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Viewing profile - The Dough Roller

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The Dough Roller
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Joined: Sat Dec 15, 2007 1:49 pm
Last visited: Thu Jul 17, 2008 3:38 am
Total posts: 17
[0.02% of all posts / 0.01 posts per day]
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Most active forum: Personal Finance
[ 14 Posts / 82.35% of user’s posts ]
Most active topic: Different Asset Classes and allocation
[ 2 Posts / 11.76% of user’s posts ]

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Website: http://www.doughroller.net

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The Dough Roller Posts

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 Forum: Personal Finance   Topic: IRA Dilemma

Posted: Wed Jul 16, 2008 6:54 pm 

Replies: 14
Views: 4808


The 5.75% load really takes away most of the 401k tax advantage. I'd be inclined to pay the tax now and invest the remainder in low cost index funds in a taxable account.

 Forum: General Discussion   Topic: What kind of watch do you wear?

Posted: Sun Jul 13, 2008 1:24 pm 

Replies: 31
Views: 14444


I have a Breitling and a Corum, but I hardly ever wear them.

 Forum: Personal Finance   Topic: Bad Time To Rebalance 401k?

Posted: Sun Jul 13, 2008 1:23 pm 

Replies: 6
Views: 2647


GP, it is exactly when funds are down significantly that you need to rebalance. For example, if you had 25% in a foreign fund as part of your asset allocation plan, and because of losses in that asset class, it now only comprised 18% of your assets, it's time to rebalance. Rebalancing almost always ...

 Forum: General Discussion   Topic: What's everybody's occupation?

Posted: Fri Jul 11, 2008 2:42 pm 

Replies: 61
Views: 23993


Lawyer.

 Forum: Personal Finance   Topic: Fidelity Roth IRA

Posted: Tue Jul 08, 2008 6:45 pm 

Replies: 14
Views: 5412


As part of your consideration, keep in mind that funds in a Roth IRA aren't really locked away. You can withdraw the funds you've invested (in contrast to investment gains) without penalty because you've already paid the tax on the money. In this regard, many view the Roth IRA as a good place to par...

 Forum: Personal Finance   Topic: 401k results - this was sobering

Posted: Tue Jul 08, 2008 11:11 am 

Replies: 31
Views: 12886


2% is crazy. I talked to my HR rep about our 401k selections and they did eventually add new options, but it took some time. If you get a company match, you want to take advantage of it, but I wouldn't invest beyond that if my choice was funds with 2% expense ratios. Also, while the S&P 500 has ...

 Forum: Personal Finance   Topic: How to find good real estate investment area

Posted: Tue Jul 08, 2008 10:39 am 

Replies: 6
Views: 2819


It is a challenge to invest in real estate far from where you live. I invest in single family homes in Ohio, but my business partner and best friend lives there. The mid-west is a great place to invest right now, but you would have to pay a property manager. That usually comes to about 10% of rents,...

 Forum: Personal Finance   Topic: Downside of accumulation

Posted: Mon Jul 07, 2008 5:14 pm 

Replies: 3
Views: 2316


Gracian, the same thing happened to me in the early 90's. I had just started investing, and it seemed that each week my losses exceeded my contributions. As you have more to invest over time, your risk tolerance does change. A 10% drop today costs me a lot more than it did 15 years ago. But it is du...

 Forum: Personal Finance   Topic: Should I buy a home or rent?

Posted: Sun Jul 06, 2008 12:59 pm 

Replies: 10
Views: 4106


Creature10, I would resist the temptation to view a home purchase as an investment. True, the value of real estate over the long run appreciates roughly at the pace of inflation, but the financial benefits of buying versus renting are a close call, at best. The question is, why do you want to buy a...

 Forum: Personal Finance   Topic: "Be Greedy When Others are Fearful"

Posted: Sat Jul 05, 2008 4:56 pm 

Replies: 18
Views: 6715


I haven't changed a thing; just keep up my monthly investments. When the market is down, I don't even check my balances.

I am buying more real estate in the next few months (I own four single family homes with a friend that we rent out), and I'm really tempted to buy more REITs and Financials.

 Forum: Personal Finance   Topic: Should I buy a home or rent?

Posted: Sat Jul 05, 2008 4:51 pm 

Replies: 10
Views: 4106


Creature10, I would resist the temptation to view a home purchase as an investment. True, the value of real estate over the long run appreciates roughly at the pace of inflation, but the financial benefits of buying versus renting are a close call, at best. The question is, why do you want to buy an...

 Forum: Personal Finance   Topic: new with 401k Q

Posted: Tue Jul 01, 2008 3:18 pm 

Replies: 7
Views: 6221


Thanks for the replies! I'll definitely have to do some research. As far as additional info goes: My husband is 28, I'm 26. So we have a long time before we retire. On the paperwork I have right now the funds listed are: Income funds: SSga Government Money Market Fund; PIMCO Total Return Fund - Cla...

 Forum: Personal Finance   Topic: Please Critique my investment plan

Posted: Tue Jul 01, 2008 3:08 pm 

Replies: 16
Views: 9204


Hi all, I'm 28 and I just started my first real job (long time in school). I have no debt and will be making $82K... My plan... 15,500 in 401K. I've looked at the list of funds available and they all seem to suck except for the Dryden S&P500 index fund (0.38% expense ratio before contract charg...

 Forum: Personal Finance   Topic: Different Asset Classes and allocation

Posted: Sat Dec 15, 2007 4:18 pm 

Replies: 11
Views: 5378


Commodities return 0% AFTER INFLATION. That's the key point. Returns are low and volatility is high, which is why I have avoided commodities as a separate asset class.
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