17 Ways to Save Big at the Supermarket

My wife isn't one of those women who can buy hundreds of dollars of groceries for $12.93. She is, however, a frugal shopper, and can often trim an $80 bill to a $60 bill. Here are some of her top tips:

    1. Don't shop for groceries if you're hungry. You've probably heard this before, but it's true. Studies show that folks who shop when they're hungry buy more. It's true for me: If I go to the store for milk on a Sunday morning without eating breakfast, I'm likely to come home with donuts and orange juice and Lucky Charms, too.
    2. Shop with a list. Make a list and stick to it. The list represents your grocery needs: the staples you're out of, and the food you need for upcoming meals. When you stray from the list, you're buying on impulse, and that's how shopping trips get out of control. Sure, a magazine only costs $5, but if you spend an extra $5 every time you make a trip to the supermarket, you waste a lot of money.
    3. Choose a grocery store and learn its prices. As I mentioned yesterday, supermarkets monkey with prices. You can't be sure a sale price is really a deal unless you know what the store usually charges. Once you learn the prices at one store, you can save even more by adding another supermarket to the mix. Learn its prices, too, and note how they compare to the first. Your goal should be to recognize bargains. You want to know when those Lucky Charms are really on sale.
    4. Buy in bulk, when possible. You can save a lot of money by taking advantage of economies of scale. But there are times you shouldn't buy in bulk, too: if the larger bundle is actually more expensive per serving, if you don't have room to store larger packages, if you won't actually use more of the product before it spoils. You don't want stale Lucky Charms.
    5. Stock up on non-perishables, if you have space. Investing in five tubes of sale toothpaste is better than buying one on sale now and four later at the regular price. If a favorite product goes on sale, buy as much as you will use before it goes bad. Again: be certain that the sale price is really a bargain. Great items to hoard include: dried pasta, canned foods, toiletries, baking supplies, cereal, and cleaning supplies.
    6. If you do seasonal baking, stock up year round. Dried fruit and nuts will keep in the fridge or freezer. Decorating supplies can be stored in a cupboard or cellar. By planning ahead, you can purchase seasonal goods when they're cheapest rather than when you need them.
    7. Know when to shop at big box stores. Costco and Sam's Club don't always have the best prices, and their selection is limited. However, they do have great deals on many items, including vitamins, toiletries, baking supplies, pet supplies, and paper products.
    8. Compare unit pricing. The biggest package isn't always the cheapest. Stores know that consumers want to buy in bulk, and so they mix it up: sometimes the bulk item is cheaper, sometimes it's more expensive. The only way you can be sure is to take a calculator. (Mapgirl says she uses the calculator on her cell phone.) Our grocery store posts unit pricing for most items, which makes comparisons easy.
    9. Check your receipt. Make sure your prices are scanned correctly. Make sure your coupons are scanned correctly. Sale items, especially, have a tendency to be in the computer wrong, and yet few people ever challenge the price at the register. You don't need to hold up the line: simply watch the price of each item as it's scanned. If you suspect an error, step to the side and check the receipt as the clerk begins the next order. If there's a problem, politely point it out. It's your money. Ask for it.
    10. Use coupons, but only to buy things you actually need (or want to try). Gather coupons from your Sunday newspaper, from weekly circulars, from in-store booklets, or from online sources. Ask friends and family to save them for you. Sort through them while you're doing something mindless — watching television, talking on the telephone, riding the bus. Clip coupons for products you use (or cheap alternates), or for products you'd like to try.
    11. Use coupons for staple foods and ingredients, not highly-processed foods.

Highly-processed foods have enormous markups. “You shouldn't even buy processed foods because the markups are so high,” my wife advises. Coupon savings barely make a dent in the price. If you must buy processed foods, wait for a good sale and then add the coupon so that you can get them at an excellent price.

  1. Take advantage of special coupons whenever possible. Double coupons are great. My wife's likes the “get $10 if you spend $50 or more” variety. Coupons for produce are rare — seasonal produce is often the cheapest and freshest. These special coupons can yield big savings.
  2. For maximum savings, combine coupons with in-store sales. What happens when you combine a steep in-store discount on Lucky Charms with a 50-cents-off coupon and a double coupon? You get very cheap Lucky Charms, that's what.
  3. Plan your meals around what's on sale. Every week, before making a shopping list or planning what to eat, go through your flyers and coupons. Check the calendar to see if there are any big events approaching for which you'll need food. If you like meat, plan your menu based on the sale cuts.
  4. Examine sale flyers carefully. On the front page are the things that the store really wants you to buy. Be wary of these. Note any special bargains. This week, for example, our store had many items on sale at ten for ten dollars, including dried pasta.
  5. Take advantage of “buy one, get one free” offers. Split with a friend, if needed. You many not need two pot roasts, but it's the same as getting one for half price if you find a friend to split the expense. (Alternately, pay the normal price and give the second away as a gift. Who wouldn't love a free pot roast?)
  6. My wife's final piece of advice? “Let your husband come with you for the company, but don't let him put anything in the cart.” The experts agree.

Note: this entry started as a response to Punny Money‘s grand coupon experiment. Nick is convinced that he can't save any money with coupons. I went to my wife for a rebuttal, but I didn't get one. “Coupons are usually for things you don't need,” she told me. “Sales are the same as coupons — you have to lump them together in your head. It's all just finding bargains.”

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Alan
Alan
14 years ago

If you have a PDA there are several shopping list programs available. I’ve used HandyShopper for the Palm; there’s also a version for the PocketPC. It’s free and available from fine Palm download sites everywhere or from the author’s site at http://www.ggaub.com/hs/ It supports * multiple stores, * compares prices for items across multiple stores, * two tax rates and pick which ones apply to items (leaving 3 levels – no tax, low tax (groceries), high tax (everything else)), * categories (e.g. Dairy, Meat/Cheese, Dry Goods, etc.) and all sorts of other things if you fiddle with it. I’ve regularly… Read more »

David
David
14 years ago

Hey there, I’m a recent college grad with a new job and I have been eating out for lunch every day since I started 3 months ago. I do this partly because I am too lazy to go food shopping and also too lazy to wake up earlier in the morning to make a bagged lunch. Every time I go to the supermarket, I drop atleast $50, and eating the same lunch every day a week can get old real fast. Sure, I try to keep each lunch within the $4-8 dollar range, but is this equal to the $50… Read more »

frugal
frugal
14 years ago

My wife is a genius in using coupons + sales. She often takes home almost free baby shampoos. Her recent buys in the last week or two was using TRIPLE coupons (tripling the value of coupons, a special for only 1 week at Ralph store) and bought Sunny Delight juice for only 25 cents. There are so many other things that I can’t keep track, but every time when she walks out of grocery store, the discounts reported by the receipt is often more than 50% savings, either due to on sale price or using coupons.

Cat Connor
14 years ago

I’m going to disagree a little bit with #1, at least for folks who don’t have a good menu planned out and ready to cook.

Before I was settled into certain menu items, I would follow the “don’t shop when you’re hungry” advice, and buy a bunch of things I thought I should eat, but didn’t necessarily love. It was food and money wasted. If I go shopping when I’m a little hungry, I know exactly what sounds yummy, and much less goes to waste.

feld-a-mundo
feld-a-mundo
14 years ago

All good points. I’ll add a few more by linking to an old blog post of mine:
http://mostlymodest.blogspot.com/2005/10/why-pay-more.html

Travis Pulley
Travis Pulley
14 years ago

Hey JD, it’s Travis from accross the street. I’m not much into coupons, but I do buy a lot of produce and items from the bulk section (not necessarily “bulk” items). I always limit my shopping by taking a small backpack on my bike. If I was shopping for two or more, I have bigger bags. That usually keeps me restricted to the necessities, while allowing me the occasional indulgence of nong shim noodles. I go later in the evening, so I can check out quickly through the self-check and I can usually find daily reduced items like donuts and… Read more »

Mike
Mike
14 years ago

I have enjoyed reading all the posts and suggestions on saving money on your grocery bill, very good stuff. I also have a blog on this same subject, just a different twist. It is new so please don’t laugh if it is not up to par yet, still learing the ropes.

Thanks, Mike
http://meatsavings.blogspot.com

Stefano
Stefano
12 years ago

Consider some specialty markets for deals as well. We live near a large hispanic foods grocery store and they have great deals on produce- avocados and tomatoes are the cheapest prices anywhere and they have varieties of peppers not found anywhere else. I also look at the back of grocery receipts for coupons on very useful services and items- discounted prices on oil changes at local independent car garages where you can meet a good mechanic for future needs. Don’t overlook deals at local markets, not only big chains have great deals

Pat
Pat
12 years ago

Just another thing I have noticed is that welfare Wendsday, and the 3rd last banking day of the month ( senior pension day) are usually the worst weeks of the month for sales. Prices will jump $2/ kilo of our type of Coffee just as one example. But if I wait a week they will be on sale for the lower price. This has happened for as long as I have been getting a pension. I now buy a months supply of the items that I know this happens to a week after pension day! Since we have lots of… Read more »

TheRoosterChick
TheRoosterChick
11 years ago

Great tips, thanks for sharing.

N Scott
N Scott
10 years ago

Another tip that has helped me greatly is to fill up the cart as normal, then before checkout put back the 1 or 2 most expensive items. This almost always saves me between 10 and 30 percent every time I go to the grocery store.

Ryan Jenkins
Ryan Jenkins
9 years ago

My mom always told me NOT to shop with a list. She prefers to go to the store on the same day each week and hunt down items that are on sale (especially if she has a coupon). If you only buy items on sale, then you’ll build a solid inventory at home to choose from.

Alexis Kirkwood
Alexis Kirkwood
6 years ago

Great tips J.D.. Internet especially has become a coupon mine where someone can save serious money. I started using online coupons for the family supplements and vitamins last year

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