The pros and cons of Personal Capital

The pros and cons of Personal Capital

If you've read money blogs over the past five years, you've heard about Personal Capital. Personal Capital is a free money-tracking tool with a beautiful interface and — gasp — no advertising. (One of my big complains about Mint is that it shoves ads in your face.)

Many of my friends and colleagues promote the hell out of Personal Capital because the company pays good money when people sign up. (And yes, links to Personal Capital in this review absolutely put money in my pocket. But any Personal Capital link you see anywhere on the web puts money in somebody's pocket.)

I sometimes wonder, though, if any of my pals actually uses Personal Capital, you know? All of their reviews are glowing. While I like Personal Capital, I've been frustrated by the app in the past. Even today, I find that it's not as useful as I'd like.

What are my issues with Personal Capital?

  • For a long time, I was frustrated trying to get Personal Capital to connect to my accounts. It still won't connect to my credit union, but that's fine. I can enter my balance manually. It was frustrating, though, that for years I couldn't get Personal Capital to connect to my Fidelity investment accounts. They work now…but I'm always worried that they won't. The app still won't connect to my Capital One credit card — and hasn't for over a year, which I find mind-blowing.

Personal Capital - Connection Issues

  • Personal Capital, as an investment app, isn't robust enough to replace something like Quicken or You Need a Budget. The latter tools allow you to track and manage your money on a transaction by transaction level. Okay, maybe you can track your transactions, but you can't do anything meaningful with them, the same way you could with Quicken or YNAB.
  • The phone calls! My god, the phone calls! Here's a not-so-secret secret: The Personal Capital app — while beautiful and useful — is actually bait. It's a lure. Its aim is to attract high net-worth users to connect their accounts. When they do, Personal Capital (the company) begins a phone campaign in an attempt to recruit the users as clients. Personal Capital isn't actually an app company; it's a wealth-management company. They want people with lots of money to sign up. (I can't comment on whether this is a good deal or not. I don't want a financial advisor. I ignore all of the calls from Personal Capital.)

Personal Capital - Advisor Popup

  • Personal Capital has pretty reports, but there aren't enough of them. My copy of Quicken 2007 — ugly as it is — has 23 different reports and 10 different graphs. (Plus, you can customize many more.) Personal Capital has maybe…nine ways to look at your money? (I can't tell for sure.)
  • The security is over the top. I suppose I should be happy about this, but I'm not. It feels like I'm constantly having to verify my identity via email or text message. Some of my other accounts make me do this occasionally, but it feels like Personal Capital does this multiple times per week. That's crazy!

Now, these complaints aside, here's a confession: I've been using the Personal Capital app for 5+ years. For real. I can't remember when I started, but I do remember being cranky because a Personal Capital rep didn't know who I was at Fincon 2013 in St. Louis. “I use your app,” I told him. “And I have a big blog.” (I wince now at the thought of my arrogance.)

Despite the drawbacks, there must be something to it. Right? Today — using my current financial situation — let's look at the pros and cons of Personal Capital.

Quicken 2007 vs. Personal Capital

As regular readers know, I'm an old fogey. My money management tool of choice is an antiquated copy of Quicken for Mac 2007. This tool is so important to me, in fact, that I'm currently refusing to update my system software to the latest version (Mac OS Mojave) because I'm afraid it'll break Quicken. (Other user experiences are mixed.) How important is Quicken 2007 to me? No joke: I would buy a used Mac laptop just to run that software.

As much as I love Quicken, it has its drawbacks. One of those is that it's a pre-mobile app. Quicken 2007 is almost as old as this blog. It came out roughly one year before the first iPhone. (Get Rich Slowly launched on 15 April 2006. I can't find a release date for Quicken 2007, but it was available by at least 30 August 2006. The iPhone launched on 29 June 2007.) If I want to interact with Quicken, I have to sit down at my desktop computer.

Because I'm a nerd, I'm attached to my mobile devices. I have an iPad. And an iPhone. And an Apple Watch. (Why isn't it an iWatch? I don't know. Apple doesn't give a fig about consistency.) I want to be able to track my money from my mobile devices.

Trust me: I've tried tons of other mobile apps. I don't really like any of them. I do, however, like Personal Capital…warts and all. I would never ever use it as my only money management tool, but as one piece of a bigger package, it'a actually kind of awesome.

Personal Capital is the only mobile money management app that I use. There are others out there, sure, but for my needs, Personal Capital fills a niche…and fills it well.

Personal Capital as Daily Money Tracker

I use Personal Capital as a daily tracker. Quicken 2007 is my actual go-to tool for entering and analyzing my data, but Personal Capital is what I've used for the past five years to check on my accounts to make sure everything is okay.

Believe it or not, Personal Capital has saved my bacon several times. What? My credit card payment is due today? Whoops! I'd better go pay it. Wait! What's this strange charge on my account? That's not me. Let me call my bank. Whoa! I forgot to pay my garbage bill. I'd better handle that when I get home.

Because Personal Capital connects to (most of) my accounts, I'm able to look at everything from a unified dashboard. I don't have to log in to each credit card and bank account to verify everything. I can do it from one place. (Okay, not my credit union. I still have to go check that separately.)

Here, for instance, is a look at my recent transactions. (I have no idea what the graph is tracking. I'm not sure I care.)

Personal Capital - Transaction List

When I shared my financial situation recently, a few readers wondered why I don't count my business finances when tracking my entire money picture. Well, in Personal Capital I do. Because I can connect the app to both personal and business accounts, I can get an idea of the Big Picture. Here you can see that most of my expenses for January so far have been blog related.

Personal Capital - Spending Summary

I'll admit, it's very nice to have a single app where I can view all of my recent transactions, both personal and business. Although I only take action on this info maybe twice per year, it sets my mind at ease. It takes thirty seconds of my time each day, but that's thirty seconds I'm happy to spend.

Personal Capital as Investment Tracker

Honestly, though, Personal Capital isn't meant to be a daily money-management tool. For that, I'd use something like You Need a Budget. Personal Capital is specifically designed to monitor your investments. Because of this, the Personal Capital app has a variety of tools to help investors.

First up, there's the plain ol' portfolio view:

Personal Capital - Portfolio Analysis

Nothing special here, right? You get a list of your investments and a graph of their performance over the past 90 days. Nothing special, but still easier for me than logging into the Fidelity website (or app).

(As a passive investor, though, I don't actually look at investment performance that often. I might check it once per week…but a couple of times per month is more likely.)

You can also get a breakdown of your asset allocation:

Personal Capital - Asset Allocation

The Personal Capital app also offers something interesting — something I think Vanguard and Fidelity should offer. They have a tool that analyzes the fees on your investment accounts. As you probably know, fees are one of the top drags on the average investor's performance. Too many suckers pay 1% or 2% per year (or more!) in mutual fund costs. Index funds have risen to prominence because they promise management fees of 0.20% or 0.10% (or lower).

Personal Capital makes it clear just how much you're paying in fees.

Personal Capital - Fee Analysis

In my case, I'm doing fairly well except in my rollover IRA. But I'm okay with that. That rollover IRA is 100% invested in a real-estate investment trust (or REIT), and those carry higher expense ratios. (True story: That REIT is actually my highest performing investment over the past decade!)

Personal Capital's Retirement Calculator

All of these other features are great, but there's one main reason I continue to use Personal Capital: its retirement calculator.

As I mentioned the other day, I hate most retirement calculators. They're overly simplistic. Their assumptions are bogus. They're designed to get users to save more than they need.

The Personal Capital retirement calculator isn't the best tool on the market — we'll look at two better tools during the next week — but it's pretty damn good for something that's free and built into an otherwise useful app.

This section is going to be the biggest part of this review, and it's going to contain plenty of screenshots. You've been warned.

First up, here's a look at my own personal financial situation as of this morning. (Sorry for the “mute” notification in the middle of the screenshot. My bad. Not sure why I was muting my iPad, but I can't fix it now.)

Personal Capital - Current Retirement

Based on my current situation — $736,170 in liquid investments and roughly $60,000 of annual expenses — Personal Capital says I'll run out of money at 62. This doesn't differ much from other retirement calculators I've looked at.

But here is where Personal Capital gets fun (and the reason I'm obsessed with it). Do you see those + signs across from Investment Events and Spending Goals? If you click on those, you can add new events. (And if you click on existing events, you can modify those.) This means you can tweak your parameters over and over and over again.

What if, for instance, I decreased my spending from $60,000 per year to $42,000 per year? (This is my aim for 2019.)

Personal Capital - Working in Retirement

Well, look at that. If I re-embrace frugality, my money will likely last until I'm 72 instead of 62. Nice!

And now that I'm back to work at the box factory, what if I stay there for ten years and earn $20,000 annually?

Personal Capital - Working During Retirement

Holy cats! As you can see, working part-time makes a ginormous difference. If I reduce my spending to $3500 per month while earning $20,000 per year, I'm golden. I shouldn't run out of money before my projected age of demise. (Even in a “worst-case scenario”, my money would last until age 67.)

And if I end up with an inheritance? Party time!

Personal Capital - Inheritance

Okay, maybe I'm getting a little too out of control there. Let's dial things back. Let's get rid of the inheritance and bring my spending back to current levels. If I work part-time for ten years, what then?

Personal Capital - Working with Current Spending

Hm. Not enough to get me to where I want to go, is it? (Plus, I was muting the sound again. What the heck?) Okay, what if I decide to sell this house at some point in the next ten years. What then?

Personal Capital - Selling House

Okay, not bad. That makes me wonder, though, what if I did not decide to go back to work for the family business. What then?

Personal Capital - No Work

Well, I guess that's not bad, but it's not nearly as good as if I'm bringing in some sort of income.

Okay, let's look at the ultimate optimistic scenario. Let's say I trim my spending from $60,000 per year to $42,000 per year. Let's assume I spend the next decade at the box factory earning $20,000 per year. Let's assume that my mother dies in ten years or so and leaves me an inheritance. Let's assume that Kim and I sell this place after increasing frustration with the never-ending repairs, then move into a rented apartment.

After all those assumptions, what does my future look like?

Personal Capital - Optimistic Assumptions

But that's a future that's far too rosy than the one I think lies ahead.

You get the point, though. Even without the app's other features, I'd love Personal Capital just for its retirement calculator. It's more fun and flexible than 95% of the other retirement calculators on the market. (As I mentioned, we'll take a peek at the 5% that are better over the next few days.)

The Bottom Line

I have been using Personal Capital for five years now. It's nowhere near a complete money-management tool, and I know that. But I don't care. I don't expect it to be the biggest and bestest. I accept it for what it is.

Personal Capital is great at a few things:

  • Monitoring your money on a daily basis.
  • Tracking (and analyzing) your investment portfolio.
  • Playing with various retirement scenarios.

If you're not interested in these three tasks, Personal Capital probably isn't right for you. If you want a lot of detail and analysis, Personal Capital probably isn't right for you. If you have a lot of money invested and don't want people to pester you with phone calls, Personal Capital probably isn't right for you.

For everyone else, though, Personal Capital is a useful (if imperfect) tool. If you decide to use it, just be aware of its limitations. As I say, I've been using it for five years. It's not my top tool, but it's the one I access most often. That's worth something, I guess.

I'm curious, though. Many GRS readers must also be using Personal Capital. What are your experiences like? Do you recommend it? What are your favorite features? What do you not like? Would you recommend Personal Capital to a friend?

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Allan
Allan
1 year ago

I’ve struggled to find a personal finance app that does what I want it to do. I’m one of those people who used Microsoft Money years ago and could customise the categories to get it to track my spending the way I wanted to. I then moved to Quicken when Money stopped being supported. For a while I used nothing but over the last few years have looked into what is available. I’m in Australia so a lot of the popular money management programs don’t sync to our bank accounts and, after years of having to upload data into Money… Read more »

Alena
Alena
1 year ago

Like Allan, I’d be really interested in an App that connects to my accounts, tracks my spending, motivates me to review some items and gives me a good retirement forecast. Alas, haven’t found one yet – personal capital is also not available in germany. For now, I download my transactions to Excel once in a while and otherwise work with automated savings – so old-school!

JB
JB
1 year ago

I still use Microsoft Money to this day. Yes, it’s not supported by Microsoft any more, but it’s free, there are a bunch of us who still use it and some smart folks have figured out ways to patch some of the problems with it (including how to make it work on Windows 10). When it finally stops working on some future version of Windows, I’ll keep using it on Windows 7 or 10 inside a Parallels Virtual Machine.

Ross
Ross
1 year ago

You nailed it. I recommend PC to friends with the same caveats. My situation is very similar to yours, Quicken for the detailed stuff and PC for the easy daily snapshots and retirement calculator. PC could add 3 things that would make me drop quicken though… a Projected Balances view that lets me enter paychecks and bills and makes sure I won’t overdraft, more flexible categorization of expenses, and the ability to manually change dates to avoid the weird spikes that happen when transfers between accounts aren’t instantaneous. Until then, I keep updating Quicken every 3 years so I can… Read more »

SmileIfYouDare
SmileIfYouDare
1 year ago

The significant reason I don’t us Personal Capital is the total disaster that would happen if they were hacked.

Larry Ludwig
Larry Ludwig
1 year ago
Reply to  SmileIfYouDare

What would happen if they were hacked…nothing.

They don’t have write access to your data and with two factor enabled (which you should do) for each account would make it impossible (ok very highly unlikely) to get access.

I would say there are easier targets based upon what info they will get directly through their site. As no account data is shown, and can’t perform transactions.

The hackers could glam info of your purchasing habits and specific things you buy.

Steve
Steve
1 year ago
Reply to  Larry Ludwig

I am 100% sure they are storing passwords encrypted. However, if they get hacked hard enough, the encryption key(s) could be extracted along with the encrypted passwords.

Not every brokerage / bank even has two factor authentication. Some of those that do, implement it in such a way that it would block aggregators like Personal Capital from accessing the data.

Like SmileIfYouDare, this is the reason I refuse to use Personal Capital. I will start using it when every financial institution allows me to set up special read-only credentials for aggregators.

Physician on FIRE
Physician on FIRE
1 year ago
Reply to  SmileIfYouDare

Personal Capital doesn’t store your login info. WalletHacks had a great post on their security: https://wallethacks.com/personal-capital-security-safe/

Best,
-PoF

Steve
Steve
1 year ago

So, why don’t they just say that? Why do they go on and on about how many bits of encryption they use?

To me, PC’s statements on security are riddled with just enough inconsistencies and non-sequiturs that I fear it is more security theater than actual security.

Nancy
Nancy
1 year ago

“The phone calls! My god, the phone calls!”

Did you ask them to stop calling you? I did, and they never called again.

Steve
Steve
1 year ago
Reply to  Nancy

It took more than one try for them to stop calling me.

Clark
Clark
1 year ago

I like Personal Capital as well, will have to try some of the tools you mentioned, didn’t know they were there! Like you, I also use Quicken for the day to day bill paying, mainly because of the ability to see a forecast for where I expect to be in the next 30 days or so. If I could find a product to replace it I would, tried Mint and didn’t like it.

Jason
Jason
1 year ago

For the Capital One connection issue, have you enabled third party access in your Capital One account? A lot of banks are doing that now, which is a hurdle but nice for security.

CalLadyQED
CalLadyQED
1 year ago

Aw, I saw the title and was thinking “human capital.” That would be an interesting article.

CalLadyQED
CalLadyQED
1 year ago

I don’t use any apps. I put everything manually into a spreadsheet in Excel as I initiate transactions and tag each with “me”. Then when it shows up on my bank’s website, I tag it “ok.” Finally, when I review my monthly statement, I mark it “S.” I follow more or less this process for cash, 2 checking accounts, 2 savings accounts, 2 credit cards, 1 payment account, 1 investment account, 1 tax-advantaged health savings account, 1 tax-advantage limited-purpose flexible spending account (some years, but not this year), and gift cards. I do not include my 401k, but I could… Read more »

Some Old Guy
Some Old Guy
1 year ago
Reply to  CalLadyQED

I do the same thing. Yes, it is tedious to enter things manually (“the horror!”) but the other side of it is that taking a few minutes a couple times a week (I average 5 to 10 minutes every couple of days) to update my spreadsheet also makes me take a few minutes to think about what I am entering into it. Am I spending a bit too much? Are my investments going up or down? Should I put the money I have set aside for savings in my next paycheck into my actual savings account or shift it to… Read more »

NW Nester
NW Nester
1 year ago

Hi JD, been a lurker for years and appreciate how personal you make personal finance.

Just wanted to note that the reason the final picture looks so rosy is because you have the inheritance setup up as $300k per year for life instead of a one time event.

Since I’m a natural spender/collector, your story resonates and I like how you dig into the details and share so much. Looking forward to following along.

Steve
Steve
1 year ago
Reply to  J.D. Roth

If you make sure to mute your ipad when you’re taking the updated screen shot, it will look like the correct image was part of the article all along! 🙂

Allan
Allan
1 year ago
Reply to  Steve

Maybe JD has lots of rich relatives all dying a year apart 🙂

Terry Westley
Terry Westley
1 year ago

I’ve been using PC for several years. I also moved about 1/3 of my assets to them when I began to realize I was paying high fees for mutual fund investments with my former financial planner. PC fees are 0.80% so that’s much cheaper than most mutual funds but more expensive than robo-advisors. When you invest with PC, you get some additional tools like multiple retirement scenarios and help with drawing down assets in retirement. My bank used to have FinanceWorks and using that with PC investment tools was a great combination. Unfortunately, my bank suspended FinanceWorks and I haven’t… Read more »

Eileen
Eileen
1 year ago

JD — you know you planted a little seed with that “increasing frustration with the never-ending repairs”. You’ve covered the house issues extensively, so I’m curious if this is truly “increasing” since the last update or just generally speaking.

I just deleted 3 paras about our 1978 house and all we’ve done and still need to do. Then I deleted them to just say: It really does not end.

Appreciate the detailed review of PC.

Donna Freedman
Donna Freedman
1 year ago
Reply to  J.D. Roth

You could be classy like DF and I and have a freestanding metal carport in front of your house. It looks ugly as a dog’s hind end, but it sure keeps off the rain and the snow. #singlehandedlybringingdownpropertyvalues

We don’t have a garage, and the only places to put it would cut off easy access to the back yard. Besides, this works just fine. I particularly appreciate not having to brush snow off the car before I drive it, and to be able to carry in bags of groceries in the pouring rain without getting soaked.

JC Webber III
JC Webber III
1 year ago

Between YNAB and Vanguard, all my bases are covered. I added all my non-Vanguard assets under ‘Outside Investments’. Now Vanguard’s ‘Balance and Holdings’ page shows everything (except CCs).

In YNAB I put all my investment accounts under the ‘Off Budget’ section, so YNAB can display an accurate Net Worth report. And it DOES know about my CCs.

8^)

zzzzzz
zzzzzz
1 year ago

Given how much you like Quicken, you might consider getting a cheap Windows computer for that. I think the newer versions of Quicken have apps that will run on your mobile devices.

ssmm2012
ssmm2012
1 year ago
Reply to  zzzzzz

JD,
There are new Mac versions of Quicken – includes mobile access as well. Might be worth testing it for $35/year – 30 day money-back guarantee.

https://www.quicken.com/mac/compare

zzzzzz
zzzzzz
1 year ago
Reply to  J.D. Roth

I agree that $35/year is very expensive. I wonder if the switch to the subscription model will kill it.

I was willing to pay about $30 every 3 or 4 years, but at $35/year or more, I’m going to stretch out the life of my current version (I think it’s 2014) as long as possible.

You may still be able to get a copy of an earlier version of Quicken, from before they went to the subscription model. I see 2017 available online, but I’m not sure if that’s pre-subscription.

Sequentialkady
Sequentialkady
1 year ago

One of the the frustrations I’ve been having with Mint is that it doesn’t talk to my Target CC and it’s increasingly glitchy with my main bank account and one of my CCs. I was thinking of Personal Capital until reading your review.

Not only is it glitchy, but they call you?! Oh hell no.

Tracy
Tracy
1 year ago

Hi JD. Just had to chime in that I’m in a similar boat with quicken. I even bought a newer version two years ago thinking my Mac upgrade would render 2007 unusable (it didn’t, but I am behind a few) but what was unusable was new quicken. Quicken 2007 is a beast. The reports! Oh the reports! But I’ve been lazy, and I’m woefully out of sync in my updates. I’ve been using personal capital to track my credit cards/investments, but quicken for checking/cash accounts. I keep looking at the new quicken but now they want a subscription or some… Read more »

CanTex
CanTex
1 year ago

Several things, First, the slick high-pressure calls were a turnoff. Also I was not about to give them my logon details for my investment accounts. As I remember there was no way to do manual data entry. Lastly, they couldn’t hook up to my Canadian accounts. Just bad vibes and uneasiness all around. Mistrust. After that bad experience I was so happy to continue with Quicken 2019.

Sandi Kay
Sandi Kay
1 year ago

I have tried YNAB, and find it to be too much work. I have a Mac, so Quicken is a problem. I won’t add in my login details, so PC is not likely. So, current options seems to be Money Dance and Buxfer. @JD – the review on Money Dance sounds like it’s made for you: “If you miss The Quicken of Old, Money Dance may be the next best thing. You’ll pay for the software, but it has a number of features. The display looks like a ledger, and you can automatically add recurring transactions, create charts and graphs to visually… Read more »

Jim Wang
Jim Wang
1 year ago

If you answer the phone calls and tell them you aren’t interested, they will stop (at least for a while!). 🙂

Juan
Juan
1 year ago

I have used Personal Capital for about 3 years and recommend it in my blog as an affiliate.
I love it as a net worth tracking tool, and as you said, to check on the fees of my index funds.

I use as my one stop shop for tracking spending, though is far from perfect here. I still track everything manually on a spreadsheet but Personal Capital helps me by giving me a view of all my accounts without having to login to 20 different banks.

I’ll be playing with the retirement feature a little more after reading your post!

Kelly
Kelly
1 year ago

I’m just jealous that you can still run Quicken 2007, that version was great! New version isn’t as clean and costs more…ugh!!

Jason
Jason
1 year ago

I still use gnucash, been using it probably for 15 years. I still download and import qfx files from my credit card websites. I’ve never tried mint or pc because I don’t want to hand all my data over them. I know most people don’t care about privacy but I do. A mobile app would be nice but I rarely need to look at my finances on the go, so I probably wouldn’t use it. All of my credit cards have the ability to send email or sms notifications for new charges, I usually get a vibration on my watch… Read more »

Norman Reiss
Norman Reiss
1 year ago

I just moved most of my IRA $ to Personal Capital because I no longer have the interest or time to monitor my investments. I was also initially attracted by the app. I chose them over Betterment because I wanted a bit more personal contact. We’ll see how the wealth management piece works out.

Brooklyn Money
Brooklyn Money
1 year ago

Mint.com’s connection issues are annoying, but I’ve been using it to track day to day spend since about 2009. I then categorize all of my expenses from Mint.com in my own custom Excel grid.

TripleV
TripleV
1 year ago

Hi, JD! You’ve asked for article requests before – I’d be interested in an evaluation of “Swell” (social impact investing). They’ve been advertising on some podcasts I listen to.

Dan
Dan
1 year ago

I find the calls rather amusing. I tell the “advisor” what I do and outline all of my strategies and then tell them to look at my historical account performance vs. the S&P 500 and wait for their shocked admission that no, I probably don’t need any assistance. Then ask if they would like mine. LOL.

Katelyn
Katelyn
1 year ago

I thought it might be helpful to add that Personal Capital’s client base has grown so much that they are not taking on new clients with investment balances (not including current employer 401k) under $100k. And JD was SPOT ON with his comment about the sales calls. Within 5 minutes of downloading the app I received a call. I hadn’t even finished linking my accounts. Their first (and only) question was “how much money do you have invested outside of an employer 401k”? >$100k they offer you a free consultation with one of their “experts”, <$100k they tell you there's… Read more »

Tim
Tim
1 year ago

I just quit Personal Capital today, and I couldn’t be happier about it. They have been unable to connect to my eTrade account for three (!!) weeks now, which is completely absurd. They put out a notice acknowledging the problem two weeks ago, but haven’t updated it since. An email to support was met with b a form letter response saying “we’ll let you know.” A second email to support was met with “sorry you didn’t like our first answer, but this stuff is hard.” No, it isn’t. How do I know? I signed up with Mint and it immediately… Read more »

Peter Newman
Peter Newman
11 months ago
Reply to  Tim

I used and loved Pc for several years, and then for some reason their software became unable to connect with my Fidelity 401k accounts. After reporting it to them 3 different times. Might be Fidelity’s fault though, as neither TIAA nor Quicken 2019 for MAC can sync Fidelity files anymore either.

Roy Feague
Roy Feague
1 year ago

We like Personal Capital until one day it suddenly stopped downloading our transactions from our credit union. That’s when we discovered that you simply can’t get support for Personal Capital, even if you offer to pay whatever fee or upgrade to whatever subscription level. We opened a ticket on April 25th. Since then, a support rep has periodically politely responded to say that she has no updates, but it’s clear that nobody is looking at our issue, and there’s nothing we can do. We had come to rely on this tool, and suddenly it’s useless and there’s nothing we can… Read more »

Ray
Ray
10 months ago
Reply to  Roy Feague

That is what I get also, however I would think they could figure out the bug with Fidelity.

Ray
Ray
10 months ago

I like Personal Capital much better than Mint, I find it easier to track to two different “goals”. It also allowed me to quickly and easily understand my allocation better since I am spread out over Fidelity, Vanguard, Schwab and my companies 401K.

My question is @JD is how did you get Fidelity to work. It has not worked for me in a couple of months.

Rick
Rick
7 months ago

I think I’ve found a flaw in Personal Capital’s retirement planner. I have my retirement spending set to equal my pension, part time income and SS income so I dont have to touch investments. 30 yrs from now at 7% annual increase, the investments should equal 3 times what Personal Capital calculates.

Mr.Thomas
Mr.Thomas
7 months ago

For what’s it’s worth a greatly reduced the calls (and website nags) from Personal Capital by scheduling a consultation on the website for December 25, 2025 (some years ago). I did still get the occasional call, but simply told them I wasn’t interested and didn’t want to be contacted anymore and I haven’t heard anything from them in awhile. I do enjoy the overall view and tools that Personal Capital provides and the retirement planner has some interesting what if scenarios to play with. That said, I still get even more accurate results from my own copy of Quicken and… Read more »

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