Developing systems that work

In my fantasy life, I'm an organized guy. In the real world, that's just not the case. I do my best to stay on top of things — I make lists, use a calendar, ask Kris for help — but there always seems to be something slipping through the cracks.

Before we left for Africa, for example, I hid my wallet. I always do this when we go on a long trip. (I don't use my wallet when I travel.) And every time, I have trouble finding it when I get home. You'd think I'd develop a system — but no.

I'm not the only one with problems like this. Sure, there are folks out there like Kris and her sister — people who never let anything fall through the cracks — but they're few and far between. Most of us need to develop systems to help our lives run smoothly.

Developing Systems That Work

I've read dozens of books on time management, coping with clutter, and getting things done. But I've never found a magic cure-all for disorganization. The trouble is, as with personal finance, there's no one right answer. Each of us is different. We have different strengths, different weakness, and different aims in life. There's no one system that's going to work for every person.

For years, my motto at Get Rich Slowly has been do what works for you. I don't mean by this that one choice is as good as another. There are best practices for paying off debt, saving for retirement, and buying a used car. What I mean is that there's no one system that works for everyone. The debt snowball helped me get out of debt, but it may have you treading water.

I've found that the key to developing systems that work for me is to take bits and pieces from other people's ideas, and to remix them in ways that fit my goals and strengths. This is true for all aspects of my life, including fitness, finance, writing, travel, and more.

I've noticed, though, that there are three elements that seem to be part of every successful system in my life: routine, automation, and simplicity.

The Power of Routine

By far the most important key to my success is establishing routines. Why have I managed to lose so much weight in the past year? Because I made it a habit to get up at 5:30 every morning so that I could be at the gym by 6:30. How did I manage to buy my Mini? I made saving a routine.

Valuable financial habits or routines include:

When something becomes routine, it becomes a natural part of your life. It's not something you have to force yourself to do. It's almost automatic, which makes it easier to do the right thing instead of letting your emotions get the better of you.

I've also had great success by foisting my routines onto the poor, unsuspecting computers around me. Automation helps my systems run smoothly.

The Power of Automation

When I was younger, I had a heck of a time remembering to pay my bills on time. Even when I had a set routine — for years, I paid bills on the first Saturday of every month — I'd sometimes forget to follow it. So, whenever I find a way to automate some part of my life, I do it.

Removing me from the equation just makes thing run so much more smoothly. That's why I've spent the past several years developing a paperless personal-finance system, which includes:

  • Automatic bill payments. All of my regular bills are automatically paid electronically.
  • Automatic saving. Every month, I have money automatically transferred to my savings accounts. (Remember, I keep multiple savings accounts to pursue different goals.)
  • Automatic investing. Well, I don't actually do this now — I'm making manual investments at the end of every tax year — but for a long time, my retirement accounts automatically pulled from my paycheck and/or checking account.

This automation is an essential part of my financial system. It helps prevent stupid errors — like forgetting to pay a bill before vacation. Plus, I've found the automation keeps me motivated. The money for my bills is going to be pulled on specific dates, so I'd better be sure my accounts are funded.

Note: Yes, I know my resistance to Mint and Yodlee and other online money-management tools goes against this quest for automation. I'm manually updating Quicken instead. That's okay. Sometimes other considerations outweigh automation.

The Power Simplicity

Simplicity is a final key to most of my successful systems.

The reason David Allen's Getting Things Done system never worked for me is that it's too bloody complicated. It's a system that requires maps and a flowchart, files and folders, and plenty of time. I'm sure it works for some people, but it doesn't work for me. (Or hasn't, anyhow, the three times I've tried to implement it.)

I've developed my own alternative to Getting Things Done. I carry a notebook with me. Whenever I need to remember something, I write it down. Whenever I get a new task or appointment, I add it to the bottom of my daily list. As I complete tasks, I cross them off the list. Every morning, I copy this list onto a new page, and begin adding things to the bottom again. Simple. This is a system that works for me. And it works because it's mostly transparent.

Simple financial systems seem to work best for me, too. I don't want to spend a lot of time picking stocks or researching retirement accounts. Some folks juggle six different credit cards to maximize their rewards; I have one debit card and one credit card. Anything more makes my brain hurt. The best kinds of systems are those that don't seem like systems at all. They just become a natural part of the way I live my life.

Note: On Monday, April wrote about her quest to find an expense-tracking system that works for her. She, too, is drawn to simplicity.

Conclusion

Even with the systems I've created, I still have trouble sometimes. I lose my wallet or forget to pay a bill. There's always another improvement to be made. But systems reduce the frequency and impact of these user errors.

I'd love to hear about some of the systems you use to keep your financial life running smoothly. Have you found that there are certain features in common among your successful systems? Or are you one of the lucky few who can get by without using any sort of organizational system at all?

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SF_UK
SF_UK
9 years ago

Financially, I’m all about automation and routine. Wherever possible, recurring bills are paid by direct debit or standing order (automated bill payment). Budgeting is achieved by a set cash amount (£50) that I take out on Saturdays and has to last me the week. Anything left over on Friday night goes in the “jar”, which is theoretically my “play money”, but doesn’t quite work as I forget to pull card transactions out of it. Note to self: find a way of making this routine. This doesn’t blow my budget though, as I am very strict about what I put on… Read more »

Jay
Jay
9 years ago

maybe this is off topic, but i’m surprised you only make your investments one time a year at tax time. i make my contributions weekly (automatically). it seems like that works the best for dollar cost averaging. investing only once a year would seem like my investments depend heavily on market timing – not intended market time, but random timing J.D.’s note: I do the once-a-year thing not because I think that’s best but because my income is irregular. (See my article about budgeting for an irregular income, if you’re not sure what I mean.) Doing it this way helps… Read more »

Pamela
Pamela
9 years ago

Having a place for important things helps me stay organized. I have a mail keeper on the wall in my foyer. When I bring in the mail, I immediately put the important items in the keeper and the junk in the recycling bin. When it’s time to pay bills or respond to something that came in the mail, it’s always in the same place. And I see it every time I walk out the door so it doesn’t fall off my mental tracking system. What I find even more important is simplifying by not doing things that don’t need to… Read more »

Nicole
Nicole
9 years ago

I’m impressed that you were actually able to read getting things done. I’ve tried twice and I just cannot get through it.

I try to use the Robert Boice systems, especially for writing. When I am on it, I am incredibly productive, even on things I’ve been avoiding.

indio
indio
9 years ago

I agree that having a mechanized routine is the best way to approach it. I put my keys, sunglasses, blackberry in the same place every time I come or go from the house. This way I always know where to find it and don’t have to waste valuable time. In fact, wasting time is one of my major pet peeves. I have so many things I’d rather be doing, that being organized is a must in order to achieve them. I have direct deposit, automatic withdrawals set up to pay recurring bills, which are mortgage, garbage, electricity, phone and automatic… Read more »

Elizabeth
Elizabeth
9 years ago

I agree with Jay on this one. Last year, I made modest monthly contributions to my retirement investments with the intention of topping it up at the end of the year. Looking back, I realized how much I would have gained if I had contributed more throughout the year. This year I changed strategies and am contributing more each month. The 30 Day rule is also a habit to get in to, unless there’s an immediate need. Most of the time I find I lose interest or negative reviews end up putting me off, but sometimes I’ve found great sales… Read more »

MK
MK
9 years ago

For finances, the one big thing that helps me stay organized is going through and handling the mail every day. If there are any bills in the pile, I log in to online banking, and register them for payment on the due dates. I also take a look at the bank’s summary of upcoming bill payments and account transfers to make sure that there is enough money in the account to cover everything. I had a few weeks that were just crazy recently, with tons to do at work, a dog with an upset stomach that just wouldn’t settle (yes,… Read more »

Dominik
Dominik
9 years ago

I also had big problem with implementing GTD, but after reading the series about the details at The Simple Dollar and finding this cool post for Remember the Milk

http://blog.rememberthemilk.com/2008/05/guest-post-advanced-gtd-with-remember-the-milk/

I was finally able to implement it correctly. It is now really easy to have the system up and running 🙂

Brett | Investing Part Time
Brett | Investing Part Time
9 years ago

I have definitely tried to make automated systems, but I always worry about automatic CC payments if I don’t have enough money in my checking account. Really, the basic system I use is setting a calendar reminder and then taking 2 minutes to double check each balance before paying. If I am out of town or unable to pay (unlikely), then it will automatically be paid the day it is due. I use an automated savings plan too, but with investing I tend to be a little more proactive. I used to think the school of thought of investing in… Read more »

Matt
Matt
9 years ago

I have a similar system. I use https://www.nirvanahq.com/ to track To Dos for the the various things I’m working. Every morning I review all the lists and add them to the list of things to get done today. I then copy that to a small pad I keep with me.

I add to the pad when things come up then move those to nirvana in the evening.

I also try to automate as much as I can, especially in relation to financial activities.

Nancy L.
Nancy L.
9 years ago

I know the theme you are asking us to consider is what systems work for us, but I keep going back to the central concept of a book I read about. (Sadly I don’t recall the title or the author, as I only read a synopsis of the book) What the book said was that whenever we have a habit that we consider “bad” and want to change, we have to figure out what we are getting that’s good out of continuing the habit. For example, most people learn at an early age that nothing good comes out of touching… Read more »

Naomi
Naomi
9 years ago

For my to-do list, I use teuxdeux.com. I have it pinned in Google Chrome, so I see it automatically every morning.

Bills are paid automatically, every single one.

Retirement investing is a once a year thing for me too, since I’m self-employed. I never know exactly how much I will be allowed to contribute. I haven’t figured out a solution to this one yet.

juyipey
juyipey
9 years ago

mine’s simple too. i have also automated bill payment, saving and investment just like J.D. then i just keep a list of to-do things in todoist.com. the list includes just about everything i need to accomplish daily, weekly, monthly, yearly and even occasionally (like if there are bdays, weddings, reunions we need to attend). i’ve placed all my automated bank activities in that to-do list as well so i could quickly check if the automation did happen as i expected. then of course, the rest that needs manual intervention is in that list too so i could do them in… Read more »

Crystal
Crystal
9 years ago

My only successful financial system for me has been an Excel spreadsheet that I sat down with my husband and created for our budget. I’ve been inputting every single expense we ever have into that thing for more than 4 years now. I love the fact that it forces me to look at our spending and only take about 90 minutes a month.

J.D. Roth
J.D. Roth
9 years ago

Some random notes that didn’t fit in the article: * The move to cloud-based computing is helping me become more organized. Before, I had bits and pieces of my life on many different machines. Now I use Google mail and calendar (can’t seem to make apps work for my life), and I use Dropbox to keep my files synced. By integrating these tools into my systems, I’ve made things run more smoothly. * There are plenty of things in my life that need to be systematized. This article was actually inspired by our first grocery trip after we got back.… Read more »

Meagan @ The Happiest Mom
Meagan @ The Happiest Mom
9 years ago

Love this post, because even though I write about organization, time management and productivity, I’m also not anywhere near “naturally” organized. I have to create systems and they have to be SIMPLE systems. I also have to build “checking in with my systems” into my routine or else they languish. For example, automated payments can cause me a HUGE problem if I don’t set aside time monthly to review them, because I’ll simply forget about them (Surprise! Your bank account has $500 less than you thought it did!) I use a to-do/task list very similar to yours. It’s basically a… Read more »

Everyday Tips
Everyday Tips
9 years ago

I was just thinking about this. Things have been a little crazy here lately, and some things have fallen through the cracks and I hate it. I need to take a couple hours and just get everything settled so I can have piece of mind. These last couple weeks have taught me that I am not nearly as ‘automated’ as I need to be. One thing that totally affected my life was my key hook. We painted the laundry room and took down the key hook. For weeks, I never knew where my keys were. We finally put the hook… Read more »

Sarah Russell
Sarah Russell
9 years ago

I have such a long way to go on this… 🙂 Right now, I have a folder for bills that haven’t been paid yet sitting on my desk. Bills that come in get placed in there until they’re paid, then they get filed. I also use a combination of Mint and Google Documents to track when payments are due and what payments have been made. I sit down a few times a month and map out what bills are coming due when and how much money needs to be in my checking account (versus my savings account) to pay them.… Read more »

Wade
Wade
9 years ago

Well, I don’t really automate payments or anything. How I pay bills is to mail out the payment the day after it shows up at the house. I know it uses more paper and everything, but I know exactly how much money is left in all of my accounts before and after each bill is paid.

Wayne Mates
Wayne Mates
9 years ago

One of the important points that JD mentions here is taking the “me” out of systems. As humans, I think we are prone to forgetting, getting off on tangents and having weird thoughts and ideas popping into our heads that just distract us. For me, most finance is automated. However, for other areas of life (work and personal), I prefer a good old fashioned hand written task list that I add to and cross off as I complete. I carry them with me at all times. Yes, it can get messy, but it works. But, it still does not solve… Read more »

threeoutside
threeoutside
9 years ago

About the wallet, JD? Why not put a reminder on your calendar, for a day or two after you get home from vacation, to pop up with a note about where you’ve left it? If you’re concerned about security, make it a coded clue that would mean nothing to anyone but yourself. (Frees up a couple brain cells to remember other, more important, things.)

El Nerdo
El Nerdo
9 years ago

I have a to-do list on my ical that has amazing powers of invisibility. Yes, it’s all there, but my brain tunes it out completely. Google calendars etc are even more easily forgotten. Any suggestions for improving on this will be greatly appreciated. I am trying to attack the productivity front and my progress is spotty at best. iCal does warn me well about upcoming appointments, etc. It’s the to-do part I haven’t figured out yet. When I think about it, I tend to use a whiteboard and sticky notes a lot for things to do. The whiteboard is fun–… Read more »

Tyler Karaszewski
Tyler Karaszewski
9 years ago

I signed up for mint.com to give “tracking your spending” another try. I still can’t make it useful for me. Here’s a screenshot where I fail totally at budgeting: http://tylerkaraszewski.com/mint.png I don’t know what to do with it. Any hints? Give up again? Otherwise, I try to keep things simple. My to-do list is in my head, it’s two or three items long, and it’s prioritized. Something only gets on the list if it’s one of the most important things I need to do. Otherwise, it falls off the list and I assume someone will remind me about it eventually.… Read more »

Sandy
Sandy
9 years ago

JD- you should read the book the checklist manifesto. Its all about how various industries develop checklists which help prevent routine errors.

Your desire to automate seems like a sort of checklist, you set up the automation to help prevent errors. Maybe using a checklist to deal with more of the business areas of your life will help with organization. (Of course I read the book and vowed to put it into practice. That was last summer….)

JakeIL7
JakeIL7
9 years ago

I automate everything I can: 1. Any fixed cost recurring bill (car, mortgage, etc.) that can be paid is paid via my bank’s bill pay 2. Any other bill is paid through my bank as well. As soon as I get the email that a bill is available, I schedule it for payment. Paper bills are placed on my keyboard until they are paid. 3. On payday (twice a month) I check to make sure I have received and plan to pay all expected bills by looking at my checking account history. *Bills are the only thing I use my… Read more »

Erica
Erica
9 years ago

I totally agree, we all have to find what works for us as individuals. I’ve gotten a system together after years of tinkering. Personally, I *hate* automation, and auto bill pay definitely doesn’t work for me (I tried it a couple of times). I love sitting down with my pen and checkbook and paying bills. I find it deeply satisfying to get the paper bill, open it, compare my electrical or gas usage or whatever and then do the online bill pay. I’m never late. I also think your “simple and transparent” notebook method sounds complicated and murky — to… Read more »

PB
PB
9 years ago

OK, hopelessly behind the times here because I still write and mail paper checks, but it’s what has worked for me for decades and I feel very in control. That being said, all bills when the come in go onto the corner of the piano. After two or three days, they go upstairs to the bill drawer. Once a month, everything is sorted out, all the bills are paid, and checks are mailed. I also write checks for bills that I know are coming and put them aside until the bill shows up. Old school? Definitely. But familiar and comfortable… Read more »

Jen
Jen
9 years ago

Love the debt snowball method, that’s been a big help for me, thank you! I’ve been trying to use the 30 day rule to control my impulsive spending, but I put these items (mostly cooking tools) on a list – I’ve tried paper, notebook, using an email folder, and an online wishlist. Unfortunately, every time I find myself using the list as a to do list forcing myself to go buy these things – so now something I wanted to buy has now become an urgent, costly (and weirdly stressful) errand. That’s not right. Any suggestions? Any other methods for… Read more »

Carla Y.
Carla Y.
9 years ago

I have a really simple system when it comes to getting things done and tracking spending. I carry I monthly/weekly planner. The one I have has a spot for appointments/notes for each day and a to do list area as well. I have $200 for each pay period that I allow myself to spend on anything that is not a planned expense and not an emergency. I write down my expenses in the notes part, and subtract that from my running tally each day. Items that aren’t routine end up on the to do section. This is the best I’ve… Read more »

KM
KM
9 years ago

O, as a busy single mother with a > full time career, I’m a HUGE fan of habits/routines. They let me live my life without anything going off the tracks, and I love how it totally frees up my mind to think about other things. Everything in my house always goes in its exact same place every single time (phone, keys, purse, kids’ phones, kids’ school ID cards, gym clothes, homework, permission slips blah blah blah) You could seriously go insane trying to keep track of all of it otherwise. Every single day the first thing I do is make… Read more »

HollyP
HollyP
9 years ago

The one area I really, truly struggle with is making time to actual update my budget & record transactions. When I get up I’m rushing around getting kids ready for school & me ready for work. When I get home from work, I’m cooking dinner, spending time with the kids, cleaning, making the next day’s lunches. By the time I’m done with that, I’m too tired to bother with anything requiring brainpower. My husband goes to night school all week so I don’t have much help. Anyone in a similar situation with suggestions on how to make routine time for… Read more »

Patti
Patti
9 years ago

One of the best things to come out of my marriage (I’m soon-to-be-divorced) is my USAA credit union account. My ex was in the Army when we got married and I can keep my accounts unless I remarry. I have a few key bills that auto deduct, but most I use USAA bill pay system to pay. I probably hand write three checks a year for odd expenses. I also keep a note book where I have each pay date (I’m paid 26 times a year) with a list of the bills/deductions that should come out of that paycheck that… Read more »

Ash
Ash
9 years ago

I found a fantastic mac list program called ‘iGTD’ (stands for Getting Things Done). It allows you to sync with your ipod etc so that you have a digital version of your lists wherever you go. When I found it it was free, since then they have added more features, but it is still available for download for free here (http://bargiel.home.pl/iGTD/). I am a freelancer, so it helps me to track spending as well as checks owed to me from various companies. I hope that you all enjoy!

Bella
Bella
9 years ago

Ah, the ‘safe place’. As a child I was forever putting things in ‘a safe place’ so I wouldn’t lose them. It was consistently so safe that I wouldn’t find them till years later. Then I met my husband, and we bought an ACTUAL safe. Much better!
My husband seems to be much better about remembering where things are than me. I need the routine of things always being in the same place. Of course, maybe he’s so good at it, because I always move his stuff to the same place?

Kevin M
Kevin M
9 years ago

I’ve automated every monthly bill so I don’t miss any of those.

I manually transfer to savings every month after our bills are paid (kind of like a sweep account I guess).

Our day to day spending is on a credit card which we monitor weekly so we don’t exceed our (soft) budget.

For bigger irregular items (life insurance, HOA dues, annual vet appointment), I have a Google spreadsheet that keeps me aware of when they are coming due.

retirebyforty
retirebyforty
9 years ago

I am fairly disorganize as well. Here are my strategy for paying bills.

– set up reminder on Outlook (or Google calendar)to pay certain bills
– set up auto payment on some bills/saving.
– minimize bills

This works pretty well currently, but if anything changes, I will probably need to adjust.

chacha1
chacha1
9 years ago

I’m a fan of Routine and Simplicity, but automation isn’t for me. I like to get my hands on things. And it seems like it would take just as much time to *verify* automatic banking transactions as it does to set up the payments & transfers and click Send. Re: vagrant wallets, etc. over on Unclutterer they have an acronym, PEEP: a Place for Everything and Everything in its Place. As KM says, putting an item in the same place every single time it’s used quickly becomes a routine. One must first, however, determine that the chosen place is actually… Read more »

cv
cv
9 years ago

A couple of people have touched on this, but one big “aha” moment for me was when I started using Outlook task lists that pop up reminders on certain days. “Has x person responded to message re: project?”, or “Start preparing for meeting next week,” and things like that. For my personal life, I use the fact that Google lets you set up lots of calendars to make one specifically for tasks so I can have it email me reminders. For example, I added one that says “Check on 401k rollover” for about two week from now because just I… Read more »

Cely
Cely
9 years ago

I pay all monthly bills automatically, even those that fluctuate slightly; I used mint to find my average, then bumped it up slightly, so that at the end of the year I can do one manual payment and have extra spending money freed up for the holidays. I still get paper bills, however, so I am reminded to check the balances and charges and make sure everything is correct. I have one filing box for all my bills and papers. When I start having trouble adding paper, I’m forced to go through and shred documents that are no longer needed.… Read more »

Vanessa
Vanessa
9 years ago

I just have to say that I am totally with you on updating your finance tracking software manually! I like to see the transactions that are being posted to my account so that I know right away if there’s fraudulent activity or if there’s been some mistake. I have actually caught a couple of fraudulent charges over the years that I may never have noticed if I didn’t look at each transaction individually. I also have a friend who had a small $9.99 charge added to their credit card every month for six months without taking notice of it, since… Read more »

reader
reader
9 years ago

I keep things simple.

Pay bills the same day as I get paid.

Pay everything online.

Done.

Marie
Marie
9 years ago

I use Mint simply to get a weekly overview of where all of my accounts stand. I like to get a quick glance at everything via one email. Once a month, I sit down, look at all of my accounts, bills, etc and make sure everything is in order. I also make a quick list of financial to-do items for that month. In other areas of my life, I’ve found that a small bowl by the door is perfect for keys (small enough to prevent the dumping of other items); I use a file drawer for important papers, organized by… Read more »

Anjali
Anjali
9 years ago

This is my first time posting. I started reading this blog about a year ago when my law school loans went into repayment and it’s helped me come up with a great GRS-inspired system for keeping my finances in order! My husband and I just went on a 2 week trip with intermittent internet access and everything ran smoothly. We have two incomes and three bank accounts (one savings and two checking). Our 401(k) contributions are of course automatically withdrawn pre-tax. My paycheck is deposited into savings and twice a month, a transfer is made into our “fixed expenses” checking… Read more »

J.D. Pohlman
J.D. Pohlman
9 years ago

I love automation! I only have two checking accounts (one I use as my savings account, since it’s currently getting 3% interest), and I organize everything through YNAB (You Need A Budget) to separate things out (like saving for a car, paying off student loans, etc.). I automatically have money taken out of my account for my Roth IRA, so I don’t even have to worry about it.

But I’m just like you with tracking. I still track everything by hand, then compare them to the transactions online. That helps me catch any transactions I might not have placed.

cc
cc
9 years ago

I also automate my finances, everything from savings to paying bills. The only exceptions are taxes and my every-60-days re-balancing of my investments. Staying organized is tough. The one thing I’ve found is that you have to spend time (and usually some money) developing a system that works for you. When I first started, I thought that a couple of folders in a plastic filing drawer and an in-box on my desk (the usual suggestions) were all I needed. But these things were such a pain to use (and so contrary to how I worked) that it actually discouraged me… Read more »

bethh
bethh
9 years ago

I just left a detailed comment on April Dykman’s expense-tracking post from Monday. I automate my retirement savings and that is it. BUT I have rituals for everything else: 1) I track all my expenses in a little notebook that goes everywhere with me. 2) Every payday I transfer a consistent amount of money into various accounts (short term savings (which later gets siphoned off into long-term savings), bills, mad money, travel, misc spending, etc.) 3) After I transfer my money around I write a little report listing all my balances in all my accounts. I send it in an… Read more »

leslie
leslie
9 years ago

Re: only doing your investments once a year…. There is a way you can do this and still take advantage of dollar cost averaging. I invest via Fidelity but I am sure the other big investment companies do this also… Because of the way we are paid, I can’t put the same amount of money into my ROTH every month. I have months where the deposit is very small and then twice a year we put a large chunk in. What I do is deposit it all into what they call our “core” account – basically a money market account… Read more »

KM
KM
9 years ago

I keep all my financial information in one excel spreadsheet per year. One “page” contains long range (20 year) planning and investment predictions for my retirement, my kids’ future college, when my mortgage will be paid off. Each row is a year and then the categories across list my various assets/debts for each year. I’ve tried to plan out what each will be for the next 15-20 years but of course anything past 3 years is just estimating. But it’s helpful to see that the mortgage will eventually be paid off and what I can expect the kids’ college accounts… Read more »

aryn
aryn
9 years ago

As a hardcore TJ’s shopper, I can tell you that what you find at TJ’s is almost always cheaper than another store. There have been a few times where a good coupon + sale at a regular grocery store beat their price, but for the stuff they sell regularly, they offer the lowest price or they stop carrying it.

Produce may not be the best price, depending on seasonality and the size of your local major grocery store, but I buy that at the farmer’s market anyway.

El Nerdo
El Nerdo
9 years ago

@ Nicole: thank you for mentioning Robert Boice, I found his ebook “Procrastination and Blocking” free to download, here: http://ebookee.org/Robert-Boice-Procrastination-and-Blocking_363096.html (I’m assuming it’s legal, yes? anyway some of the download links don’t work anymore but some do). @ 33 Ash – thanks for mentioning iGTD. Turns out the developer has joined the “Things” team and discontinued the program. However it’s still possible to download older versions of iGTD here: http://www.macupdate.com/app/mac/24288/igtd. And “Things”, while selling for $50 (“49.95”) offers a trial download. So I have now two pieces of software to test, I hope they work. — ALSO was looking at… Read more »

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