How to Build Wealth, Ignore Wall Street, and Get on With Your Life

What a difference a decade makes.

Ten years ago everyone was chasing the next hot stock. Equity markets were generating double-digit annual returns and dot-com companies were doubling overnight. Greed was widespread in the psyche of investors and no one wanted to miss out on the next sure thing: a social epidemic of excitement running rampant.

Everyone was getting rich.

Quickly.

Or so it seemed.

Fast-forward to today and everyone is running for cover. The country is mired in a deep recession and major stock market indices have declined over 40 percent from their highs. Fear has set in with investors of all ages. Our country is now struggling with a social epidemic of pessimism as investors cope with how to build back portfolios that have been sliced in half.

With one eye on the grim economic headlines and the other on a depleted portfolio, there is a tendency to think that everything is out of your control, and, unfortunately, that is when financial paralysis sets in.

Despite all the bad news thrown at us by an overbearing media, the truth is that you are in control of your financial future, and now is the time to recognize it and take charge of it. Why is this so important now? I am not saying this is an opportunity of a lifetime, but because of the significant declines in the stock market, current valuations suggest that the next decade, and beyond, are likely to generate attractive returns in common stocks. Don't let this next decade pass you by.

In my book, The New Coffeehouse Investor, first introduced in 1999 and now in its third edition, I share three simple principles to guide you in building wealth. These are principles you already know to be true and in your control.

  1. Save for a rainy day. Establishing your own personal financial plan is paramount to building long-term wealth. In doing so, you create an awareness of whether or not your current saving and spending levels translate into achievable financial goals down the road. If not, what changes need to be made? You might not be able to make enough adjustments immediately to reach your savings goal, but at least you have created an awareness of the gap between today's current saving and spending levels and your future expectations. Then, when saving and spending choices come up in the future, this financial awareness is at least present at your decision-making table.
  2. Don't put all your eggs in one basket. The key to building a successful portfolio and reaching your financial goals is to diversify your assets in such a way that you maximize your chances of achieving your goals with a minimum amount of risk. The personal financial plan you have created for yourself brings clarity to your saving and spending issues. It also allows you to determine how to best allocate your investments between stocks, bonds, real estate and other asset classes to achieve a required rate of return based on a level of risk that is appropriate for you in relation to your goals and where you are in your life.
  3. There is no such thing as a free lunch. Because markets are relatively efficient, any attempt at beating the market through the selection of individual stocks or actively managed mutual funds is likely to prove disastrous to your long-term financial health. The smartest way to build a globally diversified portfolio is through a line-up of low-cost index funds. This investing strategy is at the core of Coffeehouse Investor portfolios. Wall Street will forever tout its stock-picking prowess. Don't let them gamble with your money. Low-cost index funds are the surest way to capture the entire return in any asset class over the long haul.

The benefits of embracing these three principles are straightforward. First, from an investing standpoint, you maximize your return potential in each asset class by capturing its entire return. Second, and more important, it allows you the emotional freedom to turn your attention away from Wall Street and focus on the one component of wealth that matters most of all: How much you save and spend.

The financial media is quick to remind us that we are a nation of irresponsible, overspending consumers, living for today at the expense of saving for tomorrow. Along with the woeful tales of those who spend too much is another story that needs to be told: that of millions of Americans who do want to take responsibility for their saving and investing decisions by making the right choices today.

The problem is that we have been so inundated by the financial industry's marketing machine over the past quarter-century, that we have been brainwashed into thinking that the secret to our long-term financial well-being lies in Wall Street's hands, instead of our own hands. Nothing could be further from the truth.

For Coffeehouse Investors, our three simple principles allow us to be in charge of our own financial future. We wouldn't have it any other way.

More about...Investing, Books

Become A Money Boss And Join 15,000 Others

Subscribe to the GRS Insider (FREE) and we’ll give you a copy of the Money Boss Manifesto (also FREE)

Yes! Sign up and get your free gift
Become A Money Boss And Join 15,000 Others
guest
235 Comments
Oldest
Newest Most Voted
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Beth @ Smart Family Tips
Beth @ Smart Family Tips
11 years ago

Sounds like rational, uncomplicated advice. It’s so easy to get caught up in the hype; I prefer a simple, less emotional approach like this one.

Thanks for the post, Bill.

Tim
Tim
11 years ago

While I appreciate the sentiment, we are most definately NOT in control of our own financial future, and that type of thinking creates a false sense of security. Even the suggestions above put your fate into someone else’s hands: index funds, real estate, etc. All of those investments will be affected by external events outside of your control — index funds took the same type of beating that actively managed funds did. Rather than preaching that we need to take control, one should have a sense of that things that are not in your control — stocks, real estate —… Read more »

ObliviousInvestor
ObliviousInvestor
11 years ago

Long-term, buy & hold, index fund investing: There’s a reason it’s practiced by just about every unbiased observer of the financial markets. 🙂

Carl Marx
Carl Marx
11 years ago

Bill, Good article and well put together, but you do seem to be stuck in the rut of wall street investments. The three pieces of advice is sound, whether you are considering an investment or advising your child about his or her future. In your article you mention that”control of your financial future” and then unfortunately return to give advise about investing in the stock market. What happened to investing in your own skill sand potential business like Tim recommends? I have consulted in 14 different countries that have gone through financial turmoil long before this current world wide crisis… Read more »

Joe Light
Joe Light
11 years ago

Good post. It’s advice that’s been repeated a thousand times…probably because it’s right. @Tim — You’re right that broad trends in asset classes might be out of your control. But you can control your savings rate. Taking how much you save from 10% to 15% or 20% makes up for peculiar performances in the market. I think you’re basically saying the same thing with your “In Control” portfolio. So much money is in the hands of professional money managers, that if you put every actively managed mutual fund together, they would about perform the same as an index fund, except… Read more »

IndependentOperator
IndependentOperator
11 years ago

I think this is a good post. However, I think it still has an overconfident attitude. Buy-and-hold investors *expect* to get, conservatively, a 6% annual return on average over the long run. Many expect 10%. Why? Because that’s how it’s always been. But that is a gross oversimplification. The marketplace changes wildly, especially with regard to regulation. Tomorrow the government could pass a new regulation that makes all historical data irrelevant to future returns. In fact, it may have already happened. You won’t know until you get the returns. So to be so confident that “setting it and forgetting it”… Read more »

frugalscholar
frugalscholar
11 years ago

Well, I did all the right stuff as did my parents. And we still lost 40% on our index investments. This may turn out OK for me, but my mother is in her late 70s. As many have said, there was no safe haven in the recent downturn.

So hopefully all the “common wisdom” will turn out to be right…but who knows?

Todd @ The Personal Finance Playbook
Todd @ The Personal Finance Playbook
11 years ago

It is sound advice, and I like the title, “The Coffee House Investor,” but so many books say this exact same thing that I wonder what inspired you to write it? It’s not a fresh or different take on investing or managing your finances. Not that it has to be – I guess you can’t hear this logic too many times. I mean no offense by this comment, as I’m sure it’s a fine book, but I am curious as to what inspired you to enter the PF/Investing book foray with this idea.

Rob Bennett
Rob Bennett
11 years ago

It is this sort of article that is the true “marketing machine,” in my assessment. The market is not “nearly efficient.” It is wildly inefficient. At the top of the out-of-control bull, stocks were selling at three times fair value. A regression analysis showed that the most likely 10-year return from the purchase of a broad U.S. index fund was a negative number. An efficient market would never permit stock prices to rise so high that the long-term return became a negative number. And the problem did not come about because most of us were trying to pick “hot stocks.”… Read more »

Alison Wiley
Alison Wiley
11 years ago

I like the author’s emphasis on self-sufficiency and steering away from Wall Street stocks as our financial salvation. I have empathy for people whose assets have largely disappeared in the downturn. But at the same time, the more grandiose our culture’s expectations of returns on investment have become, the more we set ourselves up for debacles like Exxon and more recently, Bernie Madoff’s scheme. It defies common sense and ethics to expect wealth without work (Gandhi’s insight, not mine). I explain this more here: http://www.diamondcutlife.org/ken-madoff-and-wealth-without-work/

Chris
Chris
11 years ago

“The key to building a successful portfolio and reaching your financial goals is to diversify your assets in such a way that you maximize your chances of achieving your goals with a minimum amount of risk.”

‘Nuff said.. How you get there is a whole other subject. Life is about risks. Some risks you can control somewhat and some you can’t control at all. I will NEVER buy another individual stock without being hedged.. THAT is controlling risk..

JerryB
JerryB
11 years ago

Good advice and something that I can attest to.
My 401k (nearly 20 years) never dropped below my contribution levels. In fact at the bottom (if we’ve hit bottom) was still 50% above my (and employer match) contributions.
On the other hand, my actively managed fund has dropped below my investment. Although I only opened it a few years ago. In the last month it’s regained most of my investment back.
Lets just say that my fingers are crossed on my individual stock picks.

The Other Side
The Other Side
11 years ago

Great post. I wish I would have started out using index funds when I began investing in 1995. Going forward, I try to use index funds almost exclusively. But sometimes the allure of the single stock gets to me…

Bill Schultheis
Bill Schultheis
11 years ago

Wow! Thanks to everyone for taking the time to share comments. So many great ideas. My goal when I wrote the first edition 10 years ago was to introduce the philosophy to every investor in the country who was responsible for saving and investing for retirement – not to try to convince them that it was the right philosophy, but to introduce it, so that they had a “choice” over what is offered up by the Wall Street crowd. A few comments. . . For 8 years following the release of the first book, I wrote a weekly column for… Read more »

Monrymonk
Monrymonk
11 years ago

I also reviewed this book, nice advice he gives

Dana
Dana
11 years ago

I like the part about ignoring Wall Street. Colluding with the media, they hardly have the common man’s interests at heart. Investors should take heed and seek out more independent money mangers that are less hype and more substance.

JerichoHill
JerichoHill
11 years ago

Only one minor quibble here Bill from me. The efficient market hypothesis is bunk, practically. Markets are loosely efficient, but they hardly are efficient. There is literature about “positivity premiums and panicked bargains”, something I exploited quite well a few months ago. The problem I see is that the finance guys took some very basic economics courses, but failed to understand how much economic models depend on underlying assumptions, and how wrong those underlying assumptions can be. After maxing out investing in index funds, choosing other asset classes, including individual companies, or bonds, REIT, commodities, etc, is based on solid… Read more »

Tyler Karaszewski
Tyler Karaszewski
11 years ago

Buying stocks (or funds composed of them) is the *WORST* way to “ignore Wall Street”. There was a time, several years ago, when I didn’t own any stocks at all. I was free to ignore Wall Street completely. Stock market up or down? Who cares, doesn’t affect me, since I don’t own any stock. I never cared about anything that happened on wall street until I owned stocks, and now checking in on what Wall Street’s been up to is a daily occurrence for me. And how awesome would it be to read about building wealth by actually *building wealth*,… Read more »

Naszaklasa
Naszaklasa
11 years ago

This is ridiculous. There is a lot of potential on the stock market now, even during recession.

Bill Schultheis
Bill Schultheis
11 years ago

Just wanted to respond to a few comments. Tim: have got to disagree with you on your comment that we are not in control of our financial future. For those who choose to be in control, they are in control. It all boils down to saving more than you spend. I have worked with literally thousands of investors in my 27 years in the business, and those who have a firm handle on their spending and saving issues are most definitely in control of their financial future. That is what the Coffeehouse Investor is all about. Ignore the things you… Read more »

Rob Bennett
Rob Bennett
11 years ago

I agree with you that prices matter in regards to future returns on equities. How do you suggest one integrates that into a portfolio? I’m grateful for your response, Bill. The key is understanding the difference between short-term timing (changing your stock allocation with the expectation of seeing a benefit within a year or two) and long-term timing (changing your stock allocation with the understanding that you may not see a benefit for five years or possibly even ten years). Short-term timing never works. Long-term timing always works. We should be encouraging people to engage in long-term timing as often… Read more »

Financial Power
Financial Power
11 years ago

One of the biggest problems with investing is our emotions. In the last decade many people were lead by their emotions instead of common sense. Wall Street knows this very well and they are working hard to control our emotions. Markets are down and there is a potential for growth and return, if you do it right. Find a financial advisor who knows what she/he is doing. One of the mistakes financial planners and advisors made in the last couple of years is not taking the time to know their clients well. Just because the market was great that does… Read more »

Lindsay
Lindsay
11 years ago

Hi Bill, For years Rob Bennett has been promoting an investing system called Valuation Informed Indexing. He has a name and marketing slogans like “the human mind cannot imagine a better system” but what he doesn’t have is a definition of what it actually is. For many years now, he has been appearing on forums and blogs and claiming that he is ahead of the market regardless of how the market has performed. Rob has repeatedly been asked to define the system or to compare its returns to the Coffeehouse portfolio. Here are a few recent examples of requests for… Read more »

Rob Bennett
Rob Bennett
11 years ago

Rob has repeatedly been asked to define the system or to compare its returns to the Coffeehouse portfolio. After responding to Bill Schultheis yesterday on this thread (see Bill’s Comment #20 and my comment #21), I sent him a follow-up e-mail making the case for why we need a national debate on the flaws in the Passive Investing model. Bill said that he had checked out my site after seeing my first post and that his reaction was: “Holy Toledo, this is great stuff!” He noted that there are many issues at play and said that he wanted to take… Read more »

Lindsay
Lindsay
11 years ago

Did you notice that in all that typing, Rob still didn’t answer the question? So did I.

Bill Schultheis
Bill Schultheis
11 years ago

Hi Rob, A little background on The Coffeehouse Investor: I spent 14 years working for a wirehouse brokerage firm, stepping away from it in 1998 to create The Coffeehouse Investor. My audience for the book were the folks I met for coffee every saturday morning at a local coffeehouse in Seattle. These are successful people, most had families, recognized that building wealth was much more than the size of a bank account, and yet wanted to invest their 401k’s, retirement plans, in an intelligent manner. I felt there were thousands, probably millions of investors like them, who wanted clarity with… Read more »

Esko Kiuru
Esko Kiuru
11 years ago

Bill,

As you conclude your post, the advice is to steer away from Wall Street marketing gurus. A few years ago they were able to bamboozle pretty knowledgeable financial people into buying subprime mortgages on the secondary market and look at the results. A disaster. Your three points are a solid foundation. Learn the basics of investing and do it yourself.

Dave Shafer
Dave Shafer
11 years ago

Very interesting discussion. Rob Bennett’s valued informed index strategy is an updated version [using index mutual funds] of Benjamin Graham’s ideas as he wrote about 50 years ago [The Intelligent Investor]. You overweight stocks when they are relatively cheap and underweight them when they are expensive. It also combines what the trend followers insist is the only important factor, price, with the diversification of index funds. That advice is followed by Warren Buffett and many others sans the index funds. There is no doubt that this is sage advice as it has proven in the hands of experts to work… Read more »

Rob Bennett
Rob Bennett
11 years ago

Response to Post #25 “Did you notice that in all that typing, Rob still didn’t answer the question? ” What Lindsay wants me to do cannot be done. By “define the system” Lindsay means “tell me what stock allocation I should be at when stocks are at the various P/E10 levels.” There is no responsible answer that I can give to that question. It depends on the particular investor’s life goals, financial circumstances and risk tolerance. There is no one-size-fits-all answer. What would John Bogle say if you said to him: “We want to test your ‘system,’ tell us what… Read more »

Rob Bennett
Rob Bennett
11 years ago

Response to Post #26 “with those types of folks as an audience, how do you suggest they build a portfolio using your valuation method? John Bogle uses a simple rule of thumb to equate your bond allocation to your age. For most investors that probably makes sense. How would you vary from that?” Bogle recommends that investors change their stock allocations in response to three factors: (1) life goals; (2) financial circumstances; and (3) risk tolerance. Bogle says that someone near retirement should go with a stock allocation different from what he would go with when he was not near… Read more »

Lindsay
Lindsay
11 years ago

“What would John Bogle say”

John Bogle doesn’t claim it’s impossible to provide data or make comparisons. In fact, he does this all the time. Likewise the coffeehouse portfolio has published returns because it’s a real methodology.

Rob recently stated that he just keeps saying the name of his undefined investment system in the hopes that it will become a big search term on google and he can make money off that. “If it works, it should pay off big.” See:

http://www.four-pillars.ca/2009/05/21/leveraging-old-blog-posts/#comments

http://www.s152957355.onlinehome.us/cgi-bin/yabb2/YaBB.pl?num=1241703133/11#11

Rob Bennett
Rob Bennett
11 years ago

First, my thanks to J.D. for going to a lot of trouble in getting my last two comments on this thread to appear here. There was a technical mix-up that probably resulted from the site redesign and I was not able to get the comments to appear for some time. I believe that the issues being discussed in this thread are of great importance and I am grateful both to J.D. for hosting the guest blog entry and to Bill for writing it and for offering some fine comments. I have been in e-mail communication with both J.D. and Bill… Read more »

Rob Bennett
Rob Bennett
11 years ago

John Bogle doesn’t claim it’s impossible to provide data or make comparisons. In fact, he does this all the time. Likewise the coffeehouse portfolio has published returns because it’s a real methodology. Nor do I say that it’s impossible to provide data or make comparisons. It is by providing data and making comparisons re the various strategies that we all learn. There is a calculator at my site (“The Investor’s Scenario Surfer”) that permits the user to see how any Valuation-Informed Indexing strategy that he wishes to explore fares over the course of a 30-year returns sequence in comparison to… Read more »

Lindsay
Lindsay
11 years ago

“Nor do I say that it’s impossible to provide data or make comparisons”

Great, so you’re going to get around to answering the question at some point? It’s come up several times again at your forum. We’re all waiting.

eg:

http://www.s152957355.onlinehome.us/cgi-bin/yabb2/YaBB.pl?num=1241703133/20#20

http://www.s152957355.onlinehome.us/cgi-bin/yabb2/YaBB.pl?num=1242315333/37#37

Dave Shafer
Dave Shafer
11 years ago

Lindsay, obviously you have some sort of long-term animosity with Mr. Bennett. I did take a look at those links and anyone can cherry pick some years and make a comparison look valid [17 years???]. And anyone can pretend to not understand the point. The S & P 500 is regularly used as an sample index and as such is perfectly fine to use in an comparison. Have you actually looked at his calculators???? You do know that asset allocation strategies is just a way to adjust for relative values, right? That is of course Mr. Bennett’s point. The obvious… Read more »

Carlyle
Carlyle
11 years ago

“…anyone can cherry pick some years and make a comparison look valid [17 years???]. And anyone can pretend to not understand the point. The S & P 500 is regularly used as an sample index and as such is perfectly fine to use in an comparison.” Seventeen years because Bill Schultheis posts the annual returns for the Coffeehouse Portfolio dating back to its creation in 1991, 17 years. Yes, the S&P 500 is regulary used as a sample index. All the more reason for Rob to show a comparison of the returns for his strategy versus the S&P 500 and/or… Read more »

Rob Bennett
Rob Bennett
11 years ago

It’s come up several times again at your forum. That forum is owned by John Greaney, Lindsay. John is the author of one of the Old School retirement studies that have been discredited as a result of the work we have done in the Retire Early and Indexing discussion-board communities over the past seven years (I am the founder of the New School of Safe Withdrawal Rate analysis — please see the Retirement Risk Evaluator calculator at my site and the comments quoted there by numerous big-name experts that the Old School retirement studies do not work). That forum was… Read more »

Rob Bennett
Rob Bennett
11 years ago

The obvious question to this late comer to the cat-fight is why the anger? name calling? etc. on both sides. I hope that you are not trying to suggest that there has ever been even an iota of anger or name-calling from the 80 percent of the Retire Early and Indexing discussion-board communities that have on repeated occasions expressed a desire that honest posting on these matters be permitted at those boards. I can assure you that that is not the case. 100 percent of the anger and name-calling has come from the Passives and the defenders of the Old… Read more »

Rob Bennett
Rob Bennett
11 years ago

He should be taking every opportunity to show the superiority of his timing system, not hiding behind a wall of words claiming his method is superior to other strategies but showing no evidence. The historical data is public information, Lyndon. It is available at Robert Shiller’s web site. Anyone who cares to can check this out 100 different ways. I have provided four calculators that aid in the checking-it-out process. I have done hundreds of tests myself and I am personally persuaded. I certainly do not advise that anyone go solely by what I say. You should check it out… Read more »

Dave Shafer
Dave Shafer
11 years ago

I was reacting to the posts on the links from Lindsay. As to Mr. Bennett’s thesis, I find it impossible to understand why it is so controversial. I defy you to find any great investor [with a public record] that says that price doesn’t matter. Additionally, you might ask anyone that has retired in the last 5 years or has plans to retire in the next 10 based on their investing how the buy and holding of mutual funds has gone for them [including those that used asset allocation strategies]! Check out the real data for mutual fund investors to… Read more »

Dave Shafer
Dave Shafer
11 years ago

A quick look at the coffee house portfolio results tells me that $1,000 invested for the 17 years would end up at $3,418 on Dec. 31, 2008.

Compare this to an investor who says price is the most important thing, Warren Buffett. Over the same time period your $1,000 would be $9,050 using Mr. Buffett to do your investing for you.

Kinda puts things in perspective doesn’t it!

Ron
Ron
11 years ago

“That is of course Mr. Bennett’s point.”

No.

“The obvious question to this late comer to the cat-fight is why the anger? name calling? etc. on both sides.”

THAT’S Mr. Bennett’s actual point!

That’s how passive-aggressive trolling works. There’s always some newbie like Dave who jumps into the middle of a long running feud and thinks that it’s the passive-aggressive troll who needs defending. That’s what makes it fun to watch. 😉

Just don’t get sucked in!

Rob Bennett
Rob Bennett
11 years ago

I defy you to find any great investor [with a public record] that says that price doesn’t matter. There are none. Even the people who post abusively at the forum linked to above are willing (to their credit) to acknowledge that valuations affect long-term returns. This appears to me to be universally accepted. as to Mr. Bennett’s thesis, I find it impossible to understand why it is so controversial. I can point to four big factors at work here (I believe that there are more than four). One is that I don’t post about valuation-informed strategies at boards at which… Read more »

Carlyle
Carlyle
11 years ago

“Additionally, you might ask anyone that has retired in the last 5 years or has plans to retire in the next 10 based on their investing how the buy and holding of mutual funds has gone for them [including those that used asset allocation strategies]!” As you can see from the Coffeehouse Portfolio returns, an investor with that or similiarly diversified asset allocation portfolio has fared pretty well despite the vagaries of the market. And the sky has not fallen upon a prospective or current retiree with such a portfolio, especially if he or she has an appropriate allocation of… Read more »

Rob Bennett
Rob Bennett
11 years ago

Rob thinks he can use PE10 to predict when to make buys and sells. Passive strategies use rebalancing to accomplish much the same thing. This is really the entire debate summed up into a few words. Passive Indexing says that we should always stay at the same stock allocation (that’s the purpose of rebalancing). Valuation-Informed Indexing says that high stock allocations are more risky at times of high prices and that thus we should go with lower stock allocations at times of high prices. No investment strategy which includes stocks looks very good when viewed at the bottom of a… Read more »

Dave Shafer
Dave Shafer
11 years ago

@Lyndon, seems you proved my point for me. Ever read a book called “True Believer” by Eric Hoffer? You might find it interesting…… @Carlyle, yes the strategy was first outlined by Ben Graham, Buffett’s mentor. But he suggested using it along the lines of what Mr. Bennett suggests. I don’t think that the coffee house portfolio and Mr. Bennet’s value-informed indexing is that far apart, which of course is the ironic thing looking at all the animosity generated. Personally, I have found success investing along the lines of Buffett thoughts and hitching a ride on his company. But, of course… Read more »

Rob Bennett
Rob Bennett
11 years ago

I don’t think that the coffee house portfolio and Mr. Bennet’s value-informed indexing is that far apart I agree that the two approaches have much in common, Dave. I of course also think that taking valuations into consideration when setting your stock allocation is an important enhancement. My view is that Bogle started a revolution in middle-class investing with his development of the indexing concept but that the first-draft version was not perfect in every particular. And that now we should be trying to fix what’s broken. I think Buffett’s ideas are right on. But I think that most middle-class… Read more »

Lindsay
Lindsay
11 years ago

J.D. I noticed that you’ve had a run in with Rob on his blog. One thing you’ll soon learn if you haven’t already is that Rob doesn’t run an open blog. If you agree with him, praise him, or state a question in a way that he thinks is weak enough to totally refute, then your post will appear. Otherwise, not a chance. But if any blogger treats Rob the same way Rob treats his readers, he’ll complain about it like crazy and claim that that blog is a “corrupt enterprise”, has “banned honest posting”. etc. I see he’s already… Read more »

Rob Bennett
Rob Bennett
11 years ago

One thing you’ll soon learn if you haven’t already is that Rob doesn’t run an open blog. The link at my name goes to my web site. At the left side of the page is a link to my blog (“A Rich Life”). I welcome comments representing all points of view on the topics explored at the blog. My favorite comments are the ones that make the case for Passive Investing. Why? Because I often make the case against Passive Investing and I believe that we need more comments coming from the other side to give the discussions balance. I… Read more »

Caring Soul
Caring Soul
11 years ago

Bennett said: “There’s an article at the “Banned at Motley Fool!” section of the site that provides the background re the death threats.” It also illustrates that there WERE not death threats to you. None. However, the historical record does show death threats were authored BY you. Do you deny these two obvious facts? I think it is important to know if the person who is allowed to expend so many column inches here is truthful or not. For instance, while he constantly insists Finance experts should “apologize” for some imaginary transgressions which only Bennett knows of, did you notice… Read more »

shares