Cooking tips

What small tips and tricks have you found that made a difference in your personal finance life? What great article did you just read? Found a great blog?

Moderator: lvergon

Do you follow recipes when you cook?

Yes, as precisely as I can.
5
13%
only as a guide
30
75%
No
5
13%
 
Total votes: 40

Chibioki
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Cooking tips

Postby Chibioki » Sat Jan 24, 2009 3:20 pm

I like this website www.allrecipes.com because i can search an ingredient [usually the one i have in my fridge thats about to go bad] and then find a simple recipe to make. it saves me because then my food doesn't go bad. Also there's a lot of variety and if you create a profile [for free] then you can favorite the recipes you like so you can find them again.

anyone know any other good cooking websites?


[the poll question is just cause i wonder what others do]

E.C.
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Postby E.C. » Sat Jan 24, 2009 9:41 pm

I like www.epicurious.com. They have a nice ingredient search feature as well, and there are a lot of very helpful how-tos. However, it's a bit of a food snob site so there are lots of recipes that are too complicated for a quick weeknight dinner and/or require ingredients that probably can't be found within a 75 mile radius of my town.
One slightly geeky physics major attempts to survive life in the real world.
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skin
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Postby skin » Sun Jan 25, 2009 2:26 am

Not really a cooking site, but i tend to use google. i look in the fridge/freezer/cupboard to see what i've got and then type into google something like 'recipe salmon lentils' and read through the first few hits until i find something i like to make (which usually is the first hit). Quite often i don't have all the required ingredients, but that's hardly a problem substituting one for another and still coming up with some nice dish.(or not, after which we never make it again).

cynthia09
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Postby cynthia09 » Mon Jan 26, 2009 3:20 am

I tend to see Newspapers — there will be a dining/food section in the Sunday edition of many newspapers. Then TV cooking shows and the Internet has many recipe and cooking sites, usually I Google to find one.

CrankyBolt
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Postby CrankyBolt » Mon Jan 26, 2009 6:50 am

The best I can manage to cook is Cereal......

Seriously... I don't know how I would survive if I never married my wife and there was no such thing as fast food / take out.
"Look, the people you are after are the people you depend on. We cook your meals, we haul your trash, we connect your calls, we drive your ambulances. We guard you while you sleep. Do not... f*** with us. " --Tyler Durden

cmittle
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Postby cmittle » Mon Jan 26, 2009 7:47 am

http://www.nutritiondata.com/ is not exactly a cooking website, but it does let you evaluate the nutritional data of foods. You can also build your own recipes and evaluate the nutritional information of homemade cheese soup for example.

yoonoo
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Postby yoonoo » Tue Mar 03, 2009 11:20 pm

I did not follow the recipe but the procedure of course.

brad
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Postby brad » Wed Mar 04, 2009 8:22 am

Mark Bittman's "Bitten" blog at the NY Times (http://bitten.blogs.nytimes.com/) has a cool free recipe finder using drop-down menus. I've been cooking almost exclusively from Bittman's books for the past two or three years and most of his recipes are fantastic and really easy (30 minutes or less). This is a nice way to get them for free.

RHITee05
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Postby RHITee05 » Wed Mar 04, 2009 6:27 pm

My wife really likes Cooks' Illustrated (www.cooksillustrated.com). It's a subscription service, but not at all expensive (like $20/yr). Their recipes are excellent and very reliable. They also have a lot of how-to technique content on the site, plus reviews of ingredients, appliances, and tools. There's a show they produce on PBS called America's Test Kitchen that's also very good.

sandyandry

Postby sandyandry » Fri Mar 13, 2009 3:19 am

I learn lot things by viewing TV shows, reading news paper and magazines.These sources help me a lot in my work.

TripleE
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Postby TripleE » Fri Mar 13, 2009 10:32 am

I really like http://www.recipezaar.com since it's a fairly open recipe site, and has the ability for people to add comments, add their own recipes, etc.

I also get ideas by watching the Food Network, which has a pretty good search tool on its website. Just don't watch so much you get sucked into all the advertising and/or the upscale food porn that some of the shows like to turn into a way of life instead of just an occasional treat.

Binanti
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Re: Cooking tips

Postby Binanti » Wed Jun 20, 2012 6:19 am

Hi,
I got many recipes from the T.V shows and the internet. I like cooking but i still don't no many dishes how to cook. so that's why i watching cooking shows and reading cooking books and recipes from the internet.........

brad
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Re: Cooking tips

Postby brad » Wed Jun 20, 2012 7:43 am

My take on following recipes:

If I always do things my own way, I'll never learn anything new. So I generally follow recipes pretty precisely the first time I try them. Then if I think something needs "improvement" I'll vary it the next time. But I've learned a lot by following recipes: not just about technique but about flavors that go together, finding the right balance of ingredients, etc.

In general I'm not too uptight about precision with ingredients except when it comes to baking. That's a case where being off by 1/8 of a cup can make a big difference so I measure everything carefully.

I was involved with a cookbook author for a few years, and I learned by watching her that good cookbook writers test and re-test their recipes until they feel they've got it right. And her publisher tested all the recipes as well before publishing her books. I find it's very rare that I need to change anything in a recipe, at least if it's from an author whose recipes I know and trust. But most things like stews, soups, etc. are pretty forgiving in terms of ingredients and you can leave some things out or make substitutions if you don't have something on hand. I just find that if I follow the recipe exactly the first time, the result is usually far better than if I make changes, because the recipe author has already fine-tuned the measurements and ingredients.

Bichon Frise
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Re: Cooking tips

Postby Bichon Frise » Wed Jun 20, 2012 9:38 am

also with baking, measuring dry ingredients by volume opposed to weight can prove disastrous as well.
Bichon Frise

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jamescruz
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Re: Cooking tips

Postby jamescruz » Mon Jun 25, 2012 8:11 am

There are lot of recipes in magazines with good pictures and these are generally the easy ones. I always look at them, cut them out if good and try it as my quick fix. They have good salads that are easy to prepare and can be even refrigerated for the next day.

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