A Lifetime of Work

It's Labor Day weekend in the United States, the holiday that traditionally marks the end of summer and the beginning of the new school year. Officially, it's intended as “a day off for the working citizens”.

Because it's Labor Day, I've been recalling all of the jobs I've had in my life. When I was young, I wanted to be a business executive or an astronaut or a writer. I've actually managed to become the latter, but it hasn't been a very direct path.

My first paid work came in junior high. During the summer, my friends and I would pick beans and cucumbers and strawberries at nearby farms. This was piece work, though, and I didn't make a lot of money. I spent most of it at the video arcade. My first job where I drew a paycheck was planting cauliflower.

High school
During the summer of 1984 (between my freshman and sophomore year of high school), my friend Torey and I worked for a local farmer. We earned $3.35/hour (minimum wage!) walking behind a big tractor, planting cauliflower. The work was hard, but it was fun. I spent the money on clothes and cassette tapes. (I remember buying Tears for Fears and U2.) My father encouraged me to save, but I didn't listen.

Also during high school, I worked other typical teenage jobs:

  • I flipped hamburgers at Burger King (tedious)
  • I sheared Christmas trees (hard work, but paid well)
  • I flipped hamburgers at McDonald's (loved it because my managers and co-workers were smart, industrious, and funny as hell)
  • I spent a summer as a camp counselor

Most notably, however, I worked in the family box factory. On 31 July 1985, his fortieth birthday, my father quit his job to start his own business. In a dilapidated old building on our property, he built his own machinery and the family began producing custom boxes. I hated it. I wanted to be out with my friends, but dad insisted I spend my evenings making boxes. To show my disdain, I would play angst-ridden teenage music (The Cure, New Order, etc.) at full volume and sulk while I worked. I swore that after high school, I would never work for dad again.

College
During college, I held a variety of work-study jobs:

  • Creating posters to hang around campus.
  • Hanging posters around campus.
  • Delivering A/V equipment.
  • Answering telephones.
  • Working at the information desk.
  • Editing the literary magazine.

These didn't pay well, though. For real money, I had to find work off campus.

For a couple of years, I worked a hotel 45 minutes away. I'd drive up on Saturdays and Sundays to bus tables (and, later, to wait tables) in the coffee shop. I kept this same job for a couple summers. It was my first introduction to the Real World, really. Before, I'd been working with other kids my own age. At the Holiday Inn, I was working with 50-year-old waitresses and grumpy cooks who couldn't find work anywhere else. Still, I had a lot of fun and earned a lot of money. (Which I promptly spent on computers and those new-fangled compact discs.)

During my junior and senior years of college, I took a job as a resident assistant to pay for room and board.

Post-collegiate
During the summer after college, I was aimless. I found work at a Japanese school managing the audio-visual equipment. I was paid in room and board.

For spending money, I waited tables at the new Red Robin in town. The interview for that job was memorable. The manager told me, “Remember: the best way to increase your tips is to sell more food. Ask your customers if they would like a drink from the bar. Encourage them to order appetizers or side orders. Offer them dessert.” This had never occurred to me before.

Soon after this, I took a job selling insurance door-to-door around rural Oregon. This was truly the worst job I ever had. I hated it. People would invite me into their homes, and we would have a pleasant chat, but I could not get anyone to buy anything. I maybe sold ten policies in ten weeks. At $40 a policy, I was going broke quickly!

I quit the job with no prospect of another. I had several thousand dollars in credit card debt, I owed on a new Geo Storm, and I was paying rent on two apartments. It was a nightmare. I took temporary work to staunch the bleeding, but ultimately I did something I'd sworn never to do: I returned to work for my father.

The box factory
In January 1992, dad hired me to be his box salesman. This was better than selling insurance, but I still didn't like it. I stayed at it though, because he was paying me the amazing sum of $20,000 a year. With that money, I could pay off my debt in no time! Only I didn't pay off my debt. I bought comic books. I bought a new computer. Kris and I bought a house. I got hooked on the income and allowed myself to succumb to lifestyle inflation. When I got a raise, I spent it.

During my 16 years selling boxes, I did a variety of things on the side:

  • I spent a year as a part-time computer programmer (I always thought I'd love this, but I hated it)
  • I started my own computer consulting firm
  • I began blogging

That last item is most important, of course. Eventually, my web sites were generating enough revenue that I could quit my day job to write full time, something I'd always dreamed of doing. I always imagined I'd write science fiction novels, not articles about personal finance, but it turns out I simply love to write. I'm fortunate to be doing something I love.

Working for myself
In the four years since I first shared this article, I've experienced some big life changes. For example, I sold Get Rich Slowly and realized a large windfall. In theory, I could stop working for a period of time. In theory.

In reality, I'm driven to keep working, even if it's not work in a traditional sense. Yes, I continue to work behind the scenes here (doing interviews, attending conferences, editing articles), but I'm also exploring other types of tasks. I'm learning Spanish. I'm meeting other bloggers, both big and small. I'm reading. I'm writing. There's no doubt that this stuff is work, but it doesn't actually produce any income. Who knows where it will lead?

Moving forward, I have plans to start another blog. Or two. Maybe even another blog about money. I feel called to write. Something moves me to do so, and for some reason people find they can relate to my voice. I can't explain it, but it's true. And so long as it remains true, I think I'm meant to keep writing, to continue sharing what I learn with people like you.

That's enough reminiscing for one day. How about you? How many jobs have you worked in your life? Which was your favorite and why? What do you hope to be doing ten years from now?

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Cassia
Cassia
12 years ago

Oh boy! I’ve had so many jobs it’s ridiculous. In brief, since I was 12 I’ve babysat, worked at the local library as a page (re-shelving books as they came in) for $4.00/hour (minimum wage), worked lots of retail, worked at a daycare, worked at a Pizza Hut as a cook (we affectionately called it Pizza Rut), have done direct care for both mentally and physically handicapped adult males and on a Geriatric Psych floor in a hospital (both of which were stressful and depressing), cashiering at a health food store, secretarial work and am now back in retail selling… Read more »

Stefe
Stefe
12 years ago

I worked as a vet asst,waited tables (great money), bartended (better money), was an 800 operator (Grrr),cleaned toliets (YUK), and now work in the automotive industry. The latest has paid the most, been the hottest, coldest, dirtiest, and by far the best. Really the biggest downer is that I will lose it in a year or two from now. It is also an industry that has taught me the most and allowed me to further my education to a BS. Thanks for sharing!

Aaron
Aaron
12 years ago

Good stuff. Reminded me of some of my classics too. In particular, I detassled corn for two weeks. Wasn’t exactly for me. Riding the bus (unpaid) for nearly 3.5 hours a day to get back and forth for dirt wages wasn’t much motivation.

Right after high school I spent another two week stint working for the state. Another minimum wage job that culminated at a hot summer day scrapping dear guts from the road. Yummy.

A. Dawn
A. Dawn
12 years ago

Since you mentioned, do you plan to write a book in the near future? Would it be a personal finance or a sci-fi? It would be interesting to see you write a sci-fi.
Cheers,
A Dawn
http://www.adawnjournal.com

Jay
Jay
12 years ago

The best job of all time wasn’t a job so much as it was a part of my job. During high school I worked at the local Home Depot in the out door section where they sell mulch and trees. It was fun to get some fresh air, drive a fork lift, and pall around with the rest of my friends. But then one day it came. Demolition day. As I’m sure everyone has been in a home improvement store at one point it time, you know of the miniature kitchen and bath setups in the store. These are actually… Read more »

J.D.
J.D.
12 years ago

@Aaron
De-tassled corn? Oh my word. That must have been awful. Farm work is like no other. Whenever I think of the jobs we used to do (and I didn’t list all the one-off things like hauling hay or cleaning out barns or planting seedlings in the greenhouse), I’m reminded of my favorite scene from Napoleon Dynamite.

Karl Staib - Your Career Happiness
Karl Staib - Your Career Happiness
12 years ago

My best job was picking wild mushrooms, called Chanterelles, and selling them to fine dining restaurants. They only grow in a hot and humid climate, so climbing the hills and carrying a heavy bucket wasn’t easy, but decisions were all up to me. It’s why I created my blog, to help launch my own business. I’m still a few years away, but I’m never giving up. It’s all about working happy.

EscapeVelocity
EscapeVelocity
12 years ago

Babysitting ($1 an hour, $0.75 if it was just one kid), delivering the afternoon paper, punching cards, proctoring exams, filing, being a teaching assistant, teaching, reading reports and doing miscellaneous paperwork for a grant program, web development, translation, teaching German. The translating and teaching have been the most interesting work, and the second boss I had at the grant program is the best boss I’ve ever had and that job wasn’t too bad. On the whole, though, I would say that the most rewarding experiences in my life have never involved getting paid. In ten years I would like to… Read more »

Shirley
Shirley
12 years ago

Babysitting, prep cook and weekend breakfast and lunch cook at the FBI Academy (yes, I can crack two eggs at a time, one in each hand, to fill a huge wheeled pot–it held dozens of eggs … one day a wheel got caught going into the walk-in and I came very close to losing all of my hard work), front desk clerk, waitress, retail sales person (lasted two weeks), receptionist and tour guide for a model home (I could quote all the specs easily), elementary school teacher (I still miss the kids, but not anything else), technical writer/editor, and quality… Read more »

Tony Dobson
Tony Dobson
12 years ago

Maybe this is looking back with false memories, but I never considered New Order to be all that angst-ridden.

That being said, the unintentional comedy of John Barnes rapping on “World In Motion” probably never made it Stateside. 🙁

The people with the worst job at school were those who manned fresh fish counters in supermarkets. I’ll never forget them complaining about the smell lingering on them all week, then just about leaving them before they went back to the counter the next weekend.

Abby
Abby
12 years ago

Eesh, memories! I was allowed to start babysitting when I was 12. I think I charged $3/hr and $1 extra per kid. Something crazy. My mom gets more than $10 when she babysits. Quite a bit more, I’m sure, as a lot of parents just toss cash at her gratefully after a good night out. When I was 14, I was a receptionist at a hair salon. Learned some useful tips about hairstyles (I always try to bring in a picture and talk to the stylist about my particulars — curl, thickness, face shape — to help figure out how… Read more »

Another Ed
Another Ed
12 years ago

My best job so far was launching missile targets as a contractor for the Navy. I got to play with JATO bottles, Military flares, and the world’s biggest, most expensive model airplanes! Downside-very stressful. One small mistake could literally cost someone their life. Worst job- Janitor in a company that made sliding truck windows and greenhouse windows. Cleaning up broken glass for 6 hours a day.

Shanel Yang
Shanel Yang
12 years ago

Jobs for pay would take out all the stuff I did for my parents at home and at the family business. Other than that: High School: 1. Occasionally babysat neighbor’s kid 2. Brief stint tutoring shorthand College: 1. Clerk/cashier at the Rocky Mountain Chocolate Factory 2. Occasionally babysat neighborhood kids 3. Light housecleaning and cooking in exchange for room and board 4. Brief stint driving a little girl to her appointments Law School: No jobs besides helping family and family business affairs After Law School: 1. Many different firms over 10 years 2. My own image consulting business 3. My… Read more »

RetiredAt47
RetiredAt47
12 years ago

Throughout college I worked as a waitress. I learned an incredible amount about people at this job, and it also helped me learn how to manage a crowd.

Now I teach a few classes. Another teacher once observed that I seem to know how to handle a class effectively. Upon reflection, I realized it was a skill I picked up in my waitressing days!

And thanks for sharing with us about Max the “Meatball” cat. Cats are wonderful creatures when we get to know them.

Foobarista
Foobarista
12 years ago

I’ve had fewer jobs than many, and way fewer McJobs – I guess I’ve been lucky. In high school, I had a brief job as a dishwasher in a coffee house, which was boring, and had the usual share of babysitting and lawn-mowing jobs. I also worked cutting and de-pitting apricots for drying for $0.25/tray one summer. (The trays were big: you had to cut about 100 cots to fill one.) My most useful job in terms of life experience was a summer job loading and unloading my uncle’s truck as we went cross-country; I got to see warehouses and… Read more »

guinness416
guinness416
12 years ago

Good topic and post, JD! It’s labour day in Canada too. My favourite job was bartending, which I did at nights & weekends from the age of about 16 through 24. I still dream about having my own pub, to the point that I’ve scouted locations and prepared a decent business plan. I’ve also waited tables, worked in a tennis pro-shop in connecticut, and worked for architects and contractors and construction consultants, as well as picked up some side money making signs, of all things. Ten years from now? God, who knows, but I hope I’m working less hours than… Read more »

guinness416
guinness416
12 years ago

The “half slotted container” on your box site is rather nifty looking, by the way, I don’t get enough products in boxes like that.

Katie
Katie
12 years ago

This is going to take some thinking on my part… however I remember my first job… I was 15 and I was a kitchen aide and receptionist for the convent that was next to my high school. Elderly nuns lived there and I helped serve their meals, wash dishes, and answer phones… I remember that my shifts were usually about 4 hours long, and no matter what we always got to sit down and eat the meal and were not required to clock out for this break… lol! I think that was probably the cushiest job I ever had… After… Read more »

Dylan
Dylan
12 years ago

In high school: Made burgers at Burger King Dough maker and Baker at my dad’s bagel shop In college: College Admissions office tour guide Resident assistant in dorm Out of college: Nursing assistant in a nursing home EMT for an ambulance service Back in college: Writing tutor in the student resource center After college: Court officer in criminal and family courts Child support case worker for the state Paralegal for state child support office Stock broker at a wirehouse firm Financial planner in private practice My favorite is my current work as a financial planner. I don’t sell products or… Read more »

Doug
Doug
12 years ago

Hope I don’t miss anything, I have delivered newspapers, worked in my mother’s book store, worked in recreation and security at a campground, on an apple orchard picking and delivering, at Toys “r” Us, I was in the Coast Guard, worked in a boat yard, on a concession stand on the ferry’s to Martha’s Vineyard, as an EMT and now am working as paramedic for a small town and part time for a large company. I am also an on call firefighter and was a part time police officer. I am planning on going back to school for nursing in… Read more »

Miranda
Miranda
12 years ago

Thanks for sharing a bit of your life with us! I’ve had a few jobs: High school – piano teacher, cashier at a craft store College – cafeteria worker, resident adviser, serving wench at the Utah Shakespearean Festival, waitress Post college – cashier at farm store, Classified ad salesperson and office manager for local newspaper, freelance writer My favorite job is the one I have now — freelance writer. I realized in high school, when I was a piano teacher working for myself, that I wanted a job that I could do from home and set my own hours. In… Read more »

Sara
Sara
12 years ago

I saved most of my money from the jobs I had in high school and college, but looking back, I kind of wish I had just spent it. While it seemed like a lot of money at the time, I make more in a week at my current job than I made in 5 years of delivering newspapers. Then again, I guess it’s good that I got into the habit of saving from an early age. I worry about my younger sister, because she seems to think that she is required to spend money as soon as she gets it.… Read more »

Mark
Mark
12 years ago

I have (chronologically from sophomore in high school) pumped gas (back when they used to do this), dug graves, worked as a laborer on a petroleum pipeline construction crew, roughnecked on several different oil rigs in Oklahoma and Texas during the late 1970 early 1980 oil boom, became a journeyman lineman for 15 years and now work as a system operator in an electrical transmission control room. Every one of these jobs has helped make me what I am, and I don’t regret a minute of them.

Ryan @ Smarter Wealth
Ryan @ Smarter Wealth
12 years ago

I have worked just 2 jobs in my lifetime and now I am slowly becoming an online entrepreneur as a full time job, with my blogs and other website flips

Grace
Grace
12 years ago

During my lifetime I have been a writer, stockbroker, photographer, librarian, banker, mom, counselor, poet, third-shift postal worker, painter, academic psychologist, sister, English teacher, and firefighter.

Not always at the same time. Not necessarily in that order.

Which did I like best? Probably the two that are a combination of several: creator (writing, poetry, photography, art), and teacher.

Why? One allows me to share what I already know. The other allows me to share what I do not yet know myself.

What do I hope to be doing? In good health, creating and teaching! 🙂

Paula D.
Paula D.
12 years ago

Started at 16 at the local record store, great perks, cheap Beatles albums! Moved into making pizzas, managing pizza parlors, flipping burgers, to bartending.

Then when I quit drinking and I moved into more retail, now in jewelry. Tried my hand at making jewelry, having my own gallery and when that didn’t really pay much I’m now back at retail in a new venue for me that I like.

Where am I going with this? Don’t know but I have had a great life and have met lots of interesting people. I wouldn’t change a thing.

William
William
12 years ago

I think I’m on the younger end of the average reader spectrum here. I started in high school with a job at a small video business run out of a guy’s home. I transferred people’s old home films to DVD (felt slightly voyeuristic at times) and occasionally manned a camera at events he filmed. After high school I got a full-time internship with a small business in another city doing graphics, web, and print media design and web application development. After a few months there I was asked to stay on with the company after my internship ended, which I… Read more »

Krystal
Krystal
12 years ago

In Order HIGH SCHOOL 1. Local fast-food restaurant, taking orders at the drive through 2. Barista, local business 3. Hawaiian Shaved Ice maker in a booth in a grocery store parking lot 4. Babysitting 5. Service at a local restaurant COLLEGE 1. Gap Sales associate-moved up to management 2. Waitress 3. Nanny 4. Bath and Body Works (horrible) 5. Barista (many at the same time) POST COLLEGE 1. Waitress 2. Spa Appointment Taker 3. Spa Manager (different spa) 4. Spa Group Sales (changed spas again) 5. Spa Manager (again, different spa) 6. I worked at the Gap for extra money… Read more »

Katie T.
Katie T.
12 years ago

I’m a young reader too–I’m 18 and just about to start college. In middle school I took video production classes and got offered the opportunity to work with one of my teachers to film birthdays and weddings. That paid very well, and I loved it. But it wasn’t reliable–just a few jobs here and there. I tried doing it by myself recently, but it’s harder without multiple workers who will edit/film something you missed/lend you their fancy equipment. In high school, I figured if i wanted a job, it should be something I like. I started pet-sitting for the neighbors,… Read more »

MattJ
MattJ
12 years ago

My stepfather was a general housing contractor, so I started working for him at $1 / hour when I was 8-9. As I got older, the work got both harder and more interesting, hours got longer, pay got better. By junior high I was making more than minimum wage, and getting about 40 hours a month during the school year. When I was 15 I went to work for his framing contractor as well, and kept doing that off and on except for a semester during undergrad when I tried delivering office supplies for $5.5/hour (a pay cut from, I… Read more »

kazari
kazari
12 years ago

Really interesting reading everyones experiences! My list is pretty long: Student jobs – babysitting, working in a fruit and veggie shop, working in a deli, sold christmas trees, shelved books in a public library (best job ever!), took a year off to be a nanny in the Caribbean, worked as an office temp, a child minder in the swimminpool creche, croupier and at Baskin Robins. Professional jobs: Part-time conservation officer Various positions in a big state government department Poorly paid contract work at a federal agency (after we moved interstate) Finally a really good job at a Federal Agency, unfortunately… Read more »

Jonathan @ MYC
Jonathan @ MYC
12 years ago

I did telemarketing for about 1 and a half days. Probably the most soul destroying job in my entire life…

*shudder*

bizzyboy
bizzyboy
12 years ago

my job list is very small. my first job i work at josph’s italian resturant for about 3 days as a bus boy. from there i worked for my dad, as mechanic on and off through high school. during that time i also worked at kyrstal’s fast food restaurant. i also worked at burger king for a while. i got tired of food service, and went to ups. ups sucks major butt when your new. you do the hardest work for the lease pay. it only gets good when you have seniority. i never got seniority. from there i went… Read more »

MiningOilGasGuru
MiningOilGasGuru
12 years ago

I too worked at a day camp and also a theme park. They may not have paid much, but required alot of effort. I remember being tired every night.
Thanks for the fun article,

MiningOilGasGuru
http://www.stockresearchportalblog.com/

leigh
leigh
12 years ago

i had a couple formal jobs in high school, between 1 and 4 jobs at any given time in college, and now i’m contractually obligated to spend all my time on my education. that’s ok, i do that at more than full time. my favorite was retail management- it taught me that i needed to stay the hell away from retail but managing people is something i can do. i had a blast with my employees. my second favorite is the work i do for my education currently. it gives me the skill set i need to have to get… Read more »

Sam
Sam
12 years ago

I don’t think I’ve had as many jobs as most people around here – part of me thinks that’s just an attitude I was brought up with. I was always taught to stick it out, and never quit. Which isn’t the advice most young people get nowadays – it’s all ‘follow your dreams, don’t settled for second best!’. Most of my younger friends have gone through way more jobs than I have purely because of that… Anyway, my first job was doing the mail in an accounting office at 15. Which was fine, pay seemed amazing at the time (of… Read more »

plonkee
plonkee
12 years ago

I’ve worked at a theme park (push the green button to make the ride go 🙂 ). I’ve also worked in a beach store, in a bank and baby sitting. Nothing too exciting.

Now I’m a professional spreadsheet geek and part-time problogger.

MKL
MKL
12 years ago

Let’s see…: Paper route when I was 12 (lasted about a year, I decided I liked sleeping) Various work around house paid by Dad (he paid me the then exhorbitant rate of $5.00 an hour, I was the envy of all my friends) Stock room boy at Nordstrom during my junior year in high school (for less than the $5.00 an hour my dad would pay me for odd jobs). I did meet a girl that worked there that worked for a modeling agency, which led to…: Being a small-time fashion model who did some small amount of work (it… Read more »

LC
LC
12 years ago

My list is way shorter than most.

1) lifeguard during summers in college
2) 1st job out of college. Been there 5 years. Plan to be there till I retire. Maybe in 10 years?

I disagree with the idea that kids need to work in HS and during college to learn responsibility. I think it’s much better to focus on your studies, assuming that you have other ways of paying for school.

Rachel
Rachel
12 years ago

Hey JD!

My job list was marked as spam! 🙁

Rachel211

Daniela
Daniela
12 years ago

When I was 15 i got an ‘under the table’ job at a hall serving dinner at weddings and bachlor parties. I hated this job as the men would lear at you and I usually spilt somehtign hot on myself (coffee, lasagna) My next job was with Swiss Chalet at 16 as a hostess. I was good at this job and i enjoyed it but i butt heads with one server and when she got promoted i got fired. the summer after that i worked at a local burger joint for about a month got paid terribly and left to… Read more »

Kate
Kate
12 years ago

Worst job experiences:
Getting fired from the ice cream shop – my first non-babysitting job – for giving too much ice cream per scoop and mouthing off to the manager when he asked to me to weigh the scoop before putting it on the cone.

Worse/Funniest:
Answering the phone for a personal ad service. I learned a lot about the depths of human depravity which was miserable at the time, but makes for some hilarious stories now.

Best job:
My current situation as a librarian at a university.

Frugal Dad
Frugal Dad
12 years ago

My favorite job was the least paying–I drove a tractor around a golf course’s driving range collecting golf balls. It was fun work because I was outside, I could listen to a Walkman (remember those?), and I got to play golf for free. Being a target for people practicing their drives was an added bit of fun!

Brigid
Brigid
12 years ago

I can’t pin-point a job and say it was best or worst. There is good and bad in everything but I guess there are a few things that stand out. I was a photographer at JC Penneys for about a half a year. It was fine until Christmas came and half the staff quit. We were so busy and most of the customers were just terrible no matter how hard we tried. I’m also not a big kid person and thought I would have problems dealing with them. I was suprised to find that the kids were the easier and… Read more »

Susan
Susan
12 years ago

My first jobs (grade school through high school) were a mish-mash of babysitting (hated it!), petsitting/housesitting (loved it!), and a series of summer jobs at the county fairgrounds – watering the new landscaping and doing the cashier/ticket taker job at the main gate during the fair. I also had a job cleaning up every other Sunday morning after the “Swinging Singles” Saturday night dance in the main hall at the fairgrounds. It paid well, but it was enough to steer me away from janitorial jobs for ever after. After high school, I moved right in to an office assistant job… Read more »

Mike Bahr
Mike Bahr
12 years ago

Most of my jobs have been unmemorable, but one stands out as the best and most fulfilling business project I ever had. I scavenged and bought, then repaired, restored, and resold, vintage arcade video games. There was nothing quite like buying a gutted out Galaga, Tron, or Street Fighter 2 for$50-$100 and making it look and work like new again, then selling it to a doctor or lawyer for his rumpus room for $3k.

Mydailydollars
Mydailydollars
12 years ago

Most of my jobs have revolved around education, from teaching high school girls how to spin flags to tutoring ESL students to my current teaching life. I’ve daydreamed about a million and one jobs, but always seem to be stuck in school!

Michele
Michele
12 years ago

My first job was when I was 14. I was a camp aid for a month. I got to shovel horse crap and wash infirmary laundry covered in vomit, while living in a tent and using an outhouse, for the grand total of $320 before taxes.

Funny about Money
Funny about Money
12 years ago

Hmm… Reading for the blind, secretary, receptionist, graduate teaching assistant, newsletter editor, freelance writer, magazine editor (x 2), mother, wife & society matron, university lecturer, senior editor. Not many: only 11. The jobs that were hands-down the most fun were the two magazine editorial positions. Journalists drink a lot, laugh a lot, and party a lot. The best of them all is my current job, in which I earn a living wage for a fraction of the amount of work I did in any of the earlier incarnations. Worst job was working as a secretary for a demented market research… Read more »

Lily
Lily
12 years ago

I’ve been…
a greengrocer (ok)
a substitute teacher (terrible!)
a book reviewer (for free actually)
a desktop publisher (deadly boring)
a book editor (great!)

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