Capitalist Kids: Encouraging Young Entrepreneurs

Saturday, I posted what I thought was an amusing anecdote. I told how I'd bought some treats from a young girl's bake sale, but she'd been woefully unprepared to take my money and give me change. I meant the story to be comic relief, but quite a few GRS readers found it unamusing — and, in fact, thought I came off as something of a jerk. Oops.

In retrospect, many people raised valid concerns (though some folks were making mountains out of molehills). I was something of a jerk. To make amends, today I want to provide a frame of reference so you can see where I'm coming from (not that this excuses my behavior), and I want to provide some tips for parents with entrepreneurial kids.

I was a grade-school entrepreneur
As I've mentioned many times, I always do what I can to support young entrepreneurs — that's why I bought the goodies from the girls last week in the first place. I believe strongly that kids should be encouraged to make and sell things, and even start their own kid-sized businesses. I probably feel this way because I was a grade-school entrepreneur.

To start at the beginning, my father was a serial entrepreneur; he was always starting businesses. Most failed. Some succeeded in a wild fashion. (The inheritance he left the family was in the form of his most successful business, the custom box company that for 15 years now has supported his wife, three sons, and a nephew.)

No surprise then that as a child, I wanted to make money too.

I made my first business venture when I was in the second grade. I sold lemonade by the side of the road. It was miserable failure. I was trying to sell lemonade in March, on an infrequently-traveled stretch of country road, in rural Oregon. I didn't sell any lemonade.

But in fourth grade, I started a little business that actually made money. Star Wars was huge in 1978, and like all the other boys, I collected Star Wars cards. Whatever change I could scrounge went to these cards. (We used to walk the sides of the roads collecting pop bottles. We'd cash in the deposits and immediately buy more Star Wars cards.) Collecting was frustrating. Sometimes I would have six of one card, and none of another. This bugged me until I realized that I could turn the surplus to my advantage.

  

 

I took all of my doubles (and triples and quadruples, etc.) and sorted them into random piles of about twenty cards each. I wrapped each stack in a piece of typing paper and wrote 10¢ on the package in black felt pen. I made as many packages as I could, took them to school, and sold them to the other boys. I took that money to the local variety store and converted it into new cards. It was brilliant!

I did the same thing with Hardy Boys books. I loved the Hardy Boys — my aunts and uncles knew this, so I often got books as gifts. After I finished them, I'd take them to school and sell them for fifty cents. (They cost two dollars new.)

I was learning practical business lessons, and I was only ten years old.

Throughout my childhood, my father encouraged my entrepreneurial and sales activities. He urged me to go from door to door selling greeting cards and seeds, for example. (These ventures failed for the same reason the lemonade stand failed — not a big enough customer base.) When I was a bit older, a friend and I drew and photocopied our own comic books through the junior-high store. We didn't sell many of these, but we had fun trying.

In high school, I was active in our Future Business Leaders of America chapter. I learned about economics, accounting, and business math. But I also sold a lot of candy for fund-raisers. (We were always having to raise money for conventions, and so on.)

Kid-sized entrepreneurship and salesmanship were a big part of my childhood. I didn't like it much at the time, but looking back I can see that it played a crucial role in making me the man I am today. Because of this, I do what I can to support kids who sell stuff.

  • When I see a lemonade stand, I stop to buy lemonade.
  • When I see a girl scout, I buy girl scout cookies.
  • When my young friends sell magazines and books to raise money for school, I buy magazines and books.
  • Every year, Kris and I look forward to visiting the girls at the Eastmoreland Garage Sale, who have sold newsletters, “stock tips”, jokes, and more.

And, of course, last weekend I bought some treats from two girls with a bake sale. When I did this, I had only warm, positive feelings for these kids, even during their confusion regarding the change. I shared their story at GRS not to be malicious, but because I thought the situation was funny, and because I could identify with the girls.

Note: I have a cut-off line for the kids I support. I used to support college students, but I got burned a couple of times by co-eds selling shady stuff, so I no longer support college kids. This might seem unfair, but it makes things easier to only support those in high school or below.

 

 

What color is your piggy bank?
Kris and I don't have kids, but if we did, you can bet I'd encourage their entrepreneurial ventures, just as my father encouraged mine. But there's more to helping your kid explore the world of business than just letting her loose with cookies and lemonade. Here are some ideas for helping your youngster make her first foray into the world of business.

    • Encourage your kid to pursue their passions. Sure, your daughter could sell magazines door to door. But what if she's interested in something else? Like horses or soccer? Help your kids find a way to make money through their hobbies. Urge them to be creative. How can a 12-year-old girl make money through her interest in horses? I don't know — but I'll bet she can come up with a couple of ideas.

 

    • Supervise the set-up. Though you'll ultimately allow your child to run the business on his own, it's a good idea to make sure he sets smart parameters. Be certain that his choices are safe and legal, and double-check that he has everything he needs. If needed, spot your kid some start-up capital, but make it very clear that this is a loan, and that you'll need this money back when the business venture is over.

 

    • Answer questions. Again, let your child operate independently. But when she has questions, be there to help her. If you don't know the answers, help her do the appropriate research. Who knows? You might learn something along the way.

 

    • Let your child sink or swim on his own. I know some parents are afraid to let their kids fail. That's sweet, but learning to deal with failure is an important part of learning to deal with life. It's also a vital business skill. Most successful businessmen and women have been unsuccessful in the past — often for long stretches at a time. It can be tough to watch your kids sweat as he tries to sell candy door-to-door, but it'll be better for him in the long run if you simply watch from the sidelines.

 

    • Let your child make his own decisions about what to do with her income. If you already have a system for dividing your child's allowance, absolutely suggest that she use that system for her business income. But don't insist. Let her make her own decisions — and then follow up later to gently point out the consequences, for good or ill. (Note: I admit this tip is purely hypothetical; if you think I'm wrong, say so.)

 

  • If possible, introduce your child to somebody doing the same thing in real life. When I was a young comic-book artist, I would have loved nothing more than to meet an actual comics professional. Sometimes the grown-up version of a job is less glamorous than what your kid imagines, but that's okay. It's good to learn what people do all day.

And, of course, make sure your child knows how to give proper change.

If you have a kid who shows an entrepreneurial bent, track down a copy of What Color is Your Piggy Bank? by Adelia Cellini Linecker. This slim volume is a great choice for kids from 10-14 who are beginning to show an interest in entrepreneurship. Linecker explores the types of jobs a kid can do gives advice for setting up shop, and explains how to manage money. It's a fun and informative little book. (I hear that The Totally Awesome Business Book for Kids is good, too — and it was written by a 13-year-old!)

I spent yesterday afternoon chatting with my lawyer. Before I parted ways, I asked him if he had any advice for grade-school entrepreneurs. “Yeah,” he said. “Make sure your parents don't take all of your money.” Ha!

Mea culpa
I apologize if my post on Saturday seemed rude or insensitive. That wasn't my intention. Yes, I was laughing at the girl who couldn't make change for me, but I didn't intend to be mean-spirited. I love that she was out there selling donuts and cookies and lemonade, even if her small business was doomed to lose money. But I couldn't help but be amused by her timidity. Why? Because I've been there many times before.

You know what? I hope that twenty years from now, unbeknownst to anyone, I'll buy a new sofa or television or automobile in a store owned by this girl. I really do.

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uncertain algorithm
uncertain algorithm
9 years ago

I love your Hardy Boys strategy; I use that with new DVDs I always get from my family (even though I don’t own a TV).

We should encourage young kids to be entrepreneurs, but we should also instill good mathematics skills as well. That, at least, is how I understood your former anecdote (which was a balanced point).

David @ The Frugality Game
David @ The Frugality Game
9 years ago

I love this. I didn’t think you came off as a jerk (simply pointing out a humorous, insightful anecdote), but I appreciate your humility in addressing that, and the in-depth article that came out of it. I hope to have kids, and I hope I’ll have the opportunity to teach them entrepreneurial skills. My own dad has also been involved in his own business. I’ve seen lots of challenges associated with it, but I’ve also seen immense rewards. He works many hard hours, but he’s also gained some flexibility to spend time with family as needed. As a result, I’ve… Read more »

ajc @ 7million7years
ajc @ 7million7years
9 years ago

Similar background JD, except that all of my father’s ventures failed … some more spectacularly than others. I, on the other hand, didn’t discover the ‘entrepreneur within’ until my 6th year out of college.

However, my son (without any prompting from me) discovered his inner-entrepreneur when he was 12 and at 15 he still runs his eBay business and a web-site that he set up to unlock cell phones for free (using a service called Trial-Pay).

What you suggest is very important to encourage our children to become the best they can!

Steve R
Steve R
9 years ago

A rule I have is to stop if I see a lemonaide (or such) stand. I talk with the child to see what they will do with the money. I drink my cup and say thank you. I leave them $10. I now have a friend doing the same thing. She liked the thought and enjoyed it when the kid goes “wow, $10!”.
I just hope they don’t close for the day after that or raise the price 🙂

snappy
snappy
9 years ago

Great story JD,The collecting pop bottles brought back old times,in the early 70s my family an i would ride bikes around town collecting coke bottles for a dime each,would fillup my army bacpac,In my early teens would call rich people,doctors,dentists,an see if they had any work i could do for them,being from a small town they all knew me an let me work,sweeping driveways;yardwork,ext.

Sheherazahde
Sheherazahde
9 years ago

I don’t have children myself. But I tried to help a friend’s child start a lemonade stand once. She wanted money and I suggested she could make money by selling lemonade. I talked to her about costs (lemonade and cups) how much she would have to charge to make a profit.And she was with me that far. Then I explained that she would have to sit outside and sell the lemonade and she said “No way”

I don’t know what she expected, the “Underpants Gnomes” would do the work?

Nicole
Nicole
9 years ago

I remember in middle school taking orders for friendship bracelets. Our mothers said it was like a Patty Duke episode. A problem was people saying they’d paid even though they hadn’t and didn’t have the receipt saying they had (my partner in crime’s dad was an accountant). If I had to go back we wouldn’t take orders and would just sell the finished products.

Mike - Saving Money Today
Mike - Saving Money Today
9 years ago

Great story JD. My dad had the entrepreneurial spirit too, but sadly none of his ideas ever took off.

What age do you think kids are ready for their own business endeavors?

Everyday Tips
Everyday Tips
9 years ago

I love when I see little kids selling things, but I rarely see it anymore. With the internet, there are more opportunities than every for kids to make money. They can sell crafts on etsy, sell their old Pokemon cards on ebay, or even start a blog. Kids may need to be creative since jobs are so hard to come by these days. For instance, soccer reffing used to be a nice little income for teens. But now, more adults have become certified refs because of the economy. (That is just one example.) Kids can either learn young to find… Read more »

April Dykman
9 years ago

I didn’t think you sounded like a jerk, it sounded like you were laughing at the situation in general, but I could see how it might come across differently to people who aren’t longtime readers. I thought it was sweet that you took time to help them work through their business problem. I did, however, think some comments seemed kind of harsh considering how little we knew about the girl. To say her inability to answer you was pathetic or assume she was trying to cheat you seemed harsh when it was just as plausible that she struggled in math… Read more »

MOR
MOR
9 years ago

The kids were running a business, and, when one of the girls did not know how to make change, you saw it as a “teachable moment.” I also agree with folks who said that it’s more likely that either she was intimidated and shy or thought she’d get away with it than that she actually wasn’t capable of subtracting one from five. When you decide to sell people things, you need to be prepared to make change. If the kids weren’t able to do that for whatever reason, a parent/sibling/baby-sitter, etc. should have been there to assist and supervise. If… Read more »

Meg
Meg
9 years ago

Hi JD,

I didn’t read the comments on your original post, but I can tell you that you didn’t come off as a jerk to me at all. I think you were doing those kids a valuable service.

Probably the people who wrote comments were the ones who were offended, but that doesn’t mean that most people thought you were a jerk.

Wayne Mates
Wayne Mates
9 years ago

This brings back memories from eons ago. When I was in elementary school, I sold greeting paper and cards door to door throughout my neighborhood. I would present my brochure and people selected what they wanted. Most people ordered. Why I have no clue. My mom would take my orders and process the paperwork and submit the orders and I delivered the products when the arrived. It was fun and I earned different toys and products, but no money. During those years, I also walked around the neighborhood house to house with my little red wagon. I collected old newspapers.… Read more »

Tisi
Tisi
9 years ago

I can’t tell you how much money I made (and make!) off of horses. I cleaned stalls for $5 an hour, I cleaned tack at shows, I exercised and fed horses, I taught other people how to ride. I was so dedicated that I made enough money to take lessons 5 days a week during the summers, and two or three times a week during the school year until I went to college. I made enough in college (and still do!) to pay for my horse. If your kid has a hobby they love, it’s pretty easy for them to… Read more »

Debbie
Debbie
9 years ago

My son ran a coffee ‘n donuts stand at my yard sale for the early birds. He ran out of donuts within a matter of minutes. Folks just fell over themselves buying from him. One man even went to the local grocery store and bought him more donuts to sell! Today, my son is in his late 20’s, has graduated from college, has bought his first house and is still selling things. Thanks for the warm memory!

the happiness investor
the happiness investor
9 years ago

I remember I wanted to be a greeting card writer when I was a child and I got out the yellow pages business directory, sought out greeting card companies and mailed my greeting card slogans to them. One of them actually called back to say he really liked my work and asked if I could provide drawings as well (or something like that – I was really young and could barely remember). The guy wasn’t deterred hearing the voice of a child over the phone – he actually called more than once to talk business. Nothing came out of that,… Read more »

Daria
Daria
9 years ago

At the end of the school year, we used to ask teachers for broken unwanted crayons. During the summer my children kept busy sorting the colors, peeling the paper off, and melting them in tin cans in a electric skillet filled with water. Then we poured them into borrowed candy molds to make shaped crayons. They would sell them as stocking stuffers 25 cents each or 4 for a $1. It was a project that kept them busy all summer and did not cost a cent in supplies. When we would take the crayons to the pool, other children would… Read more »

ShorterMama
ShorterMama
9 years ago

Great post. Though as I sit here reading I’m just wondering…hmmm is this the day I’ll go into labor (with my first) – I actually think about this a lot. One of my goals is that my children will be able to run a business before they turn 18. I’ve wondered what this would look like at younger ages – and I love the things you mention here. Regarding the change thing – I guess I found the post more sad than amusing. I remember one time being in the grocery store with my mom in high school and a… Read more »

Warren
Warren
9 years ago

This is great, I love supporting kids business’. I was the same, had several businesses growing up, sold sports cards, candy (got in trouble at school for that and my parents supported me) I’m now selling real estate and staying succesful in a very tough market, I contribute it to the work ethich instilled in me by my parents. My only policy with supporting children is I will only buy from them. If a parent comes in without their child trying to do their work for them I’ll refuse and tell them to bring their kid in and I’ll be… Read more »

Hilary
Hilary
9 years ago

How sad that you don’t support college students! I had to sell butterbraids for a fundraiser for nursing school and luckily, my neighbors were generous enough to buy about 3 each from me and I sold my quota in no time!

I got burned trying to support elementary school kids. I bought a $10 subscription to a magazine and never even received one issue. I didn’t know where the kids lived nor did I know what school they went to. Next time, I’m going to make sure I can track people down who sell my stuff!

Shane
Shane
9 years ago

Great post. My entrepreneurial experience: All throughout elementary school, my brother and I had a stand every summer. We picked a spot on a corner street that received more traffic. We started off selling lemonade for 25 cents, but wanted to expand our business without more cost overhead. So we walked to a wild blackberry patch that happened to be growing in the woods near our house. We would pick these, getting poked by all the thorns, but it was worth it because we didn’t have to buy them as an expense. We were able to turn our labor into… Read more »

William
William
9 years ago

I read this post before reading the one leading to it. I feel some readers missed the point of the post, and focused on negativity… it was funny, or at least amusing, and shouldn’t have created such a debate. But I am glad that it did because this post is quite worthwhile. I used to sell little bracelets, and old comic books in front of my parents house, and the endeavor was a complete failure. Wrong product in the wrong place, and more importantly: not the customer bank we should have been targeting. oh well. One learns from one’s mistakes.… Read more »

Katy @ The Non-Consumer Advocate
Katy @ The Non-Consumer Advocate
9 years ago

My 12-year-old son is quite entrepreneurial. He’s king of the lemonade stand and is the neighborhood’s go-to guy for cat sitting.

Because of this, he’s always swimming in cash. However, he’s a big spender and runs out of money really fast.

My older son is less driven, but never spends any money.

Guess who has more money in the bank?

-Katy Wolk-Stanley
“Use it up, wear it out, make it do or do without”

Katy @ The Non-Consumer Advocate
Katy @ The Non-Consumer Advocate
9 years ago

P.S. Love the picture!

-Katy

Ashley
Ashley
9 years ago

First time commenter. The part of this post about letting your child sink or swim on his own made me think of something from my childhood. My family had a yard sale when I was around 9 years old, and my mom let me gather old toys to sell. I had a box full of Barbies and other dolls that I priced at two dollars each (probably 10-15 dolls in the box with assorted accessories.) During the yard sale, a man approached my mother about the box of dolls, and she directed him to me. He offered me $10 for… Read more »

sightseeing
sightseeing
9 years ago

My impression of yesterday’s article was that you were helping the girls see something their parents had obviously failed to address: that you need to have adequate change–and the knowledge of how to make change–in order to make even the smallest kid-venture work. Avoiding this very real deficit in their small operation by leaving with the few coins they’d offered you in change would hardly have been a help to them in the long run; it simply would have let them continue without a critical business skill.

Rishi
Rishi
9 years ago

I really like this post and the advice to develop entrepreneurship in kids. I come from a community of small & medium business owners in India and it is quite commonplace in our part of the world to have kids help in the business part-time and also be a part of conversations about running the day to day operations. This practical training is as important as classroom training for future business leaders and many top businessmen have had such training.

Money Reasons
Money Reasons
9 years ago

My son has a bit of an entreprenuer spirit! We have a similar scenario with you in the fact that my son put out a lemonade stand last year (he was 9) about at this time (in September). He wasn’t getting any lemonade, so he got on his bike and started driving around the block yelling lemonade for sale. I thought this would be a go experience for him failing to selling the lemonade on a chill September day! I didn’t think he would get any buyers… But surprisingly… He did!!! I think he made less that $5.00 that day… Read more »

Megan
Megan
9 years ago

I didn’t think you were a jerk in your previous entry, JD. I think the girl was trying to hood-wink you into letting her give you the wrong change.

DH and I plan to let our kids do their own businesses when they get older – they could take care of pets, wash cars, etc.

handworn
handworn
9 years ago

I also disagree with those who thought you acted like a jerk.

You didn’t yell at her. You only asked questions that taught her things that her parents should have taught her. Perhaps the parents also didn’t know those things, but either way, you did the child a good turn. If she was embarrassed or self-conscious, well, too bad, but you have to learn to get over these things. A person cannot live her life enslaved to avoiding embarrassment. Some hurt is cathartic.

Samantha
Samantha
9 years ago

I’m wondering what kinds of things college kids have tried to sell you? I haven’t heard of college kids selling anything (anything specifically related to them being in college), except for raising money for charity, where you only get a little bit of candy – or nothing – for your donation.

Samantha
Samantha
9 years ago

Also, typo:

Let YOUR child make his own decisions

Julie
Julie
9 years ago

I LOVE this topic, JD! I am not an “entrepreneur” but I believe in teaching kids about $$ early in life and encouraging them to develope their own experiences. (3) examples from me working with my own children: 1) Without us paying one nickel, my first grade son accumulated a sizeable collection of Pokemon cards by taking other kids’ doubles, triples, etc. (Apparently, those kids did not recognize the value and my son did.) I joke that he is my future commodities trader. 2) One time, I told my 2 boys they could get a “sugar cereal” but they had… Read more »

Karen in minnesota
Karen in minnesota
9 years ago

I agree that kids that age should know how to make change. But random adults like you shouldn’t be lecturing them or trying to teach them a lesson–that’s jerk behavior.

Why didn’t you lecture their parents instead (who were actually responsible for the kids no knowing this)? You said the parents were standing nearby. Of course, you didn’t talk to the kids’ parents because the parents would have gotten offended, yelled at you to mind your own business etc.

Which you should have, I say.

Stephen
Stephen
9 years ago

I just wanted to add to the chorus that thinks you did NOT come off as a jerk.

If a reader thought you were cruelly mocking a child, they should read more charitably.

bethh
bethh
9 years ago

aw, I was afraid you were going to get bashed for that post (I think I’ll skip the comments thread, though). I took it the way it was intended, and I imagine that the girl was a little embarrassed, but un-scarred from the encounter! I thought you handled it well, but it would be easy to mis-read the tone of that post.

Sam
Sam
9 years ago

I don’t think you were a jerk, if kids are going to run a lemonade stand they should know how to make change, should have change, etc., or if too little a parent should help. Use the activity as a learning activity. We made super bank off our lemonade stand, I was a little kid, probably 6 or 7, although my brother worked with me. We had a little business plan, we paid for the supplies out of our profits (we got the cups for free), we had an advertising plan (one of the kids went up the road with… Read more »

KMJ
KMJ
9 years ago

I like the miscalculated change from the bake sale story. Whether they knew how to do the math or not, I think it’s more telling how offended some of the commenters were about your recounting of the story. As if it’s not acceptable to gently point out that someone who is in charge of making change is not doing it correctly or to politely second-guess someone’s assertion. Like you are somehow obligated to give them a free pass and view the $4 as a obligatory nice-person tax. Side note: if a cashier gives me the incorrect change, I politely explain… Read more »

GBR Briana
GBR Briana
9 years ago

JD, this was heartwarming. I didn’t realize that a lot of kids who do fundraisers ARE budding entrepreneurs. It’s definitely worth supporting in the long run. I didn’t think you came off as a jerk on the previous post at all; I think some people make kids to be more sensitive than they really are. With that being said, we do have to let them live some things out on their own, including their business ventures. Let’s continue supporting the future!

Techbud
Techbud
9 years ago

JD think you original post was all in good fun. I’d be embarrassed for my kids and myself if I let the run a sale knowing they didn’t know how to make change.

My 3 children just ran a successful lemonade sale 2 weeks ago,. It made me proud!

Nancy L.
Nancy L.
9 years ago

I have to admit, as the parent of a child with an “invisible” disability (ie, most people who meet him have no idea that there is anything going on or that the quirks in his behavior are not something I can just “parent” away”), I’ve been having a tough time responding to this article or the previous one. I’ve always enjoyed the way you look at multiple sides of a situation, so it was a bit disheartening to see an article where the primary conclusion was one that presumes negative parenting/schooling. I do appreciate this follow up article, and like… Read more »

Gretchen
Gretchen
9 years ago

You weren’t a jerk.

I used to love it when I was a cashier and people would have their kids help with the math of the transaction. It didn’t happen very often.

What kinds of things are college kids selling? I can only think of when they stand in the middle of the street and ask for money for sports/similar. I hate that, and never donate.

On the other hand, I can’t think of anything kids around here do either. There aren’t that many between kindergarten and college in my close nieghborhood, though.

chacha1
chacha1
9 years ago

+ 1 to: You weren’t a jerk. You weren’t some “random adult” either, and to “lecture” the parents would have been both completely counterproductive and a waste of your time. The parents obviously didn’t – for whatever reason – adequately counsel their child about what was involved with running a bake sale. If you had gone up and said “your daughter doesn’t know how to make change” or “your daughter gave me the wrong change” it might have alerted them to the problem but it wouldn’t have taught the daughter anything. Your approach may not have either; she may be… Read more »

someone else
someone else
9 years ago

Well, let me take the opposite view.

JD, you were a jerk.

It was your tone, and the title “Kids These Days”, saying as if ‘Jeez, when I was their age I solved quadratic equations with my left hand.’ All children grow at their own pace, despite what anyone else wants.

However, ahem, you are redeemed by your current article about your childhood experiences.

From time immemorial, elders have been saying “…the kinds these days…”. It will never end…

K-ro
K-ro
9 years ago

JD,

I don’t think you sounded like a jerk, and I don’t think you have anything to apologize for.

Actually, I think too many of us are too darn quick to take offense – and the internet gives this type too much power. But then, that’s probably a discussion for another day.

Rob Ward
Rob Ward
9 years ago

Just for the record, I thought the story was hilarious. I knew you weren’t doing it to make fun but just thought it was an interesting and fun story.

This advice for kids is great. I don’t have kids yet either, but if they are showing entrepreneurial tendencies as they grow up I will most certainly encourage it. My desire to be an entrepreneur did not really start until I was out of college. I wonder if it would have been different had my parents encouraged it while I was growing up.

margot
margot
9 years ago

When I read your initial post, for a split second I thought you were being mean by being so firm with the girls and insisting on proper change. After that split second, I realized that you weren’t being mean at all and that you were in fact helping the girls learn and succeed. I’m guessing that most people who were in your shoes would have just let the girls keep the extra money because 1) the girls are cute 2) people don’t want conflict with cute little kids and 3) people think it’s endearing to support children’s endeavors and don’t… Read more »

Emma
Emma
9 years ago

You were not rude, you were not mean. You did this young lady a service. It’s these kinds of lessons that shape the adult we become. You taught her that while circumstances may be beyond her control for an instant, there’s always a way to get through a problem rather than around it. You also taught her accountability. Instead of just giving you all the change she had (which she knew was not enough)and hoping you wouldn’t notice, she should have just told you right away that she did not have the change. I’m sure next time, she’d do just… Read more »

Chris Morgan
Chris Morgan
9 years ago

Loved the article. My wife and I work in school and my co workers are always mad at me because I do not buy their children fundraiser or girl scout cookies. When asked why, I simply tell them because they aren’t teaching their child nothing if they are doing the selling. They usually walk off rolling their eyes until a random kid walks up and ask me if I would like to buy something. Utilizing this opportunity as a teachable moment I ask the child what they are selling, what it is going for and what they recommend. I always… Read more »

PDX
PDX
9 years ago

I understand where JD is coming from. I believe he means no harm. It sounds more to me like a call for parents to encourage kids to learn. I do want to mention (not to defend JD or otherwise) that since JD does not have kids, he does have a different perspective. What he thought was funny, turned out to be offensive for some. He also does not have any dogs so that one post when he said “get rid of the dog” got bad reviews too. Myself being one of them as I have a dog. I think the… Read more »

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