learn this simple acronym: BATNA. “BATNA” stands for “Best Alternative To a Negotiated Agreement.” Often times the bulk of money…

  • The new way to get rich slowly (84 comments)

    This article is by staff writer William Cowie. The face of getting rich slowly is changing right before our eyes, even as the status quo is failing. Before this year’s State of the Union address, the President’s media supporters, fretting about his low approval rating, fumed: “…never during his time in office has the state of the economy been better — yet rarely has he gotten such low marks from the public for his handling of it.”…

  • What Are Dividend Reinvestment Plans? (28 comments)

    In my previous post, I listed three things you need to start investing. Number three was opportunities. Sometimes those opportunities are unique, one-off types of things; however, they can just as easily be something that’s always been out there but you just weren’t aware of them because you weren’t paying attention to investing. Let’s explore one of those little-known opportunities — one that’s legit, good, and yet often overlooked because it’s a little, well, boring. It’s…

  • Investing Ideas that Avoid the Stock Market (37 comments)

    Investing requires resolve and a long-term vision, but it doesn’t actually have to involve the stock market. Here’s a guide to non-stock investing options: Precious metals During the Great Recession, precious metal commodities like gold and silver were all the rage. As the stock market lost more than 50 percent of its value, gold and silver started a monumental rise in price. Gold went from around $600 per ounce in 2007 to peak at $1,900…

  • What is market timing, and should you do it? (20 comments)

    This article is by staff writer William Cowie. In my previous post, a few commenters brought up the issue of market timing, generally taking me to task for appearing to advocate it. Market timing is a topic of much discussion, primarily in the world of stock investing. With this post, I hope to explain the issue and show how it applies to you, even if you never invest in a stock or mutual fund. What is…

  • Understanding the IPO process (17 comments)

    This article is by staff writer Sam. Sam spent 13 years working in Equities on Wall Street and discusses financial independence strategies on Financial Samurai. Sam is also the founder of the Yakezie Network, the largest personal finance blog network on the web. So you missed out on Twitter’s meteoric first-day rise because the stock gapped up to $45 from the initial public offering price of $26 and you couldn’t get in. With a market…

  • A primer on the most important economic metric (63 comments)

    This is a guest post (Part I in a three-part series) by Sam, author of Financial Samurai, “How to Engineer Your Layoff,” and founder of the Yakezie Network. Part II is A primer on the most important economic metric (Part II) and Part III is A primer on the most important economic metric (Part III). Finance and investing don’t have to be complicated. Consistently buying low and selling high can make you rich beyond your wildest…

  • Where to put your next investment (16 comments)

    This is a post from staff writer Robert Brokamp of The Motley Fool. Robert is a Certified Financial Planner and the adviser for The Motley Fool’s Rule Your Retirement service. Let’s say you’ve decided to add a new investment or two to your portfolio — maybe a stock, maybe a bond, maybe a mutual fund that invests in either or both. But now you’re confronted with another decision: In which account should you buy them?…

  • Understanding fundamental and technical analysis (11 comments)

    This guest post is by GRS reader Russell Kith, an avid value investor, fan of Warren Buffett and personal finance blogger. You can find more of his articles on investing on his blog, Money Street Smart. Investing is a lot like going to college. You start off with a broad range of general options (mutual funds or classes), then once you have a solid foundation, you learn the value of specificity (investing in stocks or…

  • Invest like Warren Buffett… but not really (35 comments)

    This is a post from staff writer Robert Brokamp of The Motley Fool. Robert is a Certified Financial Planner and the adviser for The Motley Fool’s Rule Your Retirement service. If you want people to read your investing-related post or book, you’ll increase your chances by mentioning Warren Buffett in your title. After all, I just did it — and it might be why you chose to read this. Every financial media company does it, including…

  • Reader Story: Dividends or bust: Thinking critically about investment (53 comments)

    This is shared by Steven Hogan (Twitter @stevehlaw), who has learned a few things about investing that he wanted to share. This story is part of our Reader Stories series. Some stories contain general advice; others are examples of how a GRS reader achieved financial success or failure. These stories feature folks with all levels of financial maturity and income. Want submit your own reader story? Here’s how. The back story When I was 18,…

  • What IS Financial Responsibility? (178 comments)

    This article is from new staff writer Honey Smith. “Be Responsible. Take responsibility for your actions.” It sounds simple, right? But what responsibility means to me has changed over the course of my life. In fact, there are so many definitions of responsibility that Wikipedia doesn’t even have a definition listed on its main responsibility page! There are over fifteen types listed there with links to their respective pages (though to be fair, one is…

  • Getting Rich Slowly vs. Taking Financial Risks (37 comments)

    For the next week (or two), we’ll be sharing “audition” pieces from folks interested in being new staff writers at Get Rich Slowly. Your job is to let us know what you think of each of these writers. Pay attention, give feedback, and after a couple of weeks we’ll ask which writers you prefer. This article is from Kristin Wong, who also writes at The Heart Beat blog for MSN Living. Her first audition article…

  • How Safe Is Your Cash? (51 comments)

    This is a post from staff writer Robert Brokamp of The Motley Fool. Robert is a Certified Financial Planner and the adviser for The Motley Fool’s Rule Your Retirement service. He contributes one new article to Get Rich Slowly every two weeks. One of oldest adages in investing is “no risk, no return.” These days, that old saying seems literally true, since cash is considered the safest asset, yet it earns virtually no interest. However,…

  • Can Money Buy Freedom? (124 comments)

    On Saturday, my friend Tyler hosted a blog meetup. I first met Tyler several years ago. He was a GRS reader who dropped me a line to see if I’d meet him for dinner. I said “yes” — as I almost always do. Now, several years later, Tyler runs a successful blog of his own. It was fun to see his readers come out to support him. Note: I’ve never hosted a meetup for GRS…

  • America’s Love-Hate Relationship with Wealth (187 comments)

    I was on the road for the past two months, first in Chicago, and then in Bolivia and Peru. As always happens, one of the side effects of travel is that I’ve been living in a media vacuum. For the past few weeks, I’ve heard almost nothing of current events. That means I arrived home to find a strange phenomenon: Protestors “occupying” Wall Street. And Oakland. And Portland. And probably many other places as well….

  • How to Buy a Pension with a Lifetime Annuity (47 comments)

    This is a guest post from Mike Piper, a long-time GRS reader and the author of Oblivious Investor, where he explains how exciting things like 401k rollovers and tax brackets work. Previously at GRS, Piper wrote about earning extra income with a small blog. Would retirement planning be easier if you had a pension? It’s a silly question, I know. For most people, the answer is, “Yes, of course.” Here’s a less-silly question: Did you…

  • An Introduction to Arbitrage: Using Craigslist to Make a Living (153 comments)

    On Saturday, I drove from Portland to Eugene to meet Jacob from Early Retirement Extreme. He’s on a mini road trip from the Bay Area, scouting Oregon for a place to live. Along with a few other ERE readers, I joined Jacob for a meet-up. (We also go to hang out with Jacob’s dog, Frank, who is so ugly he’s cute.) For those who don’t recall, Jacob is a theoretical physicist who applied his analytical…

  • Extreme Early Retirement in Practice: How Two People Did It (165 comments)

    This is a guest post from Robert Brokamp of The Motley Fool. Robert is a Certified Financial Planner and the adviser for The Motley Fool’s Rule Your Retirement service. He also has a blog, Twittering thing, and other things that are supposed to be important but he often forgets about, such as hygiene. Robert contributes one new article to Get Rich Slowly every two weeks. I regularly recommend that people spend time with a good…

  • Every Purchase Is a Trade-Off (76 comments)

    While I was digging out of debt, I cut back on my comic book habit. I’d been spending a mind-boggling $250 every month on comics — most of which I bought in the form of hard-bound compilations — but for a few of years, I slashed that to less than $50 a month. I also cut my book spending from $100 per month to $50 per month. In other words, I made trade-offs. I decided…

  • How to Spend Your Money (256 comments)

    Yesterday, as I was otherwise occupied (I spent five hours writing a post about programmable thermostats, a post nobody will even like!), the conversation on Donna Freedman’s article got a little cranky. Donna wrote about pinching pennies on some things so that she could splurge on others. In Donna’s case, that meant a trip to England. Tyler K., who’s always a little cranky, wrote in response: I’m just waiting for the post where someone’s passion,…

  • You Can Have It All (Just Not All At Once) (63 comments)

    This post is from new GRS staff writer Donna Freedman. Donna writes the Living With Less personal finance column for MSN Money, and writes about frugality and intentional living at Surviving And Thriving. Like J.D., Donna has been traveling lately — but she’s in merrie olde England, not Africa. Earlier this month, I attended a candlelit baroque concert at the historic St.-Martin-in-the-Fields Church. The Festive Orchestra of London was delightful. My seat cost £8 (about…

  • The Time Value of Money (or Why 25 Years of Cable TV Doesn’t Cost as Much as You Think) (31 comments)

    This guest post is from Stephen Popick, a government economist and founder of Coffeecents.org, a personal finance program for young adults. Popick is the long-time administrator of the Get Rich Slowly discussion forums. He loves coffee, even if his habit will cost him a latte-a-day million in thirty years. Just after Christmas, Carl Hendley of The Motley Fool wrote about his cable bill and how much lost investment income that money represented. As an economist,…

  • Life After Debt: What It’s Like in the Third Stage of Personal Finance (245 comments)

    I paid off the last of my debt in 2007, quit my day job in 2008, and have been working to build wealth ever since. As I wrote early last year, I’m in the Third Stage of personal finance: I’ve paid off my debt, built a cash cushion in savings, and am maxing out my retirement accounts. And after doing all of these things, I have money left over to spend on comic books and…

  • How Do You Define Financial Freedom? (70 comments)

    This post is from Kent Thune. Kent urges and guides readers to place meaning and purpose before money and planning at his blog, The Financial Philosopher. Can freedom be bought? Are there any (financially) poor people who are free? Are there any (financially) wealthy people who aren’t free? If someone were to ask you, “What’s your definition of financial freedom?”, what would you say? Be honest with yourself: Would you reply with a concrete definition?…

  • The Rewards of Frugality and Thrift (or, Why We Scrimp and Save) (139 comments)

    Over the past couple of weeks, more than a few GRS readers have complained about the site’s tone. These folks are afraid that Get Rich Slowly is turning into a column that’s only about frugality and self-denial, one that is neglecting the “rich” part of the blog’s title. These concerns came to the fore in last week’s article about remembering to appreciate what I already have. In that discussion, ObjectiveGeek wrote: I want the best…

  • The Marginal Utility of Money (36 comments)

    This is a guest post from Mike Piper, who writes at Oblivious Investor, where he explains such thrilling topics as 401k rollovers and Roth IRA rules. I know I’m taking a risk by starting an article by defining a term from economics. But please, stick with me. It’s not a hard concept to understand, and it directly relates to your financial success. Utility is a term used in economics to describe how much value or…

  • Why I No Longer Track Every Penny I Spend (149 comments)

    When I struggled with money during the 1990s, I had no clue what I was spending each month. I made my financial decisions based on my checkbook balance: If there were a few bucks left, I’d find ways to spend the money; if my balance was close to zero (as in $10 or $20), I’d turn to my credit cards. Where did this money go? If you’d have asked me, I wouldn’t have known. As…

  • How I Generate Extra Income by Letting Strangers Pay My Rent (81 comments)

    This is a guest post from Rebecca Rosenfelt, the founder of RealSavvyRealEstate.com, a website devoted to demystifying the home buying process for first-time home buyers. I almost never pay the entirety of my rent. I don’t have roommates and I’ve never been evicted. In the four years I rented a one-bedroom New York City apartment, I paid the full rent only one month. I now own a condo in Portland, Oregon, and I almost never…

  • How My Real Estate Investing Adventure Came to an End (58 comments)

    This article is by staff writer Adam Baker, whose own blog previously featured a comparison of money gurus in Dave Ramsey vs. Suze Orman. This is final article of a three-part series on how he stumbled into real estate investing at age 23. Be sure to read part one and part two. In the second part of this series, I discussed two mistakes I made when jumping into real estate investing. Despite running a successful property management…

  • Outsourcing Life: Unconventional Advice for When You’re Financially Secure (309 comments)

    This is a guest post from Erica Douglass. After selling her online business for a million dollars at age 26, Erica “temporarily retired”. She now writes an online business blog at erica.biz. This is very much an article about advanced personal finance techniques, and doesn’t necessarily reflect my own philosophy. You’ve pulled yourself out of debt, are saving a reasonable amount of income for your retirement, have built an emergency fund, and your daily needs…

  • Lessons Learned from Rushing Into Real-Estate Investing (40 comments)

    This article is by staff writer Adam Baker, whose own blog recently featured a must-see graphic on credit card transactions around the world. This is part two of a three-part series on how he stumbled into real estate investing at age 23. Be sure to read part one here. When we last left off, I’d just walked away from my first real estate closing with an eight-unit apartment building and $1000 cash in my hand. I was…

  • How I Bought an 8-Unit Apartment Building with No Money Down and Walked Away with $1000 Cash at Closing (98 comments)

    This article is by staff writer Adam Baker. Baker recently outlined his ambitious 2010 goals for his blogging, business, and life. When I was 23, I bought an eight-unit apartment building with no money down. And I walked away with $1,000 cash at closing! Sounds pretty fancy, right? Wrong. It was one of the dumbest (and riskiest) moves I’ve made in my young life. I escaped without a scratch, but it was due to an…