What BBQ/Grill do you own? (and general grilling discussion)

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brad
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Postby brad » Thu Jun 14, 2007 4:12 am

Wow, that looks like a stainless-steel woodstove!! ;-)

Way too big and fancy for our needs, though. We get by just fine with the little hibachi-sized Weber portable grill we use now, I think it's the smallest one they make. Our propane tank is more than twice the size of our grill.

-B.

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Postby meduzagirl » Thu Jun 14, 2007 5:45 am

morydd wrote:If you put a little cooking oil on to the newspaper before you light it, it burns a little better. (Got that trick from Alton Brown.) The weber website (that sounds funny if you say it out loud) has great tips and some good recipies for cooking just about anything on the grill.


Thanks for the tip - that's a fantastic idea. Of course, now that I've started using my creme brulee torch for lighting the paper, I'm not sure how safe that would be...

Another fun grilling tip: When your grill is nice and hot, take a half of an onion (cut lengthwise so you still have a little root holding it together), cover the cut side with cooking oil, and rub it all over the grill. Not only does it season the grill (and make is SMELL really good), but the acidic juice from the oven cleans it off a little too!

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Jethro
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Postby Jethro » Tue Aug 21, 2007 12:05 pm

I bought a few tenderloin filets last week and threw them on the grill... I think I achieved steak perfection.

Here's what I like to do: Buy some good quality filet mignon (I know, it ain't cheap) and rub each side of the steaks with extra virgin olive oil, and season the last side with 'Montreal' steak spice. Throw them in the fridge for about an hour while while you get other things ready (cut Walla-Walla onion into 1/2" slices, etc). The steaks come out of the fridge for ~15 min. before they go on -- typically long enough for the grill to heat up and the wood chips to start smoking. Throw the filets on HOT grates with peppered side down, and season the other side immediately. Cook each side for a few minutes until desired done-ness is reached (preferably no more than medium).

Top with Walla-Walla onion slices (and maybe some roasted red pepper) and enjoy an incredible steak-gasm... no steak sauce needed!
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tinyhands
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Postby tinyhands » Wed Aug 22, 2007 7:15 am

Only change I would make is to substitute grapeseed oil for the evoo. Grapeseed has a higher smoke point, so it doesn't break down as easily in high-temp cooking (less chance of bittnerness) but it isn't quite as buttery so I wouldn't use it in recipies where you should taste it (i.e. salads).
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Postby brad » Wed Aug 22, 2007 7:57 am

Mark Bittman's "minimalist" column in today's New York Times has some very good-sounding recipes for steak rubs...worth checking out. It's in the Dining and Wine section.

Funny, I live in Montreal and have never heard of Montreal steak spice!

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Postby MITBeta » Wed Aug 22, 2007 8:38 am

morydd wrote:I cannot second the recommendation of a charcoal chimney more strongly. They're great. The carcoal is ready faster, and you don't have to dump a bunch of chemicals on your coals before your food goes on. If you put a little cooking oil on to the newspaper before you light it, it burns a little better. (Got that trick from Alton Brown.) The weber website (that sounds funny if you say it out loud) has great tips and some good recipies for cooking just about anything on the grill.


Is it really that hard to light paper on fire? :P I've never had a problem in this regard.

Personally, I use a 22 1/2 deluxe Weber grill with a built in prep table for my day to day grilling needs. For smoking I have been using a Brinkman dome style smoker. I've made about 25 pounds of pulled pork this summer with it.

I have my eye on Char-Griller Smokin Pro, though:

Image

The Brinkman was $40 at the local Ace hardware store, and the Char-Griller was less than I paid for the Weber, and less than most gas grills.

The Char-Griller could replace the Weber and the Brinkman since it can grill or smoke, and it has more than double the cooking area as compared to the Weber.

One more thing in my dream basket...

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Jethro
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Postby Jethro » Wed Aug 22, 2007 8:50 am

brad wrote:Funny, I live in Montreal and have never heard of Montreal steak spice!
I had never heard of it until a few years ago... I bought some from the bulk section at a Save-On in Victoria, and really liked the flavor. Now McCormick has a 'Grill Mates' Montreal seasoning mix that you can buy in most supermarkets. I suppose the GRS thing to do would be to make your own spice mix... there are a few recipes out there if you google it.

Here is a little info on Montreal Steak Spice: http://www.montrealfood.com/mtlsteak.html

Edit: JD says that McCormick's Montreal Steak Seasoning has been around for at least 10 years now...
Last edited by Jethro on Wed Aug 22, 2007 9:52 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby Jethro » Wed Aug 22, 2007 8:55 am

tinyhands wrote:Only change I would make is to substitute grapeseed oil for the evoo. Grapeseed has a higher smoke point, so it doesn't break down as easily in high-temp cooking (less chance of bittnerness) but it isn't quite as buttery so I wouldn't use it in recipies where you should taste it (i.e. salads).
I was concerned about the smoking point of EVOO, but Cooks Illustrated recommended it for pan searing filets, so I figured I'd try it on the grill... and I actually think the buttery flavor goes perfectly with such a tender cut of meat... it just adds to the 'melt in your mouth' sensation.
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Postby brad » Wed Aug 22, 2007 10:38 am

By the way, Bittman's piece in the Times today has a video with a side-by-side comparison of cooking steak on a gas grill versus wood charcoal. Very eye-opening! Charcoal definitely produced a nicer looking steak and cooked more quickly, although Bittman admits that if you want convenience gas is the way to go.

This is convincing me to switch back to charcoal...I have an old charcoal grill stored away in a barn in Vermont that I should pick up next time I'm down there. The only issue for me has been what do do with the ashes afterwards, but we're composting now so I can put them there once they're good and cold.

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Postby tinyhands » Wed Aug 22, 2007 12:54 pm

Jethro wrote:I actually think the buttery flavor goes perfectly with such a tender cut of meat... it just adds to the 'melt in your mouth' sensation.

The Ruth's Chris chain of steakhouses has served their cuts with an actual pat of butter on top for many years now. I don't personally think anything is as good as Morton's double-thick porterhouse for two, but I won't begrudge someone for trying. ;)
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Postby morydd » Wed Aug 22, 2007 2:20 pm

Can I spread charcoal ashes in the garden at the end of the season? Is that bad/good/neither? I've been trying to figure out what to do with them. Seems silly to just dump them in the garbage.
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Postby googoo » Thu Aug 23, 2007 12:22 am

morydd wrote:Can I spread charcoal ashes in the garden at the end of the season? Is that bad/good/neither? I've been trying to figure out what to do with them. Seems silly to just dump them in the garbage.


depends on what kind of charcoal you are using and lighter fluid. generally, wood or wood-based charcoal is good (take a look at the chemicals and heavy metals though). some would be better to used in compost first, then used later once the PH levels get balanced out. petroleum based lighter fluid may burn off, but the residual crap left over built up in your garden isn't a good thing. pressed charcoal briquettes are in general bad because of additional non-friendly chemicals and metals, but some have good chemicals.

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Postby tinyhands » Thu Aug 23, 2007 7:53 am

Pressed briquets have a high clay content which, while not biologically harmful, will change the soil composition. Ashes are very alkaline too, so it doesn't take a lot to "burn" plants. Use sparingly.
Read my 'fiscal fitness' financial disclosures <a href="http://www.getrichslowly.org/forum/viewtopic.php?t=176">here</a>.

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Postby Malcolm the Enforcer » Sat Sep 01, 2007 9:39 pm

I have a Regel XL which has lasted quite a while. My tips for grilling? Cook everything at a medium heat. You'll cook it through and avoid a nasty burned outside.

Another tip: Give your BBQ a good cleaning every few months. It will improve the overall taste of the things you cook because you won't be marinating in last month's steak juices. And a clean BBQ has less flair-ups, which are not good for cooking meat.

My super good recipe for great (healthy) burgers is this:

1 egg
1 lb lean ground beef
1 c oats
1 c diced onion
1 c chopped spinach
2 Tbsp reduced-fat shredded Mexican-blend cheese
4 whole-grain buns
Salt and pepper to taste

In a large bowl, whisk the egg. Add everything else and mix -- your hands are the best tool -- until well blended. Form the meat into four patties. Place the burgers on a grill pan or nonstick skillet that's heated over medium high. Cook for 6 minutes per side or to the desired level of doneness.

Makes 4 servings. (Wrap any extra burgers in plastic and freeze them for later.)

Good luck!

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Re: What BBQ/Grill do you own? (and general grilling discussion)

Postby Jethro » Thu Jul 01, 2010 7:25 pm

With Summer upon us, I thought I'd pull my old thread back to the top. I'm loving the good BBQ weather lately, and so far this week we've done some killer burgers (not the pre-frozen variety!) and some delicious balsamic honey pork tenderloin. In fact, right now I smell like hickory smoke! :)

After 3 years with this Weber, I have to say that it is one of the best purchases of any kind that I have ever made. Sure, I could have found much cheaper grills (like the one it replaced), but I don't think I could have found a cheaper one that would allow me to achieve the same results with such ease. Unfortunately, the Weber 'Spirit' grills that I've seen in stores lately are a severely cheapened-up version of the grill I purchased. I would eventually like to add a charcoal grill or a Traeger pellet grill to my BBQ stable to go along with the Weber, but for now it will do.

Lately I've tried to catch Steven Raichlen's BBQ shows on PBS. He offers some excellent tips for both gas grilling, charcoal grilling, and smoking -- some of which have been a great help to me (cleaning a hot grill before the food goes on, applying corn oil to the hot grates before grilling, etc).

Any other thoughts or tips on grilling and smoking? Here's your thread... 8)
If life gives you tomatoes, make pico de gallo.


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