GRS Home  Forum Home
Bank Rates Center
   Savings Account Rates
   Money Market Rates
   Highest CD Rates
Insurance Rates Center
  Auto           Health
   Life              Home
Mortgage Rates Center
  Mortgage Rates
  Mortgage Quotes

Last visit was:
A place for Get Rich Slowly readers to ask questions
and exchange ideas
It is currently Mon Sep 01, 2014 9:25 pm




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 9 posts ] 
Author Message
 Post subject: No Impact Man on finances
PostPosted: Wed May 02, 2007 12:04 pm 
User avatar

Joined: Sun Apr 15, 2007 4:32 pm
Posts: 49
Location: Cambridge, MA
I've been following the blog of No Impact man, the family in NYC trying to live with as close to 0 ecological footprint as they can manage (they are about to switch off their circuit breakers).

Anyway today's post is about how much money they are saving as a happy side effect of eco-extremism. If you haven't seen it, it's worth checking out:

http://noimpactman.typepad.com/blog/2007/05/money_is_green.html


Top
Offline Profile   
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed May 02, 2007 1:22 pm 
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Apr 05, 2007 4:19 am
Posts: 394
Location: New Jersey
If he kills the power, how will he make blog posts?


Top
Offline Profile   
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed May 02, 2007 2:38 pm 
User avatar

Joined: Sun Apr 15, 2007 4:32 pm
Posts: 49
Location: Cambridge, MA
There have been lots of talk about solar powered and pedal powered laptop chargers. I'm pretty curious to see how he does it. I wouldn't hold it against him if he cheats with the laptop charging. Blogging is more important than saving the planet :wink:

I couldn't do it. I need copious hot water water as well.


Top
Offline Profile   
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed May 02, 2007 3:39 pm 

Joined: Thu Apr 05, 2007 3:05 pm
Posts: 1329
When I lived in Vermont, I had some neighbors who ran their TV with pedal power; the guy designed a little exercise-bike-powered generator and was selling them as a side business. Their kids could only watch TV if they pedaled the exercise bike, which I always thought was a neat idea (no such thing as couch potatoes in their house) but you could tell the kids weren't exactly thrilled. And besides it made a lot of noise! ;-)


Top
Offline Profile   
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed May 02, 2007 7:20 pm 
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Mar 29, 2007 4:58 pm
Posts: 948
Location: Portland, Oregon
I finally made the time to read this. I find it very interesting. Deep inside, I long to do some of the things he's doing. I don't know about composting my poop, but giving up my car for a bicycle? Count me in. I'd love to get off the power grid, too, through solar power (or other means). I, too, think it's important to buy as much food as possible from local producers. I don't follow through on this as much as I should. It makes me feel guilty.

Anyhow - great post, benbr. Front-page material. In fact, I'm off to write it up for tomorrow morning!


Top
Offline Profile E-mail   
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu May 03, 2007 11:30 am 

Joined: Thu Apr 05, 2007 11:43 am
Posts: 40
Location: Regina, SK, Canada
JD,

Don't give yourself a hard time. Changes like this take time. I know I've been slowly upgrading my house to be more energy efficient. So far so good, but I still have a lot to do in the house. Perhaps try doing a small change like putting in a rain barrel first and then make another after that. The point of it all is to improve in the long run. Also just a point of reference try going for a solar hot water heater over solar power, you get way more efficient transfer of solar energy.

CD

_________________
On the way to early retirement at 45.
http://blog.canadian-dream-free-at-45.com


Top
Offline Profile   
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu May 03, 2007 1:49 pm 
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Mar 29, 2007 4:58 pm
Posts: 948
Location: Portland, Oregon
We do have a rain barrel! We installed it last fall, and will make use of it for the first time this summer. I'm actually a little skeptical as to its utility, but Kris insists that I'll be pleasantly surprised.

As for a solar water heater: the idea intrigues me. We've already decided to get rid of our conventional water heater for a European "on-demand" system. They're more expensive up-front, but save money in the long run. Plus, as a bonus, they'll actually provide hot water, which is something our current water heater doesn't seem to know how to do.

Now if I could get a solar-powered on-demand water heater, I'd be set...


Top
Offline Profile E-mail   
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu May 03, 2007 2:34 pm 

Joined: Thu Apr 05, 2007 11:43 am
Posts: 40
Location: Regina, SK, Canada
JD,

If you have a 'on demand' water heater your half way there to a solar hot water heat system. You just put in some solar collectors on the roof with some glycol (assuming you see freezing temperatures in a year otherwise you can use water) in some pipe and then pipe it down to a coil within a water tank down stream of your current water heater. Then if the solar hot water isn't warm enough your 'on demand' system picks up the difference.

Another option would be to run some extra pipes around the house to glycol radiators to provide air heat as well during the winter. In the summer you would just use isolate the air heating system and only use water heat.

Just some ideas,
CD

_________________
On the way to early retirement at 45.
http://blog.canadian-dream-free-at-45.com


Top
Offline Profile   
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu May 10, 2007 11:30 am 
User avatar

Joined: Sat Apr 07, 2007 4:17 pm
Posts: 77
JD, I concur with your wife--I think you'll dig the rain barrel too.

We installed two rain barrels several years ago at our old house. We used them a LOT to water our ornamental and veggie gardens. And when our house was a stop on the neighborhood garden tour, they generated a lot of interest from the tourists!

About a month ago we installed them at our new house, where our gardens are still just getting underway. They're nice and full and I'm already using the water with the seedlings destined for the veggie beds, and some perennials that are still getting settled in the ornamental beds.

At both houses, the barrels have also been useful in dealing with water runoff from the roof and diverting rainwater away from the house's foundation. So they're practical in that regard, too.

Finally, we have little kids who like to "help" water, too. This usually involves wetting down the sidewalk, etc. I have no problem whatsoever with them merrily wasting water when it's the stuff from the water barrel.

Let us know how it works out at your place!


Top
Offline Profile   
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 9 posts ]  Moderators: bpgui, JerichoHill


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Google [Bot] and 17 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group
Theme created StylerBB.net & kodeki