What would be a good vocation for my nephew?

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Murky
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What would be a good vocation for my nephew?

Postby Murky » Fri Aug 07, 2009 7:22 am

What would be a good vocation for my nephew?

I'm concerned that my nephew isn't going to amount to much. He's had some run-ins with the law and doesn't have a job. His ambition level seems pretty low almost like he's given up hope of becoming a productive member of society. It is a shame because he used to always have a lot of curiosity and high levels of energy. Now he's just a layabout.

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JerichoHill
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Postby JerichoHill » Fri Aug 07, 2009 7:51 am

Is he passionate about anything?

One guy on my radar right now is this guy who's a professional wrestler now, but served a large amount of jail time when he was young. Dude turned his life around.

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Postby Murky » Fri Aug 07, 2009 7:58 am

JerichoHill wrote:Is he passionate about anything?

One guy on my radar right now is this guy who's a professional wrestler now, but served a large amount of jail time when he was young. Dude turned his life around.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Montel_Vontavious_Porter


He likes cars and watching movies. That's about the only things I know of.

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Postby xtina » Fri Aug 07, 2009 8:50 am

If he likes cars, what about a car mechanic? He can try a vocational institution or apply to be some sort of apprentice. There's a lot he can do. How old is he? When I think back to when I was a teenager/young adult, a lot of us were sort of lazy punks. :lol: For the most part, we all turned out OK once we matured a bit.

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Postby Murky » Fri Aug 07, 2009 9:17 am

xtina wrote:If he likes cars, what about a car mechanic? He can try a vocational institution or apply to be some sort of apprentice. There's a lot he can do. How old is he? When I think back to when I was a teenager/young adult, a lot of us were sort of lazy punks. :lol: For the most part, we all turned out OK once we matured a bit.


He's young (21ish), thin and wiry like a lot of auto mechanics. That would allow him to get into the tight places of the modern car. I think the biggest hurdle is going to be getting him off the couch and out doing something. Once he starts something he's fine, it's getting him started/motivated that's the problem.

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Postby Jana » Sun Aug 09, 2009 6:12 pm

I agree that auto mechanic would be a good match. If he likes movies he could start working at a movie theater, and if he sticks with it he could become a manager within a few years. Free movies too, which is a nice bonus.

If he's just sitting around on the couch, he'll eventually run out of money. That is generally a pretty good motivator. :) Just make sure no one is indulging him and letting him live off them for free, otherwise he won't feel the need to strive for something more.

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Postby galactic » Sun Aug 09, 2009 9:22 pm

mechanics have to be extremely motivated. they rely heavily on repeat customers for good business, so they need good customer service skills and they need to fix things right the first time. most of the higher-end jobs pay 100% commission, which dies down for 3 months of the year. he needs to be able to budget his money from the busy season so that he doesn't starve during the slow season.

ASE certified mechanics do far better than those who don't bother to take the series of exams. my husband has all 8 certifications (=ASE Master Tech) plus a couple of advanced certifications, and never had a problem getting a job he wanted until he got hurt. speaking of which, this is a profession that absolutely requires disability insurance from the day it is offered. you so much as mention that you strained your back 5 years ago, as a mechanic, they will not insure you.

mechanics need to have competency in working with both mechanical parts (engine, transaxle) and electronic parts (computerized control modules and vehicle communication networks). if he can work both an engine and a circuit, this is a good start. this would help him through school, a 2 year program could get him prepared for those ASE certifications.

there is also a substantial investment involved in tools. we got away cheaply with about $25,000 for a basic professional set with specialized tools for my husband's specialties (exhaust, undercar, high voltage, suspension). most of his colleagues spent $50k, and some up to the 6-figures range.

just a bit of real life perspective on the job... there is good and bad. mostly, you get out what you put in.

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Postby lizzy_09 » Thu Aug 20, 2009 9:00 pm

He could also work at video rentals since he probably has more knowledge about certain films besides the movie theater.

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Postby dtr » Thu Aug 20, 2009 9:58 pm

The Army is hiring.
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Postby ElizabethAnn » Fri Aug 21, 2009 6:02 am

I'm with dtr. How about the military?

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Postby timwalsh300 » Sun Aug 23, 2009 6:29 pm

dtr wrote:The Army is hiring.


It isn't 1968 anymore. There was a time you could get arrested as a young man and the judge might say, "you're either going to jail or joining the service." Not anymore. We are a professional military now. Those who have had "run-ins with the law" need not apply.

For a brief time, when Iraq was hot and the economy was booming (circa 2005), we were approving waivers for everything and handing out wads of bonus money, but that has completely stopped. Now you'll need, at an absolute minimum, a clean criminal record and a high school diploma or GED to enlist. The recession has drawn a lot of highly qualified people into recruiting offices.

To some degree I think it's too bad. I know that years ago the military turned around the lives of countless wayward youths, and they went on to do great things. But on the other hand, we already spend far too much time dealing with problems caused by a select few bad apples. Ultimately, our job is to provide an effective, combat ready force - not provide rehabilitation.

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Postby AynRandMindSet » Mon Jan 04, 2010 3:21 pm

Since your nephew has given up, there is nothing you, nor anyone can do.

He is a loser, plain and simple.

Until he gets off his a$$ and decides to make changes, nothing will happen.

Perhaps he'd make a so-so janitor, or mailman...

At 21 I didn't my uncle to make things happen for me....either you got it or you don't, and he don't.

It's nice you want to help though...just don't have any high expectations of him....
Read Ayn Rand Books so you'll no longer be a lemming. ;-) I'm debt free, 49 years of age, male, Libertarian, 3 rental properties, two grown children, and a cat.


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