5 money excuses that held me back

It's been several months now that I've been on a savings lockdown. It's been going well, except for this past weekend, when I had a relapse. I over-splurged on everything — food, shopping, beer — and I'm officially hungover. My buzz started when a client check came early, making me feel super rich and burning the hell out of my pockets.

Oh, I know. It's OK to splurge sometimes. But — just believe me when I tell you that I went overboard, and I knew I was going overboard at the time. The whole weekend, I kept repeating this phrase:

“You know, I work really hard. I don't care.”

And it's true! Well, the first part is true. I do work a lot. But the second part was a lie. I do care; I definitely care.

But this isn't about the aftermath of a spending binge. This is about excuses. And this past weekend, I resembled the person I once was: a gal who made a handful of money excuses. Here's how those excuses held me back and what I did to overcome them.

Excuse #1: I work hard. I deserve to spend

A sense of entitlement isn't always unfounded. Entitlement isn't always complaining about something that's free or believing you're owed something that's out of your league. Sometimes you just work damn hard and deserve to be rewarded for it.

But there's a difference between deserving something and being able to afford it. Over the weekend, I felt entitled. I felt I deserved to spend my money, and while I had it to spend, I also had a budget to consider: I recently made the decision to sock away my money for a big purchase. When I kept saying, “Screw it,” I was really only screwing over myself.

In my younger days, I felt entitled, but I didn't really have the money to spend — not if I wanted to eat or pay my bills. It took me a while to shed this entitlement, and for a short time, I entertained it and got into a several hundred dollars worth of credit card debt.

How I overcame it

I guess I haven't completely overcome it, as it still creeps up on me sometimes. But at least I know better now and it's not habitual.

Giving myself an end-of-the-month splurge budget has been helpful. It allows me to reward myself for my hard work; thus, those feelings of resentment and entitlement don't creep up on me as much.

Mostly what helped, though, was learning to put less stress on Stuff. That's the problem with entitlement — it's often linked to lifestyle inflation. So the more you get, the more you think you deserve.

Excuse #2: I'll earn more later

This was the excuse I believed the most. After all, I hoped I'd start making more than $23,000 a year someday! And I did, but it took me a while to realize that the time to save is now, regardless of how much more you might make in the future.

How I overcame it

I wanted to seize the day. For the first time in my young life, I was earning more than $10/hour. I wanted to enjoy it. Then I realized it's possible to enjoy the present while saving for the future. Automatic savings helped with this, as did a reasonable budget.

Really, though, I just got older. Once I started to feel like I was catching up with my future, I became more serious about my finances. I think this is just growing up.

I wish it were as easy as telling young readers to save now and develop good financial habits now. But the people willing to take that advice already know it.

Knowing that “the future is now” has helped me in other financial situations, though. It's the reasoning behind choosing a Roth over Traditional IRA, for example. You have to consider your future self.

Excuse #3: I don't care about money

For someone who didn't care about money, I sure was spending a lot of it.

I first used this excuse with my student loan debt. I told myself I didn't mind carrying debt for years, because I didn't care about money. I'm not materialistic, I told myself. Of course, as a full-fledged adult, I now know this is a justification for financial laziness. It's not about materialism; it's about independence.

Later, I used this excuse when I was too afraid to ask for a raise, which is probably even worse. I actually tried to convince myself that worrying about a raise meant I was being materialistic. I tried to tell myself I should shut up and enjoy my job, and, apparently, continue to be taken advantage of. Another version of this excuse I've heard is: “I'm an artist. Money isn't important.” I won't get into this one, but this guy had an interesting perspective on taking control of your finances despite the career you think you deserve.

How I overcame it

I wanted to go to Europe. This was one of the first major purchases I saved up for, and it made me realize that, yes, I do care about money, or, at least, the things I can trade it for. Some of my favorite things cost money, so I might as well stop pretending I'm above it. If I wanted to be a part of this civilization and enjoy its accoutrements, I realized that I'd better be willing to play the money game, because “finding yourself” trips to Europe aren't just handed to you.

Excuse #4: My situation is different

Before I decided to move back in with my mom to pay off my student loan, she told me about her friend who saved up money to go back to school. This friend sold her car so she could pay her tuition. This friend sacrificed the luxury of a vehicle and used public transportation until she earned her degree. Then, she found a higher-earning job and bought a new car. A better car, my mom said.

“So I'm supposed to get rid of my car?” I asked. “We live in Houston, that's not possible.”

And it really wasn't, but I was missing the point. The point was, and it was true for my situation, that there are options for saving money and paying off debt, but those options are often disguised as sacrifices.

But instead of learning from my mom's story, I decided to extract one detail and use it to support my habit of making excuses. I reduced her advice to “you should sell your car to pay off your student loan.” I took good advice and turned it into stupid advice that was easy to reject.

How I overcame it

My mom tried explaining her point to me, but she's not terribly good at defending herself, so I got away with my excuse. That is, until I got absolutely sick of being in debt. I hated debt so much; I became motivated to take action. I realized my “opportunity disguised as sacrifice” was moving back home. Of course, I thought this was all my idea, and I never really gave my mom credit for her two cents. Sorry, Mom.

At the same time, there are people out there who've already sacrificed a lot and legitimately don't have any options left for saving money, getting out of debt or earning more. But these people usually aren't defensive and petty, like I was. They already know they're doing the best they can, while I knew I had options. I just wasn't ready to embrace them.

Excuse #5: I'm doing better than my friends

Among my friends, I was usually the frugal one (or so I assumed). I didn't go out as much; I seemed to be more careful about purchases. If I ever felt guilty for overspending or not budgeting well, I took solace in the fact that I was doing a better job with my finances than my peers.

How I overcame it

Ultimately, I learned that I didn't have the same goals as my friends. Hell, I didn't really know what their goals were, or even how much they earned.

I stopped comparing my situation to those around me and made a list of where I wanted to be in five, 10 and 25 years. I came up with a financial plan that suited my own needs. Instead of comparing myself to others, I compared myself to my own potential.

And that's really what it's about, potential. Making excuses is easy. Losing sight of your long-term financial goals is easy, too, especially when you're working your ass off in the process.

There are a handful of solutions that helped me get over these excuses, but ultimately, it's about realizing these are my goals, and by making excuses, I'm only hurting myself.

More about...Psychology, Budgeting, Debt

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Jason @ froogalism.com
Jason @ froogalism.com
7 years ago

You have identified some key money excuses. I think your article will resonate with many people and hopefully help them come to a personal commitment to overcome these excuses. That sense of entitlement that you identified seems, in particular, to be a biggie.

Cheers

Derek @ MoneyAhoy.com
Derek @ MoneyAhoy.com
7 years ago

Kristin,

Great article – it’s funny how we can talk ourselves into validating just about any decision we make.

FI Journey
FI Journey
7 years ago

Excuse #1 still rears its ugly head for me. I was just telling my wife last night how I want to buy things whenever I get stressed at work, or have an overly-busy schedule. I have to watch myself closer than ever when those impulses try to take over!

Michelle at Diversified Finances
Michelle at Diversified Finances
7 years ago

I have said many of these before! I’ll try to make myself feel bad and say that I deserve things. It makes no sense.

And I used to say, well I’m only in my 20s so I’ll have plenty of time to catch up…. NO!

nicoleandmaggie
nicoleandmaggie
7 years ago

“I’ll earn more later,” always makes me think, “I’ll be able to buy that later.” I guess I’m not very good at smoothing permanent consumption in that respect.

Derek @ MoneyAhoy.com
Derek @ MoneyAhoy.com
7 years ago

Just keep telling yourself the same thing until you’re 80 🙂

nicoleandmaggie
nicoleandmaggie
7 years ago

Except I did earn more later, and I was able to buy more later instead of paying interest on debt with my new earnings.

All that thought process does is keep me from spending more than my means or feeling deprived. If I make a lot more when I’m 80 I’ll probably spend (or, more likely, give) more too.

Daphne
Daphne
7 years ago

I use Excuse #3 all the time! But then I got engaged, and the wedding expenses hit me. Talk about a reality check. I always knew I was underpaid, and once I realized my value, the resume started going out. When I had “more to live for”, I started expecting more of myself.

Brian
Brian
7 years ago

I used to fall victim to #1 all the time. It was so easy to justify spend using this logic. I still will reward myself and family for hard hard, I just make sure all other bills are paid and we do so with cash.

M
M
7 years ago

Kristin, What a wonderful piece or insight. Kudos to you. In my 20s I battled with excuse #5 except I always felt like I was doing worse than my friends. That comparison hurt me and kept me stuck. Simply out of fear, when I got my first real job I plowed as much as I could into savings so I could finally feel like a somebody. A bit extreme, but I look back now and thank my former self. Plus, I wish I could give her a hug and tell her, “Lighten, up, girl!”

Elizabeth
Elizabeth
7 years ago
Reply to  M

I’m guilty of that too — thinking I’m worse off than my friends and letting that fear take over. It’s easy to look at other people’s lives and think “they’re so lucky, they have a job with a pension/spouse/kids/house/higher income/fancy vacations”.

Then I learned things aren’t always as they seem, and some things — marriages, jobs, good health — can disappear so quickly.

It’s exhausting trying to compete with everyone else, and usually not worth it 🙁

Kate
Kate
7 years ago

I can’t say that I have overcome #1 exactly, but I’ve tried to make it work to my advantage. I use a specific goal to get me through a specific task. My most recent example: if I manage to tough it out in surfing lessons and actually stand up and stay standing for 5 seconds, I will reward myself with a massage on Sunday afternoon. That way I’m not constantly spending “credit” for what I don’t have- there is a specific reward tied to a specific action. No points for effort. I actually didn’t succeed with that example this past… Read more »

Derek @ MoneyAhoy.com
Derek @ MoneyAhoy.com
7 years ago
Reply to  Kate

Maybe you could change it up a bit and set that challenge that you save to a certain % of your income or a certain amount.

For example, say you want to save $500 next month. If you’re able to do that – then go get the massage. This way your goals are tied to something financial and it encourages the right saving behavior.

Kate
Kate
7 years ago

I’m actually not a huge fan of that set up.

I think it sets up the wrong incentive system- like a diet who rewards their weight loss with a cupcake, or a parent who gives their kids a “day off” of homework provided they complete X number of days of it.

Maybe it works well for some people, but certainly not with me.

Karen
Karen
7 years ago

Great article! My biggest struggle is excuse 1 for sure, and I find I get a lot of peer pressure in this area. I just got back from a wonderful vacation, a cruise to the Bahamas. I saved for a year to buy the tickets, and then another half year for spending money, and I knew going in I had a budget of $700 for fun money (drinks, gambling, souvenirs, tips, excursions, whatever). So on the trip, I diligently recorded every penny spent, and when I noticed it was going high, cut myself off. Only to have my mother repeatedly… Read more »

Kristin Wong
Kristin Wong
7 years ago
Reply to  Karen

Woah–I’m excited that I made it into your budget book!

I hope you were still able to enjoy your trip despite recording every penny! Based on your moment seeing the credit card ad, it sounds like you did. I’m like you, I think–knowing where my money is going makes me feel better, so I actually enjoy the vacation more. It sounds contradictory, but budgeting during a trip actually makes me think about money less, so I’m in a better mindset to take in everything!

adult student
adult student
7 years ago

#5 really gets me – especially because right now, the majority of my friends are either grad students who don’t have much money, or doctors and programmers, who have LOTS. I’m always like, “Oh, it’s OK that I don’t make enough to max out my IRA for the year, most grad students don’t even start saving for retirement while they’re still in school!” And then I talk to a doctor friend (or read PF blogs talking about “financial independence”) and realize that comparatively, saving 20% of my income still won’t add up to much even WITH compound interest. It’s depressing!… Read more »

Kristin Wong
Kristin Wong
7 years ago
Reply to  adult student

It is difficult! I’m very guilty–I even wrote an article comparing my financial situation to what’s typical for a 30-year-old.

Maybe it’s okay to compare yourself a bit, just to get an idea of things. But that can backfire–you might unwittingly limit yourself, or you might just make yourself feel like crap. But that list of money goals I mentioned really helped! My goals were specific and ambitious, but realistic. It’s simple, I know. But it did help me redirect my focus from everyone else’s situation.

Jon @ MoneySmartGuides
Jon @ MoneySmartGuides
7 years ago

I know a lot of people that equate working hard with spending. You shouldn’t spend just because you work hard. You should spend because you need something and you can afford that something because you work hard. Yes, you can treat yourself to special gifts now and then, but you have to be careful that everything doesn’t become a gift because you work hard.

Debt Blag
Debt Blag
7 years ago

Definitely! Sometimes, personal finance *should* be all about me, me, ME! 🙂

Stace
Stace
7 years ago

All of these resonate with me! I’m big on rewarding myself, and since I’m trying to lose weight, it’s often a shopping reward where a couple years ago it might be a food reward(i.e if I lose a few more pounds I can buy x, if I win a project I can do z). I’m trying to cut myself back from my shopping periods. Because once I say screw it once, I’ll usually say it multiple times. If I’ve already spent $100, what’s a few more. Then my credit card bill comes and it’s painful to pay. It’s also hard… Read more »

Kristin Wong
Kristin Wong
7 years ago
Reply to  Stace

Stace, I’ve had the same problem. Sometimes I just want everything (hence my above mentioned shopping spree). I’m embarrassed to admit it, but it’s something I’m still working on. As frugal as I am, there are still times where I think I gotta have all the Stuff, especially if I see someone else with it. And I’ll use rewarding myself as a justification to spend, too. It’s okay to want things, but yeah. It can be a problem, especially if it’s about keeping up with the Joneses. I’m learning to be better at appreciating things without having to own them.… Read more »

Erica W.
Erica W.
7 years ago
Reply to  Kristin Wong

This is a really good post and great comments. I am working on all of these same excuses, and love to read that someone else (especially someone who I think of as having it all together — i.e. Kristin Wong) has the same struggles. Yep, appreciating something without wanting to own it is a key. Maybe a future post about just how to do that? I find if I walk around with something in my hand in the store, after a while, I’m over it and I can put it back. I’d love to learn some more tactics (b/c that… Read more »

Kristin Wong
Kristin Wong
7 years ago
Reply to  Erica W.

Oooh I really like that for a future post. I’ll let it sink in, talk to some people, brainstorm and see if I can write something up that’s useful. Thanks, Erica!

Elizabeth
Elizabeth
7 years ago
Reply to  Erica W.

I’d love to hear more about that too 🙂 I love books, so I find it easy to want the latest books. However, I find when I put myself on the wait list at my library, I have often lost interest by the time I reach the top of the list.

With clothing it’s hard because I’m a common size and sometimes if I don’t buy needed items when I see them, I can’t get my sizes later on.

Heather@Burning the Books
[email protected] the Books
7 years ago

Great points, especially about entitlement and comparing yourself to friends. When I’m around people who don’t see the point of budgeting I tend to throw mine out the window. Then after the movie tickets, expensive dinners and drinks, I’m hanging my head in shame in front of my excel spreadsheet…definitely a budget hangover!

Tina
Tina
7 years ago

wow this article hits home. Although I have times where I splurge, it is my husband who for years had that same entitlement attitude. He would always say to me “money is replaceable” and it used to drive me crazy. It was his excuse to spend money. After racking up thousands in debt, he finally got that rude awakening when at 40 he was faced with finding a new job which didn’t come easy for him as he thought it should. It was a hard time in our lives but I wouldn’t trade it. This woke him up and he… Read more »

Ramblin' Ma'am
Ramblin' Ma'am
7 years ago

Once again Kristin has an insightful look at the psychology of spending. #5 is a big one for me–although it’s not just about comparing myself to my friends, but to my peers. I’m 30, and apparently the average person my age has something like $9K in retirement. So I could get complacent and think, “I’m doing great!” instead of thinking how I can save more. That said, I also have to be careful not to compare myself *too* much to my frugal friends. I have friends who have sacrificed so much on the altar of savings–don’t want to get into… Read more »

DM
DM
7 years ago
Reply to  Ramblin' Ma'am

This is a great point, actually. I’m finding myself becoming complacent because I know I save more than most of my friends and colleagues, so it’s been difficult to stay motivated lately. Paying off debt was easier because I wanted it gone. Now that I’m just focused on saving for long-term goals, like buying a house, it’s easier to justify spending in the short term.

Chuckie G.
Chuckie G.
7 years ago

“I’ll earn more later.” This resounds so loud with me, it is deafening. I found this to be the hardest obstacle to overcome. Having jumped on the hamster wheel of student loans, I was almost preprogramed to accept this thinking and practice it as a way of life. I mean after all, the whole premise of taking on student loans is that you’ll be making more and paying it off later. Next comes the car loan, next comes the mortgage, etc… You see, I understood intellectually what my debt would be. I was more or less correct in determining numerically… Read more »

El Nerdo
El Nerdo
7 years ago

This article is awesome. When I read it, my own “issues” jumped at my face to sting me like a bunch of angry bees. Ow! For me the major curse has mostly been “money is not important” (it’s not important when it’s not your own!). And the “I’ll earn more later” is how I got into debt trouble. Oh, shame shame shame, ha ha ha. But it’s true. Also, some great links there– the super-long rant of the “last psychiatrist” hating hipsters on food stamps is fantastic (linked as “this guy” in #3), and so are the videos in it.… Read more »

Kristin Wong
Kristin Wong
7 years ago
Reply to  El Nerdo

Thanks, EL! Yay, you checked out the link! Yeah, that article was quite long and scathing but she/he made some decent points, I thought. And yes–I loved the vids too!

Michelle
Michelle
7 years ago

I always get excited when I see an article posted by this blogger. The articles always seem to resonate with my own situation. Another great article and reminder of focusing on my longer term goals!!

Scooze
Scooze
7 years ago

This is one of the best articles I’ve seen lately. Good things to keep in mind! #4 is especially prevalent – there’s something in that story that doesn’t apply to me, therefore it doesn’t apply. So true! How many times have we said or heard this????

Cherie
Cherie
7 years ago

Terrific piece Kristin – especially apologizing to Mom LOL

We all fall prey to that sort of thinking from time to time – but great to see it all laid out 🙂

Matt @ Your Living Body
Matt @ Your Living Body
7 years ago

“I’ll earn more later”

That’s probably my biggest excuse. I can apply that to “I’ll save more later” too.

That’s probably the thing I need to work on most when it comes to personal finance.

terry l
terry l
7 years ago

The one i notice myself doing alot is making a purchase and then expecting that i will worker harder for the rest of the month to make up for the extra funds. I often find myself not able to make it up and then i am scrambling at the end of the month. Its a def. bad habit.

Brittany
Brittany
7 years ago

Okay, please explain more about #4. You say you shouldn’t have rejected the advice of “sell your car to pay your loans” but also said that you really truly COULDN’T sell your car to pay your loans. At the end you say you still took the advice. What did you do, exactly?

Kristin Wong
Kristin Wong
7 years ago
Reply to  Brittany

I moved out of my apartment and back home with my mom. That’s kind of the point I was trying to make in that section, though. It was silly to reduce her advice to: “sell your car.” Her advice wasn’t literally to sell my car; it was to see if there’s something I could give up to achieve my financial goals (and stop complaining to her about ’em). But it was easier to tell myself: “I can’t. I don’t have a car.” The car had nothing to do with it. Not everyone has something they can sacrifice, but I did,… Read more »

Missy Homemaker
Missy Homemaker
7 years ago

There is so much wisdom in this post. You’re fortunate to have made these changes while you’re so young.

Hayley
Hayley
7 years ago

Kristin,

This is a great article. Saving is so very important, and after reading The Simple Dollar, I realized that just because I am getting older, does not mean I have to buy all this new stuff to look like an “adult”. Being an adult means making an important decision based on your person goals. Like you said, everyone has different goals. Saving is so important for future security and personal freedom. It is the best gift you can give yourself!

Madeline
Madeline
7 years ago

Great article! The faster we start a serious evaluation of our relationship with money, the sooner we can start experiencing financial freedom. Excuses are made by everyone, financially free or not. It’s how we react to those excuses that will set us apart!

Jadzia
Jadzia
7 years ago

I have a #6: I’m miserable and can’t think of anything else that will make me feel better. This kind of intersects with the “my situation is different” rationale–I suffer from major clinical depression, an anxiety disorder, an eating disorder, and PTSD. I desperately need treatment. But I live in a foreign country and despite my best efforts (hampered by the depression for sure), my fluency in the language is not advanced enough for me to access mental health care in any way that would be useful. Also, even though this is a universal-health-care country (western Europe), I live in… Read more »

phoenix1920
phoenix1920
7 years ago

Kudos!!! Great article that really makes one think. I’ve relied on some of these, including the “make more later” when I think of how much I should be saving!

Teinegurl
Teinegurl
7 years ago

Raises Hand! Number 2!! I always do this! And it bites me in the butt because one bird in the hand is worth two in the bush! I always think oh i can make more money later on to cover the cost and then i end up not making more money and the spending regret kicks in. But like you said as we grow up the excuses are less and less. Also excuse #5 is funny because often times we look at our friends envious of what they have without realizing they make be looking at us the same way.… Read more »

marjorie
marjorie
7 years ago

RE: Excuse one: Entitlement, “I deserve to spend.” This is one of those (myriad) situations where balance is important. Of course you work hard. Of course you deserve to enjoy your free time. Planning to treat yourself reasonably at a level that works for you will help control the “gimmees.” I think if you *don’t* ever treat yourself, you begin to loathe your budget–and in loathing it, you wreak havoc on it. For me, we expect to eat a meal out once each weekend. Nothing fancy: usually we pick up Chinese or walk to the diner. But the fact that… Read more »

Dear Debt
Dear Debt
7 years ago

I have made every single one of these excuses. My favorites are ‘my situation is different’ and ‘I work hard, I deserve this’.

Patricia
Patricia
7 years ago

We lived just north of Houston for six years (until moving to FL 2 yrs. ago) I needed a car. I know it would be really difficult to live in Houston without a car unless you’re a student who lives on campus. Or you don’t work. Or you can afford housing that’s biking distance from work. That’s a long shot.

Ruth
Ruth
7 years ago

The bottom line is this. If you splurge once in a while, you need to work extra hard that week. Spend the money sometimes. Let go and unleash. This will allow your brain to refresh, and then go into work, and work twice as hard. At work the following week, try to figure something out that will allow you to perform better. Work hard and play hard.

dojo
dojo
7 years ago

This really hits home with me. Years ago I’d have used ALL these excuses and it got me into eternal money issues. I never could ‘stretch’ the money from one month to another, even if I wasn’t married and earned quite well. Not to mention getting in debt for a car I could have paid cash, if I bothered save money for 2-3 years. Oh, well, good to have gone passed those years.

Ed Coambs
Ed Coambs
7 years ago

I really liked how kristin both wrote to the excuses but also then how she overcame the excuses. It is one thing to recognize our excuses for bad money habits, its entirely another thing to do something about it. I have recently been thinking about how if we identify with being poor, middle class, or rich impacts the way we make money decisions. There are certain unspoken rules in each group. For me I feel like one of them is, you should be able to go out to eat several times a week with out worrying about it. But this… Read more »

How to make wine
How to make wine
7 years ago

Thanks for your article bro 😀 I really love to read it because i’m always riddling with money excuses.

lmoot
lmoot
7 years ago

Great article Kristen! Thanks for writing it. Wow, so much is true about your insights. I’m ashamed to admit I’m guilty about #5. I’ve been working hard to be less judgmental because you’re right, you can’t know really how someone else is doing; they may be doing better than you in the earning/ saving/ goals category…and nor should it matter. I realized I was doing this, not to belittle anyone, but as a shortcut to convince myself I was on the right path (plus it let me turn a blind eye to my own financial faults). However all it did… Read more »

Elizabeth
Elizabeth
7 years ago

This post resonated with me too — especially #1 because it’s the excuse people use on me to try and get me to spend. (Ever notice how often the words “you deserve…” and “you’re worth…” appear in commercials?) I grew up around people who were well off and people who weren’t and noticed that the bigger the income, the bigger the “reward”. For example, university friends whose parents made a lot of money “deserved” spring break vacations for working so hard. I’m trying to wipe the words “I deserve” from my excuses. Thinking in terms of “I want…” and “I… Read more »

Strick
Strick
7 years ago

#1 & #3 I hear all the time. You soon realize that #1 really should be “I work hard. I deserve to save it and retire sooner than most.” and #3 should be “Its only stuff I don’t need” (surplus has two main uses, to buy stuff you don’t need now or to buy stuff you do need later, when its used to buy stuff you need its not “only money”…)

Chad
Chad
7 years ago

Great article! I love #2 as I battled with this one for a long time. It is important that we live within our means as we move along. We can’t spend now based on money we will make later. That is how credit card debt comes about! Our future is never guaranteed, so we have to live based on our current circumstances. Nice article.

Chad
http://MakingFinancesSimple.com

RobertF
RobertF
7 years ago

Number 5 Comparison to Friends is a key one, really for the rest of your life. Comparison to others is root of unhappiness. If you do, no matter how much you have or make it will never be enough because someone will have more.

Evan West
Evan West
7 years ago

I love all of this article! It really focuses on the fact that all the strategies and techniques for staying financially stable really rely on have the right mindsets. All the planning in the world won’t do you any good if your head isn’t in the right place and this article really puts that front and center. I loved reading something so practical and all-encompassing.

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