How much is pet insurance?

Pet insurance costs will vary based on the type of pet, its age and other factors, but one national pet insurance company recently quoted us a policy online of $94.54 per month with a $200 deductible for a 6-year-old mixed breed, female dog. That number can go higher or lower depending on the deductible, very much like human insurance.

While becoming a more recognizable option, most pets are not privately insured. According to the North American Pet Health Insurance Association, there are 179 million pets in North America and about 1.4 million are covered by insurance. The most important tip is to understand what the policy does and does not cover and how the monthly fees compare to average yearly veterinary care for your pet. In some cases, it may make more sense to simply bulk up your emergency fund, as blogger Sierra Black did. Before we get to her story, though: Pet insurance isn't the only option. if you have trouble affording care for your pet, the ASPCA has resources that can help.

Sierra Black's Story

My cat, Monster, died after a struggle with cancer. Monster followed me home one day when I was 17; he was with me through every heartbreak, every move, job, boyfriend, and roommate. I'm grateful for the fifteen years we had together, but I miss him. I'll miss him always, I suspect.

Monster's death left me with a tough decision: Should my girls get kittens for Christmas? We'd been thinking of getting the kids kittens for awhile, but held off because Monster was old and frail. I didn't want a pair of kittens to terrorize him. While it felt too soon to me to get new cats, my older daughter asked very gently if she could get a cat of her own a few weeks after Monster died.

When my other daughter's preschool held a holiday pet adoption & craft fair, the deal was clinched. We came home with two kittens.

The kittens came with a brochure for pet insurance. I've never had pet insurance, and I wondered if a policy might be worthwhile, especially for young cats who need extra care and appointments, as well as vaccines.

Veterinary care gets expensive fast. I tapped out my modest $1,000 emergency fund paying for Monster's end-of-life care and cremation costs. I have never been so grateful for my new financial skills as I was when I was able to write that check without worrying about where the money would come from.

Related content: How to build up your emergency fund.

Between paying for my elderly cat's illness and adopting two kittens, vet bills have been on my mind a lot. So I looked into my pet insurance options. I decided to “self-insure” my pets by putting more money into my emergency fund, instead of buying an insurance policy to cover their medical costs. Here's why:

  • Pet insurance costs may exceed your typical annual vet costs. My cat's medical care typically costs about $300 a year. I can readily save that money myself. [Ed note: Some policies this writer encountered at the time would have run her about $1 per day or $365 per year.]
  • Routine care isn't covered. While an accident or serious illness could suddenly befall my cat, routine care is the bulk of expenses I have ever paid for a cat. It's true that a sudden illness could escalate those costs dramatically. This just happened to Monster as he was dying. After 15 years of cat tending, though, I have a decent sense of how much it costs on a day-to-day basis, and how common these expensive accidents or illnesses really are.
  • Money in my emergency fund is more flexible. I can use those dollars to pay for a surprise vet bill or a blown radiator on my car or a washing machine repair. The money isn't dedicated to a particular cause, it's available for whatever emergency life throws my way.

Of course, emergencies can pile up, making the flexibility of emergency funds a moot point. That's the risk of going it alone. For example, shortly after my cat died, I developed a problem with my hands that needed intensive medical care.

For an insurance policy to seem worthwhile to me, it needs to be cheap, easy to use, and cover routine expenses. AAA is a great deal for me, for example, because my annual membership costs about what one service call does, and driving a used car I use it every year. If they didn't cover routine roadside incidents like flat tires, I'd drop it because that's the bulk of what I use them for.

It's almost always better to self-insure your stuff (and your pets) than to buy a warranty or insurance policy. The two big exceptions in my life are home and health insurance. I can't reasonably squirrel away the cash to replace my home, and a catastrophic health event can set me back hundreds of thousands of dollars.

Related Content: For more about insurance, see how insurance works and how to save on insurance.

Health insurance also covers my routine care. I don't get my money's worth out of my health insurance every year, but I always have my care covered. My insurance premiums are the only significant cost I pay for health care. They pay for 5 physicals, any number of sick care appointments, and the various specialists my family members see.

Pet insurance would only cover major medical incidents. Cats don't, in my experience, have as many of those as people. In 15 years I've paid for one surgery and two illnesses with my cats. That doesn't suggest a lot of use for my pet insurance policy. If I'd paid insurance premiums all those years, I'd have paid over $4500. The cost of major medical bills has actually been less than half that.

Any insurance or warranty program works because most of its customers pay more in premiums than they consume in services. That's how an insurance company makes money. Before giving them some of yours, think very carefully about what kind of customer you are. Will you be paying more in premiums than you get in service? Or the other way around? Of course it's impossible to know what the future will bring, but here are some good questions to ask yourself:

  • Can I save this money myself? Be honest. Do you have the income and the discipline to save for an emergency. You want the answer to be yes, but wishing doesn't always make things happen. If you don't have the savings or a good way to build them, start working on developing those skills. Some things you just can't self-insure, but many you can if you're diligent.
  • What kind of consumer are you? For example, an outdoor cat is going to be more prone to accident or illness than an indoor cat. That might alter the equation on whether or not pet insurance is worthwhile to you.

Whatever you decide, I hope you never have to use your insurance or emergency fund to pay for a sick or injured animal. May all of your pets live long, healthy, happy lives.

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LifeAndMyFinances
LifeAndMyFinances
9 years ago

Since I have never had a pet myself, I think I am more callous in my response.

Animals are great for companianship and love, but they aren’t human. If they need brain surgery, I don’t think it should be done. For those that pay $5,000+ dollars to “save” their pets for just a few more days – I think they’re crazy.

For this reason, I don’t think pet insurance is needed. If something goes seriously wrong with your pet, you’ll just have to let them go rather than pay the big bucks.

Sarah
Sarah
9 years ago

Yikes! You are right, you have obviously never had a pet! I just looked into this for my two dogs and there was an option to add routine care. I am not sure what company you looked into, or maybe cats are different than dogs in coverage, but we got a quote from VPI. My vet summed it up well though- people that can afford pet insurance can usually afford their vet bills. The people that really need it can’t afford or think the monthly costs are too high. So it is a toss up, although I’m sure if my… Read more »

dmm219
dmm219
9 years ago

All I’ll say is that in the 4 years I have had a dog, 2 of those years I have dramatically saved a ton of money with pet insurance. The other 2 years I came out about even. If you think a reasonable expectation of vet bills for a dog (not a cat) is $300 a year…you better not get a dog. Pet insurance is 100% worth the cost in the first 8 years of a large dog’s life. The type of pet matters. Not sure it would be worth it for a cat. Plus, most pet insurance DOES cover… Read more »

Elizabeth
Elizabeth
9 years ago

I’m sorry to hear about Monster 🙁 I’ve been thinking of getting a cat, but I’m not going to until I have room in my emergency fund for any unexpected expenses. I’ve heard mixed reviews about pet insurance so this post really helped! One thing my parents have always done is decide ahead of time how far they will go to help their dogs. (In other words, to think about costs and quality of life for their animals.) It’s a very difficult topic, but it does help with financial planning and that awful step of knowing when to say good… Read more »

Chickybeth
Chickybeth
9 years ago

Sierra, I’m so sorry to hear you cat died. I have a few cats and have thought about getting the insurance, but for an indoor cat the numbers just don’t add up. From past experience I know that if something (no pun intended) catastrophic were to happen, I would have to put the cat down. A few times growing up our outdoor cats had something awful happen and even after hundreds of dollars spent on trying to save them they died anyway. What I decided to do was to put aside a fund in ING just for emergency care and… Read more »

peterxyz
peterxyz
9 years ago

sorry to hear about Monster and enjoy the new kittens.

One perspective on insuring “routine” care/claims – it costs an insurance company money to administer a claim, so that even if all of the money that you paid as premium was dedicated to paying your claims in a year, you’d still lose about 20% due to the expenses of paying your claims.
This is why insurance tends to work better for catastrophic events (as you point out)

Peter

Philip
Philip
9 years ago

Do you think maybe you are over-insured when it comes to health insurance? If you aren’t getting your money’s worth, why not switch to catastrophic care where you can save in advance and pay in full for routine visits like physicals and sick care appointments? Insurers make very little of their money from people not using up all the benefits they pay for. They make most of their money charging a large group of people for protection against unlikely events. You (and others) coming out a few hundred (or even thousand) dollars ahead or behind on insurance premiums isn’t making… Read more »

Chris Gammell
Chris Gammell
9 years ago

I’ve recently decided to drop our pet insurance. Our premiums for two dogs was about $60/month (that included the “routine” care for our new puppy which would be going away, but other premium increases would put us up near that number). Instead, I’m socking away 100/month into an ING savings account. It just doesn’t make sense otherwise for me. First off, the filing of claims is ancient. You have to fax forms and all dealings are after the fact. This alone puts my unorganized self at a disadvantage. However, the thing that really gets me are the new plans and… Read more »

chamoiswillow
chamoiswillow
9 years ago

Sierra, I am very sorry for your loss of Monster. I agree with you that pet insurance is not worth it. Primarily because the policy cedes control of whether or not to treat during an emergency to your insurance company. You need to contact them first, and have them talk with your vet, and then THEY DECIDE whether or not they’ll approve the procedure. So all that premium money and you may end up having to pay for expenses out of pocket anyway. No thank you. I’m not one to endorse credit cards, but there is a GE product called… Read more »

Kim
Kim
9 years ago

Re: 1 & 2

I’ve been a pet owner my whole life, cats and/or dogs, mostly cats. But I’m pretty much with #1 poster. I cannot imagine spending thousands of dollars should one of my cats develop a major issue. It may seem callous but, to me, it’s just practical. For people, yes. For cats, no. I also haven’t felt any need to get pet insurance. I just budget for typical cat vet care.

carriekris
carriekris
9 years ago

A long time ago, I bought pet insurance in the US and it definitely was NOT worth it. My dog developed a urinary tract infection and I had to fill out a ton of paperwork and at the end of the day I got reimbursed $30. I dropped that insurance. I bought pet insurance when I moved to the UK. It definitely was worth it! They paid the full limit of 4000 GBP and I paid the remainder 1500 GBP. (I am one of those people who will pay what it takes as long as the vets think it will… Read more »

Coley
Coley
9 years ago

“For an insurance policy to seem worthwhile to me, it needs to be cheap, easy to use, and cover routine expenses.” Any insurance policy that covers routine (i.e. regular) expenses is not going to be cheap. That’s not the point of insurance. You well understand this point when you talk about home insurance replacing your potentially burned-down house; while at the same time you don’t presumably expect it to replace your worn-out water heater or pay for gutter cleaning. And yet when we get into discussions about HEALTH insurance for people, and apparently pets, we somehow expect that insurance ought… Read more »

SupportingParents
SupportingParents
9 years ago

Sierra, I recently lost my dog to cancer and I truly understand and feel your loss. I also have a dachshund (known for back problems) that I decided to insure to be on the safe side. A few months into the insurance she herniated a disc in her back… guess what, not covered. So not only did I pay for the $350+ a year insurance, I paid for all the vet bills myself. I know some people are very happy with their pet insurance but for me it ended up being another expense on top of an expensive treatment. They… Read more »

David Hunter
David Hunter
9 years ago

I’m a pet lover and consider our dog part of the family. If he needed X-amount of dollars for surgery, we would surely pay for it. That said, I guess it would have to depend on whether the surgery would by days or years to his life. We surely would not want him to suffer. Growing up, we usually had 4 dogs. If we had insurance: $365 a year, per dog, average life say.. 12= $17,520. I know we have never spent anywhere near that number. So, my take on pet insurance, I don’t think it’s worth it. Like others… Read more »

Alex
Alex
9 years ago

dmm219 – I disagree. Pet Insurance is worth it, but only for some breeds/types of dogs. I bought it because I was also given a quote to include general checkups. However, because it is a private insurance, they can exclude things. My 1.5 year old Ridgeback mix (a rescue) tore his cruciate (ACL) and also has a dysplasia-like problem in his front paw. Neither of those are covered by pet insurance for any dog over 30 lbs, or any dog younger than 3 because they are more likely to have those problems. LifeandMyFinances – These surgeries (which we are doing… Read more »

Barb
Barb
9 years ago

My only comment is that you should rescue these new kittens, if you decide to get them. Please don’t buy. There are millions of cats sitting in shelters across the country waiting for homes- there are even kittens!

Nicole
Nicole
9 years ago

Sorry for your loss. My parents just lost their 17 year old dog over Christmas. She’s being frozen at the pet shelter for a Spring burial. I would have liked to see more information about different pet health insurance plans, not just the one that sends a flyer with a specific fair. Maybe some information on the average pet insurance plan, or information on ranges of costs for different breeds. Obviously the cost of routine care would mean a higher insurance premium. That may or may not be worth it (usually it is worth it if the insurance company is… Read more »

Holly
Holly
9 years ago

I did the analysis when I had two young dogs and came to the same conclusion: better to just put the premium in the bank.

FWIW, I found over the course of my dogs’ long lives that they were very expensive when they were young (lots of injuries from playing too hard, plus the fees for spaying) and again in old age (tests to check for cancer, meds). In middle age, from age 3 to 10 +/- medical costs consisted primarily of routine vet visits.

I’m sorry for your loss, but wish your family much happiness with your new friends.

Roo
Roo
9 years ago

I’m in the UK, my family has 2 cats and they are both insured. Coco, our older cat, has had 2 major operations- she chipped her elbow joint and had it replaced with a metal pin, then a couple of years later a ligament in her back leg snapped and was replaced by a synthetic one. This operations would have cost us around £5000 each if not for insurance. She had both of them before she was 10 and she’s now 15 and still healthy, fairly active and a happy cat. If pet insurance in the USA is anything like… Read more »

shorty j
shorty j
9 years ago

“My vet summed it up well though- people that can afford pet insurance can usually afford their vet bills.” This is pretty much how I feel. For me, for what pet insurance covers, it’s just not really worth the cost. BUT, it is worth noting, I have a sturdy, middle-aged, healthy dog who really does not need much of anything besides vaccines, and I’m pretty capable with dogs so I do a lot of her care at home, like cleaning teeth, clipping nails, etc. I put ~$50 a month into a savings account instead. Then I can use that money… Read more »

Mel
Mel
9 years ago

I have 3 dogs. I declined pet insurance but know that I’d pay thousands if my doberman needed something to save her life (or quality of life) that was likely to succeed. A friend of mine was single, no kids and had a good job. His boxer, who was pretty much his life, was out playing frisbee and came down wrong on his ankle breaking it. It wasn’t life threatening and amputation was probably a less costly option. He opted to have pins put in the ankle at the cost of over $3,0000. I know I’d probably do the same… Read more »

louisa @ TheReallyGoodLife
louisa @ TheReallyGoodLife
9 years ago

I agree with dmm219 – it’s worth it more for dogs than cats. When things go wrong with dogs, they’re expensive to fix – and not just life-or-death stuff like a brain tumour, but otherwise healthy dogs (particularly breeds) can develop wonky knees or hips that need expensive operations. A friend’s 2 year old dog developed a bad knee – if he hadn’t had insurance, it would have cost him £2000+. Our pet insurance also has a third party element – in case the dog hurts anyone else or causes damage to anything expensive. We’ve lost 2 cats in the… Read more »

Kestra
Kestra
9 years ago

I work for a pet insurance company, though not in the US. Here’s what I’ve seen: – shop around. Policies vary WIDELY between different companies. And if you get the cheapest policy, it won’t pay out much – dogs need insurance much more than cats – the more pets you have insured, the less you need insurance. If you’re paying premiums for lots of pets, statistically, they probably won’t all get sick, and that’s a lot of money towards your emergency fund. – lots of companies do cover routine health, but if you never get the routine care done it’s… Read more »

Emily
Emily
9 years ago

I have often pondered whether to get pet insurance. We have two older dogs and insuring them would be very expensive, and I also am not of the mind that expensive, invasive treatments to prolong their lives for a short time, if it came to that, would be the humane thing to do. I’ll leave aside whether it’s appropriate to spend a lot of money on end of life care, as that’s a very personal decision that no one can make for another person. We would have benefited greatly from our youngest dog having insurance, however. A couple of years… Read more »

Emily
Emily
9 years ago

I’ll add that I don’t think someone who does not have pets can really opine on this subject. Pets are not people, but they are family. I realize it’s not the same as having a child, but neither is it the same as a nonliving thing. Pet owners treat their pets as family and take care of their needs, and this is a significant priority that has its own place in the family budget.

Jinx
Jinx
9 years ago

I lost a dog a couple of years ago, it may seem excessive, but over her lifetime her vet bills easily cost £12000 +, I reared her from a week old, she was my best friend in every sense of the word. I didn’t have pet insurance at the time and her vet bills toward the end topped £7000 in about a year. We maxed out our credit card to pay. I’ve been an advocate of insurance ever since (the UK offers extensive, though expensive insurance). There is nothing worse than having a dog seriously ill and not having the… Read more »

Erin
Erin
9 years ago

I have a dog that has required thousands of dollars in surgery, none of which was “life saving/prolonging” surgery. I am happy with my decision and my dog has an awesome life with a ton of love. I’ve experienced “judgement” about the money I’ve spent on him, but to each their own. I wouldn’t buy an expensive car, but do I judge those who do? No. It’s not how I choose to spend my money. I am financially responsible, so if I choose to spend my money on my dog rather than my wardrobe, how can someone judge me? It’s… Read more »

S.P.E.
S.P.E.
9 years ago

I adopted a cat a few years ago and found out he had a heart murmur when I took him to the vet. I put him on insurance and it has been totally worth it. If your pet is crazy healthy (which you never know) I would say skip the insurance. But it is nice having it as a back-up for emergencies and for sick pets.

cc
cc
9 years ago

so sorry for your loss! monster sounds like a great kitty. i dont have pet insurance, and for a while i had care credit- but i dropped that as soon as i found out the rates (something like 25% while my other plain credit cards were around 11 and 12…. i agree with #18 and disagree heavily with #1. reasons like this are why we make money and save it. there is no rainier day than a sick animal. i also empathize with the relief over check-writing. my relatively young and otherwise healthy ferret i adopted two years ago started… Read more »

Adrienne
Adrienne
9 years ago

I have to disagree with the criteria for insurance being “covering routine expenses”. My criteria is the premiums vs. what it is covering. Term life insurance is the perfect example – it does not cover any “routine” expenses but it has a large payout for a small premium. I don’t buy pet insurance because I think the premiums are too high for the small amount (a few thousand) they pay out.
Our health insurance does cover routine expenses but for some people it makes more sense to buy insurance that only covers large bills.

Jackie
Jackie
9 years ago

I’m sorry to hear about Monster. I hope your kids have as enjoyable of memories with their kittens as you do of Monster. I have always passed on pet insurance for the reasons you outlined, but in the case of our current cat I wish we hadn’t. She has what appears to be a recurring condition of unknown cause (which is a good thing, because the known causes of the condition are all fatal.) Luckily our vet is a sweetheart and only charges for the specific treatment and not his time, because at one point we were taking her in… Read more »

Rosa
Rosa
9 years ago

I’m sorry you lost Monster. Cats vary widely in how much care they need, and also where you lives determines what’s not available; the youngest of our cats (who is now 8) has been the most expensive, and had bladder surgery when she was 4; the oldest (who died at 17 last year) only ever got routine shots; and the other elderly cat (now 18) mostly only got routine medical care but was ill a few times. The elderly cat is mine, and she only got medical care when I could afford it; the youngest cat is my tender-hearted partner’s… Read more »

Rosa
Rosa
9 years ago

That smiley should say my young cat is 8!

partgypsy
partgypsy
9 years ago

I have heard that pet insurance is only worth it if a) you have an older pet and b) you have psychic abilities to know if and in what year they will have catastrophic medical expenses. For the two pets that we’ve had die in the past 5 years they did have medical expenses towards the end of life but in the 100’s not thousands, because at that point there was nothing to be done other than palliative. For my sister in law, when her elderly cat had a stroke, she was given the option of expensive heart surgery and… Read more »

Terri
Terri
9 years ago

Thanks for this post! I’ve been going back and forth over the decision on whether to get pet insurance. I didn’t realize that pet insurance doesn’t cover routine care. For cats, I think what you mentioned about indoor vs outdoor cats is a really important factor because not only are indoor cats less likely to get injured, but they’re less likely to get a contagious disease. I also think that if you feed your cat a high quality diet and make sure they maintain a healthy weight, you can also significantly reduce their risk of having serious health problems. RIP… Read more »

Amanda
Amanda
9 years ago

For a dog or cat, I think your argument is a great one. However, I can think of one big exception, which is my own pet: a horse. Granted, horse expenses are through the roof anyway, and routine care can easily top $1,000 a year, but the costs of anything outside of routine care just skyrocket the second you call the vet. Equine health insurance usually covers major medical and a variation on end of life/loss of use. Your costs for it are usually assessed by a certain percentage of your horse’s value – so if you have a $75,000… Read more »

Carrie
Carrie
9 years ago

I pay less that $200 a year for pet insurance on our dog. That only covers emergencies, not routine care. Routine care is an option, but it makes it much more expensive, and I figured that was easy for me to budget for. I haven’t used the insurance at all this year, but in the first year I used it my dog had thousands of dollars in tests and care to diagnose him with Addison’s Disease (which is easily treatable with medication, but which would have eventually killed him if not diagnosed). I got about half of what I paid… Read more »

Sarah in MI
Sarah in MI
9 years ago

We insured our last two dogs. We found that when the major health problems came we were still left paying a large sum out of pocket, in addition to the premiums. Therefore, we decided to self-insure with our newest dog.

schmei
schmei
9 years ago

My condolences on the loss of your dear Monster. We’ve had our cat for a little over two years, and the pet insurance we bought for her costs us about half what you’re quoting and has basically paid for itself for the last two calendar years. Our cat is unfortunately a bit more special needs than most cats her age, so we’re looking at slightly higher-than-usual vet bills over the course of her life, so we’re also socking some away in savings on the side: our insurance requires payment upfront and then reimburses us later. Like with anything, do what… Read more »

William
William
9 years ago

Note that the initial cost of pet insurance will dramatically increase with the age of the pet. So what started out at $25/month for my cat at the age of 1, ended up $70/mo at the age of 15. She lived until 19.

lolo
lolo
9 years ago

Posters #1 and #10: Have you considered being pet foster parents? It seems like the level of responsibility that you’re looking for. Foster parents often get food allowances and have their vet bills paid for them, but they get to spend a lot of quality time with their foster pets. This would alleviate your personal financial concerns, but still allow a loved animal to receive life saving veterinary care. Just a thought. . .

Mary
Mary
9 years ago

Sorry about the loss of your pet. I agree with you about the pet insurance. However, maybe where you live affects whether you need it or not because I had a dog with a torn
ACL a few years ago and the total cost for surgery to repair it plus extras like x-rays, meds, etc. came to about $1000. After reading some of the other comments on costs of similiar surgeries I’m really surprised at how much they had to pay. I can only guess that the difference in cost is related to cost of living in different areas.

Courtney
Courtney
9 years ago

We don’t have pet insurance, but we do have a pre-paid ‘wellness plan’ through Banfield. For about $550 a year our two cats (who are 8 and 13) are completely covered for preventative care, vaccinations and office visits. No paperwork to file; we just show up at the vet office and everything is already taken care of. There is a plan discount (I think it’s 5-10%) on other vet services and medications, should they need major emergency care.

Nick (Macheesmo)
Nick (Macheesmo)
9 years ago

Sorry for your loss. I’m incredibly attached to my cat after just a few years…

I agree with your conclusion though that in most cases pet insurance isn’t a great deal.

My wife and I have a ceiling on what we would pay for medical services for our cat (in the 1K range). As long as we are able to emotionally stick to that in a crisis time, then pet insurance definitely doesn’t make sense for us.

Stephen
Stephen
9 years ago

Get your dog trained! Dog training is an investment that will help protect your dog’s life! Imagine that you are outside and something dangerous is about to happen to your doggy. Just tell her to COME and she will come racing to you. Dog training for the basic 5 popular commands of sit, come, stay, here, and down will cost about $350. That is about $00.08 a day if your dog lives 11 years. Now, factor in your dog’s daily living expense with an extra eight cents a day and you can see that dog training is worth it. Oh,… Read more »

Jerichohill
Jerichohill
9 years ago

We have had pet care plan for our dog through Petsmart’s Banfield Vets and I ran through the numbers and just on the cost of routine care alone, the pet care plan saves us about 250 a year. My understanding is that there are a lot of products, so I doubt a 1 size fits all solution is correct. Policies and Circumstances vary, so do research your unique situation. In addition to the care, the insurance part saved us about 1K on a big surgery for our middle-ish aged dog (@ the time) and clearly paying the same out of… Read more »

Alissa
Alissa
9 years ago

I don’t have pet insurance for my two cats, and doubt the older one would qualify based on preexisting conditions. I sat down two years ago and figured out how much food should cost for them for a month. I also averaged out how much I was paying for kitty litter. These two expenses, plus $50 for emergencies, gets set aside every month. So even though it costs me $40 a month for food, I’m not actually buying it every month since I buy the largest size bag I can. This means that left over money at least earns a… Read more »

Tyler Karaszewski
Tyler Karaszewski
9 years ago

I don’t see any problem with paying a fair amount of money to save a pet’s life. People will spend tens of thousands of dollars to fix up an old car, or go on a vacation in Europe. Maybe for some people their dog is more important to them than their car or their travels? It seems reasonable to me. Even still, I wouldn’t buy pet insurance. Most pet health problems aren’t expensive enough that I’d think it necessary, which is a stark contrast to health insurance for people. A friend of mine was involved in a motorcycle accident and… Read more »

Michele
Michele
9 years ago

Just a note- I have 3 dogs currently- 2 Yorkies and a German Shepherd. I decided to not get pet insurance when they were puppies, since routine care is part of the deal with dogs, as is feeding them, walking them, brushing them, getting them groomed monthly (Yorkies)and cleaning up after them. The only thing that has been out of control is TEETH CLEANING for dogs! Yorkies have notoriously bad teeth and they need their teeth brushed daily and cleaned professionally at least once a year. Shepherds have better teeth, but still need daily brushing and every-other-year cleaning. This requires… Read more »

Katie
Katie
9 years ago

Great topic! My five-year-old miniature dachshund has had two back surgeries in the last two years, each costing about $4000. Because of this, my husband and I were considering pet insurance for our next pet, especially if we get another dachshund. After research, though, I came to the same conclusion – the cost over the lifetime of the pet is not worth it. It’s better to just save that money in case you need it. Thanks for confirming!

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