Minimalist money: 6 steps to simplify your financial life

Finances are one of the most complicated things in many people's lives … and yet, they don't have to be. With a little effort, you can simplify your financial life and end the money headaches most people face.

I consider myself a minimalist. As such, I shy from all kinds of complexities. I look for ways to simplify. I like worry-free solutions — I like to forget about it, so I can focus on things that are more important to me.

Here's how I simplified my financial life:

Step One: I Opted Out of Consumerism.

This is the first and most important step. If you're a long-time GRS reader, you already know all about this — if you're new, dig through the GRS archives for some great stuff about frugality and the consumerist mindset.

Too often, we get into the mindset of buying, of attaining more, of shopping for pleasure or stress relief or finding self-worth, of impulse buys. This is a mindset that comes from years of exposure to advertising, and it's hard to stop. Start by becoming more conscious of it, and by telling yourself that you will no longer find pleasure in buying and having material things.

When you find yourself with an urge to buy, stop and breathe. Put the item on a 30-day list and don't buy it until 30 days after you put it on the list. Usually the impulse will dissipate. Give thought to every purchase and ask yourself, “Is this really necessary? Can I live without it?” Try to live only with what's necessary and get happiness from doing things — from spending time with people, from creating — rather than from material goods and spending.

Step Two: I Saved Up an Emergency Fund

Before you can find financial peace of mind, you need an emergency fund, otherwise you're always going to be living on the edge, from paycheck to paycheck. Every unexpected expense that comes up will derail everything I recommend below. This point has been driven home many times on this site, so I won't belabor it. But start here: Save up at least $500 by putting $50-100 per paycheck towards this fund, and gradually build up to $1000 or more.

To do this, cut out unnecessary expenses. Look closely at your spending, including regular payments you might have forgotten about, and see what can be cut. There's always something:

  • magazine subscriptions
  • monthly payments for services you don't really need (including online services)
  • buying books when you could use the library
  • cable television
  • a bigger car than you really need
  • gourmet coffee when you can make your own at home
  • a bigger home than you need
  • storage space when you could just sell your stuff
  • clothes and shoes when you already have plenty
  • gadgets and computer purchases you don't really need
  • going out to lots of restaurants or bars or clubs or other expensive entertainment when you could stay home or do fun things without spending much

Put the money you cut into your emergency fund until it gets to at least $500.

Step Three: I Got Out of Debt.

Again, this has been well-covered here at GRS and elsewhere. But it's important — otherwise, minimalist finances will be difficult to achieve. Debt payments are not essential — you shouldn't have them in the first place. But until you pay them off, they'll be headaches.

After you've saved at least $500 for your emergency fund, put most of your extra income towards debt payment, one debt at a time, until you're all paid up. Maybe put a little each paycheck towards your emergency fund.

This step will take the longest, but it's well worth it. And you can do the other stuff on this list immediately, without having to complete this step first.

Step Four: I Use Cash, Not Credit

I'm a big fan of cash, and a big credit card hater. Credit card bills are a blight on most people's finances; they make it too easy to spend money you don't have, and then you end up paying tons in interest and fees.

Sure, it's possible to use them responsibly, but in most cases, it's an unnecessary temptation. Ditch the credit cards and use cash and (sometimes) Visa or Mastercard debit cards. These are better only allow you to spend money you already have.

Cash is great because you can withdraw a pre-determined amount each month, and you always know how much you have left. With credit cards, it's easy to spend more than you have budgeted; to stay within a budget you'll have to constantly track your expenses. No need to track expenses with cash — you can see you only have a little left. Try the envelope system for cash: Put designated amounts of cash into separate envelopes for groceries, gas and other spending.

Step Five: I Automated My Finances.

I don't like worrying about bills, so I've made my finances automagical. I have all my income automatically deposited in my checking account, and I've set up automatic payment for all bills. Some are done by automatic deduction, when possible, and others are done by using the online bill-paying system of my bank, set to recurring monthly payments. Other bills — my rent, for example — I've paid in big chunks, six months to a year in advance. I also make savings transfers automatic, and when I was in debt, those payments were automatic as well.

It helps to have a sizable emergency fund so you can make payments like this and not worry about whether there's enough in your account for all of your automatic bill payments. I've actually split my emergency fund into two:

  • Most is in an online savings account.
  • The rest is in my checking, so I always have a comfortable cushion in my checking account.

It takes a little while to get automated finances just right, but you can start today by setting up automatic deposits and deductions and bill payments. It's nice, because your finances also become paperless.

I recommend putting a reminder in your calendar to check on your bank accounts once a week, just for peace of mind. Otherwise, you can now forget about finances.

Step Six: I Don't Buy Unless I Need It — And Have the Money.

This is such an old and common-sense piece of advice that it's almost embarrassing to put it here. But it's important.

Once you've done all of the above, you're debt-free with a good emergency fund and automatic finances. But what about purchases from that point forward? Should you buy a bike if you want to commute by bike? Should you buy new furniture? The answer is two-fold:

  1. Don't buy it unless you really need it, and
  2. Don't buy it unless you have the money already. Not “if you have the money next month or next week”, but only if you have the money in hand.

It's as simple as that.

Avoid debt as much as possible. The last car I bought was used, and I was able to pay cash for it (with a trade-in). I hope to buy my first house completely with cash (or at least mostly with cash).

Don't buy it unless you need it — and only if you have the money. If you follow these two rules, you'll never have to worry about finances again. You'll be able to bask in the glory of your worry-free financial life — and laugh in the face of humanity.

Update: Trent at The Simple Dollar has posted a follow-up to this article that provides some concrete examples of the advantage of going minimal.

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Stephen
Stephen
11 years ago

Agreed…I live a limited consumption lifestyle similar to yours. However, I don’t know if it’s possible to give up both cable and not going out to bars, restaurants etc.. My better half and I have a compromise, we limit eating out to once a week, and keep the cable per her request.

I don’t think having a big car is the real issue – perhaps buying new cars often is most individuals biggest dilemma. If most folks kept their car(s) for 10-12 years, there wouldn’t be a problem with size.

Little House
Little House
11 years ago

These steps cover just about all anyone needs to know to become financially independent and free. The only other thing I’d add would be a step seven, begin investing in your future through a company 401K or stocks and mutual funds. I’m just now thinking about this step and still need more info on it. I haven’t yet researched all of my options.

thanks for an informative post-
Little House

Tim
Tim
11 years ago

I don’t get it. How does not buying stuff simply your life? I don’t get it. I buy stuff I need and want and my life is simple. Seems to me in the quest for simplicity, you actually are making life more complex. Things like credit cards are designed to make life simpler and less complex–that is, i don’t have to make a trip to an atm machine or bank in order to make a purchase. that to me seems one less step. if i have to worry so much about not spending and implementing mechanisms to resist temptations, that… Read more »

Another Dave
Another Dave
11 years ago

I’m all for the simple life and that’s how we live. Getting simpler and simpler as we go. But one thing we can’t get behind is Automated payments. Maybe it’s different for you guys, but my family (thru various banks) has had numerous problems with Automated setups. Things like due dates being changed purposely so you miss payments (as credit cards have done recently). Bank systems being down so you can’t even download your statements online, and payments can’t go out thru the automated system (I can always use Credit/Debit card at the bills online website). To transfers not coming… Read more »

Nancy L.
Nancy L.
11 years ago

I think the point about size of cars is valid. When I bought my Civic, I heard a lot of comments about “Gee, I could never drive a car that small!” Yet the interior and trunk storage is more than sufficient for all of our family needs–even when we cart around other kids to activities, and the smaller size is great for parking. As for safety, many larger cars are more prone to rolling over than smaller cars, so it’s not like you magically are safe once you are in a big SUV or minivan. I know that there are… Read more »

Craig
Craig
11 years ago

I use cash not credit whenever possible as well. It helps me manage my money better and I can see the deductions right away unlike credit mentality. An emergency fund is key because you do not know when things may occur.

Shane
Shane
11 years ago

The key thing here is to combat consumerism. The American way of life is to keep up with the Jones’. This includes buying large homes, expensive cars, the HD TV, etc. The big guns of this country use us little people as pawns to make more money. Here’s some examples: 1. The switch to digital broadcasting for television. It required a lot of people to either get a converter box, or a new TV set. Just another ploy to make us spend money. My solution: don’t watch TV. 2. Manufactured foods contain many cheap, unhealthy additives that adversely affect our… Read more »

Oleg Mokhov
Oleg Mokhov
11 years ago

Hey Leo, When you have only what you need, life is simpler. There’s less choice, and decisions are made quicker. I feel your Step One (opt out of consumerism) is the most important one. When you live a frugal life–buy and have only what you need–your finances and life become minimal, and simplicity leads to happiness. Objects become tools to accomplish a goal or solve a problem, not stuff that’s neat to have but clutters up your finances, your house, your life. @Tim: I don’t think Leo meant not to buy at all, but don’t play the consumerism game ie.… Read more »

Karen
Karen
11 years ago

I agree with Tim—many times buying things actually makes your life simpler, and credit cards can be used to do the same thing. The trick is to buy things that you actually do need and to pay off your CC each month (it’s not that complicated, you know). For example, I finally traded in my 10 yo midsize sedan and purchased a new Honda CRV last year to haul me and my 2 kids and their etc around. With the added space, 4WD, and a ski rack and bike rack and trailer hitch, life is soooo much simpler now. No… Read more »

Peggy
Peggy
11 years ago

Count me in with the ones that don’t use autopay; too much potential for screw-ups. Paying things manually also keeps me mindful of what I’m paying for, and why.

Cash is great, because you can leave as much of it at home as you want. With credit or debit cards, it’s all or nothing.

To keep from “worrying about bills”, I keep a calendar of when the bills are expected to come. I write a reminder to pay the rent on our main appointment calendar. I wouldn’t prepay rent for months in advance, unless they gave me a discount.

JoesMoney
JoesMoney
11 years ago

Great guest post.

Dara
Dara
11 years ago

@Shane (#7)

I am very interested about what your sources are for High fructose corn syrup inhibiting leptin and insulin. Please share as I would love to research this more. I’m a personal trainer and need all the reasons I can to get my clients off the processed crap!

EscapeVelocity
EscapeVelocity
11 years ago

I have my paycheck directly deposited, but I still pay the bills every month–I feel like it keeps me more aware of what I’m spending, and is more secure. I have two bill-paying days marked on my Google calendar, and a folder into which I put the bills as they arrive. I find the tough thing about living within my means is finding friends who are of the same mindset. It’s kind of wearing being the only one without an iPhone sometimes. There’s been a definite drift upwards in what’s considered a middle-class lifestyle since I was a kid (partly… Read more »

MarcoK
MarcoK
11 years ago

I don’t understand everybody’s fear with CCs. Do you really need a hard limit on spending by bringing a certain amount of cash when you go out? Do you always spend all that cash and want to spend more? Yes, it definitely is quicker/easier/simpler to use CCs, but that’s the point. Also, it’s safer if you lose your wallet. Call the CC company and cancel. With cash, you are just out all that money. In fact, I have the opposite mentality of those who are the side of cash only. CCs allow you to see exactly when, where, and how… Read more »

Scadman
Scadman
11 years ago

I cancelled my cable and am at least 10x better off because of it. Any Show you REALLY actually want to watch can be found online for free. Otherwise you get advertised into sticking around for another show, and another and another, and pretty soon you are watching rock of love 3 for mindless entertainment (if you can call it that) and your productivity has come to a halt. Use your free time to learn more and gain future earning potential, or work on projects. You’ll be much more satisfied and will sleep better because your mind will be ready… Read more »

Bella
Bella
11 years ago

Great post – as most others have noted, turning away from the consumerist lifestyle – becoming a concious consumer and spending with intent is key! Since I work in the technology field it definetely feels that I’m the only one in the room without a shiny little iPhone (with a shiny little skin, and the latest aps), but honestly, knowing what I spend my time and money on – and that those were consious decision based on what I think is important – is MUCH MORE REWARDING. To the poster who said it’s hard to find friends who agree, start… Read more »

DPK
DPK
11 years ago

I don’t understand the fear of credit cards as a way to pay for things you already have the money for providing you pay them in full every month. Credit cards have superior protections than debit cards, especially in case your number is stolen or used fraudulently. The time frame for reporting problems is much shorter with a debit card and the amount you could lose, even if fraud is proven, is a lot higher.

May I suggest having a column related to the risks and benefits of credit cards vs. debit cards? You may want to start here: http://www.consumerreports.org/cro/money/credit-loan/debit-cards/the-dark-secrets-of-debit-9-07/overview/the-dark-secrets-of-debit-ov.htm

Gee
Gee
11 years ago

“Step six: I don’’t buy unless I need it –– and have the money.” Only buy what I need. Interesting idea…..hmmm…. Well, so I don’t need hobbies. There goes the enjoyment I get out of knitting and cross stitching. I enjoy knitting, but I don’t need it. That dance class I took last year. Waste of money. Darn my consumerist mentality. We don’t need a car. Sure it makes our life easier. But we don’t need it. Ok, no car. Our house. Heck, you don’t even need a two bedroom rental if you have a child. A bachelor will do… Read more »

Brent
Brent
11 years ago

I don’t completely understand people’s aversion to digital and automatic finances. I actually get frustrated with cash because its not meticulously recorded to the penny for every transaction I make. As for the Auto-pay. I love the ability to not worry about making sure its paid on time. No chance to forget, No late payments. Apparently some people have had issues with auto-withdraw. But not only have I never had it take an incorrect amount, I always see the amount before it transacts emailed to me before its payed. If you are uncomfortable with the bank draft, consider paying by… Read more »

Melissa
Melissa
11 years ago

I think using cash is definitely smart if you CANNOT pay your credit card in full every month. However, if you can pay your credit card in full every month, a points program credit card is the way to go. Most offer them. I like the Bank of America Upromise card. 1% of my purchases goes into my Upromise account tied to a 529 plan. Since my husband and I use our Bank of America credit card for everything, we rack up around $50 a month in our Upromise account!

Jill
Jill
11 years ago

I’ve had two things in my life get automatically billed to my credit card- my Sunpass (Florida version of EZ Pass) transponder because I don’t want to have to worry about getting a large ticket because I forgot to add another $25 to my Sunpass account, and an AOL account from the days when I used them as an ISP. Never had a problem with the Sunpass account, but the AOL account was another matter. When we switched to a cable-based ISP after a move, they refused to cancel our account, and we literally had to change our credit card… Read more »

chacha1
chacha1
11 years ago

@Dara and Shane, I’m also a certified personal trainer and based on my reading (Men’s Health, Women’s Health, American Fitness, Yoga Journal, IDEA Fitness Journal, and others), there is no known/documented metabolic effect of high fructose corn syrup that is different from those of other, “natural” sugars. The current consensus seems to be that the negative health effects that some are associating with HFCS are commmon to anyone with a high-sugar diet, regardless of the source of the sugar. That said, any food with HFCS added definitely has one too many ingredients, typically is very high in sugar, and generally… Read more »

Dara
Dara
11 years ago

@chacha1 I appreciate your response, but are any of those readings peer reviewed journals? I have read Men’s and Women’s health and do not like them. I prefer to get my information directly from the studies, and I like to see who is doing the studies and who is funding them. I don’t know the other journals you mentioned, so if they are peer reviewed please let me know. I would imagine that many of the articles saying that HFCS is no more harmful than regular sugar are supported by studies that are funded indirectly by the HFCS industry. This… Read more »

Oisbroke
Oisbroke
11 years ago

🙂 love the last line!

Menace
Menace
11 years ago

Thanks Leo. I love your site as well. These are the simple ideas that keep me reading GRS. Nothing mind-blowing, just good reminders to be mindful.
@ Gee- come on. Point taken, but really. Knowing Leo’s website, his life seems to be devoted to spending time with his family, enjoying the things he loves, and just filtering out the unnecessary consumerism to appreciate what’s in front of him. Take from these posts what’s pertinent and meaningful to you, and then move on.

Rob Bennett
Rob Bennett
11 years ago

I of course agree that simplicity is good. But some view it as a benefit of simplicity that you don’t need to spend time on money management. I don’t see that as a plus. I view money management as Life Management. I find it exciting and fun to plan my life (to the extent possible). So I very much enjoy the time I put into understanding money management better.

I do tend to favor simple strategies, though.

Rob

Tyler Karaszewski
Tyler Karaszewski
11 years ago

Not that any of this is bad advice, and I agree with all six points (although I do buy indulgences sometimes, but only with money I already have), but is there anything new to say about personal finance or are we just going to repeat the same things we’ve heard 1,000 times before?

Frank
Frank
11 years ago

Good post. $500 is ok to start off with for and emergency fund. Ideally you want to have at least 6 months of living expenses stashed away for an emergency fund, however much you make after taxes per month. Multiply that by 6 then you have a decent fund in case you get laid off or your car decides to blow a transmission etc. It takes time like the man says but better to have it than end up using the dreaded credit cards, if you have no savings for unexpected expenses this is how the trouble starts. Do as… Read more »

Shane
Shane
11 years ago

@Dara

I will post an article about High Fructose Corn Syrup on my blog that I’m just starting. I will also include the sources in which I read the information from.

Also, with you being a personal trainer, I would like your input on balanced diets to assist in my blog. Although eating natural foods is a lot healthier than processed, it is still necessary to have proper intake of all nutrients.. a topic I’m not too familiar with.

My email is [email protected], or you can visit my blog and leave a comment: http://www.foodfromscratch.org/ (not complete yet)

brooklyn money
brooklyn money
11 years ago

Simplicity is good, but paying rent six-months in advance is not very smart. Why let your landlord earn interest on your money?

Foo Finance
Foo Finance
11 years ago

I too am a huge fan of losing the cable TV and am against consumerism. I have written an entire post about dropping Cable TV on my blog (click my name above). The internet can be just as bad for consumerism but it is a lot easier to pick your battles online. I must admit that I am not a fan of auto-pay either. I agree that it can be good for some (such as my dad) but others can forget when payments pull and overdraw their account. I also actually enjoy looking at my finances (I am a Finance… Read more »

Suzanne
Suzanne
11 years ago

@Tim and Gee, Not sure why you follow this type of blog if you already have all of the money you need to live the lifestyle that you want to live. I am guessing that, like me, most of the people who read these articles are trying to pay off debt, and are trying to find creative ways to reign in spending. For us, it is very helpful to think in a new way. My goal is to pay off a HELOC and student loans. These hints have allowed me to bring my monthly spending budget down by $400/month. I… Read more »

Doug DePrenger
Doug DePrenger
11 years ago

I second not automating payments. Besides being complacent after a while, if you try and stop an automated payment (say you quit the service), some companies have “problems” stopping. I speak from experience. Also, changing the pay time can be difficult and time consuming.

Gee
Gee
11 years ago

Suzanne – I think it is normal to buy things you don’t need. I think being told to never buy anything I don’t need is silly. That’s the kind of extreme abstract advice that people, like me, ignore. It’s not something I can apply to my life. Under the espoused theory of this article – I shouldn’t buy an elephant, even if I can afford it. It didn’t say have a good/reasonable/frugal budget and enjoy the leftover. (At least I’m assuming that an elephant is a want. If I started a circus, I might need one to make it work… Read more »

valerie
valerie
11 years ago

Like several others have said – it’s not very smart to pay your rent that far ahead, you lose money that way! Is it really that hard to write a check on the 1st?

Same point with buying your first house. Unless housing starts appreciating faster than the stock markets, it’s better to make a 20% down payment and then pay it off quickly (i.e. <15 years). Especially considering interest rates are quite low right now.

A cash purchase of a house makes sense if you’re using it as rental property to provide positive cash flow.

Dara
Dara
11 years ago

@Suzanne I have read similar studies about credit cards, and I think that may be true for some people, but I’m actually the opposite. I like the fact that with a credit or debit card you have a track record for everything you spend. I’m much more likely to use cash for impulse purchases than pull out the plastic. For that reason, I don’t like to have cash on me. To each his own of course, but I would like to see a study done in this regard as I suspect I’m not the only one that feels this way!… Read more »

Suzanne
Suzanne
11 years ago

@Dara,

I actually agree with you to some extent. I have found that very detailed budgeting (down to the $1.00 vending machine, no kidding) works well for me. Credit cards help me achieve that. When I just take out $100 it goes much faster. I do think it helps to have the information about how credit cards tend to affect people. I’m sure that not everybody is affected that way, but in general most people are. I use this information to make sure I stick to my budget more closely.

Suzanne
Suzanne
11 years ago

@Gee, it seems like you were looking for a disclaimer.I suppose he could have included a sentence at the top: “For those people that are looking for ways to save money, consider becoming a minimilast spender like me. Here’s how:” He does present extreme suggestions. I think it’s implied that you should take hints from this that would be helpful to your situation.

Adam
Adam
11 years ago

Great tips! However, here’s my pet peeve with financial advice – Credit Cards. There are some really huge advantages to using credit cards over cash. I will share two: 1) The rewards – I have an American Express cash back card. I pay NO fees, NO annual membership, nada, nothing. Last year I received almost $1000 for my purchases. To me, that’s free money (tax free as well). 2) Consumer protection. Hands down, the biggest advantage. I have multiple times asked for a charge back, always with great outcomes. You just can’t do easily with cash. I have double warranty… Read more »

Notta Hatter
Notta Hatter
11 years ago

Don’t know about the Leptin/HFCS connection, but High Fructose Corn Syrup contains Mercury. http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2009/01/26/AR2009012601831.html Just Google ‘High Fructose Corn Syrup Mercury’ for more articles to read. Mercury ingestion leads to fertility problems and madness -the mad hatters of lewis carrolls story were real.Felt hat makers. See: http://www.unisci.com/stories/20022/0625026.htm or Google ‘ Mercury Mad Hatters’ Related to personal finance, I recently got a Discover card and set up a high interest ING Direct savings account to hold money for paying it in full every month.I earn better interst than my brick& mortar checking account, get the ccards grace period to earn interest… Read more »

james
james
11 years ago

I have done all of the above. I am 7 months away from paying off my house. I am 33 with a wife, 2 year old and one on the way.
While it may SOUND good to people in debt for me to say “I find no joy in money anymore” its kind of sad. If I get $100 or so from an ebay sale or as a gift, it no longer has the appeal and joy it once had… kind of sad.

EscapeVelocity
EscapeVelocity
11 years ago

I use both credit cards and cash. I put my grocery budget into cash–I spend a lot of it at the farmers’ market, so those are cash transactions anyway, and I’m very bad about stopping to write down exactly how much I spent and then entering it into Quicken when I get home. So I’ve started just withdrawing the grocery budget in cash on the first of the month and then keeping it in a separate wallet, along with my grocery coupons. When I run out, I just live off what I have in the house for the rest of… Read more »

james
james
11 years ago

my wife and I have been talking about doing the grocery cash thing as you have…

Dustin | Engaged Marriage
Dustin | Engaged Marriage
11 years ago

Well said! My family already follows every step you outlined here, although we could always do better.

Our financial freedom has greatly enhanced our marriage, and it is one of the topics I am excited to continue covering on Engaged Marriage!

liz
liz
11 years ago

Hmm.. I know a ton of college students, including myself, who cannot afford the college they’re going to and have to take out loans. I also know many, many people who wouldn’t be able to get to work if not for taking a loan out on a car. These tips work if you’re on a stable, comfortable salary and have just been silly about finances, I guess.

Shawn
Shawn
11 years ago

I tend to take Gee’s mentality on the “needs” part of this post. You really don’t “need” anything until you start wanting things. You technically don’t even need to eat…unless you “want” to live. I think this post needs to somehow define “need”; Where is the line? Personally I think you should rate how much you “want” something on a scale of 1 to 10, then depending on your financial situation, only purchase things that are X or higher. For someone trying to get out of $30,000 in debt, I would suggest only buying things that are a 9 or… Read more »

Stephanie
Stephanie
11 years ago

I know that there are people who cannot resist the temptation to overspend when using credit cards. But there exist many people who use them wisely. And I don’t see the point in pretending that credit cards are to be avoided whenever possible. Know yourself. Know what works for you. But the credit card isn’t the problem when someone is in debt. The consumer is. I make 90% of my purchases with a credit card. I have never once in my life carried a balance from one month to the next. It is paid off every single month. It is… Read more »

Cougar
Cougar
11 years ago

Good advise. But, what is said in here, that hasnt been told earlier by JD and other blogs? We all have read several times in here about not using CC, automate finances, not spend. why another post telling the sam thing in different words?

E
E
11 years ago

I agree there’s nothing new in this article. Also I’m not sure what’s meant by “simple.” Some interpret it as bare-bones, no frills, no fun. Not very appealing. Some think it means no credit, no debt, no consumerism. That’s old news and not necessarily helpful. Some are hearing automate, don’t look at your bills, pay everything way in advance so you don’t have to think about it. How does that help a person get rich slowly? I guess I just don’t know what the author is trying to say. What is meant by “the simple life?” What is meant by… Read more »

Broke MBA
Broke MBA
11 years ago

This is a great way to simplify everything, but stay on top of your automatic drafts. Be careful not to overdraft.

Also, I had a bad experience with the local utilities company who failed to inform that they had been unable to draft our account due to an expired debit card until we were three months behind!

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