Why giving up $100,000 a year was the right choice

My wife and I are conservative people at heart, and we don't like taking chances. In other words, we're not the type of people that gamble at the casinos. We're not the type of people that make risky investments. And we were certainly not the type of people that risk their own money to start a business.

Back then, my wife and I were your average married couple. We both worked full-time jobs. Financially, we had nothing to complain about as we lived well within our means with an occasional splurge. We both made a decent living and managed to pocket a sizable portion of our income every month.

All told, our lives appeared very stable and on the surface, we came across as just another married couple living a happy life. But on the inside, we had a few issues. For one thing, our lives were monotonous and boring. Since we weren't doing anything meaningful with our time, we lacked a sense of purpose and felt as though we were just going through the motions. The other major problem was that my wife wasn't happy with her career.

The Routine

Everyday, I'd witness the same routine. My wife would drag herself out of bed, get dressed with her eyes half open, grab a light breakfast and get ready for work. And every time when she was just about to leave the house, she would mutter “Okay honey, I'm off to the hell hole I call my job” and trudge out the door.

Things weren't much better when she got home from work. We would quickly eat a light dinner and then listlessly watch television the rest of the night. In fact, watching television was what we did best. At the time, I could tell you what was happening on almost every single show on television. My wife even created a spreadsheet of our television schedule so we would never miss a show (This was before DVR). It was pretty sad, and I knew that I hit a personal low when I became an avid fan of “The True Hollywood Story”. Ugh!

Now imagine having to live through this routine day in and day out. Imagine having to drag yourself out of the house every day to a place where you don't even want to be for most of the day. Imagine wasting your nights away watching television every single night.

The Miracle

That was our life. Until one day my wife discovered that she was pregnant with our first child! It's hard to express in words what went through my mind when I saw that plus sign on the stick, but it was like an atomic bomb went off in my head.

For one thing, I got a sudden injection of motivation and enthusiasm. All of a sudden, I felt like I needed to get off my butt and become a better person. I felt like I needed to be more responsible and to take charge of my life. I felt like I needed to get my act together and provide for my family.

As millions of thoughts swirled through my head, my primary concern became financial security. We needed a bigger house. We needed to live in a better school district. We needed to start a college education fund. We needed an emergency fund so large that we could survive even if I lost my job or got laid off.

As for my wife, she wanted to quit her job so she could take care of our child full time. She didn't want to miss a single minute of our baby's childhood.

The Dilemma

Huh? What? Quit her job? At the time, my wife made over $100,000 a year. Without another source of income and with the additional expense of having a child, it would seriously cramp our lifestyle and our financial health.

Don't get me wrong, I fully supported my wife's decision to stay at home as I'm a firm believer of having a parent take care of a young child. But the financial burden was going to be tremendous. As a result, we needed to find another way to make money and replace her six-figure salary.

After brainstorming different ideas, my wife and I decided to start a business online. Starting a business on the internet was an attractive solution because

  1. We didn't have to be physically present to make money. A computer could take orders for us even while we slept.
  2. There was little or no overhead to maintain our website.
  3. My wife could shift the work until after our children fell asleep.

Pain, Hard Work and Success

Because my wife and I are extremely conservative people, we decided to play it safe. Instead of my wife quitting her job right away, we decided that it was best that we start our little business venture on the side while still working full time.

It was tough, but we spent the next several months working nights and weekends to get our little online store ready for prime time. After watching one too many episodes of “The True Hollywood Story”, we also decided to call it quits on watching TV.

When we finally launched our online store, things were tough early on and business was slow. But gradually, we started making sales and things started to snowball. Within the span of a year, we managed to make over $100,000 to replace my wife's salary and she quit her job!

Today, my wife stays at home with our kids and runs the business while I blog about entrepreneurship and how to open an online store at MyWifeQuitHerJob.com.

Why Not Take a Chance?

Today, my wife and I are very thankful that we had the motivation to start our online business as it has truly been a godsend. Instead of wasting our lives away watching television, our business has given us a sense of purpose and fulfillment. After all, we created something that we could call our own. We created a source of income that was stable. We became our own boss so we could never be fired.

Most people think that starting your own business is too risky. But take it from two of the most risk-averse people you'll ever meet, it's not bad! We initially invested only $629.90 to start, and today we run a six-figure business that has been growing in the double and triple digits every year.

Not only that, but the operating costs are ridiculously low. Thanks to the internet, it only costs us about $80 a month to maintain our website so we can pretty much stay in business indefinitely.

If you're willing to take a small chance, then I highly recommend going out on your own with an online business. Even if you fail, you'll grow from the experience. But who knows? You might even make enough money to quit your day job!

More about...Planning

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Mrs PoP @ Planting Our Pennies
Mrs PoP @ Planting Our Pennies
7 years ago

That’s a great story and so motivational. If you can build a business that’s generating $100K in income in a year with some goals, hard work, and by ignoring the ‘boob tube’, imagine what the world could accomplish if we all shut it off for a year!

Lincoln
Lincoln
7 years ago

Without a specific accounting of how the costs and revenues stack up, I remain skeptical. How are we to know if the linens business is a loss leader, but is necessary to help advertise the self-help business?

Steve
Steve
7 years ago
Reply to  Lincoln

Hi Lincoln,

There’s no real way for me to prove that to you except to show the numbers. However, if you do some simple searches online for our keywords, check out our press page on the store, you’ll see that we are legit. We have been featured in Brides, Martha Stewart, the Wall Street Journal etc…

Lincoln
Lincoln
7 years ago
Reply to  Steve

Hi Steve, Why not provide the numbers at least in ballpark figures? One thing I’m trying to get my head around are the profit margins. If the profit margin on linens is 10%, you’d still have to sell more than 1 million dollars of linens to clear 100K in profit. If the profit margin is more like 2 or 3%, that’s a several million in linens you’d need to sell per year. I guess part of what I’m trying to figure out is if a lot of the revenue is from another source, like advertising, rather than just pure profit… Read more »

Steve
Steve
7 years ago
Reply to  Steve

Hey Lincoln,

The typical margins for dropshipping are around 30% and carrying domestic inventory is ~%50. But if you import from overseas and carry inventory which is what we do, your profit margins are even higher.

Let’s just say that when Macy’s has a 75% off sale, they are still making money.

Lincoln
Lincoln
7 years ago
Reply to  Steve

Thanks for the follow-up information. The dropshipping component helps me understand it a bit better. If you can get legit profit margins that high by being the middleman in the right market niche, then good for you. I am little surprised there isn’t more competition in this particular market in the Internet era, but I guess it is what it is.

Steve
Steve
7 years ago
Reply to  Steve

Hi Lincoln,

Just to be clear, we do not dropship. We import our goods from overseas and carry inventory which offers the highest margins.

I merely mentioned the other methods of product sourcing to give you an idea of the various options.

Dropshipping carries the least profit potential of the bunch.

NoTrustfund
NoTrustfund
7 years ago

I love stories about people actively making changes in their life when they are unhappy with the status quo. Thanks so much for sharing!

We also do not have a tv and it gives us so much more free time. Sometimes we talk about getting one but then realize how much we love our life with no tv.

Vanessa
Vanessa
7 years ago
Reply to  NoTrustfund

I don’t have a tv and my free time just shifted to the internet, or sleeping, or something else. I’ve realized that if I am determined to waste time, I will do it . TV isn’t always the problem.

Carla
Carla
7 years ago
Reply to  Vanessa

That is so true. I don’t watch TV (only the occasional movie) and I haven’t accomplished more than some people I know who do watch TV AND get so much more done. Its not the TV, its what you do with whatever available time you have.

SAHMama
SAHMama
7 years ago

This sounds much like my story. In mid-2011, I quit my job of 10 years. I have a Masters in my field and earned 55% of our family’s income. I was in the position I’d wanted since I was 14, but I was miserable. I had been happy for many years, but in January 2008, my job duties were changed due to funding cuts. I was placed into an equivalent position thanks to my labor union, but I hated it. I stayed in it for more than 3 years, growing more miserable by the day. During that time, we dealt… Read more »

Evangeline
Evangeline
7 years ago

I love your attitude. You and your wife wanted something different than what you had and were willing to make changes. I use the word ‘willingly’ because that is the key. In my case that is far from the norm. I am willing to spend less temporariy in order to get ahead; I see the bigger picture and I try to maintain a positive outlook because I think it’s worth it. Not so the hubby. He wants more of this, a bigger that, others have more, HE deserves more—-and then blames everyone/everything for why he doesn’t have it, all while… Read more »

Sam
Sam
7 years ago

I think its great that you were able to accomplish creating a home business where you earn more than a $100,000 a year.

But I found this post somewhat lacking. When people talk about quitting the day job they make it sound so easy. You have to have more than a good attitude to run a successful small business. Statistically, most start up businesses fail within the first three years. I’d like to hear more details, like where did you get health insurance for a family in the private market?

Student Loans Worked Out
Student Loans Worked Out
7 years ago
Reply to  Sam

Yes, on one hand I admire a person who takes risks and goes after their dream, on the other hand – I went to author’s page, and it seems that he is also selling educational (“How to Start Your Own Business”) products. Which puts motivation for this post into question, for me.

Vanessa
Vanessa
7 years ago
Reply to  Sam

This story reminded me of late-night infomercials I used to watch years ago of companies claiming to make people rich by starting online businesses (or selling widgets, or placing classified ads in newspapers, etc). There would be glowing testimonials from people claiming they could make as much, or as little, as they wanted, with shots of them with houses and boats in the background. Not saying that the author of this article is doing something that’s not legit, but it has the same too-good-to-be-true feel like an infomercial. There were a lot of chunks missing for me too, and the… Read more »

Steve
Steve
7 years ago
Reply to  Vanessa

Wow. This is a tough crowd. I purposely didn’t mention my info product at all in this post. It was not meant to promote anything.

The point of the post is that we are conditioned at an early age to believe that we should go to school, get a great job and always work for someone else. With the internet, starting a business doesn’t cost a lot of money and isn’t very risky. So why not take the chance?

Student Loans Worked Out
Student Loans Worked Out
7 years ago
Reply to  Steve

Steve, I am glad to see you are responding to the comments, many of which criticize you (including mine). I do not doubt that your site is doing well, however, some things you write have a negative impact on your credibility: – it is your wife who is running the business (or so we were led to believe), yet you sell the info product on how to do this – who, exactly, is conditioned as you mentioned? This is the blog for people to break the mold: who try to live within their means, live frugally, get the best value… Read more »

CincyCat
CincyCat
7 years ago
Reply to  Steve

Steve, The title is also very misleading. You did not “give up” $100,000. You gave up one of your “day job” paychecks, but still managed to make that same $100K elsewhere. Also, you did not elaborate on “why it was the right choice” other than one sentence about believing one parent should stay home with young children (which, by the way, is a highly personal opinion). I guess what I was hoping to see was more of how this impacted your personal finance goals. It seems to many of us that this had a net-zero impact since you (your wife)… Read more »

Steve
Steve
7 years ago
Reply to  Steve

Answers embedded below. — it is your wife who is running the business (or so we were led to believe), yet you sell the info product on how to do this –>Yes. My wife runs the business full time now. We have office space and employees. I still work in high tech and this article outlines why. http://mywifequitherjob.com/how-to-prevent-yourself-from-becoming-obsolete/ Basically, I run my course for fun on the side. I purposely didn’t mention it in this post. If I wanted to sell it, I would have pushed it. — surely you know that there is a lot of very smart, very… Read more »

Student Loans Worked Out
Student Loans Worked Out
7 years ago
Reply to  Steve

@Steve: you write “Not only that, but the operating costs are ridiculously low. Thanks to the internet, it only costs us about $80 a month to maintain our website so we can pretty much stay in business indefinitely.”, and then you write that you have “office space and employees”…

Steve
Steve
7 years ago
Reply to  Steve

Lincoln,

Believe it or not, this guest post was written 1.5 years ago. It took that long to make it on this blog.

The office space was very recent. Here’s the article.

http://mywifequitherjob.com/our-plan-to-automate-and-outsource-our-ecommerce-store-operations/

Carole
Carole
7 years ago

If you’re smart enough to earn a salary like that, then chances are you’ll succeed at anything you put your hand to. Unfortunately most of us aren’t that smart to begin with. Although hard work and knowing your field goes a long ways.

Peach
Peach
7 years ago
Reply to  Carole

The only thing I disagree with is the belief that we’re not that smart. I think we’re all smart! The challenge may be finding the right thing that motivates us and moves us forward while doing something we like. I think a lot of us have had success in doing work we can’t stand.

Steve
Steve
7 years ago
Reply to  Peach

I don’t believe that it’s a question of being smart either. It’s a matter of acquiring the right skill set and then having the confidence to follow through on your idea. Being able to spend more time with our family was the motivation and the spark that we needed for our business.

Katie
Katie
7 years ago
Reply to  Carole

It’s not just smarts, but access to an educational/ occupational background that is marketable at the right time as well as connections that allow you to succeed AND existing capital (your wife’s $100k/ year salary) that allows you wiggle room to fail. It’s disingenuous to act like anybody can pull this off successfully, all it takes is “confidence”. Baloney.

Pauline
Pauline
7 years ago

Great story! I was miserable at my job too but chose a simpler life instead, I lowered my needs, and relocated to a small house under the sun that I am fixing up. Whatever goal you chose and believe firmly that you will achieve you can succeed. It can be daunting to leave 100K on the table but in the end your life is worth much more and that was not life.

Peach
Peach
7 years ago
Reply to  Pauline

Pauline, it would be great to hear more about how you simplified. Fixing up a foreclosure (that’s not too far gone) is something I’d like to do next year. How about doing your own story one day?

Sheryl
Sheryl
7 years ago
Reply to  Pauline

My husband and I did a similar thing when he left his last (very lucrative) career for one that was more fulfilling. Instead of worrying about replacing the income and keeping up with the old lifestyle we adjusted our expectations and learned to get by on less.

For us the tradeoff has been greater enjoyment of our time together and he’s at a job he loves which adds immense joy to our lives. Do we miss the freedom that came with having loads of income? Sure, but the rest of our life suffered to support it.

Peach
Peach
7 years ago
Reply to  Sheryl

In my eyes, that’s real success. Living well with people you care about, and adjusting to the economics in order to maintain it. Good for you!

The most miserable time of my life was being a mom to two kids, working hard at a stressful job, and having no time to really relax and enjoy them or my life. In the short run it may work, but sooner or later, something’s gotta give.

Cammy
Cammy
7 years ago

I needed to read this today, so thank you for sharing your story. Three years ago, I was in a similar frame of mind as your wife, so I took advantage of a buy-out and left my job. I’ve been meandering along since then and have just recently been experiencing some “What have I done?!” moments of regret. This post was the motivational boost I needed to pick up the pace again. Thanks again!

Carmen
Carmen
7 years ago

This post was written concisely, but it is in such simple language that it comes across as being written for elementary students.
I would like more real information in the article, as well. I agree with the poster who pointed out that this article is more of a teaser to get people to go to his website and buy the author’s stuff. Not the usual quality of GRS articles.

Steve
Steve
7 years ago
Reply to  Carmen

Hi Carmen,

Unfortunately, the level of detail that you are looking for can not be contained in a single guest post. On my blog, I have well over 400 posts that detail all of the pain, agony and triumphs that I experienced with running the store.

Peach
Peach
7 years ago

I appreciated the story, but somehow it felt like an advertisement for starting an online business. Lots of positives, very few details on what business you actually started, and how your careers and education helped/didn’t help your journey…. and no details on the challenges and pitfalls you dealt with. I think after a couple of years reading this blog, I’m spoiled! Some writers have such courage in detailing their experiences, including their mistakes and what they learned from them. They’ve shared a lot of gory details. They’ve shared their learning experiences. They’ve shared their accomplishments and successes. I learn more… Read more »

El Nerdo
El Nerdo
7 years ago
Reply to  Peach

Gotta agree– on the one hand yes, congrats on starting a successful online business. On the other hand, sounds too good to be true. If you could run a business with no cash and no risk of loss, everyone would do it. And then the author’s website features a course about how to set up your online store for $500. This makes me think that the real business here is selling “set up your own store” courses, not selling linens. Because if you can sell PDF books and “webinars” for $500 a pop, you can make a $100,000 profit with… Read more »

Kathy M
Kathy M
7 years ago
Reply to  El Nerdo

Well said, El Nerdo. If it sounds too good to be true……….

Student Loans Worked Out
Student Loans Worked Out
7 years ago
Reply to  El Nerdo

I am not sure I agree with you on all the counts – the author indeed seems to have a legitimate business selling linens, and quite possibly it is making handsome money. But he seems to also have diversified into selling a course on how to run an online business (a popular trend nowadays, to sell info products). Now, I do agree with the other posters that this feels like a bait and a promotion article for his course. “My wife quit her job and made more money the first year” – u-huh. U-huh. This is not what I came… Read more »

El Nerdo
El Nerdo
7 years ago

@ Student Loans– yes, good point, that’s certainly possible and perhaps I shouldn’t be so suspicious. And maybe I’m too paranoid these days… …but when a blogger needs you to pay him $500 so he can share what’s it really like to run a business that makes a $100K PROFIT, I have to think, “sharing is the business” because I can’t imagine what else. I mean we’re not talking $100K in sales revenue here— we’re talking $100K PROFIT. In one year. From a $600 investment with no other cash infusions. What kind of margins are we talking about here? Sounds… Read more »

Student Loans Worked Out
Student Loans Worked Out
7 years ago

@El Nerdo “paying $500 to find out the secret recipe to megariches sounds just like the opposite of Get Rich Slowly.” – totally agree. As is buying expensive linen napkins, IMO.

snerk1
snerk1
7 years ago
Reply to  Peach

I liked the idea of the article but also felt detail was lacking. I also hate when things seem too good to be true. I went to the author’s website and agree with all of you who said it felt like an informercial. After that I basically felt like I had been had.

Emily
Emily
7 years ago

Between the myriad of ways to make money online today, and the network marketing opportunities available, starting your own business has never been easier – and often can cost much less than the $600+ you guys started with.

Thanks for sharing your story.

John
John
7 years ago

Nice little story and isn’t it wonderful how the OP wanted to ‘share’ it with all of us. Selling books had nothing to do with this little motivational tale at all. Even though his website is all about selling books. Hmmmmm.

LeRainDrop
LeRainDrop
7 years ago
Reply to  John

That’s funny because I was capable of reading this blog post without viewing either of the guest writer’s websites. Did they magically pop open for you, or did you use your own free will to click on them? While I believe certain other guest posts have read more like advertisements for the writer’s own products, I disagree that this was the nature of this particular post. Moreover, a guest writer, whether on a blog or published in a magazine/journal often gets a short biography section, and I thought it was appropriate here. I enjoyed reading this success story mostly because… Read more »

Marcy
Marcy
7 years ago
Reply to  LeRainDrop

I, too, look at a blogger’s website. It gives me more understanding about their article.

Michelle
Michelle
7 years ago

We are always thinking of some sort of business that we would like to have. We would both love to quit our jobs in order to do something that we love.

Marcy
Marcy
7 years ago

I would have a VERY hard time leaving the security of a regular job with a $100,000 salary. I liked the security of a regular paycheck and employer sponsored health insurance. I always had to make sure I was able to put food on the table. My kids are grown now and many, many times while they were growing up I certainly would have liked spending more time with them. But, when they were young there was no Internet. Still, leaving such a job would be tough…

Rosa
Rosa
7 years ago

I too would like a follow up with infoon how you chose your particular business, marketed it, wht went wrong, etc.

fantasma
fantasma
7 years ago

I love the bumbleelinens web site….gifts for my moms, aunts,weddings;)

Student Loans Worked Out
Student Loans Worked Out
7 years ago
Reply to  fantasma

How many Moms do you have ;-)?
The site is nice, but, of course, it is for people who want more STUFF in their lives …. $54 for a set of napkins? I’ll pass.

Carla
Carla
7 years ago

I know everyone had different tastes, but I can’t imagine ever wanting a set of personalized napkins for anything unless I make them myself.

Steve
Steve
7 years ago
Reply to  Carla

Just because the products do not cater to you does not mean that they are not appealing to a different audience. The readers of GRS are not the target demographic for my online store.

Sally
Sally
7 years ago

Y’all sure seem harshly judgmental about what the guy sells. For some people, linen napkins aren’t Stuff; they’re a touch of elegance that enriches the buyers’ lives. I probably wouldn’t buy them, but I know people who would buy them and thoroughly enjoy them, and that doesn’t make those people consumerism-obsessed. It just means they derive pleasure from things you don’t.

Megan
Megan
7 years ago

I like the article, but I too wish we could be privy to the dirty details. Tell us more about the sleepless nights or about any fights or misgivings you had about the business.

In other words, you need a bit of conflict to tell a good story.

Flounder No More
Flounder No More
7 years ago
Reply to  Megan

Plus it adds to the credibility of the story: we all know things aren’t 100% smooth sailing. The sleepless nights, the doubts, the setbacks– knowing all that stuff gives us info as to how to keep going when things get tough.

Holly
Holly
7 years ago
Reply to  Megan

Don’t forget about the challenges of how they managed to ensure their growing family had access to health care. My dh thought about starting his own business, but access to affordable health insurance was a deal-killer for us. Maybe once Obamacare kicks in fully we’ll reconsider.

Amanda
Amanda
7 years ago

So, the writer has some linens to sell us? Isn’t it usually a bridge? I’d love to believe that we could all quit our jobs and make a fortune online, but I’d also like to believe in unicorns. I’m hoping for a return to the useful articles soon.

Sunil
Sunil
7 years ago

This sounds too good to be true. $100,000 within a year of starting an internet
business sounds so fishy, like spam. details are missing

Miss Kathy
Miss Kathy
7 years ago

This is so cool to read about how you left the daily grind of what most people do everyday and got started on your own. More power to you and have lots of sucess!

Wm
Wm
7 years ago

The fact of life is that whatever path we may choose to tread upon, there are going to be obstacles and challenges. One path may be relatively easier than the other, but not completely devoid of risks and challenges. We might be better suited for certain professional paths depending on our personalities and family demands, but we should always equip ourselves for any expected demands in life and not believe that life may be perfect if we choose one path over the other. And, if we are passionate about something, the intervening speed bumps might look smaller and manageable. Whereas… Read more »

Mom of five
Mom of five
7 years ago

You know, this article sort of lost me in the beginning with the whole meaninglessness of life and attributing it to each partner having a full time job. It’s hard to feel that way once you’ve got a child or two. You have to be involved in things, usually much more than you’d prefer and always at the expense of a routine. So while his wife might not have been happy working outside the home while her kids were young, it’s a good bet she wouldn’t be making spreadsheets of her TV schedule even if she hadn’t quit her job.

getagrip
getagrip
7 years ago
Reply to  Mom of five

I felt much the same way as Mom of Five. With that income coming in, no kids demanding their attention, why were they sitting on their butts watching TV every night? On the one hand I’m glad that they got out of their rut, but on the other, they dug the rut with their own hands and were the sole people responsible for hopping down and wallowing in it. I mean before we had kids and with dual incomes we were involved in a variety of things from hanging with friends to clubs to sports, etc. during the week, went… Read more »

Mom of five
Mom of five
7 years ago
Reply to  getagrip

Absolutely. I just reread what I wrote and wanted to clarify that I in no way meant to imply that you can’t have a meaningful life without children. Just that having two careers does not by itself doom you to a dull, meaningless existence and that was the impression I had from reading the article.

CincyCat
CincyCat
7 years ago

Personally, I felt very let down by the end of this article. If the wife hated her job so much, why didn’t she try to find another one that she liked better (if she’s making $100K, she has marketable skills), or get involved in some volunteer work? As for the linen selling business, she must have a really awesome computerized embroidery sewing machine (which can cost $1,000 or more – not to mention years of practice); OR, she outsources the production of the linens to another company (basically, the “linen website” only serves as the “storefront”). If it is the… Read more »

Jeff
Jeff
7 years ago
Reply to  CincyCat

You nailed it. This website is becoming a joke.

CincyCat
CincyCat
7 years ago
Reply to  CincyCat

Following up – Steve has answered some of these questions in reply to other comments.

The linen business started as a one-woman operation (yes, she did already have experience embroidering), and has grown over the past 1.5 years to include employees.

GRS editors could have done a better job explaining this in the “note” at the top of the article.

Paul
Paul
7 years ago

This is an advertisement, right? Seems like GRS has changed a little.

Kelly@Financial-Lessons
7 years ago

This is why the internet is so awesome. Being able to run an entire business out of your own home, and make enough money to provide for your family while being able to spend time with them at the same time is the perfect solution. I think its awesome that this worked out for you and you guys must provide a quality product to be doing so well. Congrats on that.

Rachael
Rachael
7 years ago

Love the story! We had just made a plan to pay off our house in 2 years when literally, the next day, I got the ‘plus sign’ on the stick. I loved the industry I worked in, but hated my job and the people in charge. We knew I would stay at home. I made 70% of our household income. But the second we found out a baby was coming, we put all my money into savings and lived off my husband’s salary as practice to make sure we could really do it. When you are motivated to stay at… Read more »

CincyCat
CincyCat
7 years ago
Reply to  Rachael

Rachael,

Personally, I would have much rather read your story than this article. You truly GAVE UP 70% your income. You probably have some really good practical advice & wisdom to share, and sound like you can do it without passing judgement on working parents. Have you considered submitting a reader story? I’m being completely serious…

Nicole
Nicole
7 years ago

I find it interesting that *almost* everyone with a hyperlink to their blog found this post “Great!” “Interesting!” “Needed!” I think I found one exception with a slight critique. Most everyone else finds this a thinly-veiled personal promotion. I think GRS has just become an site for advertising PF blogs and actual goods, as was the case with this story. UGH. I also would like to read a useful article once and a while. To the people who choose this stuff, it is Get Rich SLOWLY. We are not looking for Get Rich QUICK schemes.

Charles
Charles
7 years ago
Reply to  Nicole

I was about to post that it seems Get Rich Slowly has become a portal for Get Rich Quick schemes. But then, inasmuch as that is indeed what happened with JD (he got very rich very quickly) before his departure, I suppose we shouldn’t be expecting much more.

olga
olga
7 years ago
Reply to  Charles

May be JD left even as a writer for exactly this reason?
I have a hyperlink, but no business to promote. I just run some, and have a family I care for.

Jay
Jay
7 years ago

I know this is a negative post, but really, for someone who is trying to get out of debt and currently makes no where near $100,000 at my current job, I found this article slightly offensive.
It’s a “look at me! I came from an upper middle class lifestyle, with a computer and spare time to create a thriving online business!”
Questions:
Why is this relevant to getting rich slowly?
Why do I care that you now make so much money?
How is this article supposed to help me grow?

Trina
Trina
7 years ago
Reply to  Jay

“How is this article supposed to help me grow?”

It’s not. It’s supposed to make the authors and the owners of this site money! 😉

Patrick
Patrick
7 years ago

It’s so sad that a lot of “Get Rich Slowly” has turned into pimping for other bloggers, who have nothing invested in this except getting hits on their own sites and selling their own products. The site has turned away from its original intent, and I find less and less to admire about it as useless, click-baiting articles keep getting posted here like this one.

Susanne
Susanne
7 years ago

This article is supposed to show you how you can change your situation if you are dedicated to making that change. The nights and weekends that the author mentions is indicative that this isn’t a “get rich quick” scheme. There was some serious work that went into making this a reality. I think if more details were provided it would make more sense to people but either way it shows that success in a new arena (whatever that looks like to you) is possible.

Peach
Peach
7 years ago
Reply to  Susanne

I agree, and the author provided more details to fill in the blanks for any questions I had. I now have a clearer pic of his business and his path to success. Wishing you the best, Steve!

Grayson
Grayson
7 years ago

I personally know how hard and expensive it is to run an online business. Many people will indicate that it is inexpensive, while that is true compared to a brick-and-mortar business, it is not inexpensive. If you want to succeed online, you have to have a marketing budget. The only way you will really succeed on a small budget is if you get into a low-competition niche, but those are mostly filled by now. I am not knocking the author as I know this store and it is legitimate. Most people have no idea how much work it will take… Read more »

Kathleen, Frugal Portland
Kathleen, Frugal Portland
7 years ago

Plenty of my peers are trapped by making $100K, so it’s awesome you came up with something that matches her income. As every other naysayer pointed out, the best way to make money on the internet is to teach people how to make money on the internet.

Student Loans Worked Out
Student Loans Worked Out
7 years ago

@Steve I am running out of spaces to write comments here, but I thought I’d share some thoughts. As you can see, some of us, me inclusive, were underwhelmed by the article. I do feel, though, that, as an owner of a successful online store, you DO have interesting things to share with the GRS blog (I checked out your blog, too). As a personal finance nut, I would be interested in a more specific piece. Rather than reading generalities about building your business (and then we thought: wouldn’t it be nice to just stay home with the kids and… Read more »

Steve
Steve
7 years ago

Hey Student Loans, That sounds like a fair statement. What’s funny is that as the comments started rolling in, I had to go back and reread my own article because it was written so long ago. In fact, I believe I wrote it before I started selling my info product. Perhaps none of these negative comments would have occurred if my product didn’t exist! In any case, here are some brief answers to your questions. — why did you decide on drop shipping? Why linens? Was that a long time hobby? http://mywifequitherjob.com/how-we-found-our-niche-for-our-online-store/ Did you do any eCommerce before? Any previous… Read more »

Peach
Peach
7 years ago
Reply to  Steve

Good info.

Student Loans Worked Out
Student Loans Worked Out
7 years ago
Reply to  Steve

Steve, thanks for replying. I read some posts on your blog, some are quite interesting. I cannot speak for all readers, but personally I am always interested in particulars (“we ordered $ $629.90 worth of merchandise to start with from XXX, and then looked for a provider…. outsources this and that…”), rather than generalities. Would you mind sharing what sort of “mastermind group of like minded entrepreneurs” you had in mind? I do have a lot of specific questions (for example, if you carry inventory – and you say your initial investment was $629.90 – does it mean you ordered… Read more »

Steve
Steve
7 years ago

Hey Student Loans I have this feeling that you would find the answer to practically every single question you have about our business if you read the blog. Of course that is entirely up to you. Here’s a post the details our initial investment. http://mywifequitherjob.com/starting-your-own-business-do-you-have-to-risk-your-life-savings/ The answer to your other question is that had I known the post would have gotten such a negative reaction, I would have requested to rewrite it but of course I had no idea. That is the nature of guest posting on such a popular blog. You are never sure if a post will get… Read more »

Student Loans Worked Out
Student Loans Worked Out
7 years ago

Steve, thanks for the pointer about the initial investment. Your blog does a better job describing the evolution of your business than this post. It is expected, of course, since your business is, after all, what your blog is dedicated to, but I feel, if you put your emphasis slightly differently, your article would have been more interesting to the GRS audience. Ah well. At least it introduced me to your blog (I had no idea about either your blog, or your business. I guess your “mastermind group of like minded entrepreneurs” just does not intersect with my “mastermind group… Read more »

CincyCat
CincyCat
7 years ago
Reply to  Steve

Thank you for providing the link to the “how you found your niche” blog entry. That answers my big question of whether or not your wife physically produced the hankies (she did). I’d be interested to read more about how you decided to add employees, and the mechanics of production & order fulfillment. Often, people get great ideas to run a mail-order business, then find themselves unable to handle supply chain & delivery. Personally, I think it was a little unfair of GRS editors to post this story without adding an “Editor’s Note” indicating how long ago the story was… Read more »

Steve
Steve
7 years ago
Reply to  CincyCat

Hey Cincy,

I don’t think anyone is at fault. I feel very privileged to have had the opportunity to post here.

We’ve run our online store for 5 years now. My blog is also 4 years old. There was a lot of hard work early on, but once everything became more established, things got a lot easier.

On the blog, I’ve written a lot about the hardships and the hurdles with importing from overseas including cultural barriers, language barriers etc… It’s all there but probably written 2-3 years ago. THanks for the note!

Rachel Meeks
Rachel Meeks
7 years ago

Very exciting read as my husband and I discuss getting pregnant and me quitting my job. Of course, neither of us make 6 figures. But we’re ready to leap into the fray, and we’d never considered starting our own business before…subscribing to your blog now!

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