Once-a-month shopping: Save more by shopping less

How often do you go to the supermarket? Could you get by making only one trip per month? What if it saved you money?

My wife and I are both reading America's Cheapest Family by Steve and Annette Economides. During his time as an ad salesman, Steve was “shocked to read in a food industry publication that grocers expect six of ten items consumers pick up in the store to be unplanned purchases.”

Steve and Annette discovered that scientific research backs up what grocers already knew. In their book, the Economides cite a study analyzing the decisions of 4,200 customers who made 30,000 purchases in fourteen different cities. Researchers found:

  • “Shoppers making a ‘quick trip' to the store to pick up a few specific items usually purchase 54 percent more than they planned.”
  • “Forty-seven percent of shoppers go to the store three or four times each week.”
  • “Consumers graze at the grocery store, with impulse buys making up between 50.8 and 67.7 percent of total purchase.”

When people shop more often, they buy more stuff.

What's the solution? For the past 25 years, Steve and Annette, America's cheapest family, have practiced once-a-month shopping. They only go grocery shopping 12 times a year. This boggles my mind; Kris and I shop every week. (Lately I've been making many supplementary grocery trips, and my food budget reflects that.)

Once-a-Month Shopping

How does shopping once a month work? First of all, it takes time. It also takes organization. Here's how the Economides do it:

  1. They make a list of the things they need, which they update continually. They also use meal plans (click here for a $14 day trial to $5 Meal Plan).
  2. They accumulate coupon and ads for the things they use and the stores they frequent. During the days before their monthly shopping trip, they match sales and discounts to the items on their list.
  3. They divide and conquer. Steve tackles the perimeter of the stores (meat, produce, dairy, and baked goods) while Annette scours the center (processed food, household goods, baking supplies).
  4. They leave younger children with a babysitter. The Economides have found that they save time and money by leaving younger children at home instead of letting them distract them from the task at hand. Older children, however, can actually help.
  5. They hit multiple stores. Different stores have different strengths. If you shop every week, it may not make sense to drive all over town to save a few pennies. By shopping just once a month, however, travel costs are diminished.
  6. When they have the food home, they prioritize perishables. Certain produce (grapes, bananas) need to be consumed earlier in the month. Other foods (milk, bread) may need to be frozen.

The Economides admit that each monthly shopping trip takes longer than a weekly shopping trip. But overall the process saves time and money. For one thing, it cuts down on the number of opportunities for impulse purchases.

Once-a-month shopping has worked so well for them that they've been doing it since 1984!

Putting the Plan Into Practice

“This would never work for you,” Kris said when she and I discussed this concept. “You shop all the time.”

She's right. Since I started working from home, I find myself at the grocery store several times each week. For example, I might crave a rotisserie chicken for dinner, so I head to the store to indulge my whim. While this sounds nice, it's actually costing me more money.

  • I'm indulging my whims, which tend toward more expensive foods.
  • Each time I go to the store, I tend to buy extras. That rotisserie chicken turns into chicken and a bottle of wine and a loaf of bread, for example.
  • We're wasting more food. I'm not eating leftovers, and sometimes (I'm ashamed to admit), I let other food expire.

Could Kris and I get by shopping just once a month? We're willing to give it a try. She and I have agreed to start by cutting our trips to twice a month (with a supplemental weekly run for milk and eggs). If this works, we'll make them even less often. The most difficult part, however, will be restraining myself from those quick trips for impulse meals.

Update: Many readers are concerned about how once-a-month shopping would affect their supply of fresh fruits and vegetables. Here's what Steve and Annette say in their book:

Limiting our trips to the store means that certain fruits and vegetables must be eaten earlier in the month because they are more perishable. Grapes and bananas usually last a week. Once they're gone, we move on to other fruits. Pears, lettuce, cucumbers, and peppers can last two weeks. Apples, cabbage, radishes, oranges, and celery can last a month.

We are often asked about storing bread, cheese, and milk. How could we possibly make those last a month? Well, we carefully freeze all three.

You should do what works for you. Kris and I are going to try twice-a-month shopping; the key idea is to reduce the number of trips to the supermarket.

Related note: At AskMetafilter recently, nitsuj asked, What's your secret tip for saving money at the grocery store?”

More about...Frugality, Food

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Jason
Jason
12 years ago

I’ve tried shopping once a month and once a week. It may be because I’m shopping for two and not a whole family, but I’ve found if I plan out my meals and food needs for a week and stick to the list at the store, I eat more healthily and waste less food. I think the trick to saving money with once a week shopping is eating all the meals you’ve planned before returning to the store. To me, it also takes less discipline. With monthly shopping, what do you do when you run out of milk or bread?… Read more »

Curt
Curt
12 years ago

My wife does the bulk of the shopping as she stays at home with our two boys. In the last year we began only going grocery shopping every two weeks. It’s not once a month like the book touts, but it has made a big difference for us. First of all, we live in the country and are 35 miles from the best, and most reasonable, grocery stores. So we save one, maybe two, trips a week into town at 70 miles a pop and at $4 a gallon. Secondly, it ‘forces’ us to use up all of our food… Read more »

Kate
Kate
12 years ago

I would feel pretty bummed if I couldn’t indulge once in a while. I do a major shop every two weeks and will occasionally have to do supplemental runs. I shop with a list though and if I’m tempted to buy something not on the list, I stop myself and have to make an argument for exactly what meal I’ll use it for. I actually find that I spend more money when I’m trying out new recipes and need to buy ingredients that I don’t already have than when I just go to the store and buy the stuff that… Read more »

pfctdayelise
pfctdayelise
12 years ago

I sure hope you visit a grocers or fresh food market more regularly than once a month. (Or have a productive vegie garden.) I can’t imagine how gross 2+ weeks-old vegies must be…!

Katie
Katie
1 month ago
Reply to  pfctdayelise

Carrots, celery, cabbage, onions, potatoes, apples, and citrus actually keep for the entire month (if not longer for some things like carrots) so the trick is to eat up the produce that spoils quickly first, then move on to the foods that last longer. I’ve been experimenting with once a month grocery shopping this year and have discovered that if I plan carefully, I’ll have fresh produce all month. I still haven’t perfected my amounts of produce, but I’m wasting less and less each month. I also stock up on frozen and canned vegetables and fruits when they go on… Read more »

Eric
Eric
12 years ago

While this strategy may save you some money, it would cost you a lot in the amount of energy that you get from eating fresh food. Eating fresh fruits, vegetables and dairy products is an essential way to stay healthy and energetic. If you are only eating canned or preserved food towards the end of month I would think your energy levels would drop though the floor. I shop once a week and for me that’s a good balance between being able to eat fresh food and not over-exposing myself to grocery store marketing.

Katie
Katie
1 month ago
Reply to  Eric

There are actually quite a few vegetables and fruits that will stay fresh the entire month. On top of that, frozen produce loses very little nutrition in the freezing process and can actually be MORE nutritious than fresh as it is harvested at it’s peak instead of a little early in order to ripen during transport or with exposure to gases.

Ryan K from Going Carless
Ryan K from Going Carless
12 years ago

Once a month seems like a drastic jump for the associated savings. If I were you, I’d start with every two weeks until you get the swing of it.

The part that I don’t get are the perishables. You won’t have any fruit or vegetables by the end of the month!

It helps me that I don’t have a car and have to ride my bike to the store. It cuts down on the “whims.” I average about every two weeks just because that’s my natural pattern.

http://www.goingcarless.com

Ziactrice
Ziactrice
12 years ago

I recently have engaged in a new method to cut my costs and restrict my diet. I go to the grocery store on foot or by bicycle – I can have whatever I am willing to carry the two blocks back to my apartment in a backpack and a hand-carried canvas tote, or for bigger trips to the grocery two miles distant, whatever will fit in both panniers and strap on top of the bike’s rack. Not only has my bill gone down markedly, so has my waistline. Plus, the amount of food that doesn’t get eaten and goes to… Read more »

Diatryma
Diatryma
12 years ago

My whims are generally easy/junk/stress food– mini weenies, mini donuts, cookies, and Pop-Tarts. They’re meal replacements to some extent– less thinking, less cooking, less cleanup. Problem is, I can’t stockpile them at all. If I have mini weenies, it’s mini weenies for breakfast every day for a week. Pop-Tarts last a little longer, but I’m lazy. I’m not going to make stir-fry while I have much easier food around unless I feel really guilty about not eating well. Besides, I can go through a gallon of milk in four days if I’m not in a food mood. I may only… Read more »

Merri
Merri
12 years ago

Giving up your health just to save some money? Fresh fruit and veggies are so much better (and cheaper!!!) than frozen! Please plan on buying those things at least once a week.

Katie
Katie
1 month ago
Reply to  Merri

I eat healthier now that I’m shopping once a month because I’m not making those impulse purchases of junk food on a weekly basis. ? An amazing amount of produce will last into the fourth week without diminished quality and frozen produce is just as healthy as fresh as it’s picked at it’s peak ripeness instead of a little early like most fresh produce in the stores, allowing all the nutrients to remain. I can’t speak for other parts of the country, but in my area, frozen produce is around the same price per pound as fresh when it is… Read more »

April
April
12 years ago

I’m with some of the others…what about produce? I’m not willing to only eat fruits and vegetables at the beginning of the month.

I could do this with our grocery store purchases, but for the produce, hitting the farmer’s market each week is the way for me.

Robin
Robin
12 years ago

Thanks for a great website! On this post, however, I have to disagree. I think that as long as food isn’t going to waste (which does require vigilance and creativity when it comes to meals), making frequent trips to the market is a good thing. Doing so, I buy more fresh food (which means healthier food) and can be flexible with dinner plans. Since I live in Europe in the city and don’t have a car (a major cost-saver in itself), my only real option is to buy just what I can carry. (I do miss clipping coupons, though, and… Read more »

Jen
Jen
12 years ago

I totally understand the food cravings, JD, I get them myself all. the. time. I have found, however, that if I go ahead and eat something in the house, with the promise to myself that if an hour later I still want the craved item that I can have it, I want it a lot less. Doesn’t work every time, but works enough that I don’t view the cravings as absolutes anymore. It also helps to have some favorites in the house. If I’m craving Chinese takeout, but I have frozen spring rolls, then I just fry a few of… Read more »

EscapeVelocity
EscapeVelocity
12 years ago

Some people can do this–they’re always ahead of me in the checkout line–but it does seem to me it requires living on industrially produced processed food with a long shelf life, and having a lot of storage space, neither of which are really intrinsically frugal. Use a shopping list to control impulse purchases. Don’t walk down the aisles you don’t need anything in.

Ayrk
Ayrk
12 years ago

We shop weekly but my wife is amazing at generating a meal plan, coordinating coupons, and staying on the list. She also takes flyers to Wal-Mart (where we do most of our grocery shopping) to price match.

Occasionally we’ll hit a different store for certain items, but overall, this method seems like the perfect balance of convienence and frugality. We rarely go over budget.

Annie
Annie
12 years ago

Once a month shopping actucally comes naturally to me. It’s what my mom did when I was growing up (they were only paid once a month). It’s easier b/c you buy 3 boxes of cereal instead of just 1. It saves me time/money b/c I can go to the discount stores across town all at one time instead of the neighborhood grocery each week. In response to the fruit/veggie questions, we eat salad and fresh fruits the first week or two. At the end of the month, we focus on frozen veggies (just as good) or canned fruits. We’re ok… Read more »

James
James
12 years ago

My grandparents did this. Probably more out of necessity, as my grandfather’s military benefits came once a month. But I remember staying with them and once a month we’d go to the commissary on base for the big shopping trip. They had a chest freezer, so they tended to stock up.

Of course, that didn’t eliminate supplemental trips to the store if they needed milk or some fresh vegetables. Mostly though, supplemental trips were the realm of my grandfather, who had (and still has) and insatiable sweet tooth.

Kim
Kim
12 years ago

I do a variation of once a month shopping because I live in a small rural town. We have a grocery in town, but it is very small and very expensive, and the nearest “cheap” supermarket is a 20 mile round trip. So, what I do is go to the cheap supermarket once a month and buy the nonperishables and other things that won’t spoil before the end of the month. Then once a week or so, I pop into the local grocery for fruit and other fresh items. I’ve discovered that the milk in the ultrapasturized cardboard containers will… Read more »

Annie Jones
Annie Jones
12 years ago

When I lived in the country I shopped once a month, and it does save money. And no, we didn’t live on highly processed foods; we bought staples and cooked from scratch. Many people are asking about produce and milk. Fresh produce is eaten during the first week to 10 days (as long as it lasts) after the shopping trip; after that, frozen or canned produce is used. Milk can be frozen, then thawed and used throughout the month, as can bread. Or bread can be made fresh at home every few days. I now live in a suburb with… Read more »

Rachel
Rachel
12 years ago

We only go twice a month and have a VERY strict plan. We spend $250 for two weeks of supplies – which seems like we could cut back but really evens out to $5.92 per meal for 2 adults and 1 toddler. (Actually probably less because that amount also consists of things like paper towels and diapers! Our food is more like $200) I write out an evening dinner for every night of the week and we have it posted in the kitchen. Lots of people think that we eat unhealthy, but even though we may not have fresh veggies… Read more »

Annie Jones
Annie Jones
12 years ago

@ Rachel: I love Aldi stores. They aren’t what they used to be; they have a much wider selection in bigger and nicer stores, while still keeping their prices low. They are my number one stop when grocery shopping. Any other store I go to is just to fill-in the few items I need that Aldi doesn’t carry…or if there is a really great loss-leader at another store.

Rachel
Rachel
12 years ago

@Annie

Thanks! Do the prices seem a lot lower or just like “really good sale” lower? I’m really hoping I like this place! It doesn’t open for another month, but the building looks nice.

downwithdebt
downwithdebt
12 years ago

I do believe that one way to save money is by staying out of the store. I can’t walk out of a grocery store without spending $75.00 dollars. Times that by 2 or 3 times a week and it really adds up. I have cut back my trips, I would really like to get to once a month shopping, I think it is do able. You would have to rely on canned and frozen produce after the first 1-2 weeks though. I really need to get better at buying what I need though, I get side tracked by the end… Read more »

April
April
12 years ago

I’m guess I’m too spoiled by the farmer’s market, and I just can’t bring myself to eat frozen or canned veggies.

Maybe if my husband and I were in bad financial shape and couldn’t cut back anywhere else, I’d have to consider it. But I’d drop a lot of extras before giving up the taste and health benefits of fresh, organic produce.

Adam Steer, Momentum Wellness
Adam Steer, Momentum Wellness
12 years ago

This is an interesting idea, but I see a couple major disadvantages. The first is that it takes some of the fun out of life and food… 😉 The second is that it robs you of the bounty of picking up fresh fruits and veggies (when in season of course). I do my weekly shopping with a very specific list, which I’ve definitely found to help cut the grocery bill. But I must admit to at least 2-3 extra mini-trips to local markets or grocery stores. What I am embarking on though is bulk buying for meats. I’m starting with… Read more »

Annie Jones
Annie Jones
12 years ago

@Rachel: IMO, they are consistently lower than everywhere else. That doesn’t mean other store’s sales aren’t as good or better, but other stores don’t put everything on sale all at once.

I don’t want to hijack the comments here, so if you have other questions you can email me at imannies at gmail.com.

Jane
Jane
12 years ago

We shop at Aldi weekly. I’m not a big coupon person, so perhaps if you were and watched the sales at the regular grocers, you could beat Aldi’s prices. But if you are like me and somewhat lazy, Aldi usually beats other grocers. We are also Sam’s Club people, and Sam’s often beats Aldi’s at the staples, since they are bulk. I used to be wary of produce at Aldi but now buy whatever looks good. I’ve noticed, though, that their prices on produce vary quite a bit from week to week, so you need to pay attention. For instance,… Read more »

elisabeth
elisabeth
12 years ago

I’m not convinced. I think we eat more healthy food (including a mixed green salad every day) by shopping one a week and focussing on foods that are fresh and unprocessed. It seems there are two ideas behind once-a-month: a) decrease impluse buys and b) get better deals at more stores. Both of these goals can be met with once a week shopping. We rotate stores and know what are the best buys at each. Also, with a list and a budget, I think we aren’t spending any more than we would on a monthly trip… When we were young… Read more »

Charlotte K
Charlotte K
12 years ago

I tried an experiment last month. It worked very well. I hate to shop, but I do love going to the grocery store. I can fritter away a lot of money there, plus I impulse buy chocolate in particular. Last month I decided that I was NOT going into the grocery store at all. I get an organic vegetable/fruit box delivery twice a month; have access to a weekly farmers market; and I get a monthly delivery from a beef/pork CSA (way more meat than I can eat in a month). I also have milk & eggs from a dairy… Read more »

Betsy
Betsy
12 years ago

I guess I’m pretty spoiled from living in the South and having a garden gnome for a husband, but I find that frozen veggies are a terrific supplement to whatever we can grow.

We moved this year and didn’t put in a new garden, and I have been kicking myself over the price of tomatoes, corn, cucumbers and zucchini all summer.

That said, I’ve been doing every-two-week shopping trips and am pretty happy with the frozen produce we’ve used.

Linda
Linda
12 years ago

I shop once a week and stick to the outside walls of the store…fresh vegies/fruit/fish and some dairy….stay OUT of the middle aisles as much as possible. Junk food reaching out to suck you in those middle aisles.

Right now that my son is on campus I am buying for myself and my goal is no more than $40 a week, and I am usually around $35.

I also shop at Aldis for the few items (oats, tuna, etc)but produce can be so-so(usually best to buy and eat within two days).

Stephen Stchur
Stephen Stchur
12 years ago

This is really interesting to me, especially that part that claims: “Shoppers making a ‘quick trip’ to the store to pick up a few specific items usually purchase 54 percent more than they planned.” I make these ‘quick trips’ often, and I certainly do buy more than I planned. However (and this is an important point), I limit myself to buying things that I normally buy anyway, but which just happen to be on sale now (and which are non-perishable). Cans of diced tomatoes for example, I go through like crazy. So if I’m at the store and I see… Read more »

Kelly
Kelly
12 years ago

I would agree with most everything in this article except for the “leave your kids at home” bit. Although leaving them at home would indeed most likely save headache and possibly money, it teaches children nothing in the long run.

I’m hoping to pass my good shopping and spending habits on to my kids at an early age and the grocery store is a great place to instill these values.

LC
LC
12 years ago

I agree that Aldi is a great place to shop. We started doing the bulk of our shopping there and our food bill immediately dropped by about 40% buying the same things. I’ve found their quality to be as good or superior to the name brands on most things. Especially the packaged and frozen foods and dairy. The produce is great most of the time, but it does pay to inspect it carefully, especially fruit. They even have name brand items occasionally and when I do make an impulse buy and get a box of cookies it costs me $1… Read more »

jw
jw
12 years ago

I can’t see this system working for me at all.. I live in a small city apartment so I don’t have the space to store that much food. Also with two grocery stores and a weekly farmers market within two blocks, planning out meals for a whole month seems like a waste of time.. And I’ll admit, when I go to the store, I buy a lot of things I didn’t plan for such as fresh seasonal produce (gasp!). But as long as I eat everything I buy, I don’t see it as a waste of money. In fact, finding… Read more »

Karen Putz
Karen Putz
12 years ago

I stock up once a month on all the sale items but I do a weekly run for fresh fruits and veggies. Those are important to us and I buy them at any price. If I come across a great sale on toilet paper or other items, I’ll stock up for six months at a time.

Angus
Angus
12 years ago

I’m seeing a lot of people complaining how this wouldn’t work for them, primarily because nobody wants to eat produce that is more than a week old. I don’t blame them. But that doesn’t mean you should throw out the whole idea. My wife and I use a system similar to this, but at the beginning of the month we buy most of the non-perishables we will need. This takes about half of our grocery budget. The other half gets spent weekly on perishables and high-consumption items. Milk, bread, fruits and vegetables are a weekly purchase, but just about everything… Read more »

Danny
Danny
12 years ago

It sounds nice to shop only once a month. Unfortunately, it’s not possible for me since I have to share the space with my three co-renter. Also, I’m concerned about fresh food, since I nearly eliminated processed food from diet. Though, I do make a list limited to a 3$ a meal budget (Being alone, it’s 63$ a week) and I do hit many grocery store (Loblaws, IGA), one butcher shop (Aux Côtes Croisées) and one Drug Store (Jean Coutu). They all are at foot reach from my work office. My planned meal usualy cost less than the $63 in… Read more »

Annie Jones
Annie Jones
12 years ago

Angus is right. There’s no reason that a shopping method can’t be modified to work for a person’s needs, whatever they are. 🙂

Aya
Aya
12 years ago

I think it’s a good idea in theory, but I could not do it. I change my mind far too much to plan. I also just recently went through about a week-long blackout. We had to throw away/grill all of our refrigerated/frozen food. I know this doesn’t happen everyday, but I am definitely re-thinking the grocery philosophy my mother taught me -which is freezing and stockpiling meats, buying in bulk, always keeping a certain variety of cheeses/vegetables in the fridge, etc. I loosely meal plan, watch sales, clip coupons and take grocery trips once a week.

SJT
SJT
12 years ago

I shopped once a month for years when my husband was in the Navy. We lived 45 min. from the nearest commissary (I did a comparison shopping and found that I saved a minimum of 20% at the commissary vs local grocery stores)so we only made the trip once a month. I bought all the non-perishibles and anything that could be frozen. I did still shop my local store for fresh fruits and vegies. It did take a bit of planning. I made meal plans a month at a time and had to keep my pantry stocked well. I had… Read more »

Atomic Bombshell
Atomic Bombshell
12 years ago

Fun concept, but I don’t think it would work for a vegan like me. Without fresh fruits and vegetables, I couldn’t get enough nutrients.

Steph
Steph
12 years ago

It seems that there are many variations on the once a month theme that can save people money. I agree with EscapeVelocity at #7 that to shop the way the article describes pretty much ties a person into the industrial food complex. However, you can still follow the paradigm of infrequent shopping even if you buy locally produced food. I buy my red meat from local ranchers, one animal at a time (generally a whole lamb or half a beef), once or twice a year. I stock up on flour, oatmeal, rice, etc., from the natural food store monthly, buy… Read more »

mbrogz3000
mbrogz3000
12 years ago

You need to hit up the grocery store for basics like milk and bread once a week. We eat fish and shrimp a lot, so we go regularly to buy more when the price occasionally slashes. I go with my wife mainly to monitor the ingredients of the things in say a marinade or in an ‘on-sale’ wheat bread. Basically, if sugar or HFCS is the main ingredient in anything (or if HFCS is in it period), even its its on-sale, I’m training her not to buy it. Yogurt is one you especially need to watch since if it doesn’t… Read more »

meggan
meggan
12 years ago

As far as frozen veggies go, some of them are fresher and more nutrient rich than “fresh” that has been shipped who knows how many thousands of miles before it gets to your store. Don’t get me wrong-if your eating local and seasonally all year wrong, than great. Our growing season up here is so short, that we have to blanch and freeze veggies to have them to last through half the winter. It’s such a problem of affluence to complain that frozen veggies are unhealthy and processed. I’d rather eat them knowing they were frozen fresh than how many… Read more »

Greg C.
Greg C.
12 years ago

So they only eat fruits and vegetables the first few days in a month? I don’t think I could do that. In fact several things I eat are only good for 2-3 days. Much produce and many meats are really only fresh for a couple days. I have tried very hard to go once a week and even that is very difficult due to spoilage, missing the odd item here and there,and so on. Some items are unplanned but NECESSARY- my last grocery trip was a late night trip to get some medicine. And no, I did not buy any… Read more »

Amy @ My Daily Dollars
Amy @ My Daily Dollars
12 years ago

I’m now trying to do a big shop once every THREE months for non-perishables. Then, I hit the farmer’s market every week and the grocery store every other week. At the store, I only buy meat and cheese. So far, it’s really cutting down the stress of a big trip each week, and I’ve definitely cut back on impulse buys.

DesignerDad
DesignerDad
12 years ago

Insightful Post. I’m not sure a month is realistic for our family and current fridge/freezer space. But after reading this, I think we could make the transition from about once every week to once every other week.

Prioritizing perishables is something I’ve been stressing at home lately as well.

KC
KC
12 years ago

I will not be shopping once a month – I like fresh food too much. Besides where would I put all that food? I drink a gallon of milk a week – 4 gallons would take up a third of my refrigerator and it would go bad.

But I will be more conscious of what I buy and how many impulse purchases I make. This article was certainly effective at opening my eyes to that.

Also someone else mentioned this, but I have started biking to the grocery store. Really cuts down on stuff you buy – especially drinks.

Bill
Bill
12 years ago

I would be curious to hear how this works for those of us that are single. It is harder for me to consume things fast enough without them going bad, so if I only shop once a month I can’t buy as much fresh produce, etc… I think it is harder to eat healthy when you only shop once a month too, eating all that processed food is bad for you so how do you get around that with once a month shopping. I would be curious to hear what people think about that.

Bill

James
James
12 years ago

I am not convinced you will reap all of the savings you predict. You are ignoring the fact that the grocer tends to cycle sales and loss leading products on a weekly or bi-weekly basis. By visiting at least once per sales cycle (1 week at my grocer) but buying in bulk, you get the lowest price ammortized over the maximum time (if you are really good at this, the maximum time is the shelf life).

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