Charity, hobby, or mistake? The cat we didn’t keep

Jake and I have two cats and a dog. To us, having pets is one of the most important aspects of our lives and identity. You might even consider it a hobby. Unfortunately, it is a hobby that, as you will see, has not always been entirely strategic.

Our love for animals has permeated much of our lives. I've been vegetarian for over a decade, and Jake was veggie for six years and still cuts back where he can. We also have a standing commitment to donate only to animal welfare organizations. They're our charities of choice!

Meet Julius, the Almost-Third Cat

When Jake and I met, I actually had three cats. One of them was diabetic, however, and passed away. So when an ex co-worker of Jake's said that she had found a homeless cat she couldn't keep, he said yes. Sight unseen. Can you guess how well this is going to turn out?

Julius

We picked the cat up and brought him home. At first everything seemed to be going great. He'd been living in an alley, but was friendly and litterbox-trained. He was an orange tabby, so we named him Julius.

Unfortunately, when I took him to the vet for a checkup, it turned out that he had feline immunodeficiency virus, or FIV. Now, we're okay with spending money on sick pets. Additionally, cats with FIV aren't always “sick” and can live long, healthy lives. It's also very difficult for cats to transmit the disease to others. It principally spreads through serious fights where blood is drawn. Likely, Julius was attacked by feral cats while he was living on the street and that's how he got it.

The first (cheaper) FIV test they ran can show false positives, so the vet also ran a more conclusive (expensive) test on the basis of the initial results. I also got Julius his first round of regular shots and also had him tested for worms. The initial vet visit including all tests was about $300.

Nina

When a Pet Doesn't Work Out

The next step was to supervise Julius's introduction to our other two cats to make sure there wasn't going to be fighting that could lead to FIV transmission. This was especially important because our other two cats, Nina and Max, were elderly and thus had weaker immune systems. They were also both declawed in the front and wouldn't be able to defend themselves.

Unfortunately, Julius decided to be a bully to Max. I was genuinely concerned that Julius would draw blood.

Additionally, I felt that, since Max was getting old and frail, he deserved better than being tormented during his golden years (his death two years later would teach us some important emotional and financial lessons).

Max

Julius had also clearly gotten used to life on the streets, and he didn't appreciate being kept inside. How did he express his displeasure? By yowling at the top of his lungs. All day. All night. It was seriously like an air raid siren going off in our house 24 hours a day. You probably think I am exaggerating. I am not.

Jake was working from home during this time and, as an attorney, he has to talk to clients, judges, and other attorneys on the phone. Needless to say, having a cat screeching at 110 decibels in the next room wasn't conducive to the work environment he was trying to create.

Limited (Read: Expensive) Options

Our options, however, were pretty limited. The Humane Society and Animal Control usually put down cats that test positive for FIV. Most privately run rescues won't take these animals at all. There are just too many healthy, easily adoptable cats out there who also need help.

We also didn't feel comfortable letting him loose because then he could infect other cats. It was looking like our only option was to put him down. I spent two weeks contacting vet offices (many of which are happy to help re-home pets) and a variety of rescue organizations.

Finally, I got an email back from Best Friends Animal Society in Utah. You may have heard of them. National Geographic did a series called Dog Town on their work. They agreed to take him! Only problem? I'd have to bring him to Best Friends myself.

Before I could drive him to the sanctuary, however, I had to take him back to the vet for a special checkup and a certificate so that he could legally cross state lines. Another $150. And did I mention the only date that worked for a drop-off was the day before my bridal shower?

It was a six-hour drive, so I drove the first half of the way there on a Thursday with my two bridesmaids and we stayed in a hotel. Another hundred bucks. We drove the rest of the way on Friday and dropped off the cat before touring the sanctuary (which is totally amazing, BTW. They are IMO the best animal rescue in the country, hands down). We probably spent another $100 or so in gas and $100 on food during the trip.

All in all? I think we ended up spending over $600 on a cat we didn't even keep.

Was it Worth it?

Not having to make the decision to put an otherwise healthy and friendly cat down definitely made the experience worth it for me and Jake. We were also able to track his eventual adoption via their website. I know Best Friends vets (haha! pun) potential owners very carefully, so I'm sure Julius got a great home that's a better fit for him than we were.

And now that I've witnessed the incredible work that this organization does, I donate to them any time I'm able. In fact, Jake and I wooed each other this Valentine's Day by sponsoring some of the special needs animals at their rescue. It seemed cooler than getting gifts (plus, honestly, we procrastinated!).

Even though the situation ended up being the best possible outcome for Julius, we did learn a very expensive lesson in what can happen when you make decisions without fully considering the consequences.

After Max died, we waited two months before even starting to look for another cat. Once we had decided to go forward, we made sure to go through a rescue so that we could get a cat that would be a good fit for our family. And that's how we ended up with Lucky Cat!

What tips and tricks do you have to make sure you adopt the right pet instead of making an expensive mistake like we did?

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kat
kat
6 years ago

I’m sorry, what’s the point of this article on a finance website?

All I’m getting is “honey makes bad decision”, which seems to be fairly regular.

Renee s
Renee s
6 years ago
Reply to  kat

Geez–you are a whiney pants

Susan
Susan
6 years ago
Reply to  kat

Wow. I find this topic very timely and appropriate. Too many people don’t consider the financial responsibilities of caring for a pet. This is an excellent lesson in personal finance.

Khadijah
Khadijah
6 years ago
Reply to  Susan

yup. Pets and kids are expensive. Also! $150 for pet-crossing-border certificate is so BOGUS. the cat could have wandered off by itself and gives no fcks to borders. If a cat ‘illegally’ crosses the state borders is it not eligible for health insurance? WHat is this??!

lam
lam
6 years ago

My role in life seems to be adopting special needs kitties even if I don’t know they are. My current cat Belle was an older rescue who has needed a lot of medical attention but I love her and I made a commitment to take care of her when I adopted her. This has included expensive dental work and quarterly upper respiratory infections. I have the money to take care of her but there are limits. Vet suggested an ekg to look at her heart murmur and I said no. My previous kitty was Louise and she was a feral… Read more »

Honey Smith
Honey Smith
6 years ago
Reply to  lam

My diabetic cat was also expensive (insulin costs about $100 an ounce!) and Max also needed fluids the last couple months he was alive. But I wouldn’t have it any other way, even if it has made my debt payoff journey longer.

Laraba
Laraba
6 years ago

I find this article interesting because it just shows how different people are. I used to be bananas about my pets, but then we had a kid and another kid and another kid (I’m pregnant with #9.) Our view now on animals is that we take care of them and if they get seriously sick, we put them down. I am guessing some people are horrified about that, but our view is that our job is to make sure they don’t suffer but we certainly don’t have the money to pay a lot to care for animals. (Part of the… Read more »

Eric Duminil
Eric Duminil
6 years ago
Reply to  Laraba

Sorry for this offtopic question, but have you ever heard of overpopulation?
Given the challenges mankind is facing (peak oil, global warming to name two), I’m not sure that getting 9 children is a very rational thing to do.

Jane
Jane
6 years ago
Reply to  Eric Duminil

Who died and made you the procreation police? It never ceases to amaze me how judgmental folks can be about family planning. I don’t care if she has zero or ten kids – it’s none of my business.

Her comment was substantive and brought up how individuals view pets differently. What does your comment add to the conversation?

I’m sure the commenter is used to it, though. Heck, even pregnant with my third at the moment, in many peoples’ eyes I have become a “breeder.” Good thing I don’t care what they think, and I’m sure she doesn’t either.

Eric Duminil
Eric Duminil
6 years ago
Reply to  Jane

Well, getting 9 kids doesn’t sound much like “planning” to me.
I’m just an environmental engineer, and I might be more sensitive than others on the overpopulation issue.
But if an automotive engineer tells you it’s a bad idea to drive at 120mph before a tight corner, do you tell him he’s being judgemental?

Jean
Jean
6 years ago
Reply to  Eric Duminil

Seriously? That’s what you got out of that comment? Her having 9 kids makes up for my 5 friends and me who didn’t have any children, so the average hasn’t gone up. Bet you didn’t think about that angle…

SAHMama
SAHMama
6 years ago
Reply to  Laraba

Pretty sure kids cost more than pets to take care of…

Laraba
Laraba
6 years ago
Reply to  SAHMama

Kids do cost a lot, and that’s partly why we don’t commit mentally to a lot of money for our pets. I’m an engineer, as is my husband, and we both have PhD’s. I’ve looked into the overpopulation argument and I’m not convinced. There are indeed cultures that are facing serious issues from not having ENOUGH children (Russia, Italy, and Japan come to mind.) They are dealing with an aging population and likely future problems in caring for their elderly without enough young workers. Russia is indeed doing their best to encourage women to have children, with little success. I… Read more »

Carol
Carol
6 years ago
Reply to  Laraba

I feel the same way. I enjoy visiting other people’s pets, and then I am glad that I can come home to an animal-free home. I’m sure that some people feel the same way about kids. I have a diabetic child, and I cannot imagine providing similar care/finances to a diabetic pet, although I respect others’ decisions to do so.

Ann
Ann
6 years ago

Thank you for showing that there are more important things than money. Bless you for your compassionatetreatment of Julius. I’m glad he found a good home.

Brian @ Luke1428
Brian @ Luke1428
6 years ago

We learned the hard way never to make a pet decision based on emotion. Several years ago we adopted two dogs from a foster parent when we had only gone to look at one. But they were brother and sister and looked so cute together, so we brought both home. Just this past weekend we found an adoptive home through the Humane Society for the girl dog because we realized we simply couldn’t take care of two anymore with our hectic schedules. It was tough to let her go but we would never had been in that position had we… Read more »

Kerry
Kerry
6 years ago

I actually tried to rescue a stray cat during a cold winter day a few years back and wound up paying $30 USD fee and was required to fill out forms even though I told the Humane Society it wasn’t my cat. I was actually working as a home health aide at the time and was late to my next client because of this and was reprimanded, even though I called to explain the situation. However, your good deeds will not go unnoticed. We’re very proud of you for doing the right thing. Your actions helped not only Julius but… Read more »

Quantum Surveyor Oxford
Quantum Surveyor Oxford
6 years ago

I’m struck-back by your kindness. Going to such effort to help a stray cat. You guys must have a big heart.

Shari
Shari
6 years ago

It’s good to see someone make such a responsible decision about a pet. It’s so sad how some people just throw them away if it doesn’t work out. And sometimes it just doesn’t work out.

Honey Smith
Honey Smith
6 years ago
Reply to  Shari

Thanks. We certainly felt that when we agreed to take him in the first place, we assumed responsibility for him, even if we turned out not to be a good fit. We learned that to avoid this kind of thing happening again, we should go through a rescue and ask a lot of questions before adopting. I had a list of qualities I was looking for when I went to the shelter, and Lucky Cat met all of them. “Quiet meow” was on the list!

Anne
Anne
6 years ago
Reply to  Honey Smith

I, too, am touched by your generosity but you asked for tips on finding a good fit for a potential pet ahead of time.

I wasn’t aware there was any way to find this out other than through trial and error when they got to your house. I hope I learn something new here.

Jean
Jean
6 years ago

I could have written this story. I found “Steve” in a parking lot next to my dr’s office. He was an affectionate cat and had been neutered (and was front declawed) so I took him home to see if I could find his owners. From the moment he set foot in the house, he didn’t get along with one of my male cats. No one claimed Steve, and it was obvious that he couldn’t stay at my house; too much tension and he was spraying. Regretfully I had no choice but to take him to the shelter after a few… Read more »

Honey Smith
Honey Smith
6 years ago
Reply to  Jean

That must’ve been tough! I had lived with lots and lots of cats over the years (when I was in college I lived in a 4 bedroom apartment and everyone had pets and we rescued lots of animals as well), but I’d never had such difficulty integrating a new member before. It can go pretty wrong!

Jean
Jean
6 years ago
Reply to  Honey Smith

I think Steve had been a stray for too long and was used to having to fight for his food, territory, etc. I ‘only’ had invested the cost of a vet checkup, an extra litterbox & food, and products to try to get him to stop spraying, and then products to get the stench out of the house. I would’ve felt WAY worse had I adopted him and had to return him. Brady would prefer to be an only cat, but he came second so he didn’t have a choice – but he’s going to make sure there’s not a… Read more »

michelle davis
michelle davis
6 years ago

You are amazing! Im into animal rescue and you did the right thing. Ive always wanted to visit the Best Friends Animal Society. Here are some recommendations that I suggest for people to make sure the animal is a good fit in their home. Do a “meet and greet”, this is especially good if adopting from a shelter. You can take your other pets and children. Most shelters will refund money within 30 days if you are not happy with the animal. You can also go to rescues. Our local rescue gives you two weeks to see if the animal… Read more »

Honey Smith
Honey Smith
6 years ago
Reply to  michelle davis

I totally recommend Best Friends for a visit, we got to tour the entire sanctuary and it’s just incredible. It’s 3 hours from the nearest airport, though, and the surrounding area is pretty desolate (read: if you run out of gas there will be neither a gas station nor cell phone service) so it is something to really plan for.

Good to know on the health certificate, this was the first time I had ever done that (so apparently I illegally imported Max into AZ back in the day?) so I had no idea there were different prices.

PawPrint
PawPrint
6 years ago

In our 33 years together, my husband and I have had six cats and four dogs of our own, all of them rescues. I also was a foster parent for a humane society for decades and then ran my own rescue so I’ve had many, many cats and dogs (and one rat) living with us. As we near retirement, we have one expensive 15-year old cat left. We’ve decided that we are probably not going to get another pet, mainly because of the expense. We may, however, foster a pet just because the animal shelter pays the vet expenses. After… Read more »

Honey Smith
Honey Smith
6 years ago
Reply to  PawPrint

I’d love to foster eventually, we’re just not in a good situation for that at the moment. Good on you, though!

Stefanie @ The Broke and Beautiful Life
Stefanie @ The Broke and Beautiful Life
6 years ago

Wow, that’s quite a story. I can’t imagine spending $600 on a pet I couldn’t even keep. I also have trouble justifying donations to animal shelters when there are so many PEOPLE in the world without shelter, food, and water.

TB
TB
6 years ago

There are so many animals in shelters because PEOPLE do not care for them properly. Millions of unwanted animals live tragic lives and have horrible deaths because of the way PEOPLE treat -or fail to treat them. PEOPLE have many more options for survival than animals will ever have. Irresponsible PEOPLE created the need for shelters.
Spay or neuter your pet…and any stray you can catch. It will make their world-and ours-a better place.

Jane
Jane
6 years ago
Reply to  TB

I can understand urging those to spay and neuter their own pets, but you’re taking it a little too far to expect me to corral a stray and pay to get them fixed. Do wild animals who breed willy-nilly live horrible lives as well? Should we neuter them too? Squirrels get hit by cars all the time. Is this a humanitarian emergency? Should we start a campaign to save them from a terrible life and brutal death by ensuring that less of them exist? I guess I don’t understand at what point dogs and cats crossed over from being animals… Read more »

TB
TB
6 years ago
Reply to  Jane

I was suggesting not expecting.

Heather
Heather
6 years ago

I find this response troubling. So what, we should completely ignore the plight of animals (that as the other commentator so astutely noted is our creation in the first place) until all humanity’s social ills have been resolved? That is the definition of inhumane and makes me ashamed for my species.

Marie
Marie
6 years ago

Every donation is a decision made. A donation to breast cancer is a donation that doesn’t benefit heart disease.

Gilia
Gilia
6 years ago

BEFORE adopting any pet, you should always have its health checked out. You should know what you are adopting first, not after you have acquired the pet. This situation could have certainly been avoided altogether and that cat could have went to a good home from the start. My situation was a little opposite where I had a cat that was FIV positive because he did go outside and was a bully. So he got in many fights and that is how he contracted it. After we found out he was positive, we kept him indoors but he fought with… Read more »

Anne
Anne
6 years ago

It’s certainly good advice to get a pet checked out before adopting, but a number of people here have responded that they adopted, or attempted to adopt a stray.

No way to know their health status before taking them in. And if you did, would you still leave them to starve in the alley?

Honey Smith
Honey Smith
6 years ago
Reply to  Anne

Knowing he was a stray is what really makes me evaluate the story. The day before we picked him up was the first day he’d ever been inside, as far as the woman who “found” him for us knows. And had we not agreed to adopt him sight unseen, he not only might never have had a home at all, he might have gone around infecting other strays and even people’s pets that they let outside (lots of folks in our neighborhood have indoor/outdoor cats, which I don’t feel comfortable with but there you have it). So there’s no doubt… Read more »

Laura
Laura
6 years ago
Reply to  Honey Smith

“Black cats are half as likely as other cats to be adopted from shelters.” Holy smokes – I never knew that. Growing up, we had 4 different cats at subsequent times and 3 of the 4 were fully black shorthairs. (I have been told that that means they’re a type of Siamese, as other black cats will have some other color somewhere, usually white, even if it’s just a small tuft.) They were also strays that adopted my mother that she took in; it was just sheer coincidence that they looked exactly alike, LOL. (Fortunately the last one was clearly… Read more »

Honey Smith
Honey Smith
6 years ago
Reply to  Laura

Lucky Cat had another strike against him because he was 4 years old. We wanted an adult cat because their personalities are more fully formed and there’s less doubt about how they’ll turn out, but adult cats are also SIGNIFICANTLY less likely to be adopted, compared to cute adorable kittens. It’s crazy to me. I adopted Nina when she was six and a half. I’ve had her 10 years! There’s lots of years yet in an “adult” cat.

Marie
Marie
6 years ago
Reply to  Laura

Isn’t that gross? The shelters I work with also have a shutdown period to prevent black cats from being adopted during October, to prevent people from adopting them for cult rituals or sacrifices during Halloween.

Carla
Carla
6 years ago

This article is very timely for me. I’ve been thinking about getting a cat for DH and I (I never had a pet in my life) and this article brings me back down to earth! Financially, it would be playing Russian Roulette.

Honey Smith
Honey Smith
6 years ago
Reply to  Carla

Like anything else, I guess. You can buy a car that is a lemon. You can buy a house and have it be a money pit. Kids ain’t cheap and don’t always turn out the way you imagined them, either. I agree you should know what you’re getting into and save/budget with the knowledge that things could go wrong. You can also learn as much as possible by doing research ahead of time (I was able to verify Lucky Cat’s health status and temperament in advance because I got him from a shelter). But you’re right, there’s only so much… Read more »

Carla
Carla
6 years ago
Reply to  Honey Smith

That’s why we wont have kids and don’t and maybe never own a home. My car was new enough, (the only large purchase I’ve ever made) that there was a low risk of it being a lemon.

You definitely did all of your homework before you adopted Lucky Cat (beautiful cat by the way!)I do wonder how ready one can be.

Growing up my mother always drilled into my head how financially and emotionally risky pet ownership can be that it always seems to far away from me.

slccom
slccom
6 years ago
Reply to  Carla

Sounds like she forgot to mention how emotionally rewarding it is, too. That is too bad. You are missing out on a lot of love.

SAHMama
SAHMama
6 years ago

Visit the pet, more than once if you can. With every human member of your household. If you can bring any other pets, do that too. Choose a pet that’s up to date on shots and spayed or neutered. Make sure the pet’s personality fits your lifestyle. A hyper dog with people who work 80 hours a week isn’t going to work. A cat that hates kids won’t work in a house with children. We support the local no-kill cat shelter. If for some reason the cat you adopt doesn’t work out for your family, the cat can be returned… Read more »

Jen
Jen
6 years ago

I found a 6-week old kitten by the side of the road last year that turned out to be FIV+. It is really difficult to find a rescue group willing to take a FIV+ cat, so I decided to keep her. She is the sweetest thing ever and, thankfully, gets along great with my other two, so that definitely helped. I am budgeting now for her future medical bills.

Teinegurl
Teinegurl
6 years ago

We adopted two cats from the SPCA. One was orange tabby named Cosmo , the other was a gray cat name Chloe. Cosmo got along really well with everyone in our family and loved the kids. We was really affectionate , not aggressive at all. Chloe had a really different temperment. She hated the kids, did not like to held or touch at all and scratched everything! After months of trying to discourage the scratching and trying to intergrate her into the family we finally had to give her back. It was sad but i think it was the best… Read more »

Honey Smith
Honey Smith
6 years ago
Reply to  Teinegurl

Thanks! And yes, dogs are W-O-R-K. Our dog is probably 13 (stray, so who knows really) and so she’s really calm now, but we don’t have a dog door and asking her to hold it for 8 hours is asking a lot. Now that he has a “regular” job again, Jake assumes that I will be home before him and take the dog out when I get home. Most days this is true and it’s fine, but if I will be late then I have to let him know a day or two in advance so he can leave work… Read more »

Amanda
Amanda
6 years ago

I think you’re being hard on yourself. You made the best decisions you could with the information you had at the time. When you took this animal on, how were you to know the cat was not going to get along with the family? I had a similar situation. During the 2004 storm season, we had a cat try to move in with us. We think he came from a nearby apartment complex that had gotten shredded by Hurricane Charlie. Most of our cats were fine with “Buster,” but one of them wanted nothing to do with him. It wasn’t… Read more »

Honey Smith
Honey Smith
6 years ago
Reply to  Amanda

Sounds like you were dealing with more than anyone ever should yourself, and also did the best you could.

There have definitely been friendly strays that I fed but didn’t take into the house, who disappeared–who knows what becomes of them? I think it’s important to do what you can, but no one person can save every animal they come across (or help every person, either).

Thanks for this.

AnnJ
AnnJ
6 years ago

I’m so happy that there are people like you in the world.

And don’t forget: What goes around, comes around.

Lanthiriel
Lanthiriel
6 years ago

In my short time as an adult, I’ve had to make some serious decisions about pets, and it’s taken some time to realize what I’m truly capable of taking on. Up until last year, we had two cats and a dog. The first cat my husband and I got was pretty mean. We had her for seven years before she developed a nasty bladder stone. Our choice was to shell out $1,500 on surgery or put her down. In the end, while I felt very guilty about it, I just couldn’t see her spending 2-3 weeks in a crate with… Read more »

El Nerdo
El Nerdo
6 years ago

We’ve been living with an FIV+ cat for over 11 years now. We adopted him from a shelter. Financially it hasn’t been the cheapest thing, but in terms of enriching our lives it has been priceless. I’d rather have a great cat than go on a trip–the brat provides endless daily enjoyment. — re: bad decisions As for tips/tricks specific to pets, I have none, but by going with the WRAP decision-making model (Chip & Dan Heath) I can see where there were some flaws in Honey and Jake’s decision-making process (I’ve recently learned this so thanks for offering up… Read more »

Adrian
Adrian
6 years ago

Much as I love the little buggers, cats can be an expensive proposition even without the medical bills. We got a brand new couch and two brand new kittens within months of each other and even though I tried everything short of declawing them, the poor couch got the worst end of it. I ended up donating it for a small tax write-off, when it should have lasted several more years. We also had to replace the entire downstairs carpet and install tile due to persistent “litterbox aversion” ugh! When the cat started going on the brand new tile as… Read more »

Marie
Marie
6 years ago

This is not directed at Honey, merely the general topic of pets with issues: I understand that some people cannot or will not put in the time and money to deal with extensive medical problems in their pets…but on the other hand, it’s sad to see that some people only feel an animal is worthwhile if it’s perfectly healthy. Treating a human that way would never be tolerated, and in some ways would be illegal. I am reminded again of the Gandhi quote.

Diane C
Diane C
6 years ago

I see a lot of arguments pro and con here. I think the real point has nothing to do with pets at all.

This is about emotional and financial maturity. So much of FI involves achieving these skills. Learning to balance wants and needs, willingness to bear short term lacks in exchange for future gains, etc.

It would have been much easier for Honey to throw money at this problem. Instead she faced the facts squarely and made the hard choice.

Evangeline
Evangeline
6 years ago

This is stupid. I visit this site to read about money issues, not some tepid article about pets and the ridiculous comments that go with it. The topic is important, to be sure, but on a money site? Honey, you’re really reaching…… As usual

akoilady
akoilady
5 years ago
Reply to  Evangeline

Evangeline, You didn’t have to read this series of posts, just as I don’t read posts about saving for my children’s college expenses…they are long past. If you can’t see that this series of posts is showing the emotional ties that cause financial decisions to be made or NOT made, then you aren’t really reading. I read this website for financial information too. But not everything on the site is relevant to me or even interesting to me. So I pass it by. It’s a choice… and you have the same choice. I’m glad this was posted, although it was… Read more »

Ely
Ely
6 years ago

It’s so easy to say ‘yes’ to an animal in a bad situation. We did it ourselves some years ago, and the lessons we learned have definitely stuck. On the other hand, we don’t consider the money we spent lost or wasted. We brightened an old dog’s last days; while maybe there were better things we could have done with the time and money, it’s not something I regret. Still, I vetted our later dogs MUCH more carefully. There’s always risk, but we’ve been very fortunate. At the same time, I may be done with this pet-ownership phase of my… Read more »

Jennifer R.
Jennifer R.
6 years ago

I tried so hard to read this with an open mind but so much of the article rubs me the wrong way. Pets are not investments, they are not financially sound decisions, and the point of putting money into the care of an animal is not just so it can give you love in return if you keep it. What a selfish viewpoint you obviously hold for the purpose of animals. They are independent sentient beings, not ornaments for your enjoyment. I have a beautiful cat who we adopted knowing he had FIV. He is an only cat and loves… Read more »

Serge
Serge
6 years ago

I spend hundreds of dollars on premium food for my cats (including raw) and I brush their teeth every day. But if it comes to terminate their life due to a serious age related illness I probably will. I don’t think I want to go to undergo prolong and painful treatment to gain a few extra years, why would I want that for my pets either ? We shouldn’t be obsessed on how much we and our pets live, but on the quality of their lives

Lesley
Lesley
6 years ago

First off – you and your husband are awesome!!! A year ago, I came across a starving, forlorn cat on the street. We had just lost our wonderful cat SW to feline leukemia, and still had one cat at home, so from the FeLV experience I had learned to never bring home a cat without knowing it’s status for FelV and FIV. I took this cat to the local pound but he was not claimed. I managed to get him into a wonderful no-kill rescue a few hours away. It turned out that this poor boy had FeLV too, but… Read more »

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