Professional sports: A waste of time, money, and energy?

Professional sports: A waste of time, money, and energy?

You know what I like to do on a beautiful fall day? Sit on a couch and watch other people exercise! Furthermore, I cheer for a bunch of people I'll never meet, representing a team based in a city they didn't grow up in. Heck, I myself haven't lived in that city for many years.

Yep, I'm talking about watching professional football — in my case, cheering for the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, since I grew up in nearby Clearwater, Florida. However, at this point, I've spent most of my life living outside of the Tampa Bay area. But that doesn't change the emotional connection I have to a team I watched as a kid, taking the bus from Clearwater Mall to Tampa Stadium to watch Lee Roy Selmon, Doug Williams, Jimmie Giles, and those ‘70s-inspired creamsicle uniforms.

But I don't watch football as much as I used to. I certainly don't get the NFL Sunday Ticket like I used to, which allowed me to watch every and any game I wanted (at a cost of $299.95). With a bunch of kids, I just don't have the time. And, frankly, I feel more and more like it's kind of ridiculous.

I had this thought again as I read about the recent bankruptcy filing of Warren Sapp, the former Tampa Bay defensive tackle and likely future hall of famer. Despite earning (in his estimation) $60 million while playing, and despite current monthly income of $115,881, Sapp has filed for Chapter 7 bankruptcy due to owing $6.7 million, which includes unpaid child support and alimony. Listed among his assets in the bankruptcy filing: a 58-inch high-definition TV, a boxing glove signed by Muhammad Ali, $560 worth of new Xbox games, and 240 pairs of Nike Air shoes. He once owned an 18,000-square-foot mansion, but not anymore. He also doesn't own the Super Bowl ring he earned with the Bucs, or his University of Miami championship ring. He says he lost them.

For some reason, most people enjoy reading about the financial downfalls of the once-rich and famous. But this one has garnered extra attention in the Tampa Bay area, not only because of Sapp's legacy as a player, but also his legacy as a jerk. He was notoriously rude to fans. As an example, here's what happened to high school coach of the week Mike DePue, who had been invited by the Bucs to watch one of their practices (as reported by the Tampa Tribune in 2003):

According to DePue, he and two of his assistants, Rob Burns and Vaughn Volpi, were at One Buc Place viewing practice from the sideline when Sapp walked to an area near them and “threw a tantrum,” apparently for DePue making eye contact with Sapp.

“I was just looking around in practice and he [Sapp] said to me in a confrontational tone, ‘Do you see what you're looking for?”' DePue said. And as Sapp walked back toward practice, DePue said Sapp used foul language and said he would “give me more [verbal] grief if I looked at him again.”

Bankruptcy couldn't have happened to a nicer guy.

Are Pro Sports Worth the Cost?

How can a guy like Warren Sapp get paid so much? Because professional football makes so much. According to Forbes, the average NFL team made $261 million during the 2010 season, which is a total of $8.4 billion for the 32 teams. Of course, that money doesn't just grow on turf; we sports fans are footballing the bill, through the jerseys we buy, the games we attend (and $5 hot dogs we eat), the cable fees we pay, and the hours upon hours of beer and car commercials we endure. Yet here are five reasons why devoting so much time and money to professional sports may not be worth the investment.

1. We should be exercising instead of sitting on our butts and watching other people sweat.
Many writers would now trot out all the statistics about how we're getting larger and lazier, except that trotting would exhaust them. Plus, you already know about the couch-potato crisis. As for me, I've managed to get more in shape, and the health and psychological benefits are far more rewarding than spending three hours in front of a TV to watch just 11 minutes of actual playing (which, according to the Wall Street Journal, is the amount of time that isn't spent on commercials and players standing in a huddle).

2. Many professional athletes are horrible with money.
Warren Sapp isn't the only athlete who blew through millions. According to Sports Illustrated, 78% of NFL players and 60% of NBA players are bankrupt within two years of leaving the game. I can't help but feel that spending money on professional sports is a misallocation of capital.

3. Sports can bring out the worst in people.

Sports participants and spectators can get pretty ugly. In February, 79 people died during a soccer riot in Egypt. It generally doesn't get that bad here in the U.S., but fans can still get pretty ugly. A few years ago, the Bucs were in town to play the Washington Redskins (I now live in the D.C. area), and I took my then-12-year-old daughter to the game. She was all excited, painting her face and everything. But as the game progressed, and the fans drank more, they became more and more obnoxious to those of us who were rooting for the other team. One guy yelled to my daughter, “Hey, little girl — come over here and I'll paint your face.” That was $200 well spent.

4. It's silly to care so much.
Back in the day, a poor performance by the Bucs could ruin my Sunday evening (and if you know the history of the Bucs, you know that was a lot of Sundays). Then, a few years back, they blew a huge lead and lost in overtime. I couldn't sleep. My wife turned to me at 3 a.m. and said, “You need to emotionally disassociate yourself from football.” It was the wisdom I needed to hear.

5. Is one season really that different from last season?
I'm not much of a basketball fan, and when the folks in my office gather around a TV during March Madness, I'll walk up and say, “Look, a guy threw a ball through a hoop! Oh, look — it happened again! Wow, there it is again!” But football isn't really that different. The truly unique plays could be summarized in a five-minute highlight video at the end of the season.

Football, I Wish I Knew How to Quit You

Despite all the reasons why it doesn't quite make sense to expend resources on professional sports, I can't help but spend an hour or two each week watching football. Even in the offseason, I'll occasionally flip to the NFL Network. I watched football growing up, and I played it growing up (as evidenced the by the accompanying black-and-white picture — back when I played football, colors had not yet been invented). I guess it's an addiction, or something. Right now at my desk, I have an autographed picture of Lee Roy Selmon and several old football cards. (Who remembers that Vinny Testaverde began his career in Tampa?) But slowly, I'm recovering from my addiction, and not devoting so much time and money to it. Warren Sapp will have to find someone else to pay for his shoes.

Cheesy self-interested (sorta) addendum: Want to support the young, creative innovators of tomorrow? Today's your lucky day! My son's fifth-grade Odyssey of the Mind team has made it to the World Finals, where they'll compete against kids from more than 25 countries. The team is in the process of raising $9,000 for the trip. If you'd like to contribute, send a check, made out to Stratford Landing PTA (with OM noted on the check), to Stratford Landing PTA, attn: Terri Bell (OM), 8484 Riverside Road, Alexandria, VA 22308. All donations are tax-deductible! And if you know of great places to visit as we drive from Virginia to Iowa, please let me know!

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TB at BlueCollarWorkman
TB at BlueCollarWorkman
8 years ago

Sports don’t just bring out the worst in us; they also bring out the best in us — teaching us about teamwork, responsibility, and hard work. It’s motivating to watch sports and exhilarating. And it’s entertaining to watch the feats of the human body– sure, I could exercise myself, but I’ll never be able to dunk a ball or run at record pace down a field because my job isn’t to keep my body in peak performance condition. It’s neat to see people whose jobs that is. Sports have been around since before humans recorded history, they’re important for us… Read more »

Belligero
Belligero
8 years ago

There’s an important distinction to make between actually participating in sporting activity and watching the bloated hype spectacle of the main pro leagues. Professional sport is a massive waste of intellect and resources, and it becomes an unhealthy obsession for many fans. Yes, amateur sports and athletics are part of our history, as there is an actual application for being able to run, jump and throw things accurately. This has mutated into a celebration of ignorance and waste on an unprecedented scale. Today, the athlete’s real job is to get people’s attention long enough to sell them junk food, drugs… Read more »

Anne
Anne
8 years ago
Reply to  Belligero

I don’t like sports and don’t watch. But that’s common for women… So long as state support doesn’t outweigh support for the arts and non-professional local sports opportunities, I don’t care. People should enjoy what is fun for them, no matter what I think. There are lots of outlets and entertainments I don’t understand. I hate it when people break out unhealthy behaviour. Like drinking, some people have healthy relationships with sports and some do not. Those who can’t, shouldn’t watch sports. Just like those who can’t have a healthy relationship with alcohol shouldn’t drink. I don’t see how sport… Read more »

Rhea Khan
Rhea Khan
6 years ago
Reply to  Anne

I don’t watch sports or opera. But I have NO doubt in my mind and heart that opera is at least a hundred times more worthwhile investment of time and money. The exceptional skill and talent (and gift) required for opera, the rich historical and cultural heritage of opera, the creativity in composition, music, narrative and singing …how this can even be compared with a commercially bolstered team sport spectacle as being on a similar level of comparision astounds me. Just to clarify I am referring primarily to spectator competitive team sport – not at all about engaging in excersise.… Read more »

Please
Please
8 years ago
Reply to  Belligero

So, your are okay with slave labor which is what college sports are period!

Tyler
Tyler
4 years ago
Reply to  Please

Haha, says the person who doesn’t care about the free education. That person will end up a slave in one way or another because of that attitude.

El Nerdo
El Nerdo
8 years ago

@TB – YES @ Anne – You make some excellent points and here’s a hearty thumb-up! However– a lot of women love professional sports! Anecdotally, my wife loves to watch “soccer” (that’s the American name for football); her mom loves to watch basketball and American football; a woman friend of ours is a sports journalist, and if you look at the crowds in stadiums there’s always lots of women. Female fans of sports may not fit the common stereotypes of the sports fan, but they are out there in droves! @ haters – watching “soccer” with my wife on weekends… Read more »

Anne
Anne
8 years ago
Reply to  El Nerdo

Female fans are a minority of overall fans. But you’re right there are more than people assume. I didn’t mean to imply that women who like pro-sports are either not real fans or unfeminine in any way. Just that my disinterest is pretty common amongst women. That’s important IMO to recognize when evaluating the worth a hobby or interest has. It is always easy to dismiss someone else’s interests. I would be really annoyed if a man agreed and dismissed a more feminine interest of mine as worthless because it was “silly” or cost money they were not willing to… Read more »

El Nerdo
El Nerdo
8 years ago
Reply to  Anne

Oh no no, I never read that you meant that women who like sports are “unfeminine” or any of that– I was just saying there are lots of female fans of pro sports. Perhaps they are a minority, but they aren’t an insignificant one– just a fact. But I agree with your take on this issue though.

Anne
Anne
8 years ago
Reply to  Anne

I read an article about this somewhere. How women’s dollars aren’t respected in the area of sports/entertainment revenue. Apparently NASCAR has a huge female fanbase that is largely ignored. Our money is as green. It may be that women spend more of their money on the home and less on their own interests. But then again, some may be seeing sport as a family activity too. (As you mentioned it is in your home.) It’s interesting how stereotypes can feed in on themselves.

RG GS
RG GS
2 years ago
Reply to  El Nerdo

Yeah, go and watch sports sitting like couch potatoes instead of going out with your kids and enjoy a real life. Keep making the same mistake I did and at the end you get many many hours lost in front of a tv without doing anything profitable (not talking about money) in your life where your kids will suffer same as you due to the same pattern going over and over again. There are all kind of drugs out there killing our society day by day and TV & Sports has become worst than cocaine and LSD.

Melinda
Melinda
8 years ago

Once you’re in Ames, Iowa, if the kids are pizza fans, head to Great Plains Sauce and Dough Co. downtown. They have terrific pizza and they serve honey with the crust. I’ve made the trip from Shenandoah Valley to IA, and I prefer going through Indianapolis because it’s a good halfway point and they have a nice downtown.

Chantill
Chantill
8 years ago
Reply to  Melinda

Congratulations to your son on attending OM! That’s really cool.

I second this suggestion! Great Plains is the best pizza in Ames. It’s at 129 Main Street – I highly recommend the thick wheat crust pizza, eaten with honey. Be sure to factor in a bit of time if you go – perfection takes a little time, but it’s worth it!

Stan
Stan
8 years ago
Reply to  Chantill

I will third the Great Plains Pizza suggestion! Yum! Also, for a sweet treat, stop at Cookies, etc. (at North Grand Mall) for one of the best cookies you will ever eat. It is a local store and the recipes come from the owner’s mother. Good luck to the team at OM and hope you enjoy Ames!

Misha
Misha
8 years ago
Reply to  Melinda

And on your way through Indianapolis, be sure to stop at Yats.

Carol in Mpls
Carol in Mpls
8 years ago
Reply to  Melinda

I’ll concur on Great Plains. As I’m from Ames, I’ll also recommend Hickory Park for excellent barbeque, as well as The Cafe, on the north side of town.

Congrats on making it to Ames – great opportunity for the kids! Good Luck!

Paul
Paul
8 years ago

Stratford Landing…I just moved from that area to Syracuse. Good luck in the World Finals!

Anthony @ EachPesoCounts
Anthony @ EachPesoCounts
8 years ago

I can factor in a lot of things why NFL or any sport have so many athletes, fans and more fans. Aside from being one of the best sources of entertainment in any country. Here in the Philippines, we like basketball, but soccer, rugby and dragon boat racing are catching on. I think I forgot to mention boxing. Any sporting event, especially the ones with the climactic finish, game winners and come from behind victories stir up something inside the fans, advertisers, promoters and team GMs. While there are definitely a lot of Cons with sports, not so ideal role… Read more »

Becka
Becka
8 years ago

“In February, 79 people died during a soccer riot in Egypt.”

Well… that’s simplifying it a little bit. It generally doesn’t get that bad here because the US isn’t dealing with anything even remotely comparable to the political climate in Egypt.

I don’t think there’s anything wrong with watching a couple hours of TV sports a week. It doesn’t strike me as even worth noting, really.

Kate
Kate
8 years ago
Reply to  Becka

Thank you for saying this.

There are a dozen examples that could have been used to demonstrate Robert’s point; the Egypt one just doesn’t work. That riot was not about sports; it took place in a climate of severe political instability and a huge power struggle between the transitional military council and protestors.

The jury is [literally] still out on the role of security forces in perpetrating the violence — the trial is still ongoing.

Elizabeth
Elizabeth
8 years ago
Reply to  Kate

Maybe Vancouver’s Stanley Cup Riots would be a better example? I’m still scratching my head over that one.

Still, saying pro sports are bad because they bring out the worst in people is kind of like saying don’t fly because people die in airplane crashes. Most of the time, there isn’t a problem.

Tyler
Tyler
4 years ago
Reply to  Elizabeth

He actually gave a number of reasons for having that opinion of pro sports, but you must have missed them all.

Matt
Matt
8 years ago

As a kid, my hate for the Yankees was unmatched. And the funny thing is I can actually enjoy seeing them win in my adulthood. I realized I loved baseball for the game, and not for some specific team. I still have my favorite teams, but if they lose it’s no sweat off my back.

I don’t see anything wrong with watching pro sports. But I think you hit the nail on the head with how we support the outrageous salaries. Every time I pay $15 to park at the Phillies, I just say, “Here’s your paycheck Roy.”

Kevin
Kevin
8 years ago

Many professional athletes are horrible with money. OK, but that’s more of a reason for spending money on sports, not against. “They’re horrible with money,” sure, OK, but what does that mean? They’re not piling it up and burning it. They’re spending it. Creating jobs, generating income for companies to hire more workers. Producing work for the housekeeping staff at casinos in Las Vegas (sometimes a lot of work). Wouldn’t it be far worse if they were good with money? How would it be better for society to have 1,000 super-rich athletes all hoarding their cash in hedge funds, rather… Read more »

Anthony @ EachPesoCounts
Anthony @ EachPesoCounts
8 years ago
Reply to  Kevin

This is what I’d call finding the positive in a negative situation. It’s like the Hulk saving/keeping Dr. Banner alive.

smirktastic
smirktastic
8 years ago
Reply to  Kevin

and once they’re bankrupt, who gets to support their kids?

Panda
Panda
8 years ago
Reply to  Kevin

Money other than just consumer spending still enters/spurs the economy. Money invested becomes capital for businesses to build/invest/hire. Money saved at the bank gets multiplied many times in the forms of loans (when the bank loan system is working).

Consumer spending is just one part of the economy.

Dan
Dan
8 years ago

professional sports only cost you if you let them. It is a great way to get together with friends or ways to bond with your father/son, whatever it may be. I can’t even tell you the number of girlfriends/girls I have had because we either were fans of rival teams or the same teams and had a great time cheering our teams on together or bickering with each other over our teams. It’s fun. You don’t need to spend $100+ a ticket, $20+ to park and $50+ to eat/drink. You can do all the same on a couch and create… Read more »

Mom of five
Mom of five
8 years ago
Reply to  Dan

Here in Philadelphia, you pretty much have to have cable TV to watch the Phillies. True, it’s not $200+ per game, but it is at least $60 a month.

Dan
Dan
8 years ago
Reply to  Mom of five

Is that the only thing you watch on TV the whole month? And even if it is, that is about 2 dollars a game. To entertain you for 75-90 hours a month, if you so choose.

Sounds like the cheapest form of entertainment around if you ask me.

Mom of five
Mom of five
8 years ago
Reply to  Dan

Truth be told, since we got the Roku and can stream video, the Phillies (and the sports recaps) are the only things we watch on cable. My kids are another story and do watch the cable, but I was just making the point that the cost of being an armchair fan isn’t as cheap as it used to be.

c.
c.
8 years ago
Reply to  Dan

Father/son bonding…I actually believe that’s an underlying reason so many people, especially men, are so extremely emotionally attached to professional sports: the only times their own fathers were nice to them was when “duh Bearsss” or whoever were winning a football game. When they lost or there wasn’t a game on, it was back to the usual neglect and/or abuse.

Andrew
Andrew
8 years ago
Reply to  c.

Please quit amateur psychoanalysis and find a new career. This is asinine and offensive.

Lauren {Adventures in Flip Flops}
Lauren {Adventures in Flip Flops}
8 years ago

OM! I had so much fun in OM. Glad to hear that your son enjoys (and that his team is excelling) being in it!

victoria
victoria
8 years ago

100% agreed! That’s a great experience. Good luck to your son and his team!

KC
KC
8 years ago

So much to say on this topic: Back in the mid 90’s, I worked in the front office of an NFL team. I doubt back then it was anything like it is now, but even then I was exposed to the underside of the sport (greed, sexism, etc.) not just in the office, but at the games too. Although I still look back at those days fondly because it was a great learning experience (and who am I kidding- it was fun!) as I was fresh out of college and had never worked in a corporate environment. I think we… Read more »

Mom of five
Mom of five
8 years ago
Reply to  KC

A lot of kids in the Philadelphia area are growing up with a “road tripping” fan experience. It’s been so difficult and expensive to get good seats to watch the Phils in the beautiful new ballpark, spending an overnight in Pittsburgh or DC is a fun and surprisingly inexpensive way to create lasting memories.

Kaytee
Kaytee
8 years ago

Don’t forget the game that’s played on ice in June.

smirktastic
smirktastic
8 years ago

Being emotionally attached to a sport is exponentially worse when one is in a fantasy league. My DH is completely useless to me for every football Sunday and Monday night. So to add to the author’s list of costs, I would add the time lost with one’s family.

Tom
Tom
8 years ago

and when the folks in my office gather around a TV during March Madness, I’ll walk up and say, “Look, a guy threw a ball through a hoop! Oh, look – it happened again! Wow, there it is again!” Oh man, don’t be THAT guy, Brokamp. I also believe the SI statistic is slightly misleading, in that they lumped together bankruptcy and “feeling financial pressure” or something along those lines. That article also detailed how pro athletes are easy targets for financial scams. Side Note: Is there such a thing as Strategic Bankruptcy that wealthy people might use to preserve… Read more »

Dan
Dan
8 years ago
Reply to  Tom

you ever hear about the female tennis player who had 60 million in career earnings. She funneled a lot to her father, whom she trusted to invest reasonably and keep safe. The father gave her a reasonable allowance and the rest was not talked about.

Years later the whole 60 million was gone, parents had blown it all. Every single penny. It isn’t always the “dumb jocks” fault. It’s lonely at the top. Hard to trust anyone, even though it’s all you want to do.

Megan
Megan
8 years ago
Reply to  Dan

Exactly. There are so many pro athletes who trusted their parents to make sound investments, usually because the athlete was too young to know to speak with a financial planner. Heck, if I’d been a pro athlete at 15, I probably would have trusted my parents to invest my earnings, too.

I read an article on pro athletes (it may have been the SI story referenced above) who invest in their friends’ businesses. They feel they “should” – good fortune came to the athlete, so they should literally spread the wealth and help out their friends.

First Created
First Created
8 years ago

Great article, though some die-hard football fans will take the hit hard (pun intended). Mostly because their minds are clouded by propoganda from sitting in front of the TV for hours on end, mindlessly flipping through the channels. People use to play sports becasue they loved the sport. Now people play for the money. Takes away from the game… imagine if every player in the league was as passionate about the sport as say Ray Lewis or Peyton Manning. Would make for a different game. — Originally from Iowa… if you will be in Des Moines go eat at Zombie… Read more »

Stupidly Happy
Stupidly Happy
8 years ago

They are getting paid huge sums of money to play a game. Why do entertainers and athletes make so much but the people that truly work and are productive in society get paid mere pennies in comparison? Something is backwards here.
No fan of professional sports here, I prefer playing over watching (still play and now coach volleyball).

shawn
shawn
8 years ago
Reply to  Stupidly Happy

they’re getting paid so much because most of americans either enjoy watching them play, or enjoy the elitist feel of attending games and sitting in the front rows or saying the went to such and such last night. if you can make people appreciate your job and work that much then by all means, take the money. don’t criticize sports for common societies decisions to support it. you play and coach volleyball- i understand the desire to play more than watch, as I have the same for basketball- but I also can’t perform at the same level as a professional… Read more »

Stupidly Happy
Stupidly Happy
8 years ago
Reply to  shawn

I don’t criticize the sport, I criticize common societies decision to support these entertainers and pro athletes.

Derek
Derek
8 years ago
Reply to  Stupidly Happy

It’s because they entertain millions.

Dan
Dan
8 years ago
Reply to  Derek

I find it interesting that people harp on professional athletes for playing a game for huge sums of money. But you rarely see anything regarding TV personalitys getting paid much larger sums.

Dr. Phil $80 million
Letterman $40 million
Katie Couric $15 million
Judge Judy $30 million

All they do is talk??!!?

Queeb
Queeb
8 years ago
Reply to  Dan

And the Kardashians too? Seriously, so bizarre and puzzling that they are making so much money too.

Just plain odd that our society places such a value on entertainers and sports people. The worst is when sports players are called “heroes”.
Save that for our troops, please.

AMW
AMW
8 years ago
Reply to  Dan

I am not a sports fan, but I can see value in it for a community, children learning teamwork, etc. What puzzles me is the overinflation in value for their paychecks…same goes with movies stars, “celebrities” like Snooky and the Kardashians… I don’t get it, it just seems so out of proportion to what the real heros (firefighters, teachers, nurses, etc) make that it just strikes me as absurd. And the emotional investment of fans??? Because someone lost a game (and it is just a game)it it is going to ruin your day?

Brenton
Brenton
8 years ago
Reply to  Stupidly Happy

People who are the best in their respective career earn far more than the average worker(almost always, but not quite).

There are maybe 400 NBA players in the entire United States, for example. Thats a little better than 1 in a million odds. They deserve the money they make for being the best in the world.

After all, LeBron James might make $16M a year, but Jamie Dimon, CEO of JP Morgan Chase, makes $23.1M.

Elizabeth
Elizabeth
8 years ago
Reply to  Brenton

True, but part of that is what the market can bear. I don’t think all CEOs or pro athletes in the U.S. are “the best in the world”, but market conditions certainly mean they are better paid.

Incidentally, some of the best athletes in the world are women. How come they’re not commanding the same high salaries?

Brenton
Brenton
8 years ago
Reply to  Elizabeth

I dont want to come off as sexist, but the best female athelets in the world are still slower, shorter, and less atheletic than their male counterparts.

The WNBA, for example, has shorter rims and still has far fewer fast break dunks or put-back dunks than the NBA. Its a less athletic brand of basketball that doesnt appeal to the mostly male sports-watching demographics. And yes, some men would refuse to watch women’s sports simply because they are women. I recognize that fact, but those individuals are in the minority.

ruz
ruz
8 years ago

The thing about teamwork and sports: The teamwork is only internal to the team – outsiders are the enemy. This is only good to a point. Some people can be great teammates, but absolutely cruel to the opposing team and they will be encouraged, and praised.

It is possible to be competitive and positive, most Olympic athletes are, but professional sports seems to be far skewed the other way.

Celloluv
Celloluv
8 years ago

Our NFL team is currently throwing a temper tantrum about getting a new stadium, mostly at tax payer’s expense, because their 20 year old stadium is ‘old’ and not up with the NFL’s wish list. People are out of work. There are so many priorities above and beyond football and now our state legislature is in over time trying to find funding for this team. Not things for the good of the state. The news reported secret meetings…..It makes me frustrated and angry.

KSR
KSR
8 years ago
Reply to  Celloluv

Skol Vikes!

Queeb
Queeb
8 years ago
Reply to  Celloluv

Especially after yesterday’s topic here on GRS, for sure.
And made even more maddening by the rich owners that think we the tax payers need to pay for it.

Brenton
Brenton
8 years ago
Reply to  Celloluv

The NFL should be like any other business and build their own stadium. The problem is that other cities will cough up money to steal away the team. Until there is a united stand against the NFL’s ridiculous stadium demands, this will continue to be an issue.

Not the NFL either, but the NBA as well(see Sacramento).

Frugal Chick in Indiana
Frugal Chick in Indiana
8 years ago
Reply to  Celloluv

I am in Indianapolis. Taxpayers paid for our giant Colts stadium with a retractable roof….all while we are struggling economically. Our priorities are completely out of whack. I hate the greedy Colts. I am always happy when they lose.

Jane
Jane
8 years ago

Don’t travel to Phoenix. You will get to pay for their stadiums by the highest visitor taxes in the nation!

Carol in Mpls
Carol in Mpls
8 years ago
Reply to  Celloluv

Living here in Mpls, MN, where the Vikings and the Mpls mayor are trying for the 2nd time to have the public buy a rich guy his playground. Mr. Wilf just bought a $19million condo in NYC. Meanwhile my tiny little condo has dropped 50k in value, the taxes have gone up, and basic city services are not being met (potholes, efficient snow removal, etc. etc. etc.). Last I heard, the team was the MINNESOTA Vikings, yet only the city of Mpls is having this jammed down their throats to pony up the money. Of course the legislators pushing this… Read more »

shawn
shawn
8 years ago

This was a terribly opinionated post…bashing on someones appreciation for the athleticism, abilities, among other things, of pro sports players is awfully biased. that’s like asking someone why they waste time reading someone else’s book. either get up off the couch and go exercise, or go write your own book and read that. or…why pay your mechanic to fix your car the right way- get out there and fix it yourself. And, for the most part I agree with you. It is a waste of time in my eyes as well. but i still appreciate the skill level involved and… Read more »

Ramblin' Ma'am
Ramblin' Ma'am
8 years ago
Reply to  shawn

I agree with this comment. Would we see an article asking why people “waste” hours reading about fictional characters?

Also, if you’re watching sports at home, can’t you exercise in front of the TV? You don’t have to sit on the couch the whole time.

Lincoln
Lincoln
8 years ago
Reply to  shawn

I thought the article was pretty entertaining. Spending hundreds of dollars a year watching professional sports can be a waste if you don’t enjoy it. Spending $5 watching professional sports is a waste if you don’t enjoy it. Just walk away. I can’t wait for the follow-up post that talks about how spending $9,000 on Odyssey of the Mind is not all it’s cracked up to be, either. Me personally, I do try to cut things from the budget if I discover I am no longer getting any benefit from them, regardless of how popular they are to others. The… Read more »

Winslow
Winslow
8 years ago

The only one of your points that makes any kind of sense is number 1. I don’t care what the athletes do with their money…and I am not sure why anyone else would either. The US Government is terrible with money so maybe we should stop investing in them? Number 4 may be the most ridiculous, as who are you to say, “it’s silly to care so much” about anything? Some peope live and die with their sports team, other’s treat their cars like living things or love going to weekly competitive trivia contests, etc. Generally people care about something… Read more »

Don
Don
5 years ago
Reply to  Winslow

I was born in Liverpool England. Back in the day when I was born the first three things you learned were whether you were male or female, catholic or protestant, and a Liverpool FC or Everton supporter. I have lived most of my life as a Liverpool fan and closely follow one other North American football team. I have enjoyed the emotional rollercoaster of both teams I support, but now I am questioning why? I was indoctrinated as a catholic, as most children born to catholic parents are. I was also indoctrinated as a Liverpool FC fan. (I believe most… Read more »

Eileen
Eileen
8 years ago

I’ve been a season ticket holder (at various levels) for the last 11 seasons for an NHL team. This year I am not renewing. Clearly the savings was a huge factor, but I realized that my having a “ticket plan” did not really get me any particular advantage (the team I support is in a non-traditional market) as tickets for most games are readily available. Each season I ended up giving away a few hundred dollars worth of tickets when we weren’t able to go. We also used to subscribe to Center Ice (which is not as expensive as Sunday… Read more »

michael moebes
michael moebes
8 years ago

That’s why I only watch college football.

Maureen
Maureen
8 years ago

Well, I’m not really a pro sports fan. You would have to pay ME to watch a football game. However, some of my happiest Saturday mornings were spent watching my pre-teen daughter play house league basketball. Didn’t matter if they won or lost, the main thing was that the girls were active and enjoying themselves.

I think it’s just sad that the pro sports players burn through their wealth so quickly. Certainly they could afford to get sound financial advice. What a waste!

Dan
Dan
8 years ago
Reply to  Maureen

Hard to think about saving for a rainy day when you come from the backgrounds some of these kids come from.

I don’t know what I would do without the role models I have in my parents.

soledad
soledad
8 years ago

OM sounds like a great concept and a great alternative for the kids like me who couldn’t throw a ball worth crap.

my honest answer
my honest answer
8 years ago

I also don’t like how team sports are so divisive. You either one team or the other. I prefer individual sports. It seems that you can support one participant without feeling the need to be ‘against’ all the others.

Chadnudj
Chadnudj
8 years ago

I’d recommend becoming a high school or college football fan. Look, I know college football has its ethical issues, but in many cases it can be MUCH cheaper (and much more enjoyable) than the pro game. Take my city, Chicago. Currently, it costs as much for a near-to-Soldier-Field parking pass for ONE GAME (nearly $200) as it does for SEASON TICKETS to Northwestern football (which you can get to on public transportation via either the El or Metra, and where they have free parking on the campus with shuttle buses to the stadium). So for the cost of parking at… Read more »

Andrew
Andrew
8 years ago
Reply to  Chadnudj

The ethical issues of college sports make the pro leagues look good. Check out the article “The Shame of College Sports” by Taylor Branch in the October 2011 issue of The Atlantic.

Joe Nocera of the New York Times has also been writing an interesting series of op-ed pieces about the arrogance and corruption of the NCAA.

At least pro athletes are handsomely compensated. College players are recruited with lies, used up and discarded without a second thought if they can’t perform as expected, and by and large leave college with no education and no prospects.

Chadnudj
Chadnudj
8 years ago
Reply to  Andrew

I’ve read both articles, and have many disagreements with them — college players are paid in free educations, room and board, tutoring, advanced level physical training (to help them towards their professional goal of playing sports, if that’s what they want), medical care, and even contacts for their post-playing career with influential alumni, etc. And while there are college programs that mistreat student athletes, my school/team (Northwestern) is one that graduates 100% (or close to it) of its players, offers and honors 4-year scholarship commitments (and because they frequently redshirt players, many get 5th years paid for as well and… Read more »

Barb
Barb
8 years ago

My comments on this one are pretty simple First, you dont have to have the nfl ticket channel to watch good football. I have basic cable and manage to watch football all day long on Saturday and Sunday. For every football player whose and idiot and a poor role model, there is none who is not (spoken by the mom whose son has followed payton manning since college). Football players are real people just like the rest of us. some make poor decisions, some dont. If watching football for a few hours on saturday or sunday means you dont get… Read more »

Paul in cAshburn
Paul in cAshburn
8 years ago
Reply to  Barb

It’s all part of the Government’s plan to keep your focus on bread and circuses. Over 40% of Americans don’t pay taxes (bread), and you can choose your mindless entertainment (circuses) from the list. Pro sports, Dancing with the Stars, 30 Rock, The Voice, whatever.
What Americans should be paying attention to is how the Fed is baking inflation into their futures… but instead – look, the circus is on. 🙂

a reader
a reader
8 years ago

Absolutely. Rome fell after its empire became overextended, corrupt, and its citizens focused on entertainment (circuses).

Krishanu
Krishanu
8 years ago
Reply to  Barb

Makes complete sense!

Also watching professional athletes – at the pinnacle of their prowess – compete, is a sight to behold. That makes one aspire to become one.

Incidentally, the most bang for the buck (playing duration/amount paid for ticket) for a team sport is real football (read ‘soccer’).

Chris
Chris
8 years ago

Great piece! I’m a diehard college football fan, but you’re right — the older I get, the sillier it feels to live my life vicariously through others. I once heard a millionaire talk about characteristics of successful people, and he pointed out that very few of them are big sports fans. Instead, they are out making their own dreams come true.

abby
abby
8 years ago

I did OM for a few years in elementary and middle school, and loved it and always had a blast. Best of luck!!!

Brett
Brett
8 years ago

This article sums up pretty well why I stopped watching the NFL last year. I grew up just outside Philly and have been a diehard Eagles fan since birth. However, the ridiculous amount of advertising in games, the egos of the players and the fact a guy like Mike Vick can get $100 million (dog killing aside, he is not that good). I’m a bigger hockey (GO FLYERS!) fan. The players are far more humble, the action is much faster and constant, and it’s the under dog sport in this country. Sure it has it’s fools (Tocchet, you gambling ring… Read more »

KT
KT
8 years ago
Reply to  Brett

GO FLYERS!

Misty
Misty
8 years ago

I live in Ames. My husband and I are ISU grads. Let us know if you need any help with local travel details.

Robert Brokamp
Robert Brokamp
8 years ago
Reply to  Misty

We’ll actually be in Ames at Iowa State – any tips would be greatly appreciated! Also, we likely will stop somewhere east of Ames for the first night. Any sights in eastern Iowa that a curious 11-year-old would appreciate? Thanks!

Misty
Misty
8 years ago
Reply to  Robert Brokamp

If you are in Eastern Iowa with any type of baseball fan. You need to stop in Dyersville and see the real “Field of Dreams” where the movie was filmed. The corn will likley just planted, so you will not get the total effect. But it is free. http://www.fieldofdreamsmoviesite.com/distance.html

email me at 1217topher2 at gmail dot com

Catherine
Catherine
8 years ago
Reply to  Robert Brokamp

Iowa City is about 2 1/2 hours away from Ames. The Devonian Fossil Gorge outside IC is pretty cool. It’s small, but there’s also hiking around the reservoir and you can go into IC for dinner (and there are plenty of hotels in the Iowa City/Coralville area). Go to Short’s for burgers, or Jon’s Ice Cream in Tiffin, which is the only thing I miss about Iowa.

http://www.mvr.usace.army.mil/coralville/devonian_fossil_gorge.htm

CCB
CCB
8 years ago

I think sports has a great place in teaching all those things that people say they teach (sportsmanship, teamwork, etc.) at the grade school and high school level. After that it is pretty much non-sense. Playing these sports teaches you that, watching NBA players shove the ref does not. The NCAA should be ashamed of itself about how it makes a profit off the backs of 18 year olds then don’t graduate them or remotely even help them. Most pro athletes are complete jerks. I still enjoy sports, it passes the time. I will go to a baseball game if… Read more »

c.
c.
8 years ago

I’ve never been able to get into sports, really. I tried with pro hockey once. I made it through one season, then never went back. It was an experiment, and it left me feeling pretty “meh” about the whole business. Then again, someone might look at my visceral reaction to the music of the Ramones, Robert Johnson or Rachmaninoff and wonder why I’m so into THAT. But I also make my own music, and I still spend way less bread on the art/hobby/habit. I’d put my lifetime music expenses against five years of a hardcore pro sports nut’s expenses any… Read more »

Elaine
Elaine
8 years ago

Have to say, didn’t really enjoy this article. It’s very one-sided and I could pretty much argue against all of the points. It also annoyed me that at the end of the article I was solicited for money. Won’t be reading another article from this writer.

Winslow
Winslow
8 years ago
Reply to  Elaine

It is very ironic that the author considers being a sports fan a waste of money, but then wants us to donate to something that he considers “important.”

I may just have to write a blog post about why people shouldn’t “waste” their time, money and energy on something like Odyssey of the Mind. Inevitably some of the kids involved will eventually be bankrupt and not contribute to society so why should we care so much? (sarcasm).

Ethan
Ethan
8 years ago
Reply to  Winslow

Having personally participated in Odyssey of the Mind, I feel it fits much better with the philosophy of this website than the excess and waste of Professional Sports. Odyssey of the Mind encourages creative problem solving using minmal funds.

For example, one year, my team’s task was to create a vehicle powered by 2 different kinds of power sources to pickup objects from a rather large area without touching the floor. Objects, costumes, vehicle and everything had to be constructed for less than $200.

Josh
Josh
8 years ago

It’s amazing how snobby the anti-sports and anti-television people can be.

I think arts/music are a complete waste, but if that’s how you want to spend every Friday night I’m not going to judge you.

Tyler
Tyler
4 years ago
Reply to  Josh

He’s not anti-sports. He’s anti watching pro sports. It’s amazing your inability to read. Keep watching. Have another beer and hotdog. Go Bears! Durrr

Joe D.
Joe D.
8 years ago

Robert,
I don’t know how JD feels about links, but I wrote a blog post about why you shouldn’t care about athletes and celebrities.

http://joedegiorgio.com/2011/11/07/why-you-shouldnt-give-a-damn-about-athletes-and-celebrities/

Having said that, I’m still a big Yankees and Giants fan, and my son is following in my footsteps. As far as attending games and spending my cash, we have a local minor league ball team that is a great value and a lot of fun. We love supporting them the most!

Some Guy
Some Guy
8 years ago

For me, pro sports and especially football are entertainment that can be shared with family and friends. Yeah, pro athletes get paid a lot, but so do movie and TV stars, talk show hosts, radio show hosts, singers, and many others in the entertainment business. Pro athletes also put their health at risk, which IMO should rightly carry a premium. Pro sports are an industry unto themselves. They keep millions of people employed worldwide (fan paraphernalia, television broadcasting, sports reporting, etc.), they bring business to sports bars and stadiums, and the athletes themselves employ their own posses of lawyers, agents,… Read more »

Andrew
Andrew
8 years ago
Reply to  Some Guy

As an opera fan I can assure you there’s plenty of bad behavior in that world as well.

CandiO
CandiO
8 years ago

I miss OM! I loved the 2 years I got to participate WAAAYYY back in the day in the mid-80s. Congratulations to your son’s team, making world finals is incredibly difficult and I hope they kick butt!

Bethany
Bethany
8 years ago

Great article! I know this is not a popular view to have but you are not the only one that feels that way. Thanks for being so brave as to post that!

gpjones
gpjones
8 years ago
Reply to  Bethany

Bethany, I don’t know why it’s so “brave” to post this. But I’ll admit, as soon as I saw the headline I knew what most of the comments would be like.

What I don’t understand is why one person expressing an opinion touches such a nerve. Hmmm…

do_it_movin
do_it_movin
8 years ago

I love this post. Being in the bay area, you’re pretty much exposed to every professional sport (baseball, football, hoops, hockey). It’s pretty hard not to get emotionally attached to your team. I get invested into the teams I follow because at times it’s the only thing consistent in life. Win or lose, they are always there. That being said, you have to find a balance too. As long as you have common sense, I don’t see what the big deal is. I don’t spend money on sporting events as much as I used to. I’ll maybe go to a… Read more »

El Nerdo
El Nerdo
8 years ago

HOW TO BE VIRTUOUS IN 2012 NEW PURITAN AMERICA – Exercise, religiously. Yoga is the preferred choice, as it merges exercise and religion. – Buy only organic, local and sustainable or be shunned from social life. – Don’t eat meat (or, alternatively: Don’t eat grains or legumes and eat only organic meat) – Don’t spend any money whenever possible – Give to charity, or be shunned – Condemn profit – Buy clothes only from thrift stores – Save everything for the future, die without having any fun, leave all unspent money to charity – Go everywhere on a fixed-gear bicycle.… Read more »

gpjones
gpjones
8 years ago
Reply to  El Nerdo

I wonder why people get so touchy about ONE man expressing his OPINION?

El Nerdo
El Nerdo
8 years ago
Reply to  gpjones

Why, I am just ONE man expressing my OPINION too. 😛

But if you must know, this wasn’t about Robert’s article alone. This is kind of the last (or latest) straw of silly nihilism disguised as personal finance. And by nihilism I mean the impulse to devalue everything good in life with lame moralistic condemnations.

As for Robert’s article itself, it was annoying, dull, and very poorly argued, but I didn’t address that specifically in my comments– other people in this thread have done a better job of it already.

partgypsy
partgypsy
8 years ago
Reply to  El Nerdo

lol about going everywhere on a fixed gear bike, that is a big fad here

El Nerdo
El Nerdo
8 years ago
Reply to  partgypsy

Ha ha yeah. I wanted to catalog more trends but I ran out of time 😀

(maybe: “walking is low class unless it’s done in minimalist shoes” 😛 )

partgypsy
partgypsy
8 years ago
Reply to  El Nerdo

Like the Vibrams?

Short arms long pockets
Short arms long pockets
8 years ago
Reply to  El Nerdo

This is so funny! At least I assume you are writing “tongue in cheek” and are intending it to be funny?

El Nerdo
El Nerdo
8 years ago

It’s a kind of mixed bag really. I did start with satire, making fun of middle class hipster values, but in the end I was so mad I couldn’t help myself and let the anger come out. Hey, I’m only human, and can only be preached at so much before I snap.

John R
John R
8 years ago
Reply to  El Nerdo

Thank you El Nerdo, your commentary keeps me coming to this blog. Other than that it is mostly a new post every day about how the way I live is wrong and the things I like are stupid and a waste of time.

El Nerdo
El Nerdo
8 years ago
Reply to  John R

I still find a lot of good stuff in this blog, but when drivel like this article gets posted I feel it’s my civic duty to speak up, ha ha.

J.D. Roth
J.D. Roth
8 years ago
Reply to  John R

This comment is directed at John R., not at El Nerdo. El Nerdo knows I appreciate his position as gadfly. Okay, let me nip this in the bud. Yes, there are certain recurring themes on this blog. Yes, there are certain values that the writers hold that go counter to popular culture. However — and this is a big however — so what? Why do you care what other people think? If you value something and you’re making a conscious decision to pursue that passion (whether it’s professional sports, television programs, or a Ford Excursion), then who gives a rat’s… Read more »

El Nerdo
El Nerdo
8 years ago
Reply to  J.D. Roth

But dude, the values that the writers hold aren’t really outside the mainstream. This isn’t a nest of radicals. These are actually very mainstream middle-class first-world liberal late-capitalist values; one part Cotton Mather, one part Whole Foods. The thing though is that when things get repeated without question they begin to solidify into rigid ideologies, and critical thinking gives way to conformity, and the old revolutionary becomes the new fascist. Frankly, reading Robert’s article is like witnessing one of those self-criticism sessions where Maoist militants castigate themselves for not being revolutionary enough. You ever heard of those? I have too… Read more »

Anne
Anne
8 years ago
Reply to  J.D. Roth

Why alienate readers?

Especially readers who haven’t figured it all out. Readers who may still be trying to find a way to balance a desire to backpack through South East Asia and enjoy a round of golf every week.

Calling something ‘silly’, especially something as mainstream as enjoying pro-sport is clearly a call out to be contradicted.

Fankly, I do think watching pro-sport is silly. So why aren’t I nodding along with Brokamp?

BTW, this wasn’t the article I thought it would be when I read it.

Christine+T.
Christine+T.
8 years ago
Reply to  J.D. Roth

Yeah people are taking things way too personally, if it’s not about you (you have a healthy relationship with your entertainment choices) don’t make it about you.
Gadfly lol

El Nerdo
El Nerdo
8 years ago
Reply to  J.D. Roth

THE LAST WORD Ok, maybe I’m here a bit late but here’s how outside the mainstream this blog is– so outside the mainstream fits smack right into this funny website: http://stuffwhitepeoplelike.com/full-list-of-stuff-white-people-like/ Let’s see how many checkmarks we get! farmer’s markets – check; organic food- check; gifted children! (and begging for them)– why, right in this article, check; non-profit organizations– check, yoga–check, traveling–check, not having a TV… wow, i’m dizzy keeping count! [edit: 101- being offended, 99- grammar, 87-outdoor performance clothes, 82- hating corporations, 75- threatening to move to canada, 55-apologies…making you feel bad for not going outside… oh, the list… Read more »

J.D. Roth
J.D. Roth
8 years ago
Reply to  J.D. Roth

Nerdo: ????? I defend you, and then you go all…well, crazy on me? For one, I’m not saying this blog is outside the mainstream. YOU folks were complaining that sometimes GRS makes you feel guilty for liking the things you like. I pointed out that sometimes the writers hold values that are counter to popular culture. And it’s true. We do. I get ripped apart every time I mention tiny houses, for instance, which isn’t very often. (But the readers make me feel like I mention them every week!) So, you guys are complaining that we’re taking counter-cultural positions, and… Read more »

John R
John R
8 years ago
Reply to  J.D. Roth

Alright JD you are right. I have been reading your blog for over 2 years and used to enjoy it a lot but it has become far to preachy lately. I think that it would be more honest to change the description of the blog from personal finance to ‘west coast’ lifestyle. But since only positive comments are appreciated around here I wont comment any more and wont bother reading anymore either.

J.D. Roth
J.D. Roth
8 years ago
Reply to  John R

John — I sent you e-mail, which is what I should have done in the first place. I apologize for engaging you in public, which was poor form on my part.

El Nerdo
El Nerdo
8 years ago
Reply to  J.D. Roth

EDIT: OH CRAP CRAP CRAP. I DIDN’T SEE JD’S FOLLOWUP BEFORE I POSTED THIS. DAMN PAGE REFRESHES! ———— Well, duh, of course I was being obnoxious! You think I live in The Nile or something? (not the river in Egypt) I was making fun of you and letting you have it for going unwarrantedly apeshit on one of your readers, you big dolt. Of course having a ready-made hilarious website as a source of parody helped. And no, this wasn’t because he likes my comments. I usually don’t get into rows like this for insults against me. But injustices get… Read more »

Andrew
Andrew
8 years ago
Reply to  El Nerdo

You forgot to mention hostel travel !

El Nerdo
El Nerdo
8 years ago
Reply to  Andrew

Ha ha, yeah, I didn’t forget, I meant to include it, I swear, but it got lost in the edits (the 30 minute window got me first).

BethR
BethR
8 years ago
Reply to  El Nerdo

lol! You forget one though:

– use perfect spelling and grammar at all times (and correct other people’s spelling and grammar whenever possible).

El Nerdo
El Nerdo
8 years ago
Reply to  BethR

Oh yeah, that one. I wish I would write a whole article about this ha ha.

gpjones
gpjones
8 years ago

(Who remembers that Vinny Testaverde began his career in Tampa?)

I Do! Loved Vinny!

John R
John R
8 years ago
Reply to  gpjones

I remember a great quote by John McKay while they were losing all their games in their first season. The reporter asked the coach ‘What do you think of your offense’s execution.’ To which McKay replied ‘I’m in favor of it.’

Joe D.
Joe D.
8 years ago
Reply to  gpjones

Vinny was the man!

Meep
Meep
8 years ago

I don’t watch or participate in sports, but I do not like this article, I can’t help but imagine the author to be some sad-faced hipster sitting on a really expensive and uncomfortable chair. My opinion is that Americans are so bored with their lives of plenty that they turn on themselves and/or their friends and start their own sport of extreme nitpicking and out-frugalling each other. Using every logical fallacy possible they make hundreds of silly little personal rules and then pass them along to their neurotic children. People who work very hard to survive like to be able… Read more »

Lori Blatzheim
Lori Blatzheim
8 years ago

This post is not just about one person’s odyssey sitting before a box and taking in a game. It is about the history of a person, the source of interest, experience in participating in a game, memories of friendships with people now gone, and pride in the worth of a team or player. I agree, there are lots of mistakes made by players, owners, and viewers. But, after all, we are speaking of human beings. People make mistakes. They don’t always win. As for me, I will continue to watch what is available. Our family will still forgive the unforgivable… Read more »

partgypsy
partgypsy
8 years ago

You can make these same kind of arguments about many other leisure activities, like movies (and actors), tv shows, etc. Yeah, they are all a “waste” of time, the highest levels are paid obscenely, the people involved in those endeavors may go bankrupt…
Personally never been interested in watching sports (except for an occasional US open or Wimbleton) but I think everyone has to weigh the pros and cons of how they spend their leisure time for themselves.

Carla
Carla
8 years ago

As a woman, I LOVE watching sports, specifically baseball and physical art (figure skating, gymnastics, dance, etc).

I am also very physically active. I really loathe articles that paint a specific subject or type of person into the same box. Stereotyping isn’t cool.

WorkSaveLive
WorkSaveLive
8 years ago

This is a great write-up and I’ve been contemplating delving into sports and our obsession with them in an upcoming post. I played sports ALL THE TIME as a child and there is no doubt that it can teach you certain principles that you can use throughout life: leadership, teamwork, sacrifice, discipline, hard work, etc. However, it is AMAZING how much emphasis parents place on their children’s sports these days. The amount of hours dedicated to practicing and playing games. Kids these days (even at young ages of 6 or 7) practice multiple nights a week and have multiple games… Read more »

chacha1
chacha1
8 years ago

Robert, just for the record, I appreciate that you tossed out such a contrarian post. 🙂 I give thanks on a weekly basis that my husband does not watch televised sports. He is one of those who would rather play than watch. And he would rather watch something on TV that I am also interested in watching, so we can enjoy it and talk about it together. He also likes to BE active. Our sport now is ballroom dancing, which has the benefit of being truly social as well as physically challenging. On the macro scale, I don’t think professional… Read more »

jim
jim
8 years ago
Reply to  chacha1

“public education funds going to college sports programs” Thats a common complaint. A few points : – Athletic subsidies are probably around 1-2% of university spending as a whole so its not a huge percent of their money. -Football and basketball usually make profits. So if you’re upset that the football team got a big stadium upgrade then that may be unwarranted. Usually football and basketball subsidize all the other sports which all lose money and the net to the university is still a loss. e.g. the Florida state football team makes a $2 million profit, the FSU basketball team… Read more »

jim
jim
8 years ago
Reply to  jim

I forgot one other item: A whole LOT of the olympic medals brought home by US athletes are around the necks of college students. So subsidy of college athletics also helps subsidize our olympic athletes.

Marsha
Marsha
8 years ago

I think Brokamp made some good points. I don’t think he’s telling people to stop watching professional sports, just to consider how much money/time they’re spending and if it’s worth it. Many of the points could apply to any form of entertainment. What I got out of the article was the importance of balance. Don’t let yourself get obsessed. Although I’ve known people obsessed with all kinds of things, I’ve known more football-obsessed people than any other type. That’s probably just due to the local culture.

KT
KT
8 years ago

5. Is one season really that different from last season?
I’m not much of a basketball fan, and when the folks in my office gather around a TV during March Madness, I’ll walk up and say, “Look, a guy threw a ball through a hoop! Oh, look – it happened again! Wow, there it is again!”

Your coworkers must adore you.

I also love the “I judge how you spend your time and money….now give it to my son!’ plug.

SCO
SCO
8 years ago
Reply to  KT

Wish I could like this comment multiple times

El Nerdo
El Nerdo
8 years ago
Reply to  SCO

I added one, I hope it helps.

Kristin S
Kristin S
8 years ago

Congrats on making it to World – my sister’s team did that twice 🙂 Good luck to them!

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