Blogging: A Demanding Task with Few Rewards?

Last week, a reader named Matt sent me an article from Chicago Business about how bloggers are quitting what they call a demanding task with few rewards. It's a fascinating story that explores some of the problems with blogging as a money-making enterprise.

The article suggests several reasons that blogs and bloggers fail:

  • Blogging isn't as lucrative as people imagine.
  • Blogging takes too much time.
  • Bloggers aren't willing to share their personal lives.
  • Bloggers run out of material.
  • It's easier to reach people via Facebook or Twitter.

Leaving aside Twitter and Facebook, all of these are valid concerns.

Money
As part of my job, I talk to bloggers all the time. I speak to groups of bloggers at conferences, and I meet them one-on-one for lunch all year round.

From my experience, novice bloggers have no idea how much time and effort it takes to build and maintain a successful site. Yes, you can start a blog in just an hour or two. Yes, you can run a blog as a hobby, and you can even make a little money at it. But for a blog to be a full-time business it has to be, well, a full-time business. Blogging is no easy path to riches.

Based on conversations with hundreds of bloggers, my best guess is that the average blog makes maybe $50-$100 per month. (Well, the average blog makes nothing. The average blog that's trying to make money earns about $50 to $100 per month.) A very successful blog might make $1000 per month. And some, like Get Rich Slowly, make enough for folks to earn a full-time living.

Blogging can be lucrative if you're willing to invest the time and effort needed to make a go of it. But successful bloggers don't just sit on the beach sipping piña coladas and eating mangoes. The full-time bloggers I know treat this just like work. Because it is work. (To be honest, the best bloggers I know are obsessive workaholics. They spend too much time on their blogs.)

Time
One reader wrote recently for advice on starting a blog. To paraphrase:

One of my 2011 Resolutions was to start a blog. The blog is up and running, but it's quite discouraging that people aren't visiting it. Do you have any ideas on how to get people to visit the blog?

My reply? “Building an audience for a blog takes years, not days.” Blogs don't just spring fully-formed into existence, like Athena from Zeus' head. Building a successful blog takes hundreds or thousands of hours of work.

Even then, many things have to happen right in order for a blog to grow to the size of Get Rich Slowly.

  • You need to work hard.
  • You need to write well.
  • You need to cover a subject that interests people.
  • You need to spread the word.
  • You need to get lucky.

And, if you want to make money at it, you have to have a subject that can be monetized. (That is, a topic for which advertisers are willing to spend, or from which you can otherwise earn an income, like with e-books.)

All of this takes time — and lots of it.

Details
But time isn't enough. Your blog has to be interesting, and one of the best ways to make it so is to be sure it tells a compelling story. Most blogs fail to find an audience because they're just too generic. They're bland. They could be written by anyone.

The blogs I like have personality. Why do I love Mimi Smartypants? Because she's so damn funny. What sets Progressive Ruin apart from other comic-book blogs? Mike makes the site personal. (He loves Swamp Thing, for goodness sake.) And what am I always telling the staff writers here at GRS? Write with personality — share your life.

A blog on any subject can be compelling if there's a story behind it. Sure, readers come to a blog for information. But they also come to be entertained. They come to be part of a community. For these things to happen, they have to feel like they're sharing your story. If you're not telling a story, what is there to keep a reader around?

Last July, I spoke to a group of deal-bloggers. I was dismayed at how lifeless their sites were. “To set yourself apart, you have to let your readers identify with you,” I told them. But a lot of people are scared to share too much on the internet. That makes it tough for a blog to succeed.

Material
One final challenge bloggers face is a lack of material. If you're writing a personal blog, this isn't an issue. I mean, I can write about cats and comic books for a hundred years and never run out of stories. But there are only so many people who want to read about how much weight I lifted at the gym this morning or look at the latest video I found on YouTube.

If you want to keep an audience, you have to write about a specific topic. And once you've narrowed your focus to just one topic, you've limited your pool of potential posts. Unless you only write once a week or don't mind repeating yourself, this is a problem.

Note: I recently spoke with a big-name personal-finance columnist. Somehow, we started discussing the problems with writing about money. “It's tough,” the columnist told me. “There are really only about a dozen topics we cover. But nobody wants to read the same thing all the time. Our job is to find new ways to make these dozen stories interesting.”

 

To maintain a successful blog, you need to provide a constant flow of new and interesting material. This is much more difficult than you might think. In fact, I'd argue that it's the fundamental problem that bloggers have to solve. How do you keep covering your subject's core material without sounding like a broken record?

Solving the Problem
You know what? I've faced all of the problems outlined in the Chicago Business article. But instead of quitting, whenever I've faced a challenge, I've looked for a way to solve the problem. As a result, Get Rich Slowly is not the same blog it was when it started nearly five years ago. This site has evolved, and will continue to do so.

Some of the changes have been obvious. Get Rich Slowly is now a multi-author blog, for example. Plus, there's a team of social-media elves who take care of Twitter and Facebook so I can focus on my strength — which is writing.

Other changes are less obvious because they're behind the scenes. (I've taken steps to smooth the business side of things, for example. And I switched offices. And GRS may switch publishing platforms. And so on.)

Not every change at Get Rich Slowly pleases every reader. That's fine. But the bottom line is I have to look out for myself, too. I have to strike a balance between providing what readers want and getting what I need. It's only by achieving this balance that Get Rich Slowly will survive going forward.

When this balance is achieved, something magical happens. Blogging remains a demanding task, it's true, but you know what? It's a demanding task with abundant rewards for everyone.

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Marko Saric
Marko Saric
9 years ago

Great advice! Too many start blogs and quit within weeks as it really is demanding and time consuming to get any results. People should read a post like this one before starting just to realise that it is not an easy job. Might make less people start blogging but those who start will be better prepared to put in the effort.

…you can write about blogging as much as you want if you ask me 🙂

LifeAndMyFinances
LifeAndMyFinances
9 years ago

Blogging really is tough. I started a blog at the end of August and it is inching very slowly to success. It’s honestly very difficult to stick with it at this point, but I know that if I quit, I’ll certainly make no money. Plus, my site earned me a staff writer position with another! I never would have gotten that without a site of my own.

Lonnie @ My Income Lab
Lonnie @ My Income Lab
9 years ago

I am a new blogger, writing about my experiences trying to develop streams of passive income by building monetized niche websites. This topic is covered to death but I am hoping that my writing style and transparency will help me out stand out in the crowd. It’s very discouraging to write for an audience of one, but JD, you are right, an audience doesn’t come out of the woodwork overnight, and I do have only 3 posts under my belt. But, because I do work full-time, finding the energy to spend an hour or two on my blog after a… Read more »

Elizabeth
Elizabeth
9 years ago

I agree — this is great advice and a wake-up call for a lot of would-be bloggers. It’s a nice change from other PF blogs that repeatedly recommend blogging as a great way to earn money on the side. Unfortunately, many people don’t have the talent, passion and drive to sustain a successful blog — and there’s nothing wrong with that. If people want to earn some extra cash, finding a good fit is crucial. Blogging isn’t for everyone.

Thanks for your honesty, J.D.!

Nicole
Nicole
9 years ago

I love your stories and advice about blogging! Just because a couple people don’t is no reason to make this kind of feature a one time only thing.

We’re blogging as a hobby. We will stop when it stops being fun or we run out of things to say.

Pat S
Pat S
9 years ago

As a novice blogger myself, I really appreciate you sharing this advice. Personally, I’d be thrilled with 50.00 a month from a blog, as its just a hobby at this point, and one that I’ve found I really enjoy.

I’m excited when I get new unique visitors, and am just hopeful that I’m not writing content that no one wants to read. Concerns, I’m sure, that are typical for a new blogger.

Thanks for sharing, your post was very encouraging.

slug
slug
9 years ago

I have been blogging on and off since about May 2007. This week I crested the $100 mark on Adsense for the first time. If I did this for any other reason than the love of sharing (even to a minuscule group), I would have quit long ago.

Readership is clearly akin to compound growth in your bank account. The more content you deposit, the larger your readership grows over time (assuming it’s good content).

Thanks for a great article!

J.D.’s note: I love the compound interest analogy!
Mike Piper
Mike Piper
9 years ago

When I read that Chicago Business article, all I could think was that it was a bunch of stories from people who hoped to earn income from their blogs, but had no business model with which to do it. No surprise that they failed. It was almost as if they’d used the classic “profits” meme as their playbook:
Step 1: Blog
Step 2: ???
Step 3: Profit!!!

Blogging and just hoping to make money doesn’t work unless you get extremely lucky.

Mrs. Money
Mrs. Money
9 years ago

I think everyone jumps in all excited and then realizes that everything’s pretty much already been said. There have been a plethora of money blogs that have popped up since I started mine over three years ago. I think pretty much every money saving tip has already been discussed.

It does take a lot of time and little monetary reward, but I have earned many friendships through blogging.

Mike- Saving Money Today
Mike- Saving Money Today
9 years ago

I agree that blogging is not like sipping drinks on the beach. It does take hard work to succeed, but if you enjoy the process than it really doesn’t feel much like work.

“But instead of quitting, whenever I’ve faced a challenge, I’ve looked for a way to solve the problem.” –That’s a great point. It’s easy to give up when things don’t work out immediately, but if you do you’ll never succeed at anything.

David Hunter
David Hunter
9 years ago

Thanks for posting, J.D.! Like you said, to make money you have to treat this like a business. Most businesses fail, so it’s easy to say most blogs will fail. I’m a Realtor, and have been selling real estate for 3 years. I see people come and go. They say the turn over rate for the first year is 80%. The 20% of people who make it the first year, 90% of them don’t make it the second year. I just started my blog January 1, and it’s definitely time consuming. It’s all about hard work and a little luck!… Read more »

Elle
Elle
9 years ago

I do not blog, but I follow several blogs. I cannot begin to tell you how many blogs I’ve visited that are poorly written. If I read a post with lots of grammatical and spelling errors, I stop reading and never return. J.D.’s note: I agree with you. Not to be immodest, but I feel like I write well. And I’m *always* trying to become better at it. Still, I make mistakes. You’ve all seen my stupid typos (especially homonyms), and I hate them. I’ve tried to encourage some of my fellow bloggers, like Adam Baker, to take writing classes,… Read more »

dotCOMreport
dotCOMreport
9 years ago

Oh blogging is hard work and very time-demanding. But it is possible to make an income out of it. Thanks for this post on blogging; yes it seems a departure from what you usually write but really, it isnt. It’s still about money. Somehow.

Rick
Rick
9 years ago

I started my blog to post about my son Daniel’s time in Mongolia. So it was aimed at family and friends. Having a personal blog to begin with is great for learning about blogging. Daniel has returned from Mongolia but I still blog. I even started putting a few ads on it to see how that works. Interestingly, two of my most popular posts are about Mongolia but not about Daniel’s time there, just about Mongolia. Your post matches what I have learned with my limited experience. I have noticed that financial ads, when clicked on, generate the most money.… Read more »

Chett Daniel
Chett Daniel
9 years ago

Would you add networking with other bloggers who have built or are building an audience as an element to a successful blog?

J.D.’s note: Great question, Chett. Networking can and does play an important role, especially in certain niches. But all the networking in the world won’t help if you don’t have good content.
retirebyforty
retirebyforty
9 years ago

Thanks for sharing JD. I am finding out that blogging on the side is hard work. It’s taking up all my computer game time. I guess that’s for the best really. I just put up a post today – Blogging is more fun than napping! Come by for a laugh, it’ll only take 10 seconds. 🙂 http://retireby40.org/2011/01/blogging-fun-napping/ ps. You can delete the link if it’s not relevant. thx. J.D.’s note: About links in comments — I don’t delete them if they’re on-topic and/or they’re not chronic. Plus, I’m more lax if I know you’ve been reading GRS for a while.… Read more »

Kristen@TheFrugalGirl
9 years ago

Totally agree with you, J.D. For most people, it takes a lot of time to build up a decent readership. I blogged for over a year without making any money, and it was fine with me because that wasn’t my main goal. My blog makes a decent amount of money now (not a full-time income, though!), but I think the reason I’ve been able to earn money is that I didn’t start out with that as my purpose. Most people I see who start blogs for the main purpose of making money don’t do too well. You have to have… Read more »

Jeffrey Trull
Jeffrey Trull
9 years ago

Although I’m relatively new to blogging, I couldn’t agree more that blogging must be treated like a business if you intend to make money off of it. Like most businesses that you could start in the non-Internet world, it requires a ton of work. There’s a lot of (awful) information out there about generating passive income from the web, and I think many people assume blogging is a way to make a quick and easy buck.

Everyday Tips
Everyday Tips
9 years ago

I would love if you wrote more about blogging actually. You have done it for so much longer than so many others that just love to give blogging advice. It is great to get that reminder that a blog will not have instant success. My blog is a hobby, but I think it has become too big of a hobby. I enjoy it so darn much, but I also work part time and have a few kids. I love learning and when I learn something new, I want to take a day and implement it. But, life does not allow… Read more »

Janice
Janice
9 years ago

A business of one’s own, blogging or any other is extremely demanding. Most people are not cut to have their own business and face the longer, harder and less that accompanies most startups the first few years. Particularly these days when everything that’s deemed “successful” has to spring almost fully formed within the first year or it’s deemed a failure. Add that to the writing itself which is a particular talent and the other skills needed to do that on an internet platform, and no surprise. As someone (Fran Leibowitz?) said, there may be a book inside everyone, but it… Read more »

Aaron Weiss
Aaron Weiss
9 years ago

I’ve been running my movie review and film criticism website CinemaFunk (www.cinemafunk.com) since September 2009. I’ve made enough to pay for hosting, and thats it.

The truly rewarding part of my blog is that I’m getting better at writing reviews and properly constructed (and annotated) film criticism, and the relationships that I’ve accumulated with other bloggers and twitter followers. I doesn’t make me financially rich, but I’m enjoying and providing a far richer experience with others.

Suzanne
Suzanne
9 years ago

Big thank you for sharing mimi smartypants. Her blog made me chuckle several times and is now on my reader to humor me every time she writes!

Teresacs
Teresacs
9 years ago

J.D.: One of the advantages that you have: you are doing what you love. When you do what you love, you put your heart and soul into it. That makes a big difference in the effort you put in and raises the chances for a successful outcome. Many people who are blogging do it because they want to make money, not becuase they really love to write or have a passion about something. I just started a blog in October of 2010. It is a lot of work, but I love to write (I have been writing short stories since… Read more »

Nicole
Nicole
9 years ago

To add to my previous comment… just because I have a ginormous walk-in closet and don’t need to organize it doesn’t mean you should stop April from posting about closet organization. Or just because Tyler K makes a lot of money each month doesn’t mean you should stop Donna Freedman from writing about starting baby emergency funds. Just because some folks aren’t interested in blogging…

Andy Hough
Andy Hough
9 years ago

I’ve been blogging since 2005 but I still don’t earn enough from blogging to do it for a living. It did provide me with a nice side income last year though. I think this year I might make enough to earn a modest full-time living.

akajb
akajb
9 years ago

It’s interesting to read about people who’ve made money from blogs. I’ve blogged a few times. The first time, was a personal blog about my first year in University – and was mainly for my family to know what was going on. This year (Jan 1st), I started a blog on grad school. Not for money, but because I think I need another outlet for all of my thoughts on the subject. Also, I was trying to come up with a topic, and this was one I could quickly generate a lot of topic ideas for. Are people visiting? The… Read more »

Qwerty and Mr. Q.
Qwerty and Mr. Q.
9 years ago

We too just started a blog to try to find another source of income. We are in a super niche, it would appear, transcription which you might imagine would have an even more limited amount of topics than finance. We update our blog three times weekly which is different from other transcription “blogs” which are really just informational and have only static content. We try to include fun and/or comic posts on Fridays, like our latest on the weather rock. 🙂 And our first podcast with a transcription company owner/transcriber will be posting on Monday and we hope it will… Read more »

shash
shash
9 years ago

I really do think this article would have been enhanced if you would have included a pic of you sitting on the beach, sipping a piña colada and eating a mango. 🙂

Mike Everleth
Mike Everleth
9 years ago

Great article! Really gets to the heart of what it’s all about. I’ve been doing my alternative media blog for years and it’s hard, hard work with very involved hours. Yet, due to the semi-obscure subject matter I write about, it doesn’t make enough to be a full-time gig, although I can work on it full-time hours. At the same time, it’s well respected among the audience I’m writing for and very emotionally satisfying. So, it’s worth all the time I put into it. J.D.’s note: Great point, Mike. I think that in order for a blog to be successful,… Read more »

Jacq @ Single Mom Rich Mom
Jacq @ Single Mom Rich Mom
9 years ago

Re. comment on #12:

I totally agree with your recommendation that most bloggers should take writing classes and work harder to establish a “voice”. That’s one of my goals this year. Most blogs are completely interchangeable and could be written by anyone.

Blogs which are memorable – like mimismartypants, Penelope Trunk or hyperboleandahalf just stand out in a sea of mediocrity. It seems to take several years to get your voice down (unless you’re like me and experiment with many voices in a schizo way, doing none of them very well).

SJ
SJ
9 years ago

Hi JD… a lurker who eagerly waits new posts at GRS 🙂

I’ve wanted to start a blog for a long time as a means to improve my writing. Finding the right topic is the challenge….one that I can develop an expertise in and one that resonates with a community… privacy is also a concern.

I guess all bloggers must have an end goal when they start–to make money or just share and the focus of the blog will change based on this…

Thx. for this post.

Tyler Karaszewski
Tyler Karaszewski
9 years ago

“I am … trying to develop streams of passive income by building monetized niche websites.” This is exactly what I don’t like about the “blogging about blogging” phenomenon that J.D. says he’s trying to avoid doing too much. There are a lot of people like this that aren’t really particularly interested in sharing, or community, or discussion, but just want to turn readers into advertising dollars. It’s like an online version of the reality show — you just keep making more and more of them because you know they’ll make money, even if they’re not very good and nobody really… Read more »

Banded Girl
Banded Girl
9 years ago

Thank you! I’ve been blogging for a year and a half now and still don’t have many readers. People think that all you have to do is write and the masses will come, but it’s simply not true.

I’d like to build my site up and maybe start making a bit of money off of it, but it IS really time consuming. People have no idea!

Jenny
Jenny
9 years ago

This is a great article and I’ve been following for over a year now. I finally invested my time and money starting my own website and blog over winter break and I’ve only written one article. (I was so proud!) You’ve mentioned all the things I felt discouraged about. Starting a blog is a very demanding task and I lack the motivation to build up my audience, especially since I should really be focusing on school and studying. This article just inspired me to try to start out my blog again. I just have to budget my time with school… Read more »

MelodyO
MelodyO
9 years ago

Ah, this is a timely post for me, JD. I’ve been mulling over the idea of starting a blog, and it’s all because of YOU (see, you never know how you might affect other people’s lives). It all started with the post you wrote on The Third Stage of finance, which is where I’m presently teetering in my own life. The response was so strong, and people so eager to know more, it made me wonder if that was an opportunity to be seized. I even saved the-third-stage name on Blogspot (no posts yet, though). I don’t need the blog… Read more »

David
David
9 years ago

Great article! It takes consistent action over a long period of time. And your content needs to compel people to keep listening, and to share it with others.

Lonnie @ My Income Lab
Lonnie @ My Income Lab
9 years ago

@Tyler – if you read what I posted in my blog, “My Income Lab” was started so I can hold myself accountable and create a venue for myself and readers to talk about online marketing. “My Income Lab” is not monetized (not to say that in the future it won’t be, but for now, I am interested in creating content and building an audience). My goal is to create a humorous, relevant, and information rich blog focusing on passive/online income generation. I don’t mention my monetized site by name or domain, so it’s not like I am using one blog… Read more »

JB
JB
9 years ago

I used to blog big time. http://www.techtipsforparents.org. I had google ads. I had guest posts, interviews from big names in that realm. I linked to products that I got a percentage of if someone bought them… after 2 years… I earned $70. The big reward came when my boss offered a $500 a year raise as a result of my blog. I worked for a school and the school linked its news letter to my site. I had at LEAST 1200 eyes on my site weekly… One of my best friends focused 10 years of his life (days and nights,very… Read more »

Katy @ The Non-Consumer Advocate
Katy @ The Non-Consumer Advocate
9 years ago

I’ve been writing The Non-Consumer Advocate since May of 2008, and it’s only since November that I’m no longer posting daily. This is helping me to provide more interesting content. Oddly, my stats have stayed about the same. I know there are ways that I could make the blog more profitable, but I’m not trying to make a living from it. (I have a well paying and satisfying job as a high risk labor and delivery nurse) I think what makes my blog successful is that I really am obsessed with personal finance and frugality. I’ve also allowed myself to… Read more »

Katy @ The Non-Consumer Advocate
Katy @ The Non-Consumer Advocate
9 years ago

P.S. J.D., I’m always happy to see when Get Rich Slowly is actually written by you!

Katy

Carrie from Colorado Bargains
Carrie from Colorado Bargains
9 years ago

Great post, JD. I’m one of those lifeless deal bloggers that were at the conference you spoke at. 😉 I agree a lot of deal blogs are “lifeless”, and many don’t have a personal connection to their readers. However, one thing I’d like to add: how much of yourself you pour into your blog depends on whether you want to be a business owner, or self-employed. I’ve been blogging about deals in Colorado Springs for over two years, and expanded to Denver in December. At the current rate of anywhere from 5 to 10 posts per day on each site,… Read more »

AMANDA
AMANDA
9 years ago

I appreciate that I can count on an article a day at GRS. It’s my habit to come to the site daily. Other bloggers would benefit by doing this. That way it becomes a habit of your readers. I quit going to blogs that can’t entertain me daily.

John Bardos - JetSetCitizen
John Bardos - JetSetCitizen
9 years ago

Finally, a honest look at blogging.

Blogging really is a huge amount of work and the people who are making it big seem to be the ones selling books on how easy it is to get rich blogging.

There are huge rewards from blogging, like connecting with like minded people, clarifying your thoughts, organic search engine traffic etc. but it is definitely not a way to get rich quick.

Kris @ Cheap Healthy Good
Kris @ Cheap Healthy Good
9 years ago

A good way to test whether you should keep blogging or not: Post for a year without monetizing your site. Write consistently, feel out the interest in your topic, get to know similar blogs and bloggers, and enter the occasional festival. If you stick with it and gain a small audience, keep going. If you tail off, focus your energies elsewhere. Why: You don’t make much in the first year anyway, so any potential income is offset by valuable experience, plus the happy and hard-earned knowledge that you can/can’t legitimately make a go at blogging. (Um, this is totally moot… Read more »

Andy
Andy
9 years ago

JD,
Thanks for the great article! I really enjoyed the section where you talked about how your blog needs to tell your story. If you need help on this I would strongly recommend the book, A Million Miles in a Thousand Years, by Donald Miller. If you want to have a good story you need to make sure you have interesting characters, interesting scenes, and a conflict you can eventually overcome. When JD writes, this blog has it all.
Thanks,
Andy

Finanzas Personales
Finanzas Personales
9 years ago

Thank you for sharing all this information, J. D. I recently started a personal finance blog in spanish and have been devoting long hours to it. I think the key is knowing what you’re in for. If money is what drives you, you might find several obstacles to achieving your goals and see a slow results. I’m in because it makes me feel good. I love writting and I’m convinced that sharing knowledge can make a difference. Personal finance is quite an unexplored topic in spanish literature and driving people to it is a permanent challenge. But since I’m not… Read more »

Jaime
Jaime
9 years ago

Great article. Most blogs aren’t great because most people don’t put the effort they need. I don’t think you need to divulge everything about your personal life but I think readers want to see bloggers share once in a while.

Oh and I also like it when a blogger posts a photo of themselves, that means there’s a real person writing, not some advertising company, not some anonymous person that’s going to up and disappear. A lot of anonymous blogs disappear too quickly.

Roo
Roo
9 years ago

I love it when you write about blogging, because it reminds me to get off my butt and add some content to my own blog! I don’t plan to make any money from mine and I keep it ad-free (this may change in the future if I feel I can make some pocket money). For me, blogging is a way to keep up my writing skills. I am at university, but I’m studying a very hands on subject and rarely do any writing. Hacking out a post once every few weeks keeps my writing skills in check so when I… Read more »

leaf
leaf
9 years ago

Inspired by your blog, I first started one on happiness (the happiness bank), to post about things that made me happy, as well as musings on the science and philosophy of happiness. But I decided that I would be even happier writing about food – so abandoned that to work on a food blog (the indolent cook) instead. Food blogging really is an over-saturated market, but it doesn’t matter because I enjoy it. I did have illusions about making money through blogging, but I have since realized how difficult this would be, and now I just see it as a… Read more »

Mick
Mick
9 years ago

I think the hardest kind of blog would be one like this. I’m assuming most people come to sites like this to be educated about finances.

A lot of schools never really touch personal finance. So if you aren’t that great of a writer it would be more difficult to cover this subject because you also have to educate the readers as well as entertain.

Personally for me I couldn’t sit still for more than an hour let alone write a blog. So thank you to all who do it 🙂

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