How to get your free credit report online: A step-by-step guide

Getting your hands on a free copy of your credit report and checking it for errors is one of the easiest ways to help your financial health. Correcting even a small mistake can make a huge difference to your score. A higher score means lower interest rates, insurance quotes, and can even help you land some types of jobs. And it's never been easier to get a copy of your free credit report.

AnnualCreditReport.com is a government-approved site that enables most people to gain access to their reports within minutes. Under law, you have the right to obtain a free credit report from each of the three major credit bureaus once every twelve months. Courtney and I stagger our requests so that we are able to access a different bureau every four months.

Warning: There are many scam sites that try to rip-off AnnualCreditReport.com. Stay away from the cheesy commercials and catchy jingles. AnnualCreditReport.com is safe, approved, and regulated.

Ralph writes:

I'd like to know how to get a free copy of my credit report from the agencies.

A recent federal law gives consumers access to their credit reports; however, it costs extra to obtain your credit score. Your credit score is not an actual component of your credit report.

The Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) requires each of the nationwide consumer reporting companies — Equifax, Experian, and TransUnion — to provide you with a free copy of your credit report, at your request, once every 12 months.

There is never a need to go through any other agency to obtain your credit report. This is an official, government-approved site. If you'd like, you can obtain reports from all three credit reporting agencies at once. Or, you can stagger your requests, possibly requesting one report every four months from a different agency. There are three ways to obtain your credit report:

You will need to provide some basic information, including your social security number, and you may need to provide some personal financial information. If you plan to check your report online, be wary of impostor sites. Be absolutely certain that you have reached AnnualCreditReport.com.

It's important to obtain a copy of your credit report at regular intervals. The credit reporting agencies are not infallible, and neither are your creditors. People make mistakes, and mistakes on your credit report can cost you money. If you suspect an error, read how to dispute credit report errors.

When you request your free credit report, you'll also be given a chance to purchase your credit score for about $8. Your credit score is a single number that serves as a snapshot for your overall creditworthiness, a sort of summary of your entire credit report. To learn how your credit score is computed, read my anatomy of a credit score.

How to Obtain Your Free Credit Report

I don't think people realize just how simple it can be to check your report! Below, I've taken step-by-step screen shots of each leg of the process:

First, simply visit www.AnnualCreditReport.com
ACRHome
On the homepage, all you need to do is select your state from the dropdown list and press the red “Request Report” button.
acrinfo
  • Next, enter the required information (marked with a red *).
  • I recommend checking the box (I've highlighted with the red arrow) to hide your social security number should you print out the report.
  • Enter in the security code and select “Continue”.
acrselect
  • On this page you can select the bureau (or bureaus) you'd like to get your credit report from.
  • You can view all at once, but you'll have to wait another full 12 months before re-visiting the same bureau. (In other words, if you pull all three at the same time, you can't check any of them for free for an entire year.)
  • Courtney and I stagger our request and only pull one every four months.
  • Click “Next”.
acrconfirm
  • This screen is just a confirmation that you'll be visiting the specific site of the bureau you selected.
  • Click “Next”.
experianconfirm
  • You are now asked to verify your identity on the specific site of the bureau.
  • This is Experian, although TransUnion and Equifax have similar confirmation screens.
  • Enter your information and press the red “SUBMIT”.
experianstep1
  • Experian would now like to make a quick buck.
  • Avoid the upsell, and click “Annual Credit Report” highlighted below.
experianstep2
  • Next is the Order Summary screen.
  • Verify the amount is $0.00 (Free).
  • Check the Terms & Conditions box. (If your name is J.D., you'll want to read the whole damn thing before checking the box.)
  • Click the red “SUBMIT” button.
experianstep3
  • Lastly, you have one more confirmation screen before gaining access to the report.
  • Experian asks you four security questions regarding information on the file.
  • Answer the questions (some may very well be “NONE OF THE ABOVE”).
  • Click the red “CONTINUE” button.
experiansummary
  • Now you have access to your credit report!
  • Look over the Summary, Negative Items, Accounts in Good Standing, Requests, Personal Information, and Personal Statement tabs at the top.
  • Notice the “print your report” link I've highlighted in case you want to retain a copy.
  • As always, avoid the upsells to keep your access free!
experiannegative
Here is a real-life example of what identity theft looks like! There's one negative item listed as “charged off”, but that was a fraudulent account. This is now the third time it's appeared on Courtney's report after being removed. Negative items feature a “Dispute this item” button that walks you through the dispute process.
experianhistory
This is an example of the “Requests for your credit history” tab. You can see there are two primary categories: one for “Requests viewed by others” (hard pulls) and one for “Requests viewed only by you” (soft pulls). In this example, a third party would not see any recent requests for use of credit, since there are none listed for that category.
experianfail
Note: If you've already accessed your account in the last 12 months, you will be shown this screen when trying to log-in. (Of course, they are more than willing to sell you a report if you have a credit card!)

In the rare case you are denied access…
If for one reason or another you are unable to obtain online access, you still have options for getting your free reports. You can:

  • Call 1-877-322-8228 to obtain a copy by phone; or
  • Complete the Annual Credit Report Request Form and mail it to: Annual Credit Report Request Service, P.O. Box 105281, Atlanta, GA 30348-5281.

FreeCreditReport.com vs. AnnualCreditReport.com

Mark Frauenfelder (founder of the awesome Boing Boing) has a piece at PC.com that asks: When is a free credit report not a free credit report? The answer, of course, is: When it comes from FreeCreditReport.com.

FreeCreditReport.com, which has raised the ire of many, does allow people to look at their credit reports free for seven days, but then automatically enrolls users into a $15/month credit monitoring service. This last fact is a problem. Frauenfelder writes:

I clicked on the large bright orange button that said “Get your Free Credit Report & Score!” and was presented with a form. I filled it out. I hesitated for a second when the site asked for my credit card number, which it stated was “required to establish your account,” but the site assured me that my “credit card will not be charged during the free trial period.” Having done this before (or so I thought), I went ahead and entered the information. A shopping cart receipt indicated that the total was $0.00.

I got my credit report, looked it over, and forgot about it. A week later I was looking at my checking account register online and I noticed a $14.95 charge from a company called CIC*Triple Advantage. I didn't recall buying anything from a company with that name, so I entered “CIC*Triple Advantage” into Google. The search results made my eyes bug out of my head. This was the name of the billing entity for freecreditreport.com. The thousands of search results were full of words like “deceptive practices,” “scam,” “ripoff,” “unauthorized billing!” and “beware!” In fact, all the top results were either from people complaining that they'd been conned into signing up for a $14.95 monthly credit monitoring service without their permission, or they were about how to cancel the service.

Frauenfelder admits that it's his fault for being duped, but still thinks FreeCreditReport.com is slimy. Read the rest of his story for other problems he has with the service.

Finally, on a lighter note, a post in the GRS forums pointed to this spoof commercial highlighting the problems with FreeCreditReport.com.

Your Credit Report Card

Credit.comlaunched a free new online financial tool called Credit Report Card. This tool is designed to provide users with a quick snapshot of their credit reports. According to the site's FAQ, “it breaks down your credit report into five simple-to-understand categories and gives you a letter grade for each one.”

Here are some things to know about Credit Report Card:

  • It's absolutely free.
  • You can request a new report card every thirty days.
  • It draws its data from the TransUnion credit bureau.
  • Its data comes via a “soft pull” of your credit, so using it will not affect your credit score.

Curious, I signed up for Credit Report Card myself. Some GRS readers will be wary because the sign-up process requires that you submit your Social Security Number (which is needed to pull your credit report) and asks a couple of broad but personal questions. I felt comfortable with this, though, and created an account.

My overall credit “grade” is an A. I scored high in the areas where I knew my report was strong, and I scored a little lower in the areas where I knew it was weaker. (Though I do have a personal credit card now, I try to avoid credit when possible, so I don't have as broad an “account mix” as I could.)

The bottom of the report contained a summary of the statistics used to produce the Credit Report Card. You can see that I spend about $1000 a month on my credit card, which I diligently pay in full. (This earns me about $10 a month because it's a 1% cash back card.)

Each section of the Credit Report Card also contains a detailed explanation of how your grade was derived. These sections contain a couple of paragraphs each explaining how credit scores work and recommending actions you can take to improve your credit.

The Credit Report Card isn't earth-shattering. It's not a tool that's going to revolutionize the way you deal with money. It is, however, a useful way to monitor your progress. I've added the site to my bookmarks, and I plan to check in every month or two when I'm doing my personal finances.

Get Your Free Credit Report

So what are you waiting for? If you've put this off in the past, schedule a time to get your free copy and review it for errors! Your credit score and your wallet will thank you.

More about...Debt

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The Technocrat
The Technocrat
13 years ago

I pay a small fee for quarterly updates at mycreditinform.com. Their credit calulators (“What would happen to my score if I…”) are great as well.

mike
mike
13 years ago

Thanks for the reminder. I’ve been meaning to do this for a while. There’s an incredible amount of info on these reports, kinda scary. Fortunately, all my info is good! 🙂

rhbee
rhbee
13 years ago

I recently tried to apply for a o% interest credit card for my business so that I could balance transfer to it an amount from another card that had been at 0%. But the card company told me they couldn’t allow it since the folks at Equifax said I had insufficient credit history. So I called, well I tried calling, the Equifax people to see what was going on since I have had all sorts of credit cards and loans and financial interactions over the years and I presently have two company credit cards. I got an automated system. But… Read more »

Nicole Gustas
Nicole Gustas
12 years ago

Great article! I just wanted to let you know I linked to it from our page on How to Get a Free Credit Report:
http://www.mahalo.com/How_to_Get_a_Free_Credit_Report
I read your blog frequently. I was very happy to link to it!
Mahalo!

Arthaey
Arthaey
12 years ago

Thanks for the reminder. I’ve set up Google Calendar to remind me every 4 months to get a new credit report. Now I won’t forget again! 🙂

Jake
Jake
11 years ago

I recently saw this website – http://www.freebiecreditreport.com – claiming that you can get a credit report and credit score 100% free. Ha! Yeah as long as you remember to cancel the 7 day trial. Consumer beware, sign up for these services if you must, but remember to cancel before trial ends or be billed up to $30/month. Yeah well needless to say I neglected to cancel within the free trial and had to shell out the dough.

Writer's Coin
Writer's Coin
11 years ago

With commercials like the ones they’re running, I’m surprised anyone takes them seriously.

Pirates and “ye olde fair” commercials are funny and all, but not when those people are asking me for sensitive information.

Although the guy that sings in them is getting some good play from them, and I’m all for that.

No Debt Plan
No Debt Plan
11 years ago

Not sure if you found this in your research, but here’s the real kicker of the whole deal: FreeCreditReport.com is owned by Experian. It’s sickening.

I wrote about this a while back:
http://www.nodebtplan.net/2008/03/31/who-owns-free-credit-reportcom/

You would think a company selling $15/month subscriptions wouldn’t be able to afford millions of dollars of radio and TV advertising, and you’re right. It’s backed by Experian. Makes me sick.

Ryan
Ryan
11 years ago

I’m thinking about taking the next step–freezing my credit.

We have our fixed rate mortgage at 5.5%. We have our one credit card that we pay off every month and earns 1% cash back. Good and growing savings, no car loans now or in the future. In short, no need for debt other than the mortgage, which we’re paying aggressively.

Freezing credit would primarily be as a protection against identity theft, but as a loyal reader to this site, I admit that I kind of like its other implications.

Does anyone have any thoughts or experience with this?

Horatio Positronic
Horatio Positronic
11 years ago

I used FreeCreditReport.com over a year ago. At the time they didn’t have the $14.95/month thing as clearly marked as they do now. It took me forever to figure out who CIC*Triple Advantage was.

When I finally did I went to their website and found the cancellation phone number. Cancelling wasn’t too hard, except for the guy trying to sell me more trial offers. If you stick to your guns they will cancel and stop charging you.

Miranda
Miranda
11 years ago

I don’t like FreeCreditReport.com at all. Other credit monitoring services in the same ilk have a similar policy of challenging anything negative that comes across — even if it is accurate. And sometimes there is a fee for that as well. Honestly, after I’ve used my free reports from annualcreditreport.com, I’d rather just go to one of the bureaus and pay the fee.

Andrea
Andrea
11 years ago

Unfortunately, annualcreditreport.com is useless for people like me- Americans who live or are stationed overseas. The site is only accessible from within the US.

Jeff
Jeff
11 years ago

I was burned by these guys too. Ugh.

mark
mark
11 years ago

I’ve used for annualcreditreport.com every year for a few years now and appreciate being able to get the reports for free, but the government went half-assed on this – they should have required them to give us the credit score too, as the credit score is what really matters.

Dan
Dan
11 years ago

They do apparently give you a free credit report, as offered. Then you need to cancel. Big deal. Perhaps they’ve recently changed their web site, but the front page currently contains this notification which doesn’t seem all that deceptive to me:

IMPORTANT INFORMATION

When you order your free report here, you will begin your free trial membership in Triple AdvantageSM Credit Monitoring. If you don’t cancel your membership within the 7-day trial period†, you will be billed $14.95 for each month that you continue your membership.

Morydd
Morydd
11 years ago

I’m not sure how people unknowingly get roped into this. The front page of the site says “When you order your free report here, you will begin your free trial membership in Triple Advantage Credit Monitoring. If you don’t cancel your membership within the 7-day trial period, you will be billed $14.95 for each month that you continue your membership.” The commercials say “Offer applies with enrollment in Trip Advantage.” So it seems that people are upset because instead of paying attention to what they were signing up for, they just listened to the guy in the pirate hat sing… Read more »

econobiker
econobiker
11 years ago

Again, our government is a bunch of pansies not to have hammered these idiots about this issue. I think the do nothing regulators need to make freecreditreport say “YOU ARE BUYING A MEMBERSHIP FOR $X” or “YOU WILL PURCHASE A MEMBERSHIP FOR $X”. That is if the government couldn’t just take over the domain itself… eminant domain indeed. And #5 Mark- the credit score is now in debate as there are changes to it and one of the credit reporting agencies no longer wants to pay Fair Isacc for the FICO score service anymore. The reason for the gov’t getting… Read more »

jtimberman
jtimberman
11 years ago

Helpful hint about credit reports.

If you are the victim of ID theft, and you put a fraud alert on your credit report, all three credit reporting agencies are required by Federal law to send you a copy of your report.

You can renew the alert every 90 days, and they must send you the report. This is in addition to the free report you’re entitled to once per year from each agency.

shashe
shashe
11 years ago

Just last week I helped my father who wanted to get his Credit Score through this site (the Free Credit Report, blah, blah, blah). We did submit his credit card info and, as they state, he was signed up for the “Triple Advantage” offer. After digging all over the site– we DID find the phone number to call if you want to cancel (not an easy thing to find but it is there). We called immediately, got a representative who attempted to keep my dad locked in, but after several refusals, we were able to get it cancelled. He is… Read more »

Allison
Allison
11 years ago

Andrea @ 6

If overseas, you should be able to get your credit report by mailing in a paper request form. Click the link in the article for “Annual Credit Report Request Form,” and follow the links to print off the form and mail it in.

Debt Free Adventure
Debt Free Adventure
11 years ago

I was taken by the FreeCreditReport “scam” as well. Do yourself a favor and stay away from these guys. In contrast AnnualCreditReport.com has been a joy to use. It is a very useful thing to have such a service provided you for free. As you mentioned in your article, I prefer to spread my credit reports out 1 every 4 months. Regarding credit score…people should be aware of the fact that Experian will consistently have the lowest credit score of the other 2 reporting companies. This is not a theory, but a reality that I have been witness to over… Read more »

Starving Artist
Starving Artist
11 years ago

Oh, don’t stop there! I read the fine print and after obtaining the report, I immediately called them to cancel my subscription, and I’ve NEVER experienced such aggressive customer service. They started castigating me for not caring about my credit. I actually laughed briefly at the ludicrousness of their pitch, and they said (real quote), “What, sir, do you think this is a laughing matter? Do you think identity theft is a laughing matter?” This went on for a few more seconds, then I told them THEY were a laughing matter, then I told them a few things that I… Read more »

Tom
Tom
11 years ago

This is a huge problem. I wrote a guest post about it for Lending Club last year – Keep your free credit report free

J.D.
J.D.
11 years ago

I think the people noting the disclaimers are missing the point. Or points. 1. There’s already an official way to get free credit reports that offers no risk of being charged. 2. The disclaimers are apparently rather new. 3. Regardless of the disclaimers, this is a company that bills itself as offering “free credit reports”, but that’s not its actual business model. Its business model is to sell people a subscription service credit-monitoring tool. If they called themselves something like “Expert Credit Monitoring”, but offered free credit reports as a premium for signing up, nobody would have a complaint. 4.… Read more »

tinyhands
tinyhands
11 years ago

Since JD and a couple of commenters mentioned credit score, I’d like to argue that you don’t need to know your credit score. I’ll say it again: YOU DON’T NEED TO KNOW YOUR CREDIT SCORE. What good comes from knowing this number? Are you suddenly going to stop paying the minimum on your credit card debt? Are you going to stop eating out and start cultivating organic produce? Are you going to stop paying for premium gas and keep your tires inflated? No, knowing this number changes nothing. By all means, keep an eye on your credit report and challenge… Read more »

shashe
shashe
11 years ago

@19 Whether people need to know it or not… some people happen to want to know it for a variety of reasons. My father never knew his and was curious. There will be no action taken because of his newfound knowledge– he is just a little bit happier now that he knows. Also, the pirate commercial thing is knew to me. “Free Credit Report” is actually an option that you can include on your personalized ([email protected]) internet homepage alongwith news tabs, weather reports for different cities, etc. which is how we came across it. I am not sure how they… Read more »

Shara
Shara
11 years ago

I’ll agree to always read the fine print. This is a buyer beware situation. We can argue about how to make them legally disclose what they are about, but scams will always be out there and it ultimately comes down to being aware of what you’re doing and really signing up for. Didn’t it strike you that it was asking for your credit card information? Any time you are signing up for a free service and they ask you for your credit card number chances are that they want it to CHARGE YOU FOR SOMETHING. If I call you will… Read more »

clayton
clayton
11 years ago

JD comment 18 point #4 I’m glad to hear your upet about the web sign up / phone cancellation. I absolutely hate companies that take advantage of the opt-out scheme by making it difficult to opt-out. I got burned by stamps.com for this. Funny though, I recently got an e-mail about a class action against stamps.com for this very thing–The waits to cancel on the phone were prohibitively long. So keep up the good work–it’s bloggers and others who keep these companies in line. It’s never a moral issue, just a bottom line issue–Let’s educate ourselves and make it less… Read more »

Taylor at Household Management 101
Taylor at Household Management 101
11 years ago

JD, thanks for making people aware of this. I know I myself got confused about it, and almost made a mistake when trying to research me credit report.

I also think it is important for people to understand that your credit score is NOT given to you for free, because it is not required by the government. I personally think this is a bad oversight on the part of the federal government when enacting this legislation, because credit scores are just as important as credit reports.

Gaston
Gaston
11 years ago

If you want a free credit *score* (not report), http://www.creditkarma.com/ worked for me.

Dana
Dana
11 years ago

Agreed with #23. I get the impression that many potential creditors only look at the score, not the entire report because they don’t have time for the latter, their system is automated, or what have you. If I for instance apply for a credit card online, the approval process is automated. That means they have to look at my score to give me a decision that quickly. If the score falls too low, then they will look at my report to send me a letter telling me why they rejected me. The score’s a weeding-out tool. By the way, (1)… Read more »

Ted Lehman
Ted Lehman
11 years ago

What about CreditKarma.com?

Moneyblogga
Moneyblogga
11 years ago

Luckily, I don’t need freecreditreport.com to tell me how lousy my credit is right now. There is nothing “free” about freecreditreport.com anyway as we all know. IMO just another scammer in the deep financial industry pool of scammers.

CentsInTheCity
CentsInTheCity
11 years ago

Before I type in any web address, I make sure I research that it is safe before I input any sensitive information. I don’t click through links unless it’s from http://www.irs.gov or another government website. That’s the safest way to avoid identity theft.

I never sign up for “free” services that ask for credit cards. It’s not worth the hassle. Usually you can find something else that is comparable for free.

Mini Site Templates
Mini Site Templates
11 years ago

When you do things like freecreditreport you know there’s a catch. Sometimes a quick credit score and report is pretty convenient instead of waiting on the government to send you one, you just have to watch out for the scams reading is the best way to avoid that.

thank you
Derrick

Betsy
Betsy
11 years ago

I don’t remember if it was here or at The Simple Dollar, but I was reading about getting my annual credit reports (three, actually – one from each agency) and a smart blogger or reader pointed out that a wise person STAGGERS the reports, so you can check one in January, one in May, and one in September (for example), to get a rolling (and comprehensive) look at your credit picture.

Ryan Loos
Ryan Loos
11 years ago

What’s the point on paying for credit monitoring when you can do that yourself with the 3 free credit reports? The time and money that you should be investing in if you want identity theft insurance (credit monitoring) should include a restoration service once your identity has been stolen. Credit monitoring is a waste of and does not help get your life back after someone has stolen your indentify.

Daniel@youngandfrugal
11 years ago

As a notice for people who use Free Credit Report with the intention of cancelling. They put you on hold FOREVER before you get to talk to a real person. I got fed up, found their contact e-mail, and demanded that they cancel my account and send me confirmation of doing so.

I got an e-mail back the next day with the confirmation.

So if you do use them, send an e-mail to cancel, as you might never get a real person on the phone (and I suspect they will pressure you into a discounted rate too).

Pieter
Pieter
11 years ago

I signed up for FreeCreditReport.com about two years ago. Like everyone else, I actually thought it was free. Then they started charging me about $12.95/month. After I found out who Triple Advantage was, I kept meaning to call in and cancel but since $12.95 is a pretty negligible amount I never got around to making the call. So I ended up subscribed to Triple Advantage for approximately a year and a half. Finally, after reading about them online and discovering some people claimed to have gotten refunds, I called to cancel. While canceling, I also demanded a refund. Of course… Read more »

Judy
Judy
11 years ago

It’s a great commercial though….Freeeee Credit Report dot Com…. I’m singing it now! Anyone for Red Lobster?

Peggy
Peggy
11 years ago

To Dana #25: Yes, I’ve had problems accessing my TransUnion report online. They had my married name wrong. I sent them a letter and copies of ID, and all they did was put my real name down as one of my “aliases”.

Anne
Anne
11 years ago

I’ve been looking into this lately because my sis recently had something go to collections. I want to help her pull her reports and score in a month to check to make sure the account closed and assess the damage. In this case the score is important because there is a significant chance she will want a loan of some type in the near-ish future. A few PF bloggers (I forgot who, I know I got linked there via PF page at AllTop) have tried CreditKarma.com and seem to universally report that it is a good but inaccurate estimate when… Read more »

Gaston
Gaston
11 years ago

#36 – “A few PF bloggers (I forgot who, I know I got linked there via PF page at AllTop) have tried CreditKarma.com and seem to universally report that it is a good but inaccurate estimate when compared to the actual scores.”

… so CreditKarma is estimating my score, rather than reporting it?

Carl
Carl
11 years ago

They didn’t get me with that “free” crdit monitoring, I don’t appreciate abusive business practices so when I noticed that experian no longer allow consumer to see the FICO score based in Experian data but still selling those FICO scores to lenders I decided not to do any more business with hem. I placed a security freeze in my experian report, that means no more revenue for them using my credit data. I still have Equifax and Transunion open, so far I didn’t have a single problem to obtain a new credit card an a new car loan, I guess… Read more »

Janine
Janine
11 years ago

My husband is interested in freezing our credit so that no one can use our identities to open credit card accounts. He was checking into one of the companies (I don’t remember which), and they had a freezing and unfreezing fee. This could get expensive! Any suggestions? I’m very new to this topic. Thanks

Carl
Carl
11 years ago

It’s ten dollars to freeze it. After that you can unfreeze it for free. I think Experian it’s the only one who charges a fee for a temporal unfreeze but a permanent lift is free in all 3 bureaus.

DDFD at DivorcedDadFrugalDad
DDFD at DivorcedDadFrugalDad
11 years ago

Good post! People need to know.

Ep
Ep
11 years ago

What a bunch of naive people. If you entered your credit card and still thought it was going to be free, you’re an idiot. Plain and simple.

Jo
Jo
11 years ago

Frauenfelder writes: “I hesitated for a second when the site asked for my credit card number, which it stated was “required to establish your account,” but the site assured me that my ‘credit card will not be charged during the free trial period.’” That’s a clear indication that you are signing up for something you will be paying for. If people don’t pay attention to what they read then they shouldn’t complain that they were duped. Requesting sensitive financial information from a website you found on Google doesn’t seem like a good idea in general. It would probably be safer… Read more »

bleu
bleu
11 years ago

I use virtual credit card numbers whenever I shop online. I sign in and generate a number for each shopping experience. They are one time use and expire the next month. I don’t know if “free”creditreport.com would except such a number but if you used one to obtain a credit report in the later half of the month, the number would probably expire before FCR attempted to charge it. Does anyone else find it ridiculous that you have to pay to see your FICO score? It’s like paying the dentist for the privilege of seeing my own x-rays. It’s information… Read more »

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