Action not words: The difference between talkers and doers

It's Sunday morning and I should be editing articles in advance of my upcoming vacation. Instead, I just got done playing another game of Starcraft II. Since the game was released on July 27th, I've played many games of Starcraft II. In fact, I've played at least 150 games of Starcraft II. (I know this because the game keeps track of your record. I played 50 training matches, and have since won 47 and lost 42 against human opponents, putting me near the top of my division in the “Silver League”. Plus I've played some single-player games.)

My Starcraft II ranking as of noon on Sunday, August 29th.

How much time has playing 150 games of Starcraft II sucked from my life? At about 30 minutes per game, it's safe to say I've spent about 80 hours over the past month — or about 20 hours per week — building virtual armies and blowing stuff up.

Now on the surface, there's nothing wrong with me having a little fun. I've been waiting for this game for almost twelve years. Plus, I've been working hard for the past two years, and I've been stressed because of it. I deserve some time off, and have intentionally been downshifting to a simpler life, one that gives me time for computer games.

However, having said that, in this case there's a problem. Recently my game-playing — I've also been obsessed with Carcassonne on the iPad (getting close to the global top 100 list!) — has been obsessive, and has come at a price.

  • I haven't been cycling (though I have been going to the gym).
  • I haven't been doing my work around the house.
  • I haven't been studying my French. (One of my goals was too be able to speak a bit of French before our upcoming trip to Paris.)
  • I haven't been prepping my Animal Intelligence blog for re-launch (which is still scheduled for Wednesday!).
  • I've been scrambling to get articles ready for Get Rich Slowly.

I say I'm going to do all of these things, but I never do. Instead I play computer games. Basically, I've turned into the old J.D. — the J.D. of five years ago. I've become a Talker instead of a Doer.

Talkers vs. Doers

Five years ago, I was full of hot air. Well, that and I was clinically depressed. And lazy. This was not a good combination for Getting Things Done. I talked a lot about the things I wanted to do, but I never did them. I found reasons not to. I even had trouble keeping up my end of the household chores, which my wife found very frustrating.

I was a Talker.

Maybe you know somebody like this. A Talker seems to know the solutions to everything, has great plans on how he's going to make money or get a new job. But the funny thing is, the Talker never acts on his solutions and his great plans. And he never gets that new job. He's out of work or stuck in a job he hates. To everyone else, it's clear that the Talker is full of hot air, but he believes he's bluffing everyone along, or conflates talking with doing. When confronted, a Talker always has excuses for not getting things done: he doesn't have time, he doesn't have the skills, the odds are stacked against him. When a Talker does do something, he often takes a shortcut.

That, my friends, was the man I used to be.

But something changed in the autumn of 2005. I began to read a lot of books. Not just personal finance books (though, as you know, I read plenty of those), but also self-help books and success manuals. I read Feeling Good to deal with my depression, How to Win Friends and Influence People to learn how to talk with people, and so on. And gradually I began to take the advice in these books to heart.

I began to take small steps, began to be more active in my world. Instead of just talking about doing things, I did them. I stopped looking for shortcuts — I had been a huge fan of shortcuts — and started actually doing the work required to get things done. Shockingly, this worked. By doing the work, I got the expected results. By doing instead of talking, things started to happen.

I became a Doer.

“We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit.” — Will Durant, though often misattributed to Aristotle

We are What We Repeatedly Do

Author Kevin J. Anderson has a fantastic post on his blog about the similarities between the Olympics and writing. Here's a lengthy excerpt:

I've had many people tell me, “Oh, writing is easy. Anybody can do it if they just sit down and put their minds to it.” Here's how the conversation goes:

Somebody at a book-signing: “I've always wanted to be a writer. I could write a novel.”

Me: “Oh? Why haven't you?”

Person: “I just don't have the time.”

Me: “Hmm. Nobody gives me the time, either. I have to make the time, set priorities, discipline myself to get my writing done each day, no matter how tired I am. I worked a full-time regular job while I wrote my first novels, scraping out an hour here or there in evenings and weekends. That's how I've become a successful author.”

Person: “Yeah, right. I think you're just lucky.”

[…]

I've wanted to be a writer since I was five years old. I sat in my dad's study and plunked out my first “novel” on a manual typewriter when I was eight. By the age of ten, I had saved up enough money to buy either a bicycle (like a normal kid), or my own typewriter. I chose the typewriter. I got my first rejection slip by the time I was 13, had my first story published when I was 16 (after I had gathered 80 rejection slips), and sold my first novel by the time I was 25.

I have a trophy in my office proclaiming me to be “The Writer with No Future” because I could produce more rejection slips by weight than any other writer at an entire conference. My files now bulge with more than 800 rejections. On the other hand, I also have 100 books published, 46 of which have been national or international bestsellers, I've got a shelf full of awards, and my work has been translated into 30 languages. I've written more than twelve million words, so far.

Anderson is a Doer. He doesn't just talk about writing — he writes. He writes over and over and over again. Through the sheer act of writing, he became a writer.

Note: Anderson's entire post is awesome. Go read it now. My article will still be here when you finish.

People often ask me about the secret to this blog's success. “How did you get so many readers?” they ask. “How can I do the same?”

My answer is similar to Anderson's. There aren't any secrets. Write and post great content on a regular basis for a long, long time. In short, you can't just talk about building a great blog; you also have to put in the work. Simple, right? But it's not easy.

(I appreciate the folks who come up to me and say, “You know, J.D., I don't know how you do it. I tried to keep a blog for a few months. It was hard.” Yes, it is. It's work, just like anything else.)

If there's something you want to be or do, the best way to become that thing is to actually take steps toward it, to move in that direction. Don't just talk about it, but do something. It doesn't have to be a big thing. Just take a small step in the right direction every single day.

If you want to get out of debt, take small steps toward becoming debt-free. If you want to save for a trip to Africa, save a little bit at a time. If you want to get a new job, make moves in that direction. But take action. That's the most important step.

Action Not Words

Of course, there's more to getting stuff than just taking action. It's one thing to say you want to become a commercial airline pilot and another to actually do it. Here are some of the things I learned as I made the move from Talker do Doer:

  • Make time for the things you want to do. One of the keys to getting things done is setting aside time for the things you want to accomplish. You have to make time to get stuff done. As the Kevin J. Anderson article I mentioned above demonstrates, you don't just become a best-selling author or an Olympic athlete. Talking doesn't make it so. You have to carve out time to do this stuff. You have to put your Big Rocks first and fit the small stuff in around them.
  • Have a goal in mind. I truly believe that the biggest reason I used to struggle with getting stuff done is that I didn't have any sort of plan. I had no goals. Goals give you purpose. It wasn't until I became committed to digging out of debt that I was able to actually start moving in the right direction. Part of my current problem is that I've recently achieved a bunch of big goals, but now have nothing planned for the future.
  • Don't take on too much. While it's important to set goals, don't take on too many tasks at once. I try to set just one or two major goals at a time. Any more and I find I can't pursue any of them effectively. This year, my one goal is to lose 50 pounds. I'm on pace to do that. Why? Because I don't have anything else on my schedule competing for time. This is my Big Rock.
  • Don't let failures deter you. This is huge. One of the reasons I used to talk so much without acting is that I was afraid of failure. I'm not sure where I learned to be afraid of defeat, but that's the way I was. And when I did try something but failed, I'd give up. This is no way to get stuff done. Talkers let fear of failure keep them on the sideline; Doers overcome fear and move on, and when they fail, they simply try again.
  • Don't find reasons that something can't be done; instead, find ways that something can be done. This is a pet peeve of mine. I hate when people come to me for advice, but when I give it, they tell me all of the reasons it won't work for their circumstances. (This often happens when I suggest people take a second job to boost their income, for example.) One of the biggest difference between successful people and those who aren't is that the successful don't make excuses. If something looks difficult or impossible, they find ways to make it happen anyhow.

In the past five years, I've learned that I can do anything I set my mind to. Get out of debt? After I stopped talking and started doing, I got out of debt quicker than I thought possible. Losing 50 pounds? Well, I'm not there yet, but I've lost over 30 pounds since January 1st — but it didn't happen until I stopped talking about it and started working hard to make it happen. Learning French? Well, there's one where my talk outpaces my action right now, and it's a perfect example of what I mean when I say actions speak louder than words. I don't study my French as much as I should, so basically all I can do is count and tell you what color my clothes are. (“J'ai deux chemise noir.”)

For five years, my doing slowly increased until this past winter it reached a frenzied pace. I was burning myself out. I was writing and speaking and working and exercising and…well, it seemed like I never had a spare moment. This was the dark side of doing, and it's what triggered my desire to downshift. It's what led the pendulum swinging too far in the direction of Starcraft II.

Finding a Solution

So what's the solution to my current problem? How can I stop playing computer games so much? How can I stop just being a Talker and become a Doer again? Well, making this public confession is a first step. But the thing that I think will really help is the “decision tree” I came up with the other day. Whenever the urge to game strikes, I'm going to ask myself the following questions:

  • Have I exercised today?
  • Are the house and yard tidy?
  • Have I run all of my errands?
  • Have I written and/or edited at least two articles for Get Rich Slowly?
  • Does my inbox have fewer than 20 messages?

If I can answer “yes” to these five questions, then it's okay to play Starcraft II or Carcassonne. But if I answer “no” to even one of these questions, I need to have the discipline to let the gaming go. I believe this will help me strike a balance. It'll help me return to the world of Doing again. Because you know what? Life is a lot more fun as a Doer than a Talker.

Note: At the risk of creating more Talkers in the GRS audience, I'd just like to point out that the Carcassonne app is outstanding. If you've played the board game, you must play the iPhone/iPad version. The ability to play — gulp — dozens of games in a matter of days lets you see just how rich and complex this game is. This adaptation is perfect in every way.
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Meghan
Meghan
9 years ago

Great article! I like your solution especially. I tend to watch a lot of TV, and with several shows starting up again in September I know it is going to be a huge time waster. I am going to try this, and hopefully I will get more work done instead of procrastinating all the time.

Nicole
Nicole
9 years ago

Our blog post this morning is on a solution to the above problem by Robert Boice (the psychologist who has studied how to get writers to write in randomized controlled trials). To sum: Work in brief daily sessions Start before you’re ready Stop before you’re ready Do the thing you’re avoiding (usually writing) first in the morning. He has several fantastic books. I recommend that any graduate students or professors check out his Advice for New Faculty Members. Aspiring doers should check out his book on writing and/or his book on procrastination. Good luck! It’s the start of a new… Read more »

rick@rickety
9 years ago

One thing that helps me with the games is I only play when family asks me to. So if my sons (all grown) want a game I join in.

That way I am building family relationships as well as having fun. This method works for television also.

The result for me: two or three games a month and maybe 3 movies. About 8 hours or less of television a month.

Gives me time for my blog.

JakeIL7
JakeIL7
9 years ago

Carcassonne is evil I tell you….evil! (I have it on my iPhone and play it way to much). There is worse coming out soon though…

Brian B
Brian B
9 years ago

J.D.,

I am 1-8 in post-practice matches thus far.

I keep getting rushed within 15 minutes and can’t seem to get my defenses up quick enough!! any tips??

Beth
Beth
9 years ago

I have to say that I wondered if Starcraft would be a time suck for you. Being a fellow World of Warcraft (recovered) addict, I truly understand the power of compelling games to take over your life. It sounds like you are back on the road to freedom. The life/work balance never gets easier, does it? It is a constant negotiation — and for that reason I like your list. Right now, I would need to use it to have a bit more fun. I’m in a “work, work, work” period.

Joe DeGiorgio
Joe DeGiorgio
9 years ago

Don’t beat yourself up too bad concerning the video games. Even with that, you’re still more of an “action taker” than most.

From Canfield to Robbins and every motivational speaker/writer in between, it has been stated that the taking of persistent action more than anything else ensures your success. This post is right up there with the best, J.D.

You have success because you have earned it. Without shortcuts. Congrats.

Chris Gammell
Chris Gammell
9 years ago

I nearly failed out of school my first semester thanks to Wolfenstein 3D. I got it two weeks before finals. I ended up having the most obnoxious background on my computer reminding me to stay away from it. But in the end it was only getting to the right place (the library namely) and focusing while there that got me through it all. Useful lesson for me though: stay away from getting time-vampires in the first place.

C.C. Collins
C.C. Collins
9 years ago

Looks to me like you are a doer that talks. In so doing you can’t help but inspire others. You never know how much you contribute to someone’s life but contribute you have.

Thanks for the openess and honesty.

Rob Bennett
Rob Bennett
9 years ago

This is another one of those articles in which you take on a very important topic and examine it in a highly intelligent and honest way, J.D. The only thing that I feel that I can add is that I don’t think it is always a 100 percent bad thing when we procrastinate (talk instead of do, as you put it). My sense is that the root cause is often some sort of ambivalence. It could be that our minds sense that, if we do, we are are going to end up in such and such a place, and we… Read more »

Nancy L.
Nancy L.
9 years ago

I realized long ago that if I could just “do” stuff, I’d be a lot better off than when I “plan” stuff, but it’s not always been easy to get my brain to stay on track. For a while I felt like I was self-sabotaging my plans and would beat myself up for not being stronger, but when I really thought about it, I realized it was more that I kept trying to do so much, my brain would revolt by going on strike. I was accomplishing a ton of things, but none of it was what I really truly… Read more »

Carrie Isaac
Carrie Isaac
9 years ago

THEY HAVE CARCASSONE FOR THE IPAD?!?! Glad I don’t have one or I *wouldn’t* get anything done. 🙂

KS
KS
9 years ago

I’m a Websudoku addict, and it’s been my substitute for action, especially action I’m ambivalent about.

For getting out of talker mode and into doer mode, I highly recommend Barbara Sher’s Wishcraft (available now in PDF on her website). A solid, practice, wonderful way to get from here to there, wherever there is for you.

Ian
Ian
9 years ago

Thanks for the pep talk. I’ve recently discovered a new career path I’d like to take, and need to get motivated over the next year to get all the certifications I need. I’m very excited about it now but I’m afraid my excitement will quickly die down when I actually have to start studying.

P.S. I love the Caracassonne board game, but don’t have an iAnything to play the electronic version on. 🙁

Dajolt
Dajolt
9 years ago

Hey, if you have an Ipad, why not take it to the gym and work out while you play the game? If this works for you, you could even set the rule to ONLY play Carcassone during work-outs… I’ve bought a ebook reader (the B&N Nook) for the same reasons and have to work-out when I want to read certain books. Works for me. Regarding Carcassone, have you heard of the online gaming community Brettspielwelt? It’s a made-by-fans-for-fans project which is entirely free. You can pay against real live players here. The Ipad might have better graphics, but BSW has… Read more »

Mr Credit Card
Mr Credit Card
9 years ago

The best solution is to do what you have to do first thing in the morning and get it out of the way – whether it be exercise, blog your post, make your phone calls etc..leave the entertainment stuff for the night!

April Dykman
9 years ago

“I hate when people come to me for advice, but when I give it, they tell me all of the reasons it won’t work for their circumstances.”

YES.

John W.
John W.
9 years ago

This is a really good article. I like the questions you ask your self before playing, I need to do this too. In the last few months I had made a lot of changes to be more productive, but since getting sc2 my productivity has waned as I have played almost as many games as you. @Brian B Getting rushed can be frustrating and it just takes some practice to overcome. Your best bet is to look up some specific builds for the race you like and follow them exactly until you have them down. Also, I would recommend playing… Read more »

MM
MM
9 years ago

I play StarCraft 2 as also. If I play, and its on a work day, I will try to sneak about 2 games and turn it off. Its usually about 45 minutes depending if people are rushing or not. Its easy to get carried away though. If I lose, I can’t stop until I end on a good note (a win). I thought about using a timer.

Techbud
Techbud
9 years ago

I always try and follow that rule with video games. Get my work done first, if complete then you can have the reward. I recently became a financial doer, after being a talker for many years. Something final click in my head. I think talking to my brother who has 2 children in college and his struggles to fund it hit home for me. I have 3 children myself who are 6 to 7 years away from college. Talking about it isn’t going to pay the bill, only doing will. I’m only about 3 months on my way but it… Read more »

mary b
mary b
9 years ago

I think I am a little bit of a “talker” than doer. Seems like I am always planning something and have a bunch of ideas running around in my head. I think Rob hit the nail on the head with that ambivalence factor. Some ideas don’t get acted upon because really in some way we know the end result will not be what we truly want or need. This weekend I started reading GTD and I have already found success with writing down and then doing those 1st action steps for some of my projects. I think if you are… Read more »

Everyday Tips
Everyday Tips
9 years ago

Starcraft II has totally limited access to my laptop as both my oldest son and husband have been playing it a lot! Your advice of not playing Starcraft (or whatever you ‘discretionary’ activity is) until your certain criteria are met is a good idea. However, it is so easy to say ‘I am just going to play one game’. Next thing you know, it is 5 games later and you need to get some sleep. Sometimes I read back on some of my blog posts and think “I need to take some of my own advice”. However, life gets hectic… Read more »

Steph
Steph
9 years ago

I, for one, would like to see a “What Starcraft II has taught me about personal finance” post. It would be the perfect excuse for me to introduce my (Starcraft mad) boyfriend to your website!

CathyG
CathyG
9 years ago

I love how most of these comments are about the games rather than the talking/doing/making a list!

Here’s my list:
Are the dishes done?
Have I exercised?
Have I practiced the piano?
Have I made my lunch for tomorrow?
Have I worked on one of my sewing projects?

(and yes, I made a note of the online Carcassone community (thanks dajolt) and will be looking at it later tonight)

xman
xman
9 years ago

you know what you have to do. throw that game away! it’s a waste of time.

imagine how much french you could learn with 80 hours! 5 words an hour x 80 = 400 vocabulary words.

CrankyBolt
CrankyBolt
9 years ago

Hey JD, what’s your battlenet ID? I should friend you and we could get some team matches in.

Donna Freedman
Donna Freedman
9 years ago

Everyone thinks he can write because, well, everyone can “write,” i.e., put words on paper (or computer screen). I’ve been making a living as a writer for three decades and I still run into people who say, “You know, I always thought I could be a writer.”
I bite back Stephen King’s response (“You know, I always thought I could be a brain surgeon”) and say, “You still could. Start today.”

Chris
Chris
9 years ago

Hey JD, I read your blog daily and I’m a diamond 1v1 and 2v2 player. If you would like to improve your game let me know. iNFiNiTY / 627

-Chris

Katherine
Katherine
9 years ago

Thank you. I needed to hear this. I was also going to comment further but reading blogs and surfing the internet is my equivalent of online games. So I will leave the computer and go do something.

Kent @ The Financial Philosopher
Kent @ The Financial Philosopher
9 years ago

JD: I must admit that I stopped reading this post half-way through because those few paragraphs were enough to move me to get some things done.

I’m not a talker, but I am a thinker. Thinking too much can also get in the way of doing.

Thanks for the external force needed to break inertia…

“A body remains in a state of rest…unless acted upon by an external force.” ~ Sir Isaac Newton

Raghu Bilhana
Raghu Bilhana
9 years ago

JD,

This sounds harsh, but I wanted to inform you, that is what friends are for right.

The moment you chose to allow others to write articles for you here at GRS, you were allowing yourself to take a short cut route to success.

From that moment, other than a couple of good articles here and there, there have not been good articles here at GRS. But I keep coming here everyday hoping something good comes up.

Sorry, but I wanted to put it out there.

Alex
Alex
9 years ago

All I can say is I went through the same transition. Several attempts at college over a few years, I felt like I never had time to do anything. I would find excuses to not do homework (usually going out and riding my horse), then I would do poorly in classes, and then poorly on grades at the end. I would think I just don’t have time for college! Then I got married, I somehow got grounded, then I was doing college, keeping up a home, teaching riding lessons in the evenings and weekends, volunteering for a special needs riding… Read more »

Luke
Luke
9 years ago

J.D. – it sounds a bit like you have an addictive personality to me – it’s always a feast or a famine! I used to be like this (I played Diablo II obssessively for 6 years, so I know where you’re coming from). When I say obsessively, I’m talking about setting my alarm for 3am to start playing obsessive 😮 I think the only thing that helped me quit was the patently obvious realisation that computer games aren’t real life and that nothing you do in a game will typically help you put food on the table. I’m still a… Read more »

Christina Crowe
Christina Crowe
9 years ago

Heh, I have that same problem with video games. They’re addicting, and I often find myself playing Oblivion or Dofus instead of working on my blog or writing in general.

I’ll try asking myself these questions before settling down for a little fun. Thanks for the good read!

Christina

Eden
Eden
9 years ago

Wow! You nailed it with this one, J.D. This is a HUGE problem for me. I’m always talking/thinking/reading rather than doing. I mention reading because I think that’s the biggest problem for me. I like to read, so when I want to accomplish something new I set out on a path to learn about it with lots of reading. Problem is, I feel like I’m accomplishing something with all the reading yet I never get to the part of actually doing something with what I learn. The reading is just my way of avoiding the work and possibly failing. Thanks… Read more »

This Mama Works It!
This Mama Works It!
9 years ago

I have been reading your blog for awhile not but never commented. However, this article I felt was very inpiring. I would say I am more of a thinker than a talker… I feel like if only there was a computer program that could just take the ideas from my head and formulate them into my business… But I have started carving a little time each day to dedicate to my blog. It is very little since I am a mom to two and work fulltime outside the home. Nonetheless even if it is 40 miutes on my lunch break… Read more »

ami | 40daystochange
ami | 40daystochange
9 years ago

Hehe – But JD – you’re decision tree gives you the perfect excuse to keep playing Starcraft II. “Fewer than 20 emails in inbox” (not to mention the combination with the other items) requires not just discipline but exquisite timing and, perhaps, lightning quick reflexes – leading to the fatalistic “Well, just one quick game since I’m going to spend the next hour on emails . . . ” (or is that just me?) 😉 I’m going to try the JD Roth decision tree method of busting procrastination – as soon as I finish reading all the blog posts on… Read more »

Brenton
Brenton
9 years ago

I found that the best way to keep myself from spending too much time on the PC playing games, is to unplug my laptop, and when the battery runs out, play time is over. That gives me 45 minutes to an hour, and then its back to getting things done.

RugbyGuy
RugbyGuy
9 years ago

I’ve found the downward spiral of depression, procrastination and negative self-talk to be quite debilitating. I’ve worked hard and used lots of therapy to help get out of that rut. Although I do find myself slipping back from time to time. I would play video games and not get things done. As I realized I was not getting things done, I would become more morose and depressed and this would lead me to more avoidance and procrastination. The downward spiral would continue until the day was over and I had accomplished nothing…expect many hours of gaming. The next morning I… Read more »

Sarah
Sarah
9 years ago

I don’t know you at all, but a few things in your post caught my eye – you used to be clinically depressed, and couldn’t seem to motivate yourself to get up and do the things you needed to do… that’s a symptom of depression. You found a way out of it, found something to be passionate about (personal finance), and built a successful blog. Now you’re coasting and find yourself inexplicably getting drawn into a game where you can pretend to be someone else (and work toward and achieve goals) and not doing the things you need to do.… Read more »

The Skinny On
The Skinny On
9 years ago

Another great post, J.D. Thank you. I always chalk this kind of discussion up to one question: How badly do you want it? Kevin Anderson has always wanted to be a writer, probably more than he’s wanted anything else. Which is why he looks at his 800 rejection slips like badges of honor. If you didn’t really want it, just a few rejections would be enough to spoil your appetite for more. Of course, procrastination is always there, nagging – even for the most highly motivated. But developing a system (yours here is perfect – succinct and clearly defined) is… Read more »

Wayne Mates
Wayne Mates
9 years ago

Great article, JD! I also found myself wasting hours of time almost everyday on online games and frivolity for over 3 years. In January of this year, I was facing some surgery and I realized, I was not immortal. (Laughs) I resolved I was done wasting time. It was time to get my butt in gear and accomplish something…anything! I read a couple of books which helped clarify my thinking, set life and career goals and get moving. Since then, I have taken up an excercise program (lost 20 lbs), changed my diet slightly, started a blog to share my… Read more »

Mark
Mark
9 years ago

I found the most productive time in my life was when I was so broke I couldn’t afford Internet or Cable TV service, not even dial-up for 15/month. (divorce and bankruptcy will do that to you) I’ve very much considered canceling Internet and Satellite now that I’ve got money to burn, so I can focus on the things that are actually important, instead of sitting around on my lazy duff surfing/playing/watching old movies in HD. As a matter of fact, I’m going to go do it right now. Thanks, J.D., I guess you were the external force I needed to… Read more »

Jacqueline
Jacqueline
9 years ago

I have ghosted here for a very long time but this post struck so close to home that I had to comment.
JD, this is a timely post for me. For some unknown reason, I have a reputation as a ‘doer’ but have found myself talking far too much lately. I think my reputation has allowed me to coast but it will catch up with me eventually.
Thanks for the kick up the backside. It always helps to know that others face similar situations.

Andrew
Andrew
9 years ago

My problem is turning the talking of some aspects of my life into doing. I’ve got the same goal of losing 50 pounds (though I’m only about 6 lbs of the way there). Every day I make sure the house is clean (GF works out and I work from home), but I find I make a ton of excuses for not trying new things on the money earning side. Exercising EVERY day I find difficult as well. I’ve taken the approach of doing 1 thing at a time to turn it into a habit and then starting on other stuff.… Read more »

Dan Hill
Dan Hill
9 years ago

This article came just in time to wake me up out of my talker slump. I am a gamer too, it does not take much to distract me from the next actions.

I fear for my goals when Cataclysm is released :d

AC
AC
9 years ago

You know what could help you with your french is splurging for a tutor off of craigslist. It is easier to attain goals when someone else is holding you to your progress!

Ditch the computer games, they can lead to depression.

Peter
Peter
9 years ago

Hi JD,
i just started a new business and the fear of failure has definitely been holding me back. after reading this post though, i just emailed 5 developers to see if they were interested in participating in an upcoming product release. if they say no, i’ll just move on to other developers.

Thanks,
pete

Money Reasons
Money Reasons
9 years ago

I have a history of mostly talker and partially doer…

I use to have a certain level of success with something, then get impatient and give it up. Or I stop trying as hard and go an easier route.

But for my kids sake, I’m trying to change that, and become more of a doer and less of a talker…

Robin Hernandez
Robin Hernandez
9 years ago

Thanks for the words of motivation! I’m printing out today’s post to wallpaper my work space 🙂

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