Falling in Love with the Freedom Fund

This guest post from Lisa Mueller is part of the “reader stories” feature at Get Rich Slowly. Some stories contain general advice; others are examples of how a GRS reader achieved financial success or failure. These stories feature folks with all levels of financial maturity and income.

When I was in my twenties, I didn't really understand the point of wealth accumulation. To me, it kind of looked like greed.

I had grown up in a solidly middle-class family as the daughter of a successful stockbroker. One would think that in this context, I would have been extremely savvy with personal finance and on the path to building wealth myself. But I actually took quite the opposite path, choosing to volunteer, and work at low-paying jobs in the non-profit sector. I didn't really understand the purpose of saving for retirement at such a young age, or saving for any other goals for that matter.

Saving can create freedomIt wasn't until I finished my master's degree (with $33,000 in student loans and negative net worth) at age 30, that I started to take my personal finances more seriously. I slowly started to develop an awareness of the need to save and to contribute to retirement. But what really got me going was when I realized that saving isn't just about building wealth; saving can also create freedom and flexibility.

I read a lot of personal finance blogs (including Get Rich Slowly) to keep myself focused and expand my knowledge. I read early retirement blogs, get out of debt blogs, investing blogs, economics blogs, and simple living blogs. Each blogger brings his or her unique perspective. It's from this exposure to a broad range of ideas that I've found what resonates with me: the idea of building a freedom fund.

I admire the early retirement bloggers, and it's useful to see how they got where they are, but my ultimate goal isn't early retirement. I like to work. What I want is the flexibility to not be tied to any particular income level, career path, or cubicle/office job. I want the freedom to choose my schedule, to work in a job or career that fuels my passion, or to work part-time if I want to. This is possible with a freedom fund.

Many people fail to realize that they have the power to build a better (or different) life for themselves. I have friends who are high earners but who are drowning in debt due to their choices (and in part due to the housing crash). But what they don't see is how they can use their income to create freedom and flexibility in their lives. I think if they could see the possibilities, they would be much more motivated to save and would make different choices with their money. The consumerist mentality and the work-until-you're-65 mindset is so ingrained in our society that many people don't see that they have much more control of their lives than they even know.

I had a co-worker several years ago who understood the concept of the freedom fund. He was in his mid-twenties, lived very frugally, and had a sizable portfolio of assets already at that young age. He, unlike me, worked full-time while he went to graduate school and saved religiously. Even during the most stressful times at work, he was never stressed out.

I used to wonder how he could be so calm and collected all the time. I'm sure that part of it was just his personality, but I also think a big part of it was that he didn't actually need that job. He wasn't living paycheck-to-paycheck. He wasn't drowning in debt like many of us. He had a freedom fund! He had the peace of mind that if anything should happen to his job, he would be okay. And he had the flexibility to change his career path at any time.

The concept of a freedom fund means different things for different people.

  • Maybe it means that you can take more risks at your full-time job.
  • Maybe it means that you can take that six-month vacation to see the world.
  • Maybe it means that you can leave your corporate job to purse your dream of becoming a teacher or to pursue your dream of starting your own business.
  • Maybe it means that you can fulfill your goal of being a stay-at-home parent.
  • Maybe you don't know yet what a freedom fund would mean to you, but don't delay in getting started.

My freedom fund has allowed me to walk away from a 9-5 job (at least temporarily) to re-examine what it is that I really want out of life. It has allowed me to travel, to re-connect with friends, to take a class, to enjoy summer, and to think about what I am passionate about. Without a freedom fund, I wouldn't have the flexibility to take this time for myself.

Take action to build your freedom fund. You have the power to create the life that you want and each dollar that you put in your freedom fund will help you get there. What does your freedom fund mean to you and what dreams will it help you fulfill?

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Jerome
Jerome

Great post! Exactly the concept I used 18 years ago to sell being frugal and start saving to my wife and to myself. In my case I was put on the the right track by my boss, who was fired but who was totally relaxed about it. When I asked him how he could be so relaxed, his answer was: “I have 100.000 dollar in my bank-account”. It took me a couple of months before I realized that he was not bragging but explaining that money reduces stress. So I started saving and becoming free. We are free now and… Read more »

Elizabeth
Elizabeth

I wasn’t calm when the company I worked for went under — it’s an awful experience — but I wasn’t stressed about money because I had an emergency fund. Being able to say “I have the resources to deal with this problem” takes a lot of stress out of stressful situations.

Jerome
Jerome

I think I know at least a bit how you felt: I was fired 5 years ago when the company I worked for was taken over. Luckily I had already saved, so the only thing I had to worry about financially was how to get as much compensation as possible. The whole experience was rather Kafka-esque but worked out fine in the end. I still feel for some of my colleagues with a mortgage and expensive cars. Their stress must have been enormous.

Tom
Tom

Three years into building my freedom fund, I got laid off, but did not stress about it and had the freedom to wait for the right opportunity. Six years into my fund, I had the freedom to leave that job (the company was entering a shaky period) to move cross-country to a region where I could afford to buy my first home and work for my dream company. Eleven years into my fund, I had the freedom to move to another expensive housing market and buy a house there without having to sell my first home (which was now paid… Read more »

Meridith
Meridith

Really enjoyed this post! I recently paid off my student loans and credit cards, started a Roth IRA, and am setting money aside each paycheck to build my emergency fund. These actions were triggered by a combination of relationship drama and a toxic work environment. These issues have since been resolved – I worked things out with my partner, and the toxic co-worker left. I’m still figuring out the ultimate goal(s) of my freedom fund, but knowing that I’m actively working towards being less dependent on less-than-ideal situations is deeply satisfying.

Kestra
Kestra

Probably because it’s so all encompassing, this is absolutely the most important reason to avoid debt and live well below your means. It doesn’t matter whether you want early retirement, to leave a bad job, to leave a bad marriage, to travel, to take an unpaid day off, to ask for more flexibility at work, to have fun that money can buy… Everything is more possible with money in the bank. For myself my husband and I went back to school at 34 with no loans, and I have huge flexibility with my employer. If I didn’t get what I… Read more »

Jenzer
Jenzer

We paid off a sizable debt last summer, on our way to becoming debt free in 2015 (that’s our target date). When I read the title of your post, the first word that popped into my mind was “calm,” before I even read the part about your co-worker. In the months since our one debt was retired, I’ve noticed that I am much more calm/less anxious overall. I’ve also become more generous with my time and better able to listen to others in conversation, due in large part to fewer nagging worries constantly repeating themselves in the back of my… Read more »

nicoleandmaggie
nicoleandmaggie

This hit us as well when we had an opportunity to take a year off from our regular jobs (but at a fraction of the pay). Totally worth it.

Vanessa
Vanessa

I’ve never heard a freedom fund described this way before. What I call a “freedom fund” is savings for all of my regular, but non-monthly expenses like car insurance, prepaid cell phone minutes, etc. That way when I need the money, I don’t have to touch my emergency fund or scrape it together out of checking and part of my paycheck. I think I read about this term many years ago on the Motley Fool boards. I guess I don’t really have a freedom fund as defined in this post. I have an emergency fund which is helping me through… Read more »

Tonya
Tonya

Mary Hunt (DebtProofLiving.com) routinely uses the phrase “Freedom Fund” in relation to an account where you set aside money for expenses that occur every year but not necessarily on a regular basis. I include gas, gifts, vacations, car repairs, haircuts, etc., in my Freedom Fund. This author uses the term more like an emergency fund and/or savings. I think the author could have better described WHAT a freedom fund is. I recommend http://www.DebtProofLIving.com if you want to learn about Mary’s description of a Freedom Fund. For me it has been a godsend, always knowing there’s money set aside for periodic… Read more »

Elizabeth
Elizabeth

I’m confused — is the “freedom fund” a retirement fund and emergency fund all rolled into one? I agree that saving up a large cash reserve and getting out of debt gives us a lot of freedom, but I find having specific goals helped me when I was paying off student debt, trying to build an emergency fund and plan for retirement. Retirement money had to be “do not touch”, and emergency money was a cushion for job loss, etc — so I could weather an emergency without harming my financial future. It’s a matter of personal preference, I think.… Read more »

CincyCat
CincyCat

I think this is more along the lines of a “life happens” fund, or a “money I don’t need, so I’ll save it for whatever I want” fund.

I interpreted this as not an emergency fund or infrequent expenses fund, since a Freedom Fund is money that is not pegged for a specific purpose.

If the author so chooses, she could write a giant check to the charity of her choice, and still have her true emergency and infrequent expenses money intact.

T Hollis
T Hollis

Oh what I wish I had known in my 20’s, 30’s, 40’s… And I love the term “Freedom Fund” because that is exactly what it is!
Go for it, Lisa!

Megan
Megan

I like “Freedom Fund” a lot more than another term commonly used in its place – “[email protected]#$% You” money.

The latter is actually limiting, when you think about it; it’s usually intended to mean money that you’ve saved so you can walk away from a bad job and tell your boss that phrase.

By calling it “Freedom Fund,” it opens up the possibilities for the saver. You can save to get away on a great trip, get away from a bad marriage, etc.

Jacq
Jacq

I don’t think most financial independence / early retirement (FIRE) bloggers are necessarily opposed to work although some are. Most people on the E-R forum seemed to be over 50 when they FIRE’d – which is really not that young. Maybe the difference is that you’re looking for a temporary freedom and they (and me I guess) are aiming for 100% replacement of income. There’s a world of difference between say $30,000 saved for a year off vs. $x,xxx,xxx (your # of X’s may vary) that generates $30,000 a year for a lifetime of potential freedom from work. Knowing you… Read more »

KSR
KSR

All of this could not have been better said Jacq. I’m wondering, because of my own guttural trepidation of actually taking the leap, if you hesitate due to this financial crisis we have come to know as a new reality (and the unhinged outcomes of its shameless idiocy) or if it’s just the idea of distributing your accumulated assets. Or, do you just enjoy the job you’re doing well enough to maintain that safety? Maybe a little of each? I can’t make my own leap until I figure that out but the alarm has rung and the clock still ticks.… Read more »

Jacq
Jacq

KSR, I think anxiety of some kind is normal until you have a few years and “proof in the pudding” under the belt. Here’s a poll on ER and anxiety: http://www.early-retirement.org/forums/f28/anxiety-before-fire-poll-54589.html The only way I know how to reduce the anxiety for me (since I don’t have a defined pension – moved the one I had to a LIRA that becomes available to me at 55) is to get a (hopefully) guaranteed dividend stream in my taxable account going that covers my base and become better at value stock picking. I also believe – rightly or wrongly – that often… Read more »

KSR
KSR

Ha! Your diplomatic insight into the rights and wrongs of chaos ring loud in my ears. I sit on the sidelines in wait like a stealthy sniper as I study my prey. Right or wrong– doesn’t matter in this particular game.

Thanks for the reply with excellent sources. I will dive in now.

El Nerdo
El Nerdo

lolololol @ NINJA!! hilarious acronym.

Jacq, a question for you please — in building your own ER/financial freedom/total calm fund, do you do it instead of traditional retirement, do you prioritize over traditional retirement, or do you do it in addition to 401(k)s and IRAs and the like?

I’m really really curious about this. Not asking to peek into your finances, just wondering about strategies/ percentages/ etc (the way for example ERE had 70% income into dividend stocks for 5 years, was it?)

Jacq
Jacq

El Nerdo, I have no filter when it comes to sharing finances. 😛 I can’t wrap my head around people who write about personal finance without putting some practical dollars and cents around the topic. I’m Canadian and our retirement programs / limits etc are different than yours – I think yours are “use it or lose it” on the 401k? Whereas we can carry forward contribution room on RRSP’s. Also, my income isn’t consistent so I just do what makes the most sense tax-wise – max retirement in high income years and taxable / “calm fund” in lower income… Read more »

El Nerdo
El Nerdo

Thanks Jacq! I get what you’re doing with the taxes, and it makes sense.

Beyond that, I need to school myself– I read the thread, but it was full of incomprehensible acronyms and other concepts.

I ended up somehow in the Bogleheads wiki. I really need to learn more about this because we need to move a 403b into some other place. Not urgen though, but it would be nice to know our options. Good thing I never tire of learning 😀

El Nerdo
El Nerdo

I love the idea, but I’m missing some meat: how exactly does one build a fund of this type? What type of account do you need? What type of financial instruments are good for it? Clearly it can’t be one of the various retirement vehicles because those tie you up until you’re 59.5 or some such age. So– how did you do it? Did you prioritize it over retirement? Did you create that instead of a retirement fund? What are/were the strategies? Is this just a big savings or is it more like an early retirement thing? I’m really curious.… Read more »

Elizabeth
Elizabeth

I’ll second that! It was a good post, but left me without any sort of context about where the OP is now and how she got there. I’m all for looking at different ways to think about money – but how does one apply a philosophy their savings goals?

Laura
Laura

Lisa – what El Nerdo said, plus I would very much like to see which blogs you recommend. I’m still in Dave Ramsey Baby Step 2, feeling stuck, and could use the inspiration. Thanks.

Lisa
Lisa

Laura,

Thanks for your comments. Some of the personal finance blogs I read include Mr. Money Moustache, The Simple dollar (look at the old posts), Man VS. Debt, Canadian Dream: Free at 45, Brave New Life, and If I could start over: no more Harvard Debt.

Lisa

Kestra
Kestra

I hadn’t heard of that Canadian Dream blog before. Thanks for mentioning it. It looks pretty good. I get tired of reading financial info on US blogs and forums that doesn’t apply to me at all.

Laura
Laura

Thanks, Lisa. I realize I’m familiar with most (but not all) of these – so here’s another question for you & other posters: are there good personal finance blogs (other than GRS) where the person getting out of debt did not make a six-figure salary? I was really interested in NoMoreHarvardDebt until I realized how he did it: his annual salary was approximately 2-3 times the size of mine, without anyone else to support, he sold an expensive car and motorcycle, raided a 401K, got a roommate (something my husband would object to, I think) and slashed his entertainment budget… Read more »

Lisa
Lisa

Laura,

I understand that it can be discouraging to read blogs where it seems like the author has a large income which makes it easier to get out of debt and meet other financial goals. However, I think you can still get something from the message of the blogs. You can still have the same outcome, it may just take you longer to get there. Also, try to focus on one goal..like getting out of debt..before focusing on other financial goals. It can be overwhelming if you feel like you have to to everything at once.

Lisa

Rebecca
Rebecca

Laura, you might try http://earlyretirementextreme.com/ The author is not really blogging actively anymore, but check out the archives. He got to FI on a pretty modest salary largely by dramatically decreasing his expenses. It might not be for everyone, but I found it refreshing because he breaks down a lot of assumptions about what you really need, and suggests a philosophy where you are learning to do things for yourself and need to rely on paying others for services/goods less. His book was good too.

Lisa
Lisa

El Nerdo,

Thanks for your comments. I did not prioritize the freedom fund over retirement. The freedom fund is in addition to my retirement. I currently have the funds split between mutual funds and an online savings account (which used to have a much higher interest rate). I am not thinking of this as an early retirement fund, but rather as a fund to give myself more options and flexibility in the future.

El Nerdo
El Nerdo

Ah, I see! So this is like an emergency-plus fund?

I love my job and my employer is awesome even though he’s making me work on a Sunday (it’s me, ha ha), but I’d love to do this while being financially independent.

My problem is I don’t know where to focus. Because everyone tells you “save for retirement!” but I don’t want to retire, I want to work until the day I croak– however, I want the financial freedom, the sooner the better.

Ah, what to do…

Lance @ Money Life and More
Lance @ Money Life and More

My freedom fund would mean that I could live without relying on my day job for the significant future. At first when I read this I thought you were going to be talking about Fidelity but I’m glad you didn’t. I wish more people thought of wealth accumulation this way. I feel a lot of people just think it is evil and greed but if you have a reason and it lets you live the way you want I think it is a reasonable goal.

Mara
Mara

Like you and the others, I value having a calm and stress-free life. It’s knowing that that you’ll be okay even if a financial crisis hits. It’s worth every penny or every frugal habit I do that totally annoy my kids. Ha! I’d like to think that the freedom fund can also be separate from the 3-6 months of emergency funds. The emergency funds are what saves me from going into debt should I lose my job or resign. The freedom fund is what helps me escape the 9-5 job. This could be an additional 6-12 months of living expenses… Read more »

Fleur
Fleur

I like idea of freedom fund. I am at the beginning of my personal finance journey and hope to one day build a freedom fund that allows me to travel around the world as and when I please, without worrying about retirement and old age health care. You mentioned – “I read a lot of personal finance blogs (including Get Rich Slowly) to keep myself focused and expand my knowledge. I read early retirement blogs, get out of debt blogs, investing blogs, economics blogs, and simple living blogs” I am new to the world of personal finance and GRS is… Read more »

Janice
Janice

I think the point is having savings gives you options. This was a lesson learned by me well into my adulthood, like embarrassingly so. But learned nevertheless. Money is a tool to give you freedom, not to tie you down. Save as much as you can as early as you can and make your money work as hard as you can even in these low interest rate times. Have a very short term goal (emergency), a longer term goal (freedom) and a long term goal (retirement) and fund them appropriately for you. It’s not complicated, but it does require discipline… Read more »

claudia@machen und tun

wow, very well said! you packed almost everything into a few sentences – more like that and we wouldn´t need any more wordy blogs on the subject 🙂
again, well done, thanks!!

Rebecca
Rebecca

What personal finance/investment/living simply blogs do you recommend? I read GRS regularly and have tried to find others that I enjoy just as much, but haven’t had much luck.

Tonya
Tonya

http://www.DebtProofLiving.com is my favorite. You’d have to check it out to see what you think. It deals primarily with frugal living but includes information about saving, investing, retirement, etc. I relate to Mary Hunt because she used to be up to her eyeballs in debt at one point and had to stop and turn it around (without bankruptcy) and learn how to live this way. She relates to the average American. I read Tightwad Gazette and was convinced that lady was BORN frugal! I didn’t relate.

Laura
Laura

Thanks for the tip – will check her out (DebtProofLiving).

Mom
Mom

Nice story. I think I once read in The Tightwad Gazette by Amy Dacyczyn that you buy your freedom with your frugality. That is certainly how I view it in my life.

Holly@ClubThrifty.com

I, too, have a freedom fund of this sort and what it means to me is that-one day- when I get pissed off and fed up enough with my job…I will leave for good. I like having the option to do that.

However, when I am able to leave for good…I will not want to go back to work at all. Having a freedom fund just to use “here and there” to figure out what I want seems just like the prolongment of retirement to me.

When I am done, I will be DONE.

Janette
Janette

We did not “retire early”. We “retired” at 58 and 52. I continue to substitute teach to buy plane tickets :>) We saved equally in His IRA/ My IRA/and brokerage fund after we paid off the house. We also chose- early on- to have my husband take a position that had lower pay- but a pension. We have been living off of that- debt free and enjoying life–for many years. My largest warning is that few will make a million off consulting or blogging. Taking a break in your 20’s or early 30’s can be seen as OK. Taking it… Read more »

Special_Ed
Special_Ed

Excellent post. I, myself, got sick of living paycheck to paycheck and being buried under an ever-increasing amount of debt (with nothing to show for it) in my early thirties. The climb out of debt 20 years ago was a long one, but well worth it. My freedom fund is not a specific bank account or a single stack of money in a vault. My freedom fund includes my savings account, my investments, my fully funded Roth IRA, and my house that is paid off. I have the freedom that Lisa is talking about. I work a low paying job… Read more »

Lisa2
Lisa2

I learned this lesson 6 years ago the hard way. My company’s CEO was replaced by a venture capital hire, and he was cleaning house of anyone that was there for over a couple of years. Although I wasn’t targeted (yet!), his approach had me so angry that I wanted to leave, but I was trapped because of my debt and lack of savings. I ended up taking another job that I wasn’t crazy about, and I immedietely took all steps necessary to not be in that position ever again. I downsized my house and car, paid off all debt,… Read more »

SB @ One Cent At A Time
SB @ One Cent At A Time

Only if you think your job as slavery the concept and need of freedom fund comes in, isn’t it?

Love your job, be indispensable for your employer and you don’t need separate freedom fund. You can enjoy freedom. At least that’s how I see people at my work.

El Nerdo
El Nerdo

Agreed, agreed. A job is not (should not be approached as) slavery. However, the economic history of the past 30 years has taught us that we can’t put our fate in the hands of a corporation or any employer for that matter. The days of giving 25 years to a company and expecting the company will always take care of you are gone. Outsourcing, donwsizing, broken contracts, raided pension funds, nobody has a job and pension for life. What if the employer leads the company to ruin and you’re 5 years short of retirement and nobody will hire you because… Read more »

SB @ One Cent At A Time
SB @ One Cent At A Time

Near-retirement-job-loss, did happen to my dad, and when my guest post was published at GRS I did mention that episode as well. I have a very first hand experience at that. I learned to believe since then that I’ll make myself the last employee to leave the company in a downfall. I may not have been there till now. But I am in a situation where I have freedom to do things my way. And yes I am building retirement fund, there’s no doubt you’ll need retirement fund. But, freedom fund? I don’t know… Like I said, make your work… Read more »

El Nerdo
El Nerdo

Don’t call it Freedom Fund then, call it “Unemployment Insurance”– like the government’s, but better. 😉 ps – Sorry about your dad’s lost job! The lady I was talking with is a few years short of retirement but her company is being mismanaged by new owners. Lucky for her she’s the chief accountant, so she might be very well the last one to leave, but it’s not a job she enjoys anymore, and she can’t find a new job to move to because of age discrimination– companies prefer to hire someone young that makes less. Stuff like this happens all… Read more »

chris
chris

I’m looking for more blogs to read to keep me invigorated to reduce my debt. You said in your post that you “read early retirement blogs, get out of debt blogs, investing blogs, economics blogs, and simple living blogs.” Do you, or anyone else, have a few in mind that you recommend other than Get Rich Slowyly for each of the categories you mentioned?

SB @ One Cent At A Time
SB @ One Cent At A Time

hahaha..most of the commenters here, the ones you see with links in their names, are bloggers. Most of them are good bloggers, struggling to establish their blogs. See if you like any of ’em…click on names to visit their blogs.

chris
chris

Glad you got a laugh…I’ll skip on going to One Cent at a Time.

Lisa
Lisa

Chris,

Thanks for your comments. Some of the blogs I recommend include:

Mr. Money Mustache, Canadian Dream:Free at 45, Man VS Debt, Zen Habits, The Consumerist, Escape from Cubicle Nation, The Simple Dollar, Rowdy Kittens, and Daily Finance,

Also, Wise Bread has a list of the Top 100 personal finance blogs. It is really about finding the blog that “speaks to you”.

Hope this helps.

Lisa

chris
chris

Thanks Lisa! That’s exactly what I was looking for. I’m new to reading blogs so I don’t even know where to find more of them. Get Rick Slowly was recommended about a year ago to me and I’ve been reading it since.

Cheers,
C

Julie @ Freedom 48
Julie @ Freedom 48

Great reminder on the importance of having savings (or a “freedom fund”). As someone who does have significant savings/investments, I can attest to the fact that just having that money tucked away affects every other aspect of our life. We live a stress-free life when it comes to finances, and when I hear people talk about not being able to pay their bills… I just can’t imagine how they’re able to sleep at night. Having savings for an early retirement is our ultimate goal – but we have certainly benefited in all other aspects… every step of the way. I… Read more »

Jamie
Jamie

Love this post! You should follow up explaining what your fund includes now!

Isela
Isela

I am in the same process as Lisa, I walked away from my job two months ago and have been enjoying the perks of a freedom fund. I wanted to take time for my family and myself, to write a book and to fully develop my blog. Now everybody looks at me and says “I will love to be able to do the same thing”. I am enjoying every minute of the process, and If this new phase of my life doesn´t work out, I can return to what I was doing previously recharged and with new experiences to share.… Read more »

Debt Free Teen
Debt Free Teen

I agree..it’s really all about freedom of choice to work at the job you want to do. I’m not about early retirement, I just want to be debt free and have choices.
Chase

Erin
Erin

I really appreciate your post. I love changing the perspective from saving to pay off debt to saving to acquire freedom! Thanks for your story. I do, however, wish you had more tips on HOW to do this. I, like you, work in the non-profit sector, I am 30 years old, recently married, and am getting a Master Degree currently. The only debt I have is my recent school loans, which will accumulate to about $30,000.00. I make 45k annually (though my goal is to increase that by at least 35% or so after I graduate in February of 2013),… Read more »

CincyCat
CincyCat

I would love a freedom fund like the one the author describes. I’d probably spend some on myself & my family, but I would also like the freedom to just write the check if I discover a charitable cause that I want to support.

🙂

cls
cls

I have two types of savings – retirement (401k) and non-retirement (mutual, stocks, cash). I also read the blogs mentioned by the OP. My approach is to throw as much money into them as possible, using tips and skills picked up by reading all these sites. I see my non-retirement savings as a cushion/freedom fund/FU money – money that gives me peace of mind and the freedom not to be stuck in a situation that makes me unhappy.

rudy
rudy

Thanks for your ideas about a “freedom fund”: quite though provoking. I think your ideas truly provide a way of living a less stressful and more worryfree life financially.

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