Furniture shopping secrets: How to tell superior from shoddy

Here at the Koke-Long house we're in the market for some furniture. Our living room is currently semi-furnished with a comfortable but deteriorating Ikea couch and some leftover dining chairs; we'd like a nice armchair or two and some tables.

I've mostly gone for Ikea ‘cheap and new' furniture in the past, but I've been disappointed by its (understatement alert!) lack of durability. This time I'd like to try buying used but higher-quality. As I began to look around, though, I realized that I knew very little about what makes for a strong, long-lasting piece of furniture.

Anyone can identify a rip, scratch, or stain, or decide whether they like a certain color, without special knowledge. But judging whether a piece is likely to last two years or twenty — just by looking at it — is harder stuff. Time to research! Here's an overview of what I learned, with a checklist at the end.

Wood Furniture — Composition

I used to think hardwoods were hard and softwoods were soft. Silly me! Actually, hardwood just means ‘from a deciduous tree' and softwood means ‘from a coniferous tree', and some hardwoods (like aspen) are softer than some softwoods. What you want on exposed surfaces is a wood that's reasonably scratch-resistant. You can test this easily enough by attempting to draw a thin line with your fingernail across the wood; if it makes a visible dent (use a flashlight here if necessary) you know it won't stand up to much use.

Structurally, any kind of solid wood or sturdy plywood will do the trick. If plywood, look for at least nine layers. Check the wood for knots, even on unexposed pieces; all knots are susceptible to cracks. Some woods, like pine, are ‘knottier' than others, and therefore less desirable. Avoid particleboard, pressed wood, or fiberboard.

Veneers — a thin piece of premium wood covering a lower-quality piece of wood — are often used even in very high-quality furniture. As long as the base piece is solid wood or plywood, the only drawback to veneer is that it limits the number of times an item can be refinished.

Wood Furniture — Construction

Joint construction is the main determinant of quality furniture. Anything held together with staples or nails is shoddy construction. Ditto if it's glued and you can see the glue. Dowels (wooden pegs slotted into two opposing holes) are good, as are screws. The best joints are either dovetail (interlocking squarish ‘teeth' — see photo) or mortise-and-tenon (narrowed end of one piece inserted into a hole in the other). Corners should have a reinforcing block attached at an angle.

Look for thin sheets of wood between drawers in a chest of drawers or desk. While not necessary, these ‘dust panels' improve structural strength as well as protect drawer contents. Drawers should run smoothly on glides and have stops to prevent accidentally pulling them all the way out. The best drawers have bottoms that are not affixed to the sides but ‘float' in a groove, allowing for minor expansion and contraction caused by changes in humidity and providing extra strength.

Lift the piece at one corner — it should not twist or squeak. Check that all legs are touching the floor. Press on various corners to see if the piece rocks or wobbles.

Upholstered Furniture — Composition

For a sofa or chair with removable cushions, unzip a seat cover and have a look inside. You should see a block of foam wrapped with dacron, cotton, or (for very high-end cushions) down, preferably with a protective inner cover (usually muslin). Foam-only cushions are both less durable and less comfortable. If you're buying new furniture, inquire after the density rating of the seat foam: you're looking for 1.8 pounds or higher.

Removable back cushions may have foam as well but are more often loose fill. In the latter case, multiple internal compartments are preferred as they prevent the fill from settling.

If there's a tag or label, look for a cleaning code: ‘W' means water-based cleaners, ‘S' means solvent-based cleaners (‘dry cleaning'), ‘X' means no liquid (vacuum only).

Upholstered Furniture — Construction

According to Consumer Reports, the oft-touted “eight-way hand-tied coil springs” don't have a corner on comfort; coil, cone, sinuous, and grid springs can all work well. Best just to test the feel of the specific piece by sitting in various spots to see whether you tip or sink. If the cushions are removable, lift and press down on the deck underneath: you should feel even spacing and resistance to pressure.

Squeeze the arms and back: ideally you should not be able to feel the frame through the padding. Lined skirts and ones with weights will hold their shape better over the long run.

Are the cushions reversible? You'll get twice the wear if they are. Flip them around and make sure any upholstery patterns match up both ways.

Tip: Consumer Reports has a nice diagram to help you assess upholstered furniture construction.

Quick Furniture Checklist

That's a lot of information. If you're like me, you might find it difficult to remember all of these factors while you're actually shopping at the furniture store. To make things easier, I've created a basic furniture shopping checklist. You may download the 35kb PDF or simply print the list below:

Wood

  • good: solid wood or 9+ layer plywood
  • bad: thin plywood, particleboard, pressboard, fiberboard
  • bad: knots, cracks
  • bad: soft, easily scratched surfaces

Joints

  • great: dovetail, mortise & tenon
  • good: reinforcing corner blocks
  • good: dowels, screws
  • bad: staples, nails, visible glue

Drawers

  • great: dust panels, floating bottoms
  • good: metal glide rails, stops
  • bad: wood-on-wood sliding

Frame

  • good: even, level with floor
  • bad: twists, creaks, wobbles

Springs

  • great: hand-tied coil springs
  • good: close together, even resistance
  • bad: any springs more than a few inches apart

Cushions

  • good: firm foam wrapped in padding
  • good: protective inner cover
  • good: reversible cushions
  • bad: bare foam
  • bad: loose fill without internal sectioning

Upholstery

  • good: aligned patterns
  • good: skirts with lining or weights
  • bad: skimpy padding along arms and back

Armed with this information, I feel much more confident about approaching future furniture purchases, both new and used. I hope you find it helpful too. Happy hunting!

IKEA photo by OiMax.

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Tyler Tervooren
Tyler Tervooren
11 years ago

That’s a pretty handy little guide. Now you just have to figure out how to navigate the daunting furniture stores and salesmen. I’ve noticed, though, that when you’re dealing with really high end and used furniture, the vibe of stores and salesmen is not nearly as sleazy. I prefer to buy most of the stuff I need from a local furniture builder. There are a few of them around me and they are so much easier to work with than a big-box showroom salesman. You know you’re getting quality because they love their craft and their furniture is a direct… Read more »

Four Pillars
Four Pillars
11 years ago

Wow, that’s a pretty good summary. I can’t get my head around paying lots of money for furniture but if I ever do – then I’ll use this post.

Greg@eliminatethemuda.com
11 years ago

Very nice piece! As a hobbyist builder for 25 years I can tell you, you nearly nailed it. Your summary is perfect as a checklist but I would add a “great” under “wood”. For great you would have solid wood, for good you would have plywood. However plywood also comes is a range of qualities, birch will often have more layers that are thinner in a 3/4″ panel. If you are looking at a panel that is only 1/4″ you’ll probably never see 9 layers. For great furniture focus on the joints listed and look for them in the case… Read more »

David
David
11 years ago

Well, I don’t believe in spending a lot of money for furniture. My mother’s house is full of fine, expensive, incredibly-heavy furniture from the 50s and 60s and I don’t want any of it. Solid rosewood stuff from Hong Kong and Japan, probably worth a lot, but when she passes on I’m probably going to have to auction it off. I’m an IKEA-kind of guy and if my $300 “Klippan” sofa that’s about four years old ever falls apart, it’s not too hard to buy a new one, and it’s still in fine shape, plus I can buy new covers… Read more »

carol
carol
6 years ago
Reply to  David

People that buy cheap furniture and throw it away are filling our landfills with these junk pieces. Can you imagine if you have to replace your furniture every five years or so, how much you alone will throw away in your lifetime. Buying quality furniture is a luxury, but it will last.

as for you expensive sofa that you bought when you were young, a cheap one would have gotten ruined much sooner by misbehaving cats, and careless guests, so don’t blame that on the good piece of furniture.

Liz
Liz
11 years ago

I think David brings up a good point: how the furniture will be used and the amount of damage it’s likely to sustain. I’m all for buying high quality when appropriate. My husband and I bought (used) a pristine set of midcentury dressers that is solid wood, weighs approximately 1 ton, and will definitely be usable well into the next century since we take good care of them. On the other hand, we also have a beautifully made Eames coffee table (also bought used in great condition) that I am now regarding with a somewhat jaundiced eye as we think… Read more »

Laura W.
Laura W.
11 years ago

IMHO in furniture you get what you pay for. We stupidly bought futon sofas for the family room that lasted 4 years–never again. So we followed the advice of an upholsterer friend and purchased a quality name brand sofa this time around. I also would buy American manufactured furniture.

Janette
Janette
11 years ago

Liz- don’t get rid of the good furniture. Don’t shoo your kids away either. Treat it with care- and they will do the same.
David- we have that beautiful table. If you find someone who wants your mom’s – let us know. Neither of our kids want it and we are tired of it!
Bought a new couch today. Hopefully, everything else will be made by my hubby!

Karen
Karen
11 years ago

This is so true. Except you could skip the long list of things to look for—all you need to do is just look at the price tag! With furniture you definitely get what you pay for (unless you’re buying vintage and stumble across fine old furniture from seller who doesn’t know what it’s worth). Another thing to consider: certain pieces need to be high quality and others don’t. For example, go ahead and buy end tables from Target if you like the style–they’re not going to fall apart unless you do the unusual and sit & climb on them. But… Read more »

Karen
Karen
11 years ago

A few other things, re kids (I have 2–now teenagers. Also appropriate even if you’re human and tend to throw parties and spill red wine on things): – buy upholstered furniture that comes with washable slipcovers or leather that is “supposed” to look semi-distressed. Otherwise all it takes is one kid eating cheetos on your couch, or a bored toddler scratching patterns into the leather at naptime, to pretty much ruin it. I have a pottery barn sectional with textured white cotton slipcovers that still looks great after 12 yrs of kids–I just throw the slips in the washer &… Read more »

kenyantykoon
kenyantykoon
11 years ago

i have always thought that that most expensive pieces were the best of quality. this post has shown me the flaw in that reasoning. its a nice set of points when hunting for furniture. thanks. i will keep this in mind when stocking up my lair

Caitlin
Caitlin
11 years ago

Hardwood is used to make paper products (like facial and bathroom tissues) soft, and softwood is what makes those things strong!

David N.
David N.
11 years ago

For incredibly nice upholstered furniture at a killer price, look at http://www.homereserve.com. You assemble it yourself; covers are cheap and easily replaced; and many of my friends have bought from them on my recommendation and are delighted. It comes in UPS boxes, and can later be disassembled for moving if necessary. Really an incredible bargain and much better made than the majority of the more inexpensive pieces around. I’d have it myself, but I live in Europe where it is impractical to ship…if and when I move back to the States, you can bet that’s where I’ll go for furnishing… Read more »

David/Yourfinances101
David/Yourfinances101
11 years ago

That is some great info. However, when buying furniture, I usually go with the old standby–“You get what you pay for.”

I never try to go with the cheapest and the high end stuff is a little too high end for me.

Brad Castro
Brad Castro
11 years ago

Couches/sofas are what challenge me. An expensive price tag doesn’t always equate to long term quality and durability.

Here’s a very low-tech test you can conduct, although not always possible – when no one’s watching, especially the sales staff, get a running start and cannonball into the cushions. This little “stress test” should provide some immediate and fairly accurate feedback about the furniture’s long term prospects.

Also, a second tip – NEVER buy the floor model.

Patty
Patty
11 years ago

You sure have the knowledge to shop. Here’s another tip. I have some old pieces – like a wing back from a roommate in college days that belonged to her aunt. It was really beat up and upon graduating, she was going to toss it out our 4th floor walkup. I assured her that I’d take it off her hands. Fast forward – the chair and a few other pieces I’ve collected along the way, were beat up but fantastic finds. The wing back chair was reupholstered to only find out it was a true treasure. Try checking out Estate… Read more »

Chickybeth
Chickybeth
11 years ago

This was a very helpful article to me. I have read the “Millionaire Next Door” and it talks about millionaires buying quality furniture that lasts forever. The only problem, is it never talks about how to judge what “quality” means or where to shop for things like that. (I’m thinking Art Van isn’t exactly quality, but I never knew what to look for.) So, thanks!

Tim
Tim
11 years ago

i think you have to separate upholstered furniture with non-upholstered. for non-upholstered furniture, solid wood is easier to repair, will take more abuse, and will last longer than mdf, veneer, particle board, plywood, etc. for upholstered furniture, get upholstery that can withstand spills etc. with that said, the frame and cushioning material are important if you want it to last a long time. i prefer my upholstered furniture like couches and chairs to have regular shaped cushions so you can flip them over to rotate their use.

Andrew
Andrew
11 years ago

You’ve had bad luck with Ikea? I’ve had fantastic luck. I’ve got a couch (4 years old) two bookcases (6 years old) and some assorted other stuff that’s all first class. I take good care of my stuff, but it’s doing great.

Do the rest of you guys find it’s not high quality?

lizz
lizz
11 years ago

i would always go for old/ recycled wood products and then refinish them, over buying new ikea products… usually even w/ the ‘sweat-equity’ and the varnishes, etc, the price was cheaper… i remember buying an olive green channel back sofa and chair for $500 total – both were in great condition. after using them (lightly) for four years, I ended up being able to sell them for the same price… so essentially i had free furniture for the time i was using it. the set was made in the 50’s, weighed a lot, but was pure mahogany… so would stand… Read more »

Jill
Jill
11 years ago

My frugal mother was also big on the idea that you bought non-upholstered furniture with the idea of buying the best quality you could afford because it was likely to last, but that you were eventually going to kill the cushions on upholstered furniture with regular use no matter what you did. Our couches and living room chairs came from one of those big furniture warehouse sorts of places that sells off overstocked and misordered decent quality pieces. You don’t always get exactly what you want, but we have managed to score the $2000 retail Ekornes chair and ottoman for… Read more »

John DeFlumeri Jr
John DeFlumeri Jr
11 years ago

That was a useful furniture article. I hope I never have that crap they staple together from paper-like particle board again.

John Bardos
John Bardos
11 years ago

On a visit to a furniture store in Canada last year, I was amazed that the prices relative to quality. Furniture seems to be twice the price and half the quality of Japan.

Maybe it is shipping costs, it definitely is cheaper for Asian manufacturers to ship to Japan, but the difference was astounding.

The workmanship and quality of materials even in a higher end furniture store were so lousy.

I have heard of tours to Indonesia primarily for the purpose of buying handmade furniture made of real wood, after my experience last year I understand why.

quinsy
quinsy
11 years ago

@ Andrew #18… I don’t think IKEA is necessarily a bad buy, but I wouldn’t call it sure to stand the test of time. I’ve bought a whole bunch of IKEA furniture, mostly used, and it doesn’t seem to hold together well, but it works. For example I have a large bookshelf and a chest of drawers in their cheapest style, I bought both used from college students who had broken them already with light use. Basically they are held together by duct tape in the back, but you can’t see the duct tape, and I’ve had each piece for… Read more »

robert
robert
11 years ago

Interesting post, I agree with your points.

Personally, I do not buy a lot of furnature, and usually go the cheaper route. However, when I have wanted something nicer, I have also bought antiques and fixed them up. The quality seems to be good and I think the furnature has some character and value to it.

Sarah
Sarah
11 years ago

thanks for this post – I don’t know nearly enough about furniture. Now I feel better about knowing what to look for

UnderstatementJones
UnderstatementJones
11 years ago

This is awesome!

What would be really great is the same thing for clothes – spotting long-term quality in clothing is so tough, since most brand-name stuff is as schlocky and useless as what you get at target. I need a way to identify clothing like my old burberry trenchcoat, which appears to be literally indestructible, lasting as it has for probably two decades now.

Gail
Gail
11 years ago

My better half and I are big believers in not buying “disposable” (inexpensive when new) furniture. When we buy a piece, we plan to keep it for many years. Our house is full of a mix of high-end furniture from Stickley and Room and Board, and used pieces from estate sales that I refurbish myself. I agree completely with the author–that’s exactly what I look for when I’m shopping for used. We like classic pieces with simple lines that won’t go out of style, artisan-made pieces (which can be bought at flea markets and festivals for prices below furniture-store sales),… Read more »

EscapeVelocity
EscapeVelocity
11 years ago

Kids can be taught not to eat on the couch or put their shoes on it (if their parents don’t). I would go fairly inexpensive on the dining-room chairs, because they are good for making forts and rocket ships out of, but my parents have a couch that’s older than I am. It was upholstered in Naugahyde for a few critical years.

An advantage to buying used, as far as quality, is that if it were going to break easily it probably already would have.

Kevin M
Kevin M
11 years ago

Interesting topic and very good info, thanks for sharing.

My favorite piece of furniture is still the little bookshelf I bought in college and refinished myself. It was painted lime green when I bought it for $15. I’m going to try to build a side table for our foyer since I can’t seem to find any I like.

Leah
Leah
11 years ago

Very interesting. Thanks a lot for the tips. I inherited my parents’ old living room couch five years ago. They bought it in the early 1970s and went with a good quality, name brand piece, albeit in gold and white velour. As an adult, I lived with this extremely comfortable (and extremely ugly) couch for about five years. Just a couple of months ago, we got an estimate on having it reupholstered. The upholsterer said it was in great shape, and would respond well to being refinished. We had it done in a sturdy fabric and a solid color, so… Read more »

Honey
Honey
11 years ago

When my boyfriend and I can afford nice new furniture, we’ve decided we’ll buy antiques. There’s a reason it’s lasted that long to begin with, and it’s the only type of furniture you can buy that has the potential to appreciate in value, if you treat it right.

Thad
Thad
11 years ago

Buy antiques or second-hand pieces. If a piece has survived a hundred years, it is going to likely last another hundred years (as long as you take reasonable care of them).

jeff
jeff
11 years ago

While I can’t vouch for upholstery purchased from ikea, I have a number of shelving units/book cases, kitchen islands and dressers. I have had them a long time. I have put them together AND taken them apart every time I have moved during school and after. I have no complaints. They are as solid (or more solid) than much more expensive units. And I can move them! By my self! I think a lot of it has to do with how well you, the consumer, can put your ikea stuff together. If you are a little handy and have the… Read more »

Karawynn @ Pocketmint
Karawynn @ Pocketmint
11 years ago

Brad (14): curious why you say never to buy the floor model? We have quite a few of the Ikea Billy bookshelves (as does almost everyone else I know). The sides and shelves have held up pretty well, but the backs are terrible — super-thin pressboard laminate that detaches, warps and peels. With tables, we’ve had a lot of problems with peeling veneer. And no, it’s not because we’ve put things together badly; it’s that the design focus was on the ability to take apart and flat-pack, rather than sturdy usefulness. But the biggest disappointment has been the Ikea couch.… Read more »

Phil
Phil
11 years ago

Don’t remember where I read it, but a tip that’s always stayed with me when looking for a good couch is this:

Lean down and lift a front corner of the couch one inch off the floor. Now look at the other end; the opposite front corner should also be one inch off the floor. If not… keep shopping.

Karawynn @ Pocketmint
Karawynn @ Pocketmint
11 years ago

The points about kids, roommates, and pets are all well-taken, especially with regard to upholstered furniture. One of the reasons it makes sense for us to find something of better quality now is that our dog is past the puppy-chewing stage, our cat has never scratched on upholstery, and our youngest kid, while not of careful temperament, is at least old enough that I can hope for minimal damage.

Gail (27), I’d love to know what furniture wax you use?

Jessica
Jessica
11 years ago

I agree with the comments about IKEA, for me it hasnt really held up over the long term and in my opinion a bargain, isnt really a bargain if it I have to replace every five years or so. My husband and I are slowly starting to replace our hand me down pieces with a more matching set but its really a slow process. I am not saying that furniture has to be expensive though, we found an amazing china hutch through craiglist for $200 and a few other pieces at local thrift stores for less than $100. Does anyone… Read more »

In the Industry - Manufacturer
In the Industry - Manufacturer
11 years ago

Karawynn – Good article. Since I am in the industry, on the manufacturing side, I thought that I would chime in on a couple of points. Prior to my entry into the Furniture industry, I didn’t know a thing about quality and did most of my furniture shopping at places like Lowe’s (kitchen table and TV stand). Since coming into the business, I’ve seen both the good and bad. Things aren’t as clear cut when it comes to furniture as it is with other goods or services (i.e. Consumer reports ratings on refrigerators and the like). However, quality can be… Read more »

chacha1
chacha1
11 years ago

Very informative. I would add: if you are not sure you are in your “forever” home, and/or if you are not sure you are settled with a mate, and/or if you are not sure what style you want to live with, thrift stores are not a bad way to go. You can find a wide variety of pieces, typically lightly-used, at charity stores. You often won’t know what you’re going to love until you live with it for a while. I really have never seen the point of buying high-end furniture at full price. Almost all of our stuff was… Read more »

Paul Martin
Paul Martin
11 years ago

I would like to cast one more vote in favor of buying furniture used. We have had considerable success at antique stores, estate sales, garage sales and through the classifieds (or Craigslist, today). The standards for building furniture have fallen considerably over the years. My Dad still has furniture he bought new 40-50 years ago. It is difficult to find furniture built to those standards today, and you will pay dearly for it when you find it. On the other hand, there are deals to be found in used or antique furniture which was built when quality hardwood furniture was… Read more »

Martin
Martin
11 years ago

This is all excellent information for buyers. I am a furniture designer and have designed one off custom pieces all the way to mass produced in china. As you might have guessed, if you buy the cheapest thing out there, you shouldn’t expect it to last, but it’s possible to spend only slightly more and get something comfortable and durable. You have to look at the design and materials used. Buying a leather sofa at ikea for $400, it won’t last very long. Why? because that sofa cost about $150 to make, and most of that went on the leather,… Read more »

Deb
Deb
11 years ago

STOP – please do not 1. assume a veneer is cheap. Actually they originated with the highest of quality, to create beautiful, varied wood designs. I would take an inlayed mahogany veneered piece any day. It is the low quality pieces that will cause problems in seperation. 2. Buy new, upholstered furniture without checking the care/keeping/fiber content/wearability rating of the fabric on the piece. I’ve seen many a sofa or chair go bad because of light wear fabrics, long before the cushions or frames give up. 3. Buy upholstered furniture that has a one-piece, rounded top and front cover on… Read more »

Jen
Jen
11 years ago

These are all great things to keep in mind. Quality furniture will last–but, know thyself. If your style/mood/decor changes every few years, pick really simple, basic pieces that transition well between styles. I worked at Resto for a while, so a few more tips: – At stores like Resto and PB, there’s usually a “Friends & Family” promotion around the holidays. Ask for a coupon–many of us didn’t use our full allotment of coupons and would happily give one to a customer. – Look over the floor samples, usually there’s nothing too wrong with them, but we moved ours around… Read more »

Ben-David
Ben-David
11 years ago

Some comments: 1) Try to buy loose-cushion styles over upholstered. Usually these styles have a solid wood frame, and the cushions are easily replaced or recovered. You can find nice, snuggly sofas in daybed or bench styles with either wood or brass frames. You can get almost every style from historical/shaker to modern/shaker (notice that shaker goes with everything!) Which leads to: 2) Explore garden furniture. Teak and oak garden furniture is virtually indestructible. Although it’s usually left to weather outdoors, you can varnish it and it stays a rich brown color. “Flimsy” pine garden benches are usually sturdier than… Read more »

Ian
Ian
11 years ago

Here’s a trick we used when we needed furniture in Germany. Look on ebay. Most people don’t want to ship, and most locals don’t think to use ebay. We bought a 1920’s dining set for $200 because nobody wanted to drive out to pick it up. We had to rent a station wagon for a day, but still saved over 50% of the crap that was selling for new, and someday when we need a bigger table we’ll likely get what we paid of more for it. I’m in the same position as many folks here. I have some IKEA… Read more »

Bret
Bret
10 years ago

I found a mortgage calculator that takes inflation into account. Good to know that my payments are $1160 now but I’ll be paying the equivalent of only $500 by year 30.

http://ostermiller.org/calc/mortgage.html

Brad Castro
Brad Castro
10 years ago

“Brad (14): curious why you say never to buy the floor model?”

—-
Karawynn –

I was being a bit facetious since I was also advocating cannonballing into the floor models. You wouldn’t want to buy something someone like me previously “stress tested.”

My apologies for not contributing much to the conversation . . .

greg
greg
10 years ago

In light of all this great advise, does anyone have any suggestions as to where to look for some good sectional furniture; ideally, one with a bed? I see the great advice, but it’s not always easy to narrow down the marketplace when it comes to this stuff.

Sarah McAninch
Sarah McAninch
10 years ago

I have been disappointed by furniture before.
It looks great for a year and then starts breaking down.
I have had my best luck with refinished antiques.
If a piece can last 20 yrs.and still look good then
I have more faith for the next 20.

It is hard to find craftsman in the U.S. that still
make quality furniture but I am always looking.

Lorna
Lorna
10 years ago

I liken IKEA to what I refer to as disposable furnishings. Honestly, most is not built to last. On the other hand, go to your local estate sales and fine quality pieces with dovetail joints and solid craftsman construction can be purchased for less than a trip to Swedish common sense. It will probably last a lifetime but you’ll likely change it out. And when you do you, you can easily get back what you paid for it because of it’s quality holds its own. TIP: Apply a good coat of Old English scratch cover and you’ll have a beautiful… Read more »

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