A primer on finding unclaimed property

Finding free money lying around with your name on it seems a little too good to be true, doesn't it?

That's what I thought when I learned about Missing Money, a website that offers to help you track down unclaimed property that may belong to you. Sometimes free money is for real, though. The site is legit and exactly what it claims: a tool for finding free money. Specifically, money that's already yours that you may have forgotten about or lost track of.

What is Unclaimed Property?

Unclaimed property is any financial asset that has been abandoned for a period of time. That time might be as little as one year or as much as three, depending on the state you live in. If the financial institution or company holding your money loses contact with you and can't locate you within a certain period of time, they have to turn your assets over to the state. According to Missing Money, some common types of unclaimed property include:

  • Bank accounts and safe deposit box contents
  • Stocks, mutual funds, bonds, and dividends
  • Uncashed checks and wages
  • Insurance policies, CD's, trust funds
  • Utility deposits, escrow accounts

You can also discover more exotic things. One of my colleagues reported that he and his sister used an unclaimed property claim to recover royalties for natural gas rights on land they own together.

The notion of unclaimed property is seductive: The idea that somewhere out there, money or property that rightfully belongs to you is languishing, just waiting for you to lay claim to it. It's the stuff of Dickens novels! In real life, it's a little more prosaic. Your unclaimed property search isn't likely to be a rags-to-riches story

You may well find some money you'd lost track of, though. State treasuries are holding at least 32 billion dollars in abandoned assets. Some of that might belong to you. According to my home state, Massachusetts, as many as one in ten people have unclaimed property that can be retrieved by claiming it from the state that is holding it.

Missing Money exists to help you find out if you're one of those people. It's a free search service that takes some basic information, like your name and what state you live in, and searches a database for records of unclaimed property that match your data. You can search for anyone's name, not just your own. It's fast, simple and appears to work. A quick search on my name and location turned up two instances of unclaimed property in my name.

The search doesn't give you a lot of detail about the unclaimed property. In my case, it told me who it belonged to (Sierra Black), what town the owner lived in and whether the asset was worth more or less than $100. One of the items had a company name attached to it, the other did not.

To lay claim to the property, you need to file a claim with your state. If your state is one of the ones participating in the Missing Money database, you can fill out the forms directly through their site. If your state isn't participating with Missing Money, or if you prefer to deal directly with your state government, Consumerist suggests a clever hack for finding the appropriate state agency: simply google the phrase “unclaimed property” along with the name of your state, and it should turn up your state's web site for dealing with these claims.

I did this for Massachusetts and it led me to the Abandoned Property Division, where I ran a search under my name and filled out a form very similar to the one on Missing Money. The two processes seem to be interchangeable. Either should work equally well for reuniting you with your long-lost assets, if you have any.

In addition to the basic forms, you may have to prove your right to the assets the state is holding. In the case of the natural gas royalties, my colleague needed a notarized letter verifying that he in fact owned the land in question.

Beware of Scams

Missing Money is a legit site, approved by the National Association of Unclaimed Property Administrators. Its services are free to use. Making a claim directly through your state government is also free. It should not cost you anything to recovered your abandoned property.

That doesn't mean people won't try to sell it to you, though. There are a number of businesses that charge “finder's fees” for finding unclaimed property. They're just doing the same thing you can do for yourself. You might be contacted by a service alerting you to unclaimed property and offering to help you get it back, for a fee. Don't bite. The fees are typically around 10 percent of the total funds recovered, but can range much higher.

There's no need to pay a finder's fee to get your money. You can just fill out the forms through Missing Money or your state's website and retrieve it yourself.

In addition to shady businesses trying to make a buck off real unclaimed property, there are also outright scammers who will try to convince you there's money waiting for you in order to get access to your personal information. Again, you shouldn't need to deal with any third party to get your unclaimed property back. You absolutely should not have to pay a fee for it.

Put This on Your To-Do List

You don't have to pay to get your free money, but you do still have to put some time and effort in. Is it worth it? You decide. The forms are relatively quick and simple to fill out, so for me it seems totally worth it. I expect to get between $100 and $200 back, and the whole search process took less than an hour. That's a pretty good rate of return on my time. I'm adding a search for unclaimed property to my list of annual financial chores, along with pulling my credit reports and checking to see if the interest rate on my savings account is still competitive.

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Nick
Nick
9 years ago

I’m not so sure that many of the GRS readers are going to suddenly find “missing money” that they never knew they had. I would have liked to see the author’s recommendation for a system (electronic, filing cabinet, etc) to prevent money from going missing in the first place. I’m curious how other GRS readers track their investments…

Nancy L.
Nancy L.
9 years ago
Reply to  Nick

You’d be surprised. We didn’t think we were missing any money, but unbeknownst to us, my husband’s previous employer had one final check that they somehow couldn’t deliver to us. The ridiculous thing was that they had our correct address listed on the unclaimed money site, but for whatever reason, they turned it over to the state rather than deliver it to us. We didn’t know he was supposed to receive it, so we never thought to keep an eye out for it or call when it didn’t arrive. It was a very nice surprise when we found out how… Read more »

Kate
Kate
9 years ago
Reply to  Nancy L.

I had a similar experience with a previous employer. My last check (that I didn’t know was due to me) was eventually sent to my state’s unclaimed fund. I was in and out of that store several times right after I quit so I have no idea why they didn’t just give it to me then. Plus like you it had my correct address printed on it. Oh well, I found it and used the “extra” money to help my little sister go on a high school band trip.

Roberta
Roberta
9 years ago
Reply to  Kate

Yep, I just checked and there’s nothing for me, but I found an old paycheck from a summer job my ex-husband had over 20 years ago in his home state. I forwarded him the info (we’re on good terms) — no idea why he never received it, the address listed is still his parents’ address! I’m sure he returned to college and spaced out that he had one more paycheck to collect. It’s under $100 so it might be teeny tiny, but still! Money!

Mary Pitman
Mary Pitman
9 years ago
Reply to  Nancy L.

There are several comments about the correct address being on the unclaimed property site. Here’s how that can happen:
Not all states require that the holder of the money perform due diligence to find the owner of the money. (Due diligence is making a reasonable attempt to locate the owner of the money.) In your case, a simple post card to the address of record would have done the trick. That’s why even though the address is correct your money may end up in the state unclaimed property site.

mom of five
mom of five
9 years ago
Reply to  Nick

Well, I just ran it and my husband and I are on there. It says we have $100+ due us from Allstate Indemnity (our car and homeowners insurer). It’s probably $101, but we’re certainly going to try to collect it.

It says it’s a premium refund. I don’t know what that would be for. I guess since we weren’t expecting a check, we must’ve thrown the envelope right into the recycling bin when it came in the mail. Why they wouldn’t contact us some other way or credit it toward our premium I have no idea.

Dee
Dee
9 years ago
Reply to  mom of five

I just checked too, assuming that I wouldn’t find anything but I also have an old Allstate premium refund coming to me. Hey, $70 is $70 and I’ll happily take it.

E. Murphy
E. Murphy
9 years ago
Reply to  Nick

It might be bits of money that deceased parents or grandparents left behind. We found $1800 from my deceased father’s checking account. As one of three children I was only entitled to $600, and it took me a full year to get it.

We also found several small amounts from another deceased relative. $25-$50. It had to be split in three, plus a notary had to be paid. We let the state keep it.

Mary Pitman
Mary Pitman
9 years ago
Reply to  E. Murphy

You can get forms notarized for free at your bank or your insurance agent’s office.
When looking up deceased relatives, under the last name enter Estate Of or The Estate Of. Those two entries alone will bring up more than 12,500 listings in Calif. In NY, it brings up more than 2,400 listings. It works in every state to varying degrees. If you don’t look it up the way it’s listed, you’ll never find the listing.

Mary Pitman
Mary Pitman
9 years ago
Reply to  Nick

Here are tips to prevent your money from going to the state: 1. Cash every check as soon as you get it. 2. When you leave an employer, make sure of how many checks you have coming. For example, if the last day of the pay period is a Friday but your last day that you work is Saturday, they you have TWO checks coming, not one. 3. When you move and change your address with an employer, don’t forget to change it with the insurance companies (health, dental, vision, life) plus the 401K administrator. It’s not up to your… Read more »

sarah
sarah
9 years ago

Nick, you’d be surprised. I used to work for the federal agency that regulates credit unions. Occasionally we’d have to shut one down and it was very hard to track down all the people. Lots of accounts with under $100 that were opened through a job, or in conjunction with an auto loan (many require a $25 minimum in a savings account for a loan), etc and people had forgotten about them. It’s pretty rare for it to be a lot of money, though. A couple of times I’ve found myself or a family member on the unclaimed property site… Read more »

Mary Pitman
Mary Pitman
9 years ago
Reply to  sarah

To search for money from credit unions go to http://www.ncua.gov/resources/assetmgmtcenter/unclaimed.aspx
Transfer agents handle the administrative work of stocks. To find out who the transfer agent is, go to the company web site and then go to the investor relations page. The transfer agent should be able to answer any questions you have about the stock.

STRONGside
STRONGside
9 years ago

I had this happen to me a few years ago. It was actually a refund check from my mortgage lender when I applied to have my house tax rate reduced (the prior owners were renting the home out and was being taxed at a higher rate). I forgot to update the address, we refinanced and the check never got to me. So that was a nice $600 present.

lostAnnfound
lostAnnfound
9 years ago

After reading this article, I tried out Missing Money for ha-ha’s, looking for family members and I also ran my name. I was quite surprised to find an account in my name! It is from a UPromise account I opened up many years ago. The site says it is less than $100.00, but with my first daughter going to college next year, it might be enough to pay the fee for application to one of the schools she picks.

Nicole
Nicole
9 years ago

I also ran it for kicks and was startled to find $35 from a gas company I did business with almost 8 years ago, while I was renting a house my senior year of college. That’s not a ton of money, but it’s worth the 20 minutes it took me to find it!

bon
bon
9 years ago

I’m sorry – this is the THIRD article on Missing Money on GRS. The last article (Jul. 26th, 2010) was excellent, and I don’t think this added anything new to the conversation.

Kate
Kate
9 years ago
Reply to  bon

I think a reminder article almost a year later is in readers’ best interests. There are probably new readers since then that haven’t made it quite that far in the archives yet. Plus, it’s difficult to have NEW, EXCITING information all the time.

Kathleen
Kathleen
9 years ago
Reply to  Kate

I agree! I just started reading GRS in the last few months. Although I love searching the archives for the vast information that can be found, I had never seen one on missing money before.

I didn’t have any to my name, but I forwarded it to my friends and family. Who knows, maybe they’ll find something!

Brent
Brent
9 years ago
Reply to  bon

I have been reading this blog since the beginning and I must have missed the last 2 Missing Money articles or I cannot recall them. In any event, it is good to have a reminder.

shash
shash
9 years ago
Reply to  bon

Reminders are good, but a year ago seems a little too soon.

I, too, saw the post and thought, “here we go again.” Luckily, I can always check back tomorrow for something different.

CT
CT
9 years ago

Also check in any other states you’ve previously lived- not just your current address. I used to remit unclaimed property to states for a rental car company, and most often the problem was renters who had a cash deposit but an old address on file. We remitted to whichever state was in the given address. Happy Finding!

Betsy
Betsy
9 years ago
Reply to  CT

I did this! It amazed me that I could be missing money from a time when I was in grad school in another state (I made only $370 per month — how can money go missing when your income is that low!?) But sure enough, there was a refund due me from the university based on some fees that were cancelled, and they never tracked me down to sent it to my new address. Also, I was due over $300 from my auto insurance company (I think they lost a class-action lawsuit after I moved from the state — not… Read more »

Penny Pincher
Penny Pincher
9 years ago

I once claimed “unclaimed property”. My last paycheck from my employer in Massachusetts was waiting for me, months after I’d moved to the Midwest. They sometimes will publish a list of all the names of people with money out there in the paper. And I thought I’d collected the last paycheck, but I guess there was one more. I think most of the time the amounts of money concerned are going to be small, but why leave it out there?

Mary Pitman
Mary Pitman
9 years ago
Reply to  Penny Pincher

The list that is published in the newspaper is frequently the new listings since the last pubication. If you name isn’t on the list, you should still check the state unclaimed property site.

Gryphon
Gryphon
9 years ago

Just found over $100 dollars for my grandmother. She needs a new roof and every little bit makes a big difference in helping her afford that. I will take your advice and check this annually. Thank you for a helpful, relevant article!

Max
Max
9 years ago

In Illinois you can just go to the secretary of state’s website and look it up for free. My sister had $97. Nothing for me tho 🙁

Dana
Dana
9 years ago

Does anyone know of a ‘missing money’ website for the UK? Five years after my grandfather passed away, we found he had several accounts still open in the UK.

Mary Pitman
Mary Pitman
8 years ago
Reply to  Dana

Dana, here are some places you can check in the UK for missing money:
http://www.unclaimedassets.co.uk
http://www.mylostaccount.org.uk
http://www.bonavacantia.org.uk/output This site administers the estates of those who died without a will or known kin and collects the assets of dissolved companies and failed trusts.
I hope this helps.

Tyler Karaszewski
Tyler Karaszewski
9 years ago

This article would have been a lot better if you’d waited until you actually received your two checks to publish it. Then you could answer a bunch of questions that we’re all still asking, like: Did you *actually* get any money back? Was it as much as you expected? Was it as easy as you expected? Did it take weeks or months to get it?

As it stands, it feels a bit like reading a review of a movie written by someone who’s only watched the trailer.

maggie
maggie
9 years ago

Tyler – My experience was pretty easy, and it wasn’t even my money, it had belonged to a deceased distant relative. It took a little while because I had to get copies of her death certificate and the death certificates of everyone else that would have been in line to inherit. Several people had died without wills, so I thought I’d have a hard time proving that I was in line to inherit it, but I wrote it all out, sent it in with whatever documents I did have and they accepted that. My boyfriend also found some money from… Read more »

Kate
Kate
9 years ago

Missing Money has no part past helping you find the money. Time it takes to process your claim and receive the money has everything to do with the individual state’s where the money is held. My experience, within a month of mailing my forms I had my check in the mail. Mine was a last paycheck from a summer job in college of approx 240 dollars.

Mary Pitman
Mary Pitman
9 years ago

The main factor in how long it takes to get the money is the amount of national or statewide publicity the missing money program has recently received. The more publicity, the longer the wait. The complexity depends on the type of claim. Those listings claimed as an heir are the most complex requiring a certified copy of the death certificate, a copy of the will (if one exists) a copy of your birth certificate (if the money is from a parent), the form may need to be notarized. For a simple claim for yourself, it usually involves a copy of… Read more »

SB (One Cent At A Time)
SB (One Cent At A Time)
9 years ago

If you are not good in keeping records of your investments and did not register for online access, there might be a chance that your money somewhere is lying unclaimed. Condition deteriorates when you changed your address in past. In that case USPS has an arrangement to send you all your mails to new address (for $1) for one year after your move. Do register for that. If you haven’t changed your address in the investment accounts after your move, you won’t get any communication once that 1 year USPS service is turned off. Missing money helps you in this… Read more »

Peter
Peter
9 years ago

Change-of-address is free, if you do the little card you can get at the brick-and-mortar post office.

(Not quite relevant, but I figured I’d clarify that since most GRS readers probably save every $1 they can.)

abby
abby
9 years ago

Didn’t find any for me, but found money that probably belongs to my mom, and some that definitely belongs to my fiance!

maggie
maggie
9 years ago

Be sure to check names of deceased relatives in the states they lived. I ended up getting over $14,000 that belonged to a distant relative (a grandparent’s sibling) who had no direct heirs. You need to be able to show you would be in line to inherit it, but that was not as difficult as I thought it would be.
Often these are small amounts though, like a refund due to you from the gas company from your first college apartment.

Anne Cross
Anne Cross
9 years ago

I’ve found probably $6,000 this way over the years. One pot of cash was from a job from when I was in high school, the others were old accounts in my deceased parents’ names. I check it every time I read a blog or newspaper article about it. It’s totally worth two seconds of your time!

smirktastic
smirktastic
9 years ago

Found an amount for my deceased grandmother. Nothing for me, but it’s good to check every so often. You never know.

maggie
maggie
9 years ago

http://www.unclaimed.org/
This is the website I used. (But it seems to be connected to the missingmoney site Sierra lists.)

Mary Pitman
Mary Pitman
9 years ago
Reply to  maggie

Both sites are affiliated with the National Association of Unclaimed Property Administrators (NAUPA). I prefer unclaimed.org because I go directly to the state site. This has a couple advantages.
Each listing needs to be claimed in the state in which it is held so you might as well save time and go there to begin with.
I always get more listings by going to the individual states because the very new and very old listings are not on missingmoney.com.

Beth
Beth
9 years ago

Our local paper puts the names of folks with unclaimed property in the paper. Every year I look to see if I or a deceased relative is in it. Imagine my surprise last fall when my name appeared! Everybody was calling me with the news! I called up the State of NH and low and behold, I had almost $1,500 sitting in some escrow account from a townhouse I sold about 8 years ago!! It was a happy day!

Corinne
Corinne
9 years ago

My husband got a letter from our bank saying that he has $500 in unclaimed money. No details on where it came from though and we have no idea. How can we verify that this is our money and not someone else’s with the same name? We can’t prove it’s his because we have no idea where the money came from. It saddens me to leave it unclaimed, but I don’t see how we can ethically claim it.

sarah
sarah
9 years ago
Reply to  Corinne

I would think it’s the bank’s responsibility to confirm that it’s the correct person.

maggie
maggie
9 years ago
Reply to  Corinne

If it’s an old abandoned bank account, it would have a social security number attached. Is this the bank you are with currently? If I got a call like that, I’d want to make sure it was a legitimate bank, and not a phishing scam.

Katy @ The Non-Consumer Advocate
Katy @ The Non-Consumer Advocate
9 years ago

Well dang, I was hoping to find something, but I guess today is not my day. I did work for a company in NYC in 1989 that never gave me my last paycheck, so I was crossing my fingers.

I think I’ll go and plug in my husband’s name from every state we’ve ever lived in.

Better computer game than Pac-Man! And certainly better odds than the lottery.

Katy Wolk-Stanley
“Use it up, wear it out, make it do or do without”

Katy @ The Non-Consumer Advocate
Katy @ The Non-Consumer Advocate
9 years ago

Holy crap, I just found “Over $100” for my husband from when we lived in Albuquerque!

Thank you, Sierra!

Mwah!

Katy Wolk-Stanley

Melanie
Melanie
9 years ago

We found unclaimed property about 3 months ago. $443. Nice! Escrow from a previous home.

Sammy
Sammy
9 years ago

Made the first attempt with our state’s tax department for some unclaimed property. I have an unusual name, so I know it’s mine. The tax department felt my claim was legitimate, and therefore revealed that it was a check. But, they are requiring another step from me, which was to provide proof of a particular bank account in 1994, 17 years ago! I’m fairly certain I know what the source of the check is, and was drawn on the check-writer’s account, not mine. So, I’ll never be able to claim the money. Oh well.

Mary Pitman
Mary Pitman
9 years ago
Reply to  Sammy

If you know the name of the bank, you can trace bank “genealogy” and find out who currently owns the bank. Go to
http://www.ffiec.gov/nicpubweb/nicweb/nichome.aspx
Other than that, try to go up the chain of command at the unclaimed property office.
I think a fair question to them is, “Do you have records from 17 years ago?”
When your name and social security number match, I feel that anything else is simply a way for the state to deny giving you your money so they can keep it.

PawPrint
PawPrint
9 years ago

After the other unclaimed property article, I ran my deceased father’s name and received over $1,000. I’d moved and couldn’t put my hands on my father’s trust documents, but managed to cobble together enough to show that I was an heir along with two sisters. The state sent each of us a check separately. It was a nice windfall and interesting because I’d checked previously after he died with nothing showing.

s
s
9 years ago

Nice article!

Years ago, I worked in a Savings & Loan (remember those?) in the dept that submitted unclaimed monies to the State. We sent letters at the 3, 4 and 5 year anniversary of last activity before submittal. The highest account I ever resolved was for $14,000 (estate) and the weirdest one was for a famous deathrow inmate (watching too much violent TV was his defense and ticket to fame).

Rosa
Rosa
9 years ago

I didnt find anything for myself, but found money for my Dad and brother. Pretty neat! Thanks Sierra!

Bellen
Bellen
9 years ago

For quite quite a few years, maybe 11, CT has published names of people with ‘Missing Money’. Two of my sons had some, $600 & $35, from a last paycheck and an abandoned savings account. Last year I was checking some genealogy facts and found leads to missing money for my DIL, her mother, both under $100 and a whopping $1250+ for my BIL’s aunt – hers seems to have been from an escrow account involved with her husband’s death and a property sale. Amazing where the internet can lead you. All monies were claimed thru state sites and checks… Read more »

Julie @ The Family CEO
Julie @ The Family CEO
9 years ago

I recently blogged about finding unclaimed money as well. I also used Missing Money. The amount wasn’t huge – $55 – but it was worth the hour or so it took me to claim it.

BD
BD
9 years ago

It boggles my mind that anyone lets any of their money ‘go missing’. I keep track of every single refund, check, dividend, etc. that I am owed. I can’t afford not to! I guess some people are so flush with money that they can allow $30, $50, or $100 or more be unaccounted for.

Just to be sure, I tracked my name on the site, and sure enough…nada. I don’t earn enough to allow any penny owed to me to go ‘missing’.

Bob
Bob
5 years ago
Reply to  BD

Its not difficult to understand. We were paying estimated taxes on an account that was seized and liquidated for years because due to a clerical error, only the parents statements arrived. Not the children’s. Only during a website inquiry on the mutual fund website we found out it was “missing”.

The lesson is to be more active with passive investments or buy and hold will turn turn into buy and go missing.

kll
kll
9 years ago

Anyone have ideas of proof of an address from 6 and nearly 10 years ago, respectively (my husband and I both have some money to claim, apparently)?
I may have an old cancelled drivers license with my old address on, but I can’t figure what my husband would use as proof for his address 10 years ago.

Susan
Susan
9 years ago
Reply to  kll

Old tax returns.

Mary Pitman
Mary Pitman
9 years ago
Reply to  kll

Try a utility company, the school board if you had a child in school, the property appraiser’s office or county tax assessor, a utility company, a former employer, or possibly even your credit report. Get a truly free copy of your credit report by going to http://www.annualcreditreport.com.

Marcella
Marcella
9 years ago

For Australians there are two services from the government you can use. One is for general stuff, the other is specification for superannuation (our version of retirement savings). Both are linked here:

http://www.moneysmart.gov.au/tools-and-resources/find-unclaimed-money

I have seen ads for commercial services touting on trashy current affair programs like Today Tonight. Such a shame that people would waste their money by providing a commission to these crooks when they could easily do the search themselves.

Sadly, I am too organised to have ever lost money to find again.

Mary Pitman
Mary Pitman
9 years ago
Reply to  Marcella
Dan M53
Dan M53
9 years ago

It’s pretty convenient to have an unusual last name when using this site. I searched my last name and all jurisdictions and got only 45 hits. The only one I recognized was my cousin (for >$100). I haven’t spoken to her in over a year, but it’ll give me a good reason to drop her a line!

Suwannee Refugee
Suwannee Refugee
9 years ago

This is what my dad does for a living. Finding money and their heirs. I’m being objective in saying that he’s probably the best in the Southeast, if not east of the Mississippi, in what he does. Drop me a line if you’re interested in doing a post about this. I’ll put you in contact with him.

Lori
Lori
4 years ago

I am interested in learning more as I am a widow and wanting to supplement my income. Any help would be appreciated.

Tina in MN
Tina in MN
9 years ago

Last year I checked all my family members and got a check for $110 back. This year I will check the deceased family members too. Great reminder. Thanks.

partgypsy
partgypsy
9 years ago

nuts, I’ve never found anything for me or my immediate family, guess we are too penny-pinching to let anything slide. But I think this would be a good idea for people who move alot or looking for deceased family members.

Mary Pitman
Mary Pitman
9 years ago
Reply to  partgypsy

Not all states participate on missingmoney.com. Click on the map of the US on the home page. It will take you to a color-coded map. Green states participate. Blue do not. Yellow are in the process of uploading their info. I always get better results by searching the individual states.

Peter Bratt
Peter Bratt
9 years ago

I did find some unclaimed property for my wife, and she ended up getting $260 back from the state of Michigan. While we need to pay taxes on it, it is worth it in my book. I used Missing Money, and it worked really well.

Peter
Peter
9 years ago

I wrote about this site on my own site a while back and had two readers find unclaimed money. One found a check from an old closed account he had forgotten about, while another found $50 from an old cell phone contract or something. The money is out there in places you never realized sometimes.

stephanieg617
stephanieg617
9 years ago

I had $5000 in stocks from an old job 10+ years ago. It was a very pleasant surprise and paid for a good chunk of preschool for the kid.

David Maier
David Maier
6 years ago

Hello, As a registered LLC locator service in Wisconsin, I disagree with the claim that anyone can find unclaimed property simply by using Google to access a state’s database. As of Q3 2014 I have located 1.4 million dollars of unclaimed property – all of which would have never been found because of typographical errors. State government lists are rife with errors because there is no standardization to enter data. Using Google and a state’s database to find unclaimed property is like fixing a flat tire without a jack. You need more tools. Also, a good locator works off all… Read more »

Tez
Tez
5 years ago

I found $10,000 for my sister several years ago. I discovered the account years ago during my tenure in the tax department. I located $350,000 for the company. I visit the site every year and locate money for at least 5 or 6 family members. I stopped telling everyone because people do not believe that it is true. I do not waste my time now. It only takes seconds to type in a name.

Mark
Mark
4 years ago

I have to agree with Dave the locator from Wisconsin. You can cherry pick with Google and some states lists, but that’s about it.

There are so many other places to look that most individuals or businesses wouldn’t even think of.

R.M.
R.M.
4 years ago

I had a deposited several thousand dollars at Frost National Bank, in Texas, when I was in my early twenties. A couple of years ago I found those uncashed deposits in a box at my parent’s place. Frost refuses to acknoledge the deposit and sd that they have records going back only 7 years and that it is up to me to prove that I have not withdrawn the money! I tried to contact the Texas Department of Banking, but to no avail. Anyone have any ideas on how I can recover my money? (it is NOT listed on an… Read more »

Allyson Strobel
Allyson Strobel
3 years ago

Don’t sign up for the book, they take the money and no number to get it back and of course, no book!

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