Outsourcing life: Unconventional advice for when you’re financially secure

You've pulled yourself out of debt, are saving a reasonable amount of income for your retirement, have built an emergency fund, and your daily needs are easily met with your income. Congratulations! Now what?

That's exactly where I was in 2007. I sold my business and generated a huge windfall — over a million dollars. I paid off all my debt. And then I looked around and said, “Oh, crap.”

I had absolutely no idea what to do with my money. Previously, any extra money I'd earned was immediately stuffed back into my business, and I had been running deficits nearly everywhere. This was the first time in my adult life I'd ever had my head above water, financially speaking.

Over the next three months, I proceeded to blow over $50,000. Oh, don't get me wrong — it was fun! I bought a new car (that I still drive), some really beautiful artwork from artists I loved (that looks great on my walls), and thousands of dollars in clothes, new furniture, and other indulgences, such as $4,000 custom hand-made stereo speakers (that I'm listening to right now.)

It was fun…for a couple months. Then it got boring.

My Spiral Into Depression

Like many lottery winners, I spiraled into depression. The business I had spent six years of my life building was gone. I felt adrift — like I had no purpose. Despite having been “successful”, no one knew who I was. I had marginalized most of my personal relationships in favor of growing my business and working myself to death. And money wasn't going to buy me out of the situation.

Slowly, I pulled myself out of my depression. I realized I had the opportunity to make myself into anyone I wanted to be. I could do anything I wanted. I had complete freedom. The thought was both exhilarating and terrifying.

I bought a shelf full of self-help books and read them all, relentlessly seeking to answer the many questions I had. Some of them were philosophical, like “What made me successful when so many others have failed?” Some were practical, like “How do I invest my money?” But all of them led back to one deeper question: “What should I do to be happy?” I soon realized the latter question was incorrect. The better question was, “Who should I be to be happy?”

In December 2007, I started blogging. I exposed a significant amount of my business life and thoughts. I wrote about my successes and my mistakes and failures. I enjoyed writing, doing videos, and interacting with my readers. Helping others figure out their purpose, their businesses, and their websites and blogs was a fantastic experience.

Spending With a Purpose

I made a point of trying to achieve greater states of happiness on a daily basis. Instead of being merely content — or even apathetic — with my current state of being, I realized I could be happier daily. And suddenly it hit me: I understood what I wanted to do with my money. I wanted to outsource pretty much everything I hated doing.

In order to live a simpler, calmer, but more effective life, I had to drop the shackles of wanting to do everything myself. To allow time to meditate, think, write, and create, I had to get rid of the drudgery of daily tasks. I realized my money could serve a fantastic dual purpose: To allow others, whose passion is cooking, cleaning, or assisting in various ways to help me — while I supported them by giving them income to do what they loved.

My life fundamentally changed that day. I started hiring people to do everything I didn't want to do. The first step was to hire a cleaning service. Then I hired a personal assistant to work out of my house, filing papers, doing laundry, and organizing. I hired virtual assistants to do all the menial tasks I hated doing: bookkeeping; video editing; audio editing; even setting up my Facebook fan page. (Lisa, my VA who set up the Facebook page for me, said happily: “I can't believe I get paid to do this!” And I realized…we're both lucky.)

My Daily Routine

I wake up in the morning and my VAs have sent me their updates. I am building a business where I create how-to videos for small business owners and bloggers who want to drive more traffic to their sites and get more customers.

I learned meditation, and currently spend about 40 minutes a day relaxing. I also spend a few hours a day doing the parts of my business I love, from creating videos to writing to programming. When I walk down to the kitchen, it's clean; Elia, my housekeeper, comes in every week to make sure it's spotless. She spends 2 hours cleaning our kitchen; total cost to me: $30.

My VA in the Philippines edits my videos and does a fantastic job for $3.33/hour.

Whenever I do an interview with another entrepreneur, I send it to another VA in the Philippines, who, for $9/hour, edits it perfectly, getting rid of all the strange pauses and “um”s. I send the edited interview off to a transcriptionist. For less than $30, I get back an excellent transcription, often 12-16 pages long.

Lisa, my VA here in the U.S., has set up an entire website and integrated it with a shopping cart for my customers to order products and access them once they have ordered. She charges $30/hour (my most expensive staff member) and she's worth every penny.

I treat my staff members well, and they love the fact that they can work from home and get paid great wages ($3/hour in in the Philippines is equal to about a $65,000/year wage here in the U.S.) They are happy — I can see it in their emails and text chat messages.

My partner Richard and I fight less. There's no scrapping over who will do a certain task. If no one wants to do it, we work together to figure out how to hire someone.

A Disease Opens My Eyes

I was recently diagnosed with Celiac disease. The management of the disease may sound simple, but it's not: eliminate wheat, oats, barley and rye from your diet. Most restaurants have very
few gluten-free items; I'm lucky if I can order one non-salad item from a typical menu. Some restaurants are impossible to eat at; soy sauce, for instance, has wheat in it. I've gotten sick from things as odd as bacon, cake frosting, and ranch dressing.

After a few weeks of eating mostly hot dogs and tuna fish, I grew tired of my limited options. I thought about learning to cook, but it wasn't something that excited me. So we hired a personal chef to cook our meals — one who understands the challenge of cooking gluten-free. We pay her $10/hour, including travel time to deliver the food to us, and she gets a fun side job.

In a randomly-chosen week before I hired a personal chef, I ate out four times and went to the grocery store twice. I spent a total of $179.91 on restaurants and groceries. Last week, I spent $215.49, including groceries, for eating out and paying my personal chef. My “eating out” expenses dropped from $86.14 to just $32.28 — over 60% less! My total spent was $35.58 more, but to me, that's a small price to pay for gourmet food of my choice delivered to my door. Another remarkable and unexpected side effect was that I no longer have an urge to go out and spend money at fancy restaurants — I simply ask my chef to make what I want and deliver it to me.

It has been more than two years since I sold my business, and I am happier than I have ever been. I made different choices than most: We rent a house instead of owning (a savings of nearly $4,000/month in our neighborhood — more than our monthly rent payment!); we only have basic cable; we don't have a landline, credit card debt, car payments, or student loans.

I chose, instead of buying more Stuff, to live a more fulfilled life. For me, even more important than holding onto my money tightly was to learn to let it go — to give it to others in exchange for work well done, and to trust that they could do tasks well. It's one of the best decisions I've ever made.

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Jonasaberg
Jonasaberg
10 years ago

“…I chose, instead of buying more Stuff, to live a more fulfilled life…”

That’s basically what I’m striving for as well and it’s something I believe you can do even though you aren’t a millionaire.

Chickybeth
Chickybeth
10 years ago

I always said that if I won the lottery, the first thing I would do is hire a maid. This confirms what I always thought: to be happy you need to be doing what you do best and not worry about the small stuff.

DJ
DJ
10 years ago

I cannot believe that you are bragging about how cheaply you can hire people from the Philippines when there are so many qualified people here in the US that need the work so desperately. Yes, they won’t/can’t work for $3.33 an hour, but, according to your post, money is not the issue.

Adrian
Adrian
10 years ago

I found it fascinating to hear about life from the opposite side of the spectrum, and I find very few people who have amassed great wealth are open to conversation on that topic; I guess they too, like many people, are guilty of the belief that “money is the ultimate taboo topic.” As for oursourcing your time, I believe that it is necessary to do that only when you are doing something more personally-productive/fulfilling OR bringing in more income than what is being outsourced to your workers. I’m sure many people that have reached Erica’s level of financial independence have… Read more »

Kathy
Kathy
10 years ago

I really couldn’t relate to this piece. “I’ve just sold my business for a large sum, I’m lost.” I would love to be in that ‘predicament,’ but alas, it did offer a chance to see that sudden wealth can bring its own problems.

Broadcast Thoughts
Broadcast Thoughts
10 years ago

I have to agree with Erica. While I’m not independently weathly just yet I do value my free time more than 10 bucks for a lot of stuff.

http://www.broadcastthoughts.net/2009/05/utility-of-time.html

Recently my wife got on board and discovered she could pay $10 to have her pants hemmed which traditionally took her an hour to accomplish.

While being frugal is admirable in most cases moderation in all things has value too. Cutting expenses at the cost of quality of life is not always the best decision when you are still able to meet your financial goals.

Chris H
Chris H
10 years ago

Great article. I’m glad that some of the pieces are shifting to a more financially independant theme as some of the readers are surely progressing from a debt stricken base to a more financialy secure group.

AG
AG
10 years ago

One nice article Erica … 🙂 Sometimes I feel good that I don’t have so much money and I have to go to a job next morning!

Sandy L
Sandy L
10 years ago

Loved the article. Regarding DJ’s Phillipines comment, I’d like to add an alternate view. I’ve been to many developing countries. Income from foreign jobs helps improve a person’s standard of living tremendously. Erica gets more bang from her buck both in goods received but also in changing someone’s quality of life. I doubt if these side jobs were done in the US, they could significantly impact pulling someone out of poverty. I personally don’t know anyone in the US who lives in a dung hut or shanty without running water or electricity. I’ve seen plenty in Asia and Africa. I… Read more »

bon
bon
10 years ago

Oh no, I’m a little upset — DJ — do you have a passport? When you say that people in the US need that work desperately — do you mean to feed their families or to upgrade their cable package? I have no problem with the fact that opportunities for success are now available to people beyond the US border. Lots of people in the states have had vast opportunities for success at their doorsteps their entire lives and never realized it, or made poor choices and squandered it. Sure, sometimes bad, unfair things happen — but I encourage you… Read more »

Wes
Wes
10 years ago

@Kathy – not everyone can relate to the “how to pay off your debt and develop a budget” articles either. like JD talks about, there are stages of personal finance, and while most people aren’t in the last stage, it’s still interesting to read more about it.

@DJ – maybe you missed the part where she hires a US-based maid and a US-based personal chef?

Overall, great post, and a great complement to JD’s “money as a tool” post from a couple weeks ago.

DJ Wetzel
DJ Wetzel
10 years ago

Like previous comments, it goes to show that money does most certainly not buy happiness and that we will only be satisfied when we find the things in life that really give us peace and true contentment.

Taiyab Raja
Taiyab Raja
10 years ago

If you really are having trouble with how to spend your money, I would recommend setting up a charity or trust of some kind, and go out to poorer countries and donate and work to help their lives and experience what they’re going through. By helping them, you’ll feel very content, and you know your money is being put to good use by helping to save lives.

Alexandra
Alexandra
10 years ago

I like that some of the reading here has to do with more philosphical pursuits once a level of income is attained that frees us from debt. That is where we will all eventually be, right? This article is a perfect demonstration that money doesn’t neccesarily lead to happiness, but can very easily provide you with the freedom to do the things you want to do, and conversely, choose not to do the things you don’t want to. Excellent. #4 Adrian – I disagree that you should only outsource your time if you replace it with something “more personally-productive/fulfilling OR… Read more »

EscapeVelocity
EscapeVelocity
10 years ago

The part of my life I’d really like to outsource is the part that brings in the income, unfortunately.

Adam
Adam
10 years ago

Message I got from this article: If you’re rich and unhappy, pay people do everything you hate/are too lazy to do yourself. This will make you more happy by eliminating the things you do that you unhappy. Meh. For me, I don’t mind cleaning my condo, but I’m not the best at it. So once a month I hire a Philipino lady who I love to come clean it. She makes $60, I get my floors scrubbed. I do it because I’m not talented enough at mopping for the perfectionist in me, not because I dislike cleaning. I was hoping… Read more »

Carrie
Carrie
10 years ago

I loved this article. I feel strongly that hiring someone to do tasks I hate is a means to circulate wealth – as long as I am treating and paying the service provider well (usually a bit above the going rate). Whenever we can EARN (vs get a handout) a living (especially if we enjoy the work) providing a service, we feel better about ourselves and can further our goals. I view doing something I hate to do myself so as to save money (when I can well afford it) denies someone with that skill an opportunity to earn –… Read more »

Kent @ The Financial Philosopher
Kent @ The Financial Philosopher
10 years ago

I believe a key takeaway from this post is that we all are searching for meaning and often become diverted from our path by searching for money…

“What is important in life is life, and not the result of life.” ~ Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe

“If thou wilt make a man happy, add not unto his riches but take away from his desires.” ~ Epicurus

“Money often costs too much.” ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson

“Freedom is not procured by a full enjoyment of what is desired, but by controlling the desire.” ~ Epictetus

Lesley
Lesley
10 years ago

I can really relate to this article. We’re financially comfortable, and I recently spent a year working only 3 days per week. I was so much happier and the additional time was more than worth the 40% pay cut. I’ve also begun the process of outsourcing since returning to full-time work. The first time I had someone in to clean, it felt like the greatest thing ever! I love the idea of some sort of personal assistant like she mentions, someone to do various household tasks and errands, but I’m not sure where to find a person to do that… Read more »

Sarah
Sarah
10 years ago

Interesting article. I’ve often thought that I would not do well if I had a lot of money. I need to be busy to keep from driving myself crazy. I noticed that Erika attributes her loss of happiness (and regaining it) to outsourcing menial tasks, and I can see how that might have a part in it. But what usually makes people feel depressed is feeling like there is no point to live. Not having a purpose. Also, being isolated from other people. When she sold her business, she no longer had purpose, and when she began doing something she… Read more »

Laura
Laura
10 years ago

I enjoyed this article so much! I feel exactly the same way. I work two jobs to get my bills paid (and debt paid down- debt snowball here I come!) and I pay someone to come into my house to clean it every two weeks. Costs me $70 a month. And most people say – “Wouldn’t you rather work one job and clean your own house?” Not a chance. My second job (teaching voice and piano)is my dream job, my first job is the “I have to have health insurance job.” So if it comes down to teaching or cleaning,… Read more »

Abe Smith
Abe Smith
10 years ago

Some of these guest posters are getting annoying. They offer few insights or original thoughts. The one above merely babbles on about her life. Most are regurgitating self-help books again, and again and again. And most self-help books are written by Tony Robbin-like losers anyhow. They rip off advice and common sense that have been with us for centuries, repackage it with a slick title and sell it to the ‘tards.

Let’s hear more about gardens and box factories.

Kevin
Kevin
10 years ago

@Adam(#15): “I was hoping this article was going to talk about charitable donations or volunteering when you become independently wealthy” If I had so much money that I never had to work again, why would I want to continue working, for free? I want to become wealthy so I no longer have to work at all. Why would I give money away, and risk not having enough to maintain my “don’t-have-to-work-ever-again” status? If I give away $10,000, then the markets take a tumble and I’m faced with the prospect of having to rejoin the workforce, will those charities send me… Read more »

gn
gn
10 years ago

It’ll be interesting if/when Erica has children. The temptation to outsource their care will be quite difficult to resist for all the same reasons.

IMO A personally-fulfilling life doesn’t come from the things that money buys (including outsourced menial tasks) but from the mark we leave on the world. Donate big money to a local charity and get involved (donating time) and see some real meaning in life.

KC
KC
10 years ago

I totally agree with buying services for the things you don’t enjoy doing when you are in position to. My husband and I lived frugally while he was in med school, residency, and fellowship (10 years). I worked long hours at a job I wasn’t crazy about (but paid well). He was paid as a resident and fellow, but not very much. Our goal for when he became a full fledged physician (one that made decent money) was to be debt free except the mortgage. And we were, we even had an emergency fund of 2 months. So when he… Read more »

Mike
Mike
10 years ago

Wow

I really love this piece especially about how Erica hires people to help her out. It’s refreshing to hear about someone who really understands the value of their time.

Julia
Julia
10 years ago

I can’t relate to this post at all. I am somewhat secure financially; however, I hope I’m never “secure” enough to smugly advise people to outsource things they’re too lazy to do to other countries and tout that as a skill. To those claiming that outsourcing work to the Phillipines will help pull these workers out of poverty, that’s simply not true. People living in dung huts or shanties are not getting these jobs – she says they work from home, which means they have homes with internet access and video editing equipment. But hey, as long as she can… Read more »

Kate
Kate
10 years ago

I love this post.

The PF blogosphere has been a tad monotonous as of late. There can only be so many posts on how to build a budget, make your own burrito, hang your clothes out to dry…

SecondhandMoon
SecondhandMoon
10 years ago

I don’t disagree with the premise of hiring people to do work you hate when you can afford to do so, but I think, Erica, your privilege is showing. I sincerely doubt your housekeeper’s “passion” is cleaning other people’s houses. Hire out your work, fine, but don’t act like you’re doing your maid a favor by letting her scrub your kitchen. This sort of attitude contributes to the barriers between classes, and frankly I see it a lot in personal finance writing. The general LACK of that attitude at GRS is why I read this blog.

Willow
Willow
10 years ago

I can’t relate to this post at all. The self congratulation around paying someone $3 an hour in the Philippines made me sick. If $3 an hour makes the Filipino VA happy, imagine how happy an American minimum wage would make her, how life-altering and philanthropic that would be. So far the track record for female guest posters is pretty poor as far as I’m concerned, what with the designer purse rentals and paying Filapinas $3/hour. I might stick to the archives for my inspiration for awhile. I know JD is busy with his book but it is getting to… Read more »

ami | 40daystochange
ami | 40daystochange
10 years ago

Wow, interesting discussion. I used to share the view of some that extra funds should be donated to charity. However, on reflection, I think that Erica’s choices to outsource DO make a difference – to the people she pays. No administrative overhead (as many charities have), she receives value in return for her spending AND the person she pays directly benefits. Not sure if this is any different than, for example, charities that allow people to “sponsor a child,” except that someone works for the money and the giver receives a tangible benefit. Perhaps conscious spending to enable people to… Read more »

Nicole
Nicole
10 years ago

When we can afford it again, I’m looking forward to hiring a college student to personal assist for us. Well, I’m not actually looking forward to the hiring because that can be stressful, but I am looking forward to having someone take care of clutter (e.g. load the dishwasher) and that to-do list that seems to build up.

Kathleen
Kathleen
10 years ago

I hope, Erica, that you don’t have to call on a credit card glitch any time soon. You’ll be patched through to someone in the Phillipines or India to talk about your money–and good luck to you trying to understand what they’re telling you! Outsourcing to other countries makes sense for people who want to save a few dollars–but horrible for Americans so in need of money to buy groceries or shoes/clothing for their children. (Other reader up above: Do you really need to see mud huts along our streets to feel empathy for people in need?) And I DEFINITELY… Read more »

Poultry in Motion
Poultry in Motion
10 years ago

I’ve read Erica’s stuff in the past, and this post is very similar in both writing style and topic….honestly, she seems like a well-written author, but I can’t relate to many of her topics. This one included.

elysianconfusion
elysianconfusion
10 years ago

I’m glad Erica is not depressed, but I really cannot relate to this post at all. Outsourcing one thing or another that you hate doing is fine, but outsourcing it all and pretending others love what they do for you…. I think there’s some joy to be found in all the little things we do in our lives (that we don’t always love). I don’t love folding laundry, but it’s nice to sit next to my husband and fold it all up and put it away. And I love cooking good food for my family (even though it can be… Read more »

Meg
Meg
10 years ago

I have liked the idea of the guest posts, as they strive to represent “all walks of (financial) life.”

However, this one sounded like it was written as an infomercial, and it really just turned me off to the writer’s post.

Dotty dot dot
Dotty dot dot
10 years ago

Hi,
I have to agree with Abe and Willow: all the guest posts are getting tiring. I read this blog because I really enjoy JD’s “voice”. I know guest bloggers provide alternative views, but they are no longer resonating with me…

Good luck with your book, JD. I hope it gets finished soon and you come back to us!

Loyal Reader
Loyal Reader
10 years ago

Hi – I’d just like to say that I appreciate, and would love to see more, articles on the more advanced stages of personal finance. I know budgeting and the realization that you need to spend less than you make is a critical stumbling block for many, but imagine that many of your regular readers have taken that step (we are nerdy enough to be reading PF blogs! :). I know I appreciate articles like this that help keep the bigger goal of financial independence/stability in mind and give some concrete steps of what can be done. Thanks!

Beth
Beth
10 years ago

I’m trying really hard to like this post, but I can’t help but cringe. The “I’m so much happier because I don’t have to do menial tasks!” attitude can be a little hard to swallow when you haven’t reached financial independence (or may have quite that level of freedom).

More power to her, though. Different things make people happy, and we have to work with what we’ve got.

Courtney
Courtney
10 years ago

I saw nothing in the article to suggest that Erica was actively seeking out people in other countries to work as virtual assistants at a lower rate, instead of people in the US? I’m guessing she didn’t put a classified ad on Philippine Craigslist – she probably went to a VA clearinghouse and said “I’m looking for someone to do X” and they said “Here’s a qualified candidate and this is their going rate.” Personally I like this idea, even though I can’t relate to it just yet. It is my goal in life to have someone come clean my… Read more »

MikeTV
MikeTV
10 years ago

I think the author is missing her own point. Hiring people to cook or clean isn’t what made her happy — it freed up time, to be sure, but what made her happy was getting back to work. There are many posts here on GRS about the subject of money vs happiness, and I see it in my own life and those around me. Many, many people focus all energy on accumulating enough money to be happy. Some make it, and are happy for a bit. The author relates this experience. To be happy, though, she started up a new… Read more »

mmeetoilenoir
mmeetoilenoir
10 years ago

Great article. This is exactly where I want to be within a year or two. It’s interesting that many people say, “I can’t relate.” Here’s the thing: the path to amassing wealth is fraught with giving up control of things like labor, cleaning, etc. Knowing that you can’t handle it all is an important step to becoming wealthy and affects scalability. I don’t think she sounds smug at all. It could be that some are threatened by her candidness about a very taboo topic – outsourcing. It’s personal to many, and can be hard to excuse for that reason. However…she… Read more »

bon
bon
10 years ago

Seriously? (sorry, I’m usually a pretty calm commenter, and its been a long day — I really mean no offense) I don’t think Erica’s maid is following her passion, nor do I think Erica does — so should the entire field of low-wage, low-skill, often difficult work be eliminated “so that everyone can pursue their passion”? THINK. I love the quote “its absurd to think you’re doing your maid a favor by letting her scrub your kitchen floor” directly below an indignant comment about sending work overseas — um… ironic much? Julia — income generated through small business (and skilled… Read more »

Bryce
Bryce
10 years ago

Too bad I don’t have $1 million to blow to rid my life of all the things I hate to do.

The Skeptical Housewife
The Skeptical Housewife
10 years ago

Hmmm, I too feel uncomfortable with the idea of paying someone in the Phillipines $3 an hour and calling it a good thing. It’s another example of that sense of entitlement that we in first-world countries have, and our fortunes are built on the backs of people who weren’t as fortunate as we were because of where they happened to be born. Maybe that’s a good wage in the Phillipines, but what if they wanted to move to North America? Or take a vacation to another country? Not such a great wage anymore, is it? However, it’s really not my… Read more »

Wayne K
Wayne K
10 years ago

My takeway from this article is to look at all the things I do (outside of work) that are unpleasant to me and evaluate 1) whether outsourcing the task would provide me with overall value (value=benefit > cost) and 2) if I can justify the cost within my budget.

As long as the cost can be worked into a budget that meets the criteria we talk about on this site and other PF sites every day then it is worth considering as a quality of work improvement.

Jennifer Lissette
Jennifer Lissette
10 years ago

I’m a daily reader of GRS, though I don’t often comment. However, I just want to back up some of the other comments and say bring back JD! It’s one thing to write an article about improving your best asset – your ability to make money. I appreciate posts about negotiating your salary, starting a side hustle, etc. And I understand the need for posts about using wealth to create more wealth. Yet, it’s another thing entirely to smugly opine that you’re improving somebody’s life by granting them the privilege of cleaning your kitchen and washing your dirty underwear. What’s… Read more »

Taylor
Taylor
10 years ago

Umm…am the only one who thinks that $1M at 26 isn’t going to last her very long if she used some of it to pay of her debt and she continues to spend as she appears to be spending? I don’t remember the article speaking of her savings, retirement nest egg, etc. Indeed, she mentions not even owning a place – that is a hefty chunk of per principal for a down payment right there – if she ever decides to buy. I get that $1M is a lot of money. But at 26, that is a lot of her… Read more »

Raghu Bilhana
Raghu Bilhana
10 years ago

JD

I guess these guest articles are really deviating from the purpose of this website.It is supposed to be about how to get rich slowly but not how you get windfalls and brag about it and how you brag about being able to hire labor from philippines for $2/hour.

I really like articles written by you and these guest articles are really disappointing.

Eric
Eric
10 years ago

I love the comments on this story. They really show how the ‘poor-and-going-nowhere’ think about the world. -start snarky sarcasm- Ohmygod – you pay someone to clean your house and dare think it’s a win-win? You are degrading that cleaning lady. You pay a freelancer (and a non-US one GASP!) to do work for you at a rate you both agree on and think it’s a good thing? HOW DARE YOU!!?! -end snarky sarcasm- The article was ok, but take a look at yourself if you posted or agree with some of these comments saying ‘i can’t relate – i’m… Read more »

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