How to Save Money While Traveling

When I was packing for my trip to Argentina, a friend advised me, “Put everything you're taking on the bed. Now put back half the clothes, and take twice the money.”

Take more money than you think you'll need when traveling.Good advice. I tried to follow it and still ended up bringing more clothes than I could possibly need. I didn't bring much money, though, because one of my goals for this trip is to keep saving even while I'm traveling.

Saving for travel is relatively simple: You set up a targeted savings account and put a little money aside each week or each month. Setting a schedule and sticking to it is the key to saving for anything. Travel is no exception.

Saving while traveling is a bit more complicated. Even the most carefully-planned vacation is plagued with unexpected expenses. Over at I Will Teach You to Be Rich, Ramit Sethi suggests budgeting 20% more than you think a trip will cost to pay for sundry expenses along the way.

That's a lot of dough. Where does it all go?

    • Taxes and fees. Many countries levy special taxes and fees on tourists. A little research can let you know what these will be, so you can plan ahead. To find local tax, toll and fee information, check the websites for each state or country you plan to visit, or talk to your travel agent. At the airport in Argentina, for example, we had to pay $140 per American citizen to enter the country. A fellow behind us in line hadn't know about that fee, and was miserably explaining to the ticket agent that he didn't have that much money on him and didn't know what to do.

 

    • Unexpected needs. Baby Tylenol. Adapters to plug in our electronic gadgets. Groceries from the corner market. I knew we'd need something day to day on our trip, but I didn't know what. It wouldn't have made sense to travel with every possible thing I might need. These things were cheaply and readily available here, and would have taken up valuable space in a suitcase. Bringing cash to cover incidental needs made more sense than imagining every possible occurrence and packing ahead.

 

    • Impulse spending. Part of the joy of travel is seeing new things and having new experiences. Some of those may cost more than you'd expected. In our travels in Argentina, I've had the chance to visit Eva Peron's grave, fall in love with a local winery, and take a river cruise. Better to budget in advance for museum tickets, scenic tours, and souvenir shopping than to find yourself pinching pennies halfway through your trip because you splurged at the beginning.

 

  • Emergencies. On our last visit to Argentina, my infant daughter caught a terrible ear infection and needed hospital care. Our insurance ultimately paid for her care, less our normal co-pay. But at the time, we had to pay out of pocket for everything here, and then chase down reimbursement for it through a maze of paperwork once we got home. Having a comfortable cushion of while traveling lets you handle real emergencies as they crop up.

There's no doing away with all these expenses, but there are plenty of things you can do to keep your overall costs low. Here are some easy ways to save while traveling:

    • Be prepared. I mentioned planning to buy some small needful things, like infant Tylenol, while you travel. A little research on your destination can help you figure out what necessities are going to be cheaper where you're traveling to, and which ones might cost a lot more. I planned to buy a fancy dress for the party I'm attending, because clothes are generally cheaper here. But I bought my husband a video camera before we left, because electronics cost quite a bit more in Buenos Aires than they do in Boston.

 

    • Travel with frugal companions. Just like your friends influence your spending at home, they can pressure you to spend or save on the road. I have a close friend I've traveled with several times during the past year. She's more frugal than I am, and she's great at checking my impulse to spend excessively just because I'm on the road.

 

    • Know your weaknesses. I splurge when I'm stressed and when I'm celebrating. Travel tends to push both those buttons. I worry about making it on time through the airport, so I throw caution to the winds and pay for overpriced food rather than packing a picnic ahead of time. I want to treasure the memories of where I am, so I spend money on knick-knacks or clothes that I don't really need. This is a habit I picked up from childhood. My normally tightwad mother would open her purse with abandon when we were traveling, and I've never quite shaken the habit. Knowing this about myself makes me look twice at any purchase I want to make when I'm on the road.

 

    • Make a game of it. See how low you can keep your daily travel budget. Can you get through a whole day in a foreign country without spending a dime? Can you clip coupons in a language you barely speak? Take advantage of local specials at the neighborhood diner instead of eating in your hotel? Score points with your spouse by finding ways to save on your vacation.

 

  • Have a savings goal in mind. What are you going to do with the money you don't spend on this trip? Having a prize in mind helps keep me focused on saving. I have a pool of money I can afford to part with here in Argentina. Any money I take home will go into my high interest savings account towards my next savings goal: paying off our car loan. My goal is to shave time off that deadline by bringing home enough unspent “travel money” to make a full months' car payment.

Of course for some people part of the joy of travel is being able to let go the reins of frugality and spend freely. If you've saved diligently and have that 20% cushion Ramit Sethi suggests, there's no reason not to.

But if you enjoy frugality, there's also no reason to leave your frugal habits at home. Careful spending while traveling only reinforces wise fiscal habits at home, and if you come home with part of your travel fund untouched, you're that much closer to the being ready to book your next trip.

J.D.'s noteOof. I have a lot to say about this one. Maybe I ought to leave my thoughts in the comments, but I'm going to be bold and append them to Sierra's post.

I've become a huge fan of the packing list. As I begin to travel more and more, it's very useful to have a fixed list that indicates the things I need to take with me. This keeps me from panicking with last-minute worry that I've forgotten something, but it also helps me keep costs down because I have a sort of mini-inventory of travel stuff I need. (I used my last Breathe Right nasal strip in Denver last weekend, so I bought more today because I had a coupon.) I have two packing-list apps for my iPhone, have bookmarked several packing-list sites, and even have a packing-list book on hold at my library!

The packing list also helps me to pack light, which is another way it saves me money. When I pack light, I know what I have and where I have it. Plus, I don't have to check a bag. (My goal — even for our upcoming month-long trip to Europe — is to travel with a single carry-on bag.) In extreme cases, I've known people who have packed so much Stuff they've actually had to ship some of it home. From Europe. Now that's expensive!

Finally, on long trips, I keep a daily log of what I'm spending. I know my overall trip budget (and what that works out to per day), so my daily tracking lets me know when I need to pinch pennies and when I can cut loose a little. And in my case, I use a specific credit card that waves overseas transaction charges while also giving me 1% cash back.

Sorry for hijacking Sierra's post. I'll go to the gym for deadlifts and burpees now…

[Wait! One last tip! If you're traveling in the U.S., order an Entertainment book for the city you're traveling to. When Kris and I do this, we recover the cost very quickly.]

 

Photo by Rick.

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DreamChaser57
DreamChaser57
9 years ago

Happy Travels, Sierra! Your long summer excursion certainly has not adversely affected your ability to produce quality substantive work. The thought of exotic travel is just absolutely exhilarating to me-it’s something I want my household to be able to do and take advantage of not just in retirement but now, my frugality is just a stepping stone to new adventures beyond a loathsome cubicle. Extensive travel is quite appealing because you get to immerse yourself in the culture. That being said the $140 fee per American citizen is insane, I wonder is this just levied on American citizens or all… Read more »

Sam
Sam
9 years ago

I’m a big fan of a travel spending plan. This is what we do, we have an auto savings travel account that we always contribute to. As a result, when we plan a vacation we normally already have enough to pay for our flight in our travel account. While we don’t use credit cards in our day to day financial life we do use them to book flights, reserve hotels and rental cars. We normally plan a trip at least a couple months out so once the flight is booked and the hotel reserved we have a good chunk of… Read more »

everyday tips
everyday tips
9 years ago

I too like to experience what the locale has to offer when I go on trips. If I can’t afford to do that, then I don’t go.

I thought I heard that if you travel internationally, it is easier to pay with credit card as you don’t have to worry about conversion and such, that you just get the exchange rate as of that day? I hate carrying a lot of cash around, so I usually rely on credit as much as possible wherever I go. (But I ALWAYS pay off my card, always. Every month.)

Brian
Brian
9 years ago

J.D.,
Where do you find the Entertainment books for the various cities you travel to?

Annelise
Annelise
9 years ago

Interesting article, but not everyone wants to travel like a tramp or a pauper, with a single bag, therefore having to wear the same, crumpled, dirty, unfashionable clothes every day. You can be frugal AND stylish, taking pride in your appearance. What’s more, sometimes it’s more relaxing NOT to meet the locals or “immerse” yourself in the local culture – instead, take in the sights and sounds while enjoying the company of loved ones or friends, or enjoy your solitude. Superficial, happy-clappy “friendships” with fellow travelers or locals never last beyond the journey home, so spend your time wisely with… Read more »

Slackerjo
Slackerjo
9 years ago

I went to visit my brother in Holland in May and the gifts that were the biggest hit with my friends? Postcards. People so rarely get snail mail (of the non bill variety) and everyone I sent a postcard to was thrilled. Cost – about 1-2 euros per card and .95 in postage to Canada and the US.

Darrell
Darrell
9 years ago

We just got back from a 3 week honeymoon in Europe, going from London all the way down through Rome. We didn’t really have a problem taking everything in one carry on bag each (though most all airlines give you one free checked bag for international flights, which we took advantage of on the way home for souvenirs and gifts). The hardest part is keeping the bag small for airline travel, but if you’re going by car/rail once you’re over there, don’t be afraid to get shampoo/soap/etc at a store once you land, then pack your bag a little thicker… Read more »

Money Smarts Blog
Money Smarts Blog
9 years ago

My wife has a list which she uses to do the packing for our frequent trips to my parents’ place. Quite useful.

As for budgeting on vacation? I think for small stuff I just can’t do it. If I’m going on a snowboard vacation, I’m not going to worry about the food budget.

Of course, if it’s a decision about something more expensive, like going heli-skiing for a day – I have to debate whether I should do it.

Mike

J.D. Roth
J.D. Roth
9 years ago

@Brian (#4) When we buy Entertainment books for other cities, we get them through the Entertainment website. @Annalise (#5) Why do you think that living out of a single bag means that you’re living like a tramp or pauper and that your clothes will then be crumpled and unfashionable. I don’t get your logic at all. My clothes are no more crumpled than if I pack three bags full of them. I’m able to wash and iron them, just the same as if I had ten shirts instead of three. And the number of items you take with you has… Read more »

JakeIL7
JakeIL7
9 years ago

So a couple of comments: First, while you *should* try to spend as little as possible *for what you want* never, EVER be afraid to pay for experiences. The last thing you want to do is travel across the country and, after you come back, say “I wish we had…” Budget for the vacation you want, not just what will get you there. Second, on shopping in a foreign country: never, ever promise to get people anything more than about $5. That narrows it down to things like postcards or a tin of Chinese tea. You will likely be getting… Read more »

Barb
Barb
9 years ago

This will be long. Im afraid that as aa long term international traveler Im going to agree with JD that the things like the tylenol and the appliance issue should be planned for, even if that means one more small carry on (especially in your case as it sounds like once you arrive you will be in one place. Have a master packing list for the entire family that includes clothing, toiletries, medications, and all needs. Inventory it when you return from your trip and update it when you leave-that takes a few minutes. I suggest a small first aid… Read more »

Annelise
Annelise
9 years ago

@ J.D. Roth (#9) Honey, you know and I know that the kind of person who travels for weeks with one bag is neither fashionable nor well dressed 😉 I love this site and the reason I commented is because I worry that other people such as myself will be put off after reading articles like this. Increasingly people are being hectored into taking ridiculously tiny amounts of baggage on trips and told that the only valid traveling experience is to spend all one’s time with “locals” in “authentic” (read: grimy) hangouts. Believe me it’s perfectly possible to be financially… Read more »

Janette
Janette
9 years ago

Great article Sierra! @Annelise- hubby worked for embassies in several countries. He never carried more than one bag. Nice slacks,tie and shirt fit well with the internationally worn jeans,polos and shoes. He used the front desk for dry cleaning or wash services outside of the hotel. When I traveled with him I learned the same- 2 blouses, 1 skirt, 1 pants, dress shoes, dress bag, jammies, toiletries and undies (of course I was wearing a differnt set of clothing on to begin with- we wear jackets/coats on the planes). If something came up and we needed a different look- we… Read more »

My Personal Finance Journey
My Personal Finance Journey
9 years ago

When I am traveling, one way I save money is by staying at a hotel whose rooms feature kitchenettes. I can then go to the grocery store and purchase food to prepare. This helps trim down the fat in my spending and in my stomach! 🙂

HollyP
HollyP
9 years ago

I love shopping on trips. When I travel, I try to kill two birds with a single stone by shopping for unique holiday gifts on my trips. (Or three birds, really… since I get to avoid the mall in December!)

ts
ts
9 years ago

I had found from past travel experiences with my husband that as usual, we are completely incompatible when it comes to money issue. Ugh! I’m a saver, and he, what else, a spender! And since he thinks i know how to save it makes him feel even freer to spend! Toward the end of a trip I would become so furious about his spending that a vacation became an unhappy battle gound. So, I wised up and created a vacation/gift fund. After reading this entry, I’m also going to give my husband, my 2 kids, and myself a set amount… Read more »

questioner
questioner
9 years ago

I, too, am a huge fan of the one-bag (preferably a backpack) mode of travel. You can be awfully stylish out of a single bag, washing or cleaning items as necessary. To really save money on a trip, you have to prioritize. Spend money on what you really care about. For ex., when I travel, I spend money on food and experiences, but I skimp on my accommodations. This means I will stay in the cheapest room of a pretty basic place (the rooftop of a hostel in Syria – US$5/night, my cheapest evening so far.) But that leaves me… Read more »

Jason
Jason
9 years ago

@Annelise — One thing I’ve noted about people who travel a lot (especially for business) is that they get everything they need for a week into one bag. That bag is commonly also approved to be a carry-on bag so you can head right to the gate at the airport, then not have to wait for baggage claim, load it right in the rental car (or taxi or train) and only make one trip from the car to the hotel. Being business travelers, they most definitely need to be presentable in front of clients, as well. I can’t stand to… Read more »

Michelle
Michelle
9 years ago

I find that I spend less if I take cash out while traveling and leave my credit cards in my wallet and ONLY for hotels or emergencies or car rentals. I realize that I pay a fee for cash withdrawals while out of the US, but I plan carefully to make only two withdrawals, it is only a few dollars, and I end up spending less than half. Every time I used cash on my most recent trip to Canada, I keep thinking – do I really NEED this, or is it just an impulse purchase. We ended up spending… Read more »

GayleRN
GayleRN
9 years ago

No one has addressed travel insurance so I will. Sierra commented on a medical emergency that was a big hassle for them. I had the experience of having a friend break his leg while in a lesser developed country. He was a medically complex person to begin with and there was not a hospital in that country that could fix that complex fracture. In the end we had to do a medical evacuation halfway around the world which took 48 hours 4 different planes through 4 different countries and required the accompaniment of a physician and an RN (myself which… Read more »

Bargainshoppermom
Bargainshoppermom
9 years ago

Obviously this will not work for international trips but for trips in the US, you could check out Groupon for the cities you are visiting for a few months before you go. You can get food and activities at more than half off.

Don’t know about Groupon? I explain it here.

http://www.bargainshoppermom.com/have-you-tried-groupon/

Steve
Steve
9 years ago

Wow, $140 per person to get into Argentina? We went only two years ago and it was free. (Well, maybe $10 airport tax or something.) On the other hand Brazil had a $100 visa fee. We met a couple at Iguazu Falls who had planned to go to the Brazil side. They were OK (both dual citizens) but their children, with only US passports, would have cost them hundreds of extra dollars.

DianaH
DianaH
9 years ago

We use my husband’s reward points from his credit cards to travel. We usually have enough reward points for free airline tickets and hotel rooms. The credit card(s) are paid in full every month so we don’t carry a balance by using them.

Budgeting in the Fun Stuff
Budgeting in the Fun Stuff
9 years ago

Great tips! I also make specialized packing lists based on my general one. I pack the basics and any specifics based on the trip. Sea-sick patches for a cruise, extra sunscreen for any water plans, etc…

Always bring at least a few hundred in cash…there are just too many things that could pop up that would require some liquidity…

Caroline
Caroline
9 years ago

I think that people usually feel free to spend more when travelling. I am usually careful with my money but I did pay 7 Euro (almost 10 $!) for two small portions of ice cream when travelling in France… So I may be not qualify to give advice about how to save money when traveling. 😉 Still, I have some advices… 1 ) You can save a lot by doing free activities. There is so many things you can see and visit for free! If you are in a new country, simply walking on the street can be very fun.… Read more »

Luke
Luke
9 years ago

‘a fancy restaurant with a nice bottle of wine and a dress code rather than a grubby roadside stall, a shiny mall full of bargains instead of an overpriced market rife with price gouging. Spend some money in this way and you’re supporting the local economy more than haggling down to the last cent with people far poorer than yourself.’ Sorry – how exactly does going into a mall no doubt owned by a large company support the local economy more than going to a market? That’s like saying that by shopping at Walmart you’re benefitting the community more than… Read more »

Rob
Rob
9 years ago

I couldn’t agree more with the packing list. I use Remember the Milk on my iPhone and have a list just for packing every time we travel.

Tyler Karaszewski
Tyler Karaszewski
9 years ago

I guess I’ll share my own philosophy, although I doubt anyone else is going to follow it. It works great for me, but someone like Annelise would probably hate it, and I’d probably hate traveling with her. We seem to travel for different reasons. Like J.D., I pack light. Unlike J.D., I don’t make a list. I need a couple changes of clothes (what clothes depends on the destination climate), a camera, an outlet adapter, a notebook, and that’s pretty much it. I can get through that without three different computer applications. Unlike Sierra, I don’t try to be particularly… Read more »

Tyler Karaszewski
Tyler Karaszewski
9 years ago

@Steve:
The reason Brazil charges that outrageous fee to U.S. travelers is specifically because the U.S. charges the same fee to Brazilians traveling here.

Jewel
Jewel
9 years ago

We’ve become big fans of packing light for trips – better mobility means better flexibilty! If you’re interested in packing more efficiently, I recommend this website: http://www.onebag.com/ Because we’ve pared down on other stuff, we now have room in our van to take a tent and sleeping bags for our family of five, and plan to camp several nights on our trip from California to Idaho, as opposed to staying in hotels. This is going to save us hundreds of dollars. I know camping is a concept from hell for a lot of people, but staying in a hotel room… Read more »

Joel | Blog Of Impossible Things
Joel | Blog Of Impossible Things
9 years ago

I always put all the clothes I think I’ll need for the trip out on the bed. Then I’ll get rid of half of them and then i get rid of half of what’s left and I STILL end up bringing too much stuff!

Stephen
Stephen
9 years ago

Hey JD — I’m going to be traveling through the Americas for 6 months – 1 year starting in a couple of weeks, and have been researching for a good CC to use internationally. Which one do you have that you mentioned in your post? “And in my case, I use a specific credit card that waves overseas transaction charges while also giving me 1% cash back.”

Thanks!
-Stephen

elaine
elaine
9 years ago

At the bottom of my packing list (which I ALWAYS use as a guide, even when I’m going for just a weekend), I have a list of reminders: turn down water heater, unplug electronics, is mail handled (on hold or picked up), and the like. The list has evolved over time, but is ALWAYS helpful – don’t have to actually remember anything!

Griffin T.
Griffin T.
9 years ago

I just returned from a 2 week backpacking trip in Costa Rica and Panama. Packing light is key, especially if you are going to be carrying your packs with you at all times.

C.R.
C.R.
9 years ago

@JD
“And in my case, I use a specific credit card that waves overseas transaction charges while also giving me 1% cash back.”

Which one? Those fees can add up!

Melanie
Melanie
9 years ago

A couple more tips: 1) A couple of months ago the NY Times posted an article about one-bag traveling written by an expert: a travel agent. 2) Instead of trying to hit EVERY site mentioned in your travel guide, spend some time in public places (churches, parks, squares) or walking around the city. Some of my favorite travel memories have been free, non-itinerary experiences. For example, I recently traveled to Istanbul. Instead of paying $10 to see the Basilica Cistern (not a huge priority for me) I spent $3 on a tray of mouth-water baklava and an hour people watching… Read more »

Seattle Veggie
Seattle Veggie
9 years ago

I noticed J.D.’s remark about people shipping home packed items from Europe – a few years ago I did that on a month-long trip to Europe as we moved from a cold area (early June) to a much warmer one (July) – plus we mailed home some local wine, so that we didn’t have to carry it around with us! Definitely worth it.

MrsKruse
MrsKruse
9 years ago

Capital One & Charles Schwab both waive foreign transaction fees. Both offer cards with cash back.

And I know that Schwab will even refund any ATM fees you encounter if you have their checking account.

Jessica
Jessica
9 years ago

I’m with Annelise. I prefer nicer hotels, even if I’m not getting the “authentic” experience – whatever that is. I’m not a local and I’m not going to experience Europe like a local, no matter how hard I try. For me it feels forced to try too hard for that. I am lucky that I travel for work in the US and accumulate hotel points so I tend to stay in major American hotel chains for free when I travel abroad. I don’t feel that I am missing out on real experiences by being at the Hilton. While I find… Read more »

jenk
jenk
9 years ago

On the way back from my first-ever business trip I discovered my home airport in Seattle was closed due to bad weather. I was stuck in Chicago overnight. My company reimbursed me for the hotel and got me another flight, but it was still a scary experience.

I don’t travel unless I have an emergency fund that can handle a few extra nights in a hotel+meals. Call me paranoid, but I don’t.

Christina in NM
Christina in NM
9 years ago

My travel budgets have changed a lot over time. When I was in college, I would scrape by on the bare minimum- staying at hostels and eating at cheap cafeterias. Now that I’m older, my style is quite different as I am not willing to put up with poor food and uncomfortable sleeping conditions on the few days of vacation I have a year. I find that much of the big ticket costs of travel I pay ahead of time- airfare & hotel stays and any internal air/train tickets. I rarely bother with getting people gifts- perhaps a box of… Read more »

KarenJ
KarenJ
9 years ago

@Annelise I respect your right to have a new outfit every day if that’s important to you. My husband and I travel to the carribbean once a year, and we find that the style is so much more laid back and casual. Also, we practically live in bathing suits, so we find that bringing dressy clothes is just a waste of space. One of the things I’ve found that helps save money without cutting back on the vacation experience is to get a timeshare or some other accommodation with a kitchen. This gives us the opportunity to eat some meals… Read more »

Alicia
Alicia
9 years ago

I love that Groupon idea! When my bf and I travel, we end up spending too much on food. We like to enjoy ourselves and have one comfortable/indulgent meal a day (like having lunch on the go and dinner at a restaurant). But it seems like we always spend way more than I would have expected. And half the time, the quality of the food doesn’t match the price. So on our next vacation, I’m planning to do some serious Yelping beforehand and find some cheap, highly rated places to grab food. Has anyone tried that before? I have a… Read more »

chacha1
chacha1
9 years ago

@ Elaine #32 – great tip! DH and I have not yet had the opportunity to take a “real” international trip. But we are now beginning to plan what we hope will be a two-week vacation in Europe. I appreciate all this expert advice on packing light and budgeting, which have both been challenges for us. I haven’t seen anyone else mention timeshares. That’s how we’ve vacationed for the past 8 years and we LOVE it. We have a high-value property and are able to exchange it in thousands of places. We’ve chosen condo-type resorts with full kitchens and in-unit… Read more »

J.D. Roth
J.D. Roth
9 years ago

@Stephen (#32)
I use the Capital One No-Hassles Cash Back card, which was recommended to me by GRS readers in 2007 before I left for England. The card doesn’t charge one common fee (I think it’s the international transaction fee, but don’t quote me on that), and it gives 1% cash back. Between these two things, it helped keep my costs down a bit…

Nicole
Nicole
9 years ago

I always take an eyemask and earplugs with me when I travel. You could be staying at the most luxurious hotel in the world and still have to contend with construction noise or summer sun somehow leaking in at 3 am. A good night’s sleep = non-grumpy me. Like other people here, my traveling habits have changed over the years, but I still find using a moneybelt handy. Most of my cash, identification, emergency traveler’s checks, (which I was once *really* glad I had) and ATM & credit card go here, with some cash in a more easily-accessed location during… Read more »

honeybee
honeybee
9 years ago

JD, *how could you* have held out on us so long with this Entertainment tip?? I just went and bought two books for my area for a combined $12, including shipping. The discounts look unbelievable. My favourite beer bar apparently has one in there for a free entree, which immediately takes care of the cost of the book. I had totally forgotten about Entertainment — this was a book that kids used to hock for fundraisers in high school and I had forgotten all about it.

Are you holding out on any other golden tips??? Spill ’em!!

James
James
9 years ago

i think putting back half your clothes is great advise. i wish i could do that when i travel, it would make my life a bit easier.

your point about traveling with frugal companions is a great one. going anywhere with people who spend out of your means can really set you up for an expensive vacation.

Steve
Steve
9 years ago

@Tyler yep – and that’s the same reason Argentina has been increasing their entry costs. It seems like a lot of countries don’t appreciate the US treating their citizens so poorly! By the way, having visited Athens myself, I recommend only a week or two there. We spent 2.5 days there and that felt like plenty. Almost more than enough. Of course your mileage may vary. Personally I travel like I live – keeping fixed costs to a “reasonable” minimum to leave money for experiences. I don’t budget because my (and my wife’s) natural frugality is generally more than enough.… Read more »

DreamChaser57
DreamChaser57
9 years ago

Tyler (Poster #29) –

Your trip to Greece sounds delightful, do you have experience sailing? Do you have to hire staff for the boat?

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