Can we really change our financial habits if our backs aren’t against the wall?

I recently had a discussion with a friend who made an argument why it's better to eat out in Manhattan than to save money by cooking because of the convenience and the joy of eating with friends. I'm all for breaking bread with good people, just not so much if you're concerned about income. My friend just went through a divorce and eventually needs to find a job since she gave up her career in the arts to raise her son for a decade.

The reality is my friend does have income in the form of alimony. And I'm sure the alimony is a healthy amount because her now ex-husband is a wealthy businessman worth millions. I've been to their fabulous, 2,000-plus-square-foot apartment downtown. But alimony doesn't usually last forever and when she was challenged by her brother to reduce her spending by eliminating eating out for one month, she failed after one week.

Let's assume, for the sake of argument, that you are in her shoes and your alimony will last five years. Would you really drastically cut back on your lifestyle and master personal finance? Probably not. The more likely scenario for people is to keep on living like they always have until the last year of alimony and then realize, “Oh, man, I'd better change my ways!” It's the same idea as waiting until the last minute to study for a final exam.

Maybe the alimony is indefinite since, in many instances, spousal support can be ordered for as long as necessary to help the recipient spouse receive training and become self-supporting. Who knows?

Starting a project

I was thinking about starting Financial Samurai in 2003 but did nothing to pursue it for six years until the financial crisis finally pushed my lazy self to launch in 2009. If there hadn't been a financial crisis, I'd probably still be working my Wall Street job now. It wouldn't be the end of the world, but after 14 consecutive years of doing the exact same job, I started to get bored with life. I was already beginning to tire after Year 10. I'd probably tell myself “just one more year of work,” which would ultimately turn out to be 10 more years. Golden handcuffs are hard to slip.

I've always encouraged readers to really focus on their X Factor. The X Factor is a project one is passionate about that may not seem like much in the beginning but that, with time and enough consistent effort, could turn out to be substantial in the future. You never know what will hit, so it's also important to keep on trying new things. If you're in any game long enough, good things happen.

Financial Samurai led me to escape Corporate America after 13 years in 2012 because it helped me create a financial plan that I methodically executed over the next three years. Financial Samurai also gave me something to do, one of the biggest questions people have when they no longer want to work a day job. If you can find a purpose after retirement, it makes retiring that much easier.

Getting out of debt

I speak to folks in debt all the time through my financial consultancy practice. Some have credit card debt amounts equivalent to their salaries! How on Earth does this happen? The most credit I can get on my main personal credit card is $30,000 compared with my average monthly credit card spend of $1,500.

Not paying off in full and letting your debt compound at 15 percent plus the annual rate is a scary thing to do. Not even Warren Buffett has averaged those returns in his glorious career, which should jolt you into never accepting revolving credit card debt again.

What usually made these debtors start handling money responsibly was that their credit card companies finally cut them off. Except for the credit card companies saying, “Denied!” they would have continued to make minimum monthly payments, eventually costing more than their monthly take-home salary. It takes that kind of action to force such debtors to stop.

Another client finally woke up to his credit addiction when he realized that he couldn't pay the minimums of his seven credit cards with his current monthly income.

It makes absolute sense why people get into debt. It's fun to buy and experience things you can't afford. After all, if you take out a $1 billion loan to live it up and die from too much fun, you win! It's also equally satisfying to successfully pay off the debt and tell all your friends about your achievement. Here are some tips on how to get out of debt and become happier in the process.

Saving money

If I wasn't whipped so hard every single day for two years working at Goldman Sachs in Manhattan, I never would have gotten the urge to save at least 50 percent of my after-tax income on Day One. New York City is a wonderland if you have money to burn, thanks to all the incredible shows, restaurants, and bars. Instead of blowing my salary at Peter Luger's Steakhouse followed by $13 cocktails at the Soho Grand, followed by another $200 for bottle service at the clubs, I just hung out with family and friends at low-key establishments. Petting strangers' dogs at Union Square Park was always a favorite pastime.

I knew I couldn't last going into work at 5:30 a.m. and leaving after 8 p.m. for longer than five years, so I saved like a maniac just in case I ended up unemployed for years after. My career lasted eight years longer than expected since I moved to San Francisco where life is more balanced. But even working in finance in San Francisco requires getting up before 5 a.m., so I didn't stop saving.

If I landed a cushy 9-to-5 job where the bosses were nice and stress was at a minimum, there's no way I would have saved even 25 percent of my income because there would be absolutely no sense of urgency to get out. When you're young, you tend to think you could happily work forever. If you are in your first years of your job, come back to me after you've worked for 10 consecutive years and let me know if you still love it or not. If you don't save money during this time, you will have an “uh-oh” moment.

Please try and save as much as you can before your energy for work fades.

Making more money

Life is relatively easy if you are born and raised in America, or any modern country for that matter. We've got infrastructure, a sound legal system, peace, subsidized health care, subsidized living, subsidized income, and plenty of free public facilities such as libraries and parks. If you are complaining about living in America, clearly you've never spent more than a month in a developing nation where they cherish the things we take for granted.

Two things motivated me to make money. The first was seeing my mother work into her 60s at a job she hated. She wasn't happy working past midnight on a frequent basis. She mentioned how some of her managers were mean to her, and that really pissed me off. All I wanted to do was make enough money as quickly as possible so she didn't have to work any longer.

The second motivation came from living in countries such as Zambia, Malaysia, and Taiwan in the '70s and '80s. I saw tremendous wealth and tremendous poverty mixed together. The impoverished frightened and saddened me while the wealthy emboldened me to pursue what I might become. There was no way I wasn't going to study and work my absolute hardest if I was given a chance.

CONCLUSION

The reason you may hear so many recent immigrant success stories is because they have a basis for comparison that makes them unwilling to return to their former existence. I don't think we can fault a person who was born and raised in America who only speaks one language and has never left the country for complaining about how life isn't fair. Our lives are all we know.

If you grew up with parents on welfare, wouldn't it be understandable to expect that's the way life is as an adult? Only until I came to America for high school did I realize everybody doesn't travel around every two to four years attending international schools. It was hard for me to adjust in the beginning because my classmates grew up with the same friends since elementary school.

You can't blame people for making sub-optimal financial choices in general because everything is rational. We do things that make us happy and stop doing things that inflict pain. There is a self-correcting mechanism in personal finance, therefore, we shouldn't worry about other people. Pushing our way onto others is a sure path to ruining a relationship.

Readers, can we really improve our financial habits if our backs aren't against the wall? What are some life events that caused you to improve any poor habits? Does everything self-correct in the end?

Sam

More about...Psychology

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Brian @ Luke1428
Brian @ Luke1428
6 years ago

I believe having our backs against the wall (feeling pressure) creates the motivation to change. That pressure could come in many forms…financial hardship, loss of work, disappointing a loved one, etc. For me, I spent more money than I made but didn’t see my need to change until I realized how it was frustrating my wife. The desire to better our relationship is what drove me to admit my faults and change my behavior.

AC
AC
6 years ago

I am happy to see that you wanted to change that for your relationship. My ex was husband at the time loved to spend spend spend. The problem was it was all with a Credit Card. I tried so many times to tell him to stop. I had to refinance my house and get some help from the family to pay off the CC so I could do that. I would of lost the house and everything if it was not for my parents. After that was all done he went back to his old ways. I could not take… Read more »

Financial Samurai
Financial Samurai
6 years ago

Nice job Brian. Your story is a nice example of where everything is rational in personal finance. You love your wife and don’t want to see her frustrated, so you stop what you do that frustrates her and together you are better because of it!

Gal
Gal
6 years ago

That is remarkable to change just for her as normally those habits are so deep in us, so indeed only a crisis can do the change. I am, a natural saver, using the shopping list is a significant part of saving. I am using a list on my phone which is always with me and also automatically sync with the rest of my family. I use https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.gal.appshoppinglist

Dave @ The New York Budget
Dave @ The New York Budget
6 years ago

It does seem as though there is often a big event that makes us change paths in life (whether financially or otherwise). I have always been a frugal person, but all it took for me to switch from normal frugal, saving 10% or so to saving 50%+ of my income was learning that it is possible. I never even thought about doing that until I started reading personal finance blogs. So information can at least help, but if they aren’t receptive to the info, then it still takes that big event.

Anne
Anne
6 years ago

Same here. Was always somewhat frugal, never had a serious financial crisis.

I think what I did have was a really good imagination and possibly a slightly dark view of life. I always knew that bad things could happen and wanted to be prepared.

Beth
Beth
6 years ago

I don’t think people need a crisis, but I do think they need a catalyst. For some, it’s combining finances with a loved one or starting a family. For others, it might be seeing someone else make a horrible mistake. Unfortunately, some people do have to hit rock bottom before they will change. I suspect if the financial crisis hadn’t hit, many people wouldn’t be nearly so interested in personal finance as they are now. Last year, we had three deaths in the family and that has me re-thinking some of the habits I’ve formed. My back isn’t against the… Read more »

Financial Samurai
Financial Samurai
6 years ago
Reply to  Beth

Glad to be here Beth! I’m not sure if I can write twice a month as originally planned due to my new part-time consultant role, but once a month should be no prob!

Sorry to hear about the deaths in your family.

Kate
Kate
6 years ago

For me, it’s less “one big event” than it is an absolutely miserable day-to-day drain at my current job. I’ve always squirelled away about 25% of my income in order to give myself better choices, but being young, that’s not enough to live on quite yet. So every day that I’m in the office at 6 am, still at my desk at midnight, crawling back home to sneak under the covers and start again, with a boss who screams at me in from my staff every. single. day. I am that much closer to the day that I can finally… Read more »

Samantha
Samantha
6 years ago
Reply to  Kate

Can I ask why you stay? You sound, as you said, absolutely miserable. Not trying to be nosey, just wondering.

Ross Williams
Ross Williams
6 years ago

Actually, the real question is can people appropriately change their financial habits while their back is to the wall. Most people faced with daily immediate crisis have very little ability to develop a coherent plan for the future. There is plenty of evidence that poor financial habits don’t cause people to be poor, being poor causes poor financial habits. Most people get out of financial debt by increasing their income and making investments that reduce their long term costs. Its affording a car that doesn’t require constant emergency repairs. Its owning a home that stabilizes housing costs with a fixed… Read more »

Ramblin' Ma'am
Ramblin' Ma'am
6 years ago
Reply to  Ross Williams

The NY Times had an article about this recently, how financial stress can prevent you from making optimal decisions. That came to mind while reading this.

“There is plenty of evidence that poor financial habits don’t cause people to be poor, being poor causes poor financial habits.”

But what about people who SHOULD make plenty of money to live on, yet are always broke because of poor financial planning? I know plenty of those.

Ramblin' Ma'am
Ramblin' Ma'am
6 years ago
Reply to  Ramblin' Ma'am

Maybe I should distinguish between people who are poor, and people who are simply broke? Or is that a false distinction?

Beth
Beth
6 years ago
Reply to  Ramblin' Ma'am

I definitely think there’s a difference. To me, “poor” means having little or no financial resources. “Broke” means you think you have no resources because you aren’t using them well. For instance, you don’t have cash for an emergency car repair because you have two cars, a big house, a cottage, and you’re still paying off that vacation. That perceived lack of resources has little to do with socioeconomic status and more to do with financial habits.

Financial Samurai
Financial Samurai
6 years ago
Reply to  Ramblin' Ma'am

This is a good point. I wrote an article if you click my name entitled, “Maybe It’s Your Fault Why Wealth Inequality Continues To Widen.” I think you’ll find it interesting b/c of all the commentary from folks who went against my 1/10th rule of car buying.

Stefanie @ The Broke and Beautiful Life
Stefanie @ The Broke and Beautiful Life
6 years ago

The unpredictability of my acting career and the terrible experiences I had waiting tables, babysitting, working as a tradeshow hostess, and my various other side gigs, were the ultimate motivation for creating something better for myself. I would have never thought it would be in the form of my own website and writing business, and admittedly there was quite a bit of trial and error. But I’m almost thankful for the adversity I’ve faced in my life, because it helped me discover my power and value as a businesswoman and as a person.

Sam
Sam
6 years ago

We changed our financial ways upon marriage (and because I wanted a new car). No seriously, I was shopping for a new car but didn’t want a car payment. I cam across Dave Ramsey’s name b/c he has some guidance on how to buy a car without a car payment and checked his book out of the library. We had just paid for a wedding, Mr. Sam had quite a bit of debt from his MBA, we had a little debt from the wedding (when all debt was added up it was $55,500). I decided we needed to kill all… Read more »

Financial Samurai
Financial Samurai
6 years ago
Reply to  Sam

I’d like a new car without having to pay for it either 🙂

Totally rational!

Becky @ RunFunDone
Becky @ RunFunDone
6 years ago

Hmm. I’ve never felt that my back was against the wall, and yet I still feel that I put great efforts into making good financial decisions. That being said, for most of my adult-life I haven’t had a lot of money, so now that I make a good salary, it’s not too hard for me to save and continue to be frugal.

Financial Samurai
Financial Samurai
6 years ago

Perhaps one of the worst things is to be born rich, have a huge windfall, or graduate with a big money making job. Harder to appreciate wealth this way!

Vanessa
Vanessa
6 years ago

I see the words, but I’m not comprehending them.

Jason
Jason
6 years ago

The eating out vs. buying groceries depends greatly on your current income and living situation. I spent 8 years as a college student and the money that I would budget on groceries would ultimately go to waste because I was not home often enough to cook. In addition, being on a limited budget I often had to eat the same thing over and over and not get a varied diet. I found instead of buying groceries, using that money to eat out, afforded me the peace of mind to eat out knowing that I did not have food at home… Read more »

lmoot
lmoot
6 years ago

The thing that pushed me was actually both a push and a pull. It was combination of wanting to escape from something and wanting something better. I’d like to think though that even if I enjoyed where I was at, I’d still want something better and that would be enough to motivate me.

Everyday I visualize what it is I’m working towards and that is my biggest motivation. Love this post! I can relate, minus the cushy Wall Street gig.

freebird
freebird
6 years ago

I guess I have the best of both worlds. My first job out of school I didn’t like due to a poor fit, so I wanted out as fast as possible. Over time my job changed and so did I, and the fit became better, but my max savings way of life had pretty much settled-in. Now after 25 years I’ve long since crossed into financial independence so my paychecks don’t matter, but I still have the habit of spending little more than I did during my first year of work. So I guess my case doesn’t answer your question–… Read more »

Financial Samurai
Financial Samurai
6 years ago
Reply to  freebird

Same premise indeed.

I’d also like to challenge the fact that it’s easier to save when you make a lot of money. Temptation is much greater as we’ve read the stories of millionaire bankruptcies!

Carla
Carla
6 years ago

“Readers, can we really improve our financial habits if our backs aren’t against the wall? What are some life events that caused you to improve any poor habits? Does everything self-correct in the end?” I honestly don’t know. For years my back was constantly against the wall for one reason or another: divorce (and it cost ME a lot of money), job loss, health issues, etc. Those events caused me to improve my habits. Smooth sailing hasn’t occurred yet but I can imagine that I would probably relax a little if it did after years of white knuckling it. “Self… Read more »

Financial Samurai
Financial Samurai
6 years ago
Reply to  Carla

Self correct, as in everybody figuring out how to make improvements naturally without anybody’s help or guidance.

Carla
Carla
6 years ago

Got it! I think that’s been part of my problem: trying to do everything myself, alone without any help.

El Nerdo
El Nerdo
6 years ago

It’s very hard or nearly impossible to self-correct successfully when misinformed though! It’s like navigating with a wrong map– you know where you want to get, but the map keeps sending you to the wrong place (e.g., Suze Orman’s advice to the young and fabulous to use credit card debt to supercharge their great careers). This is where books and blogs and other people’s feedback can make a huge difference, and being able to see the whole picture of your financial journey becomes important (because it’s not about the money, in the end).

waverly
waverly
6 years ago

Great post. I agree with nearly all of it except for the part where you say we have peace in the US. I’m 37 years old and already have experienced 3 wars. Iraq 1, Iraq 2 and Afghanistan.

We also have a major problem with non-war gun violence in the US. It isn’t very peaceful in many urban neighborhoods here.

Redstar
Redstar
6 years ago

For 12 years I lived in affordable housing. I loved the cheap rent but when we got married, the catalyst was to own a home, bigger space, and move my business out of my 555 square foot apt. Had to educate myself about $$, and was panicked we weren’t combining our finances to save/invest more because our rent was sooo cheap so we splurged more than the usual. (And sometimes carried debt, too!) I am almost 40, and the catalyst is being able to retire early and pay off our home early since my parents didn’t get to experience either,… Read more »

PawPrint
PawPrint
6 years ago

My 35-year old son just moved in with us until he finds a room. He has experienced financial fortune and financial misfortune. Sadly, the misfortune has never caused him to self-correct. He’s had to live in his car. He’s had a car repossessed. Although he was trying to improve his credit score, he bought a used car with a $597 car payment and then found himself with no job and no savings. Who does that? He dreams big, but his dreams only came to fruition once, and he didn’t save any money. He was able to find a job fairly… Read more »

Financial Samurai
Financial Samurai
6 years ago
Reply to  PawPrint

Sorry to hear this. Thankfully he has you to turn to though.

Any idea whether it’s one particular thing that keeps on keeping him down?

El Nerdo
El Nerdo
6 years ago

Wow, great, article! Loved reading it. Covers a lot of ground– a two-parter really (and I agree with both). I’d like to think that humans are better than to change our ways before a crisis forces us, but experience proves otherwise. I not only had my back against the wall, I had a boot on my throat and a gun pointing at my head. So I really had no choice. Stuff like global warming is what worries me though– will we have the chance to be rational once whole cities start to sink underwater? I guess Venice is proof… fingers… Read more »

Shannon @ Financially Blonde
Shannon @ Financially Blonde
6 years ago

I think we can all change our financial habits, but it takes A LOT of hard work, commitment and patience. I actually advise clients all the time to live like they are in crisis mode when they aren’t. It’s the best way to test what you are capable of and save money while doing it.

Steven @FinanceandFit
Steven @FinanceandFit
6 years ago

The “X” Factor can be everything. Another factor is what you are working towards, that dream and sacrifice on your way to what? If it’s a new house, financial independence and never working again, spending more time with your family, these are what keeps me going in the right direction.

Elizabeth
Elizabeth
6 years ago

My grandmother was a family counselor, and she My grandmother was a family counselor, and she used to say “Without pain, there is no change.” It could be pain because of a poor situation, or pain because you hold yourself accountable to a particular goal. I don’t believe that people self-correct. If my decision-making got me into a particular situation, I need someone else (mentor, counselor, blogger, etc.) to teach me to make different decisions. I don’t believe that people accept that sort of education without hurting enough first.used to say “Without pain, there is no change.” It could be… Read more »

Teinegurl
Teinegurl
6 years ago

Hi! Financial Samurai! Nice to see an article from you. I like the article as a whole and agree with you except for “If you grew up with parents on welfare, wouldn’t it be understandable to expect that’s the way life is as an adult?” I think the same things applies in that you see the struggles your parents go through on welfare and strive to be better than that. It doesnt motivate you to stay on welfare. It’s a fun life at all. Also hvaing been through a divorce myself as a friend you should seriously talk to your… Read more »

Financial Samurai
Financial Samurai
6 years ago
Reply to  Teinegurl

Thanks for sharing. I definitely plan to talk to her as much as possible about her finances since she’s been out of work for 10 years taking care of her son, and is finding it very difficult to start her own creative design business. She’s been living a financially good life and I am going to drill it into her that eventually the alimony will run out. Not to worry!

That Career Girl
That Career Girl
6 years ago

I suppose that’s why people increase their savings when the economy is bad. I spent like no tomorrow up until when the economy showed signs of slowing down. I wonder how many people my age would not have learned to be financially savvy had it not been the prospect of not being able to find a job in the back of our minds. Pressure makes diamonds, tough times make tough people, and all that.

Laraba
Laraba
6 years ago

Some people are, I think, just born to be cautious, frugal savers. I was. My grandmother told the story of how when I was a pretty young child, I showed remarkable self control with small gifts set aside for the week before Christmas…I was given a special tree with 5 gifts, as were my brothers. They all opened theirs the first day, but I carefully rationed them and opened one every day. No credit on ME — I just was born that way. As someone else said, a pessimist nature might be partially responsible. I’ve always thought something bad could… Read more »

Cynthia
Cynthia
6 years ago

Wow. I would feel terrible if I were your friend. Maybe I am reading too much into your article, but it came across to me as very judgmental. If her ex is worth millions then presumably there will be some sort of division of assets. She shouldn’t have to be a pauper and struggle to make ends meet.

Financial Samurai
Financial Samurai
6 years ago
Reply to  Cynthia

She doesn’t, so don’t worry. He may be worth millions, but she isn’t, b/c she wanted out. Asset wise, she is OK, but income wise is no go. Even if you have $1 million in the bank, that’s only $30,000 – $45,000 a year, which is not enough living in Manhattan. Her spending is QUADRUPLE that based on the life she’s accustomed to.

It’s important to help people face reality, especially if you care deeply for that person.

Kasia
Kasia
6 years ago

Financial pressure can lead to better financial choices but it can also lead to paralysis. If you’re constantly stressing about not having enough money for this or that it can prevent you from finding suitable solutions. I have to wonder whether people are born to be savers or spenders? Is it in our nature to save our money? Maybe once upon a time that was the case, but nowadays with so many options to spend it’s becoming harder for society to pay themselves first and even difficult times don’t lead to changed habits. As a kid I was a saver.… Read more »

Jason
Jason
6 years ago

I recently got out of a bad relationship that had me spending more money than I was taking in each month for 3 years. And it completely decimated my savings. I didn’t know what to do and she didn’t want to talk about changing habits. I felt stressed and lost. And then she left, and it was the best thing to happen because it let me take back responsibility and ownership of my life. I put together a budget, stopped eating out, stopped spending on non-essentials, and started saving again. And after 2.5 months a dire situation is looking up.… Read more »

Slink
Slink
6 years ago

What I find interesting is how different people are about finances. I know people who were born into typical middle class families and they tend to struggle from time to time but remain middle class. Then there are others I know who have been in the “system” since birth and they have absolutely no desire to change that. The attitudes about money are so completely different.

Debbie
Debbie
6 years ago

Interesting idea. I really think it depends on someone’s personality. I went through a divorce nine years ago and received alimony for eight. I recognized I could either make some small changes right away or I would have to make some drastic changes in eight years when the alimony ran out. Paid off my house last year and am now living comfortably on less than $35,000 a year. I would rather feel safe and secure financially than have a lot of “stuff”,sp it was easy for me to figure out how to accomplish my goals. I don’t think though, that… Read more »

El Guapo
El Guapo
6 years ago

Sam, Good to see an article from you on this site. You are one of the few contributors on GRS that I care to ready anymore. Your story sounds similar to mine in that my parents are in their late 50s with no retirement in sight. In fact, the only way I see them retiring is when they inherit real estate when my grandma passes. Seeing them has made me obsess about retirement planning. I have spreadsheets and projections and I constantly update them and run “what if” scenarios. I have had to force my “back up against the wall”… Read more »

Financial Samurai
Financial Samurai
6 years ago
Reply to  El Guapo

That’s very nice of you to say El Guapo. Thank you.

So long as you’re mindful of your current financial situation, and working towards something, I think that’s more than half the battle.

What about sitting down with your siblings and coming up with a game plan to ensure your parents will be OK? Perhaps the next holiday family gathering or something where you ask each one to bring something to the table.

Richie @ Practical Cents
Richie @ Practical Cents
6 years ago

Great post Sam. I think in most cases it does take a crisis to improve one’s financial habits. I remember losing my job a few years ago as the catalyst to improving my money management.

However, I credit my parents’ daily work struggles for providing the inspiration to continually work hard and never take anything for granted.

EEC
EEC
6 years ago

Great read. I needed this today.

Jennifer Roberts
Jennifer Roberts
6 years ago

I paid off all my credit card debt and a used car within one year before I got married. The cards had been for buying books and other college needs. My dad encouraged me to sign up, and he would make the payments. Well, he missed quite a few. Every one of my cards had a 28% interest rate. I found out when I was turned down for a loan for that first car because of my bad credit. I did not want to bring that baggage into my marriage. I educated myself and took control. That experience changed me.… Read more »

Sonja
Sonja
6 years ago

This article is poorly written. It meanders and only loosely ties to the headline and subheads. Very disappointing as the topic had promise.

I believe you can make changes even if “your back is not against a wall.” It just takes desire and determination. For instance, we’ve made many positive changes due to recent small windfalls we’ve received. Those allowed us to tackle some long-standing goals and the positive feelings generated motivate us to continue the positive behaviors.

Financial Samurai
Financial Samurai
6 years ago
Reply to  Sonja

You’re right. I do meander in this article. Thanks for the feedback. Any specific tips for improvement? I’m always looking to get better. Sometimes my mind and my writing are disconnected because I think in different languages.

Sonja
Sonja
6 years ago

I am pretty sure the fact that you think in multiple languages puts you in a higher intellect bracket than me!

You were gracious to contact me outside GRS. I wish you the best in all your endeavors.

Grayson @ Debt Roundup
Grayson @ Debt Roundup
6 years ago

Great article Sam. I think that you need the added push in order to make the change. Most people don’t just change because they want to, they change because they have to. Status quo is not a motivator.

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