Working for Uncle Sam overseas

This guest post from Mike is part of the “reader stories” feature at Get Rich Slowly. Some stories contain general advice; others are examples of how a GRS reader achieved financial success — or failure. These stories feature folks from all levels of financial maturity and with all sorts of incomes.

Traveling to exotic new places is a passion of mine. My wife reminisces fondly over a dinner conversation we had about nine years ago while we were still dating. I emphatically told her, “I am going to show you the world.” Sure, she probably took it as a pick-up line, but little did we know that those words would become prophetic for us.

At the time, I was a federal employee living in San Diego, California, working within the Department of Defense as a civil servant (non-military) employee. Over the next four years, we wed and my wife gave birth to our first child. Prior to marriage, we made the decision that having my wife stay at home with the kids was important to us. Anyone who has spent some time and money in San Diego knows that the city's cost of living makes choosing to be a single-income family difficult. As our family grew and our costs increased, we decided to consider looking for a more affordable place to live.

The Job Search

The U.S. Government's official website for job opportunities and information is www.USAJobs.gov. Most federal employees, including myself, maintain current resumes on that site in case a better opportunity comes along. Although I enjoyed federal employment, at the time I didn't want to limit my job search to federal jobs. I also looked into some of the non-government job search sites on the web.

Shortly thereafter, the resume that I'd posted on www.Monster.com was pulled by a company in North Carolina, who flew me cross-country for an interview. I flew over on a Sunday night to interview first thing on Monday morning. Although the interview went well, we couldn't agree on a salary, so I thanked them for the interview and flew home that night. When I returned to my office on Tuesday morning, I found an email in my inbox that changed my life.

Honey, How Do You Feel About Japan?

“Dear Applicant, your resume is under consideration for a vacancy with the U.S. Navy in Yokosuka, Japan”, the email began. After reading through the entire email and recognizing that the job description matched well with my career goals and past experience, I called my wife for her thoughts. “Honey, how do you feel about living in Japan?”, I asked.

She told me that she wouldn't consider it until I was offered the job. Within a matter of weeks, I interviewed for the position and received an offer, which I discussed with my wife and then accepted.

Working overseas can provide all sorts of new experiences.

Federal Overseas Employee Benefits

Many folks are already aware of the benefits of full-time federal employment:

  • flexible work schedules
  • health insurance
  • life insurance
  • retirement planning and matching contributions through the federal 401k-like Thrift Savings Plan
  • generous leave accrual policies
  • and so on

But overseas, the benefits are greater. I didn't know it at the time, but by accepting the job offer, I was embarking on a wonderful personal finance journey, which included Living Quarters Allowance (LQA), Post Allowance, Home Leave, access to worldwide military Commissaries (grocery stores) and Base Exchanges (shopping centers), and one roundtrip Space A flight per year.

For those GRS readers that don't have previous military or federal civilian backgrounds, here's a brief explanation:

    • LQA — Uncle Sam paid for my housing, gas/electric, water, and other utility bills associated with my living quarters off base in Japan. This money was provided as a tax-free allowance, with a value representing roughly 35% of my gross salary.
    • Post Allowance — Uncle Sam provided an allowance to compensate for the difference in cost of living between the Washington, DC metropolitan area and the host nation locality cost, which amounted to a few hundred extra tax-free dollars per month.
    • Home Leave — I earned an extra week per year of vacation time, in addition to my already generous vacation benefits. This benefit is provided in acknowledgement that home is more difficult to get to from overseas.
    • Commissary and Base Exchange Privileges — Generally, military bases have grocery stores and shopping areas to meet the needs of the active duty personnel stationed to the base. We had use of these facilities, where purchases could be made without considering the typical sales tax many of us are familiar with in the USA.
  • Space A Flights — “Space Available” flights are available from nearby Air Force bases. If your schedule is flexible, it is a terrific way to fly for really cheap back to the States.

And though I didn't mention it before, we also had access to the Department of Defense schools, medical and dental clinics, and free gym access on base.

Our Overseas Experience

We absolutely enjoyed our four years in Japan. It was a rewarding professional experience for me, and an enjoyable personal experience for the entire family. From central Japan, we were easily able to visit other parts of Asia, including South Korea, Thailand, Singapore — and, of course, much of Japan as well. We also took trips back home from time to time to see family, and enjoyed a couple of vacations in Hawaii.

Despite all the traveling, we were also able to save money more rapidly than at any other point in our lives. Without having the burden of a rent/mortgage payment and large utility bills to hammer our budget each month, our percentage of monthly income that went to pay for Needs plummeted. We were able to afford many more of our Wants and still save for both short and long term goals without hesitation.

We're often asked whether we'd consider moving back overseas again. We most definitely would if the right opportunity came along. In fact, at the time I'm writing this, I'm waiting to hear back regarding an interview I recently had for a position in Europe. My wife and I are both giddy about the opportunity!

How About You?

This opportunity may be a challenge for some people. First, there are federal employment limitations for folks who are not U.S. citizens — though it is possible. Second, some people won't necessarily feel the same way about international travel that my family does. If this story doesn't appeal to you, I hope you've stopped reading long before now!

But for those of you that wonder if it could work for you, there's a strong likelihood that it could. I've been told that the US Government is the largest employer in the world and that over 88,000 of those jobs are located outside of the United States, in over 140 countries worldwide. Available jobs include technical, administrative, educational, white-collared, gray-collared, blue-collared…you name it.

If you're interested, I suggest logging on to www.USAJobs.gov to explore the career opportunities available to you. There, you can create and post a resume, search positions currently available, and track the status of your job inquiries. You can also limit your search to certain geographical areas within or outside of the United States and to certain salary levels.

Who knows — maybe one day you'll find yourself traveling the world, courtesy of Uncle Sam.

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Nicole
Nicole
10 years ago

The large private company that my sister works for often sends employees overseas for months or years at a time. The monetary and vacation benefits are huge. Though one of the locations is Siberia… not quite as nice as their other international assignments. Though they do provide full maid service on top of everything else. If one is looking to retire early and see the world it’s a great way to do both.

In her company, mostly the young singles take advantage.

Judy
Judy
10 years ago

Very interesting story. I am a Program Assistant and work for an international organization which I joined in my home country in Africa. I managed to get a transfer and moved to Washington, DC for four years before moving back to a different country in Africa for a one year assignment. To make this sweeter, my company pays for all my living expenses, rent, maid services and still pays me my salary in the US. As a result, I have managed to finish building my house in my home country while saving as well. I also travel quite a bit… Read more »

Stephen
Stephen
10 years ago

Lucky You!

I have applied for many job postings abroad on usajobs.gov and never been considered for an interview.

Fontaine
Fontaine
10 years ago

Sounds like a great experience. Although I do wonder if that many benefits are necessary for a civil servant.

Taxpayer dollars hard at work.

Bob B
Bob B
7 years ago
Reply to  Fontaine

Don’t feel bad. The USAJOBS.GOV is a flawed system that allows your resume to process through. However, it comes down to WHO U KNOW! I have applied for many jobs within my skill set and only made ONE interview in four years. However, at the same time, I watch lesser qualified people get the job. Now, they have really cool trick that allows people to apply within 120 of retirement? What that means is, they already know who has the job so, advertising it on USAJOBS is just smoke and mirrors.

Jim K
Jim K
6 years ago
Reply to  Bob B

USAJOBS is more about knowing HOW to write the resume to fit the PD than anything else…and being able to understand how long positions are open (one week suspense usually indicates a job is being listed because it legally has to be in order to get the “right” person…longer than that, and the job opening is usually legitimately available…open continuous are just positions that are collecting resumes). My mother had 20+ years of experience in the federal government and had a hard time making the cert lists for lower-paying jobs when she came back to the US, but it was… Read more »

Nikki
Nikki
10 years ago

Thanks for sharing your experience Mike! The major turning point in my financial life was the two years my husband and I spent overseas with the federal government. We were both working and we have no kids — most importantly, there were few ways to spend money there. Our jobs and living situation were stressful but the pain has faded and it’s satisfying to look at our fat 401K and savings. PS To Stephen, it’s not just you, these jobs are hard to get! They use a strict (and somewhat inscrutable) points system. I missed out on several jobs because… Read more »

uncertain algorithm
uncertain algorithm
10 years ago

I am amazed at how much they reimbursed you. You’re right, though, that would be the quite the opportunity to travel and save a significant amount of money in the long run.

Janette
Janette
10 years ago

My husband and I met in Germany- he was military and I DoD. We loved every minute of our time there. Our children (27 years later) have the travel bug since they spent half of their elementary overseas. My daughter is trying to get on to DoD right now. She wants her son to have the same travel experiences she had as a child.
Not so easy to get on though…DoD is a tough place to get a job.

Everyday Tips
Everyday Tips
10 years ago

What a great story. I would have loved to have been able to live overseas. But sick family members, kids, etc seemed to always get in the way. I am hoping that we can retire somewhat early and hopefully take extended vacations to other countries.

Thanks for all the information too. I had no idea what a great deal that could be.

Roo
Roo
10 years ago

How did you cope with the language barrier, or did you spend so much time with other government employees that it didn’t really get in the way?

I visited Japan and played tourist for a week in 2009 (part of a longer trip that included Portland and Hawaii). Next time I’d like to stay much longer, but I found the kanji a bit intimidating!

Barb
Barb
10 years ago

Great Story. Late Hubby was a DOD employee for thirty years and the last seven we spent in Germany. I’ll add for people who don’t know that the reason they pay housing and utlities is because many of us have homes at home that we cannot sell and sometimes cannot rent. And while I can’t speak for the poster, in our case, we lived “on the economy” in a house away from the base. We had german neighbors and I shopped as much at german stores as the commissary so I learned to speak German. Not fluently , playground german… Read more »

Marsha
Marsha
10 years ago

Uhhgh…the federal government! No ill will intended to individual employees, but I bolted out of there as fast as I could after several years. If you’re into EXTREME routine with often nothing to do, busy body bullies and all around existential malaise, join the federal government.

Jolyn@Budgets are the New Black
[email protected] are the New Black
10 years ago

We, too, were overseas with the gov’t, but as active duty military. We would do it in a second in a heartbeat. At our last assignment, in Italy, we knew of an active duty NCO who retired overseas and got a civilian gov’t job doing the same thing he’d been doing in the military. His pay double and his housing allowance quadrupled. It’s definitely a good financial deal.

Barb
Barb
10 years ago

John, had my husband lived we were looking at retiring in Germany. We might not even have worked. But because we would be using Germany medical care (paid for by Fed Inusrance) we could have managed to get paid in dollars and spend Euros. Marsha, I expect how regimented the job is depends on the department and the job, just like anywhere else. I mean there are all kinds of jobs in the federal government, just like anywhere else. In my husbands life time he was a recreation manager, an Officers Club Manager, a Budget department Chief, and eventually a… Read more »

grrlpup
grrlpup
10 years ago

One major drawback to the federal government as an employer is that it doesn’t recognize same-sex marriages. If a straight married person and I were to accept the same job, he or she would be getting thousands of dollars in benefits for the family, while my family would be left out in the cold. Would I even be able to take my family with me to an overseas job? I haven’t looked into it, but it’s definitely depressing and a disincentive to working for the feds.

ftbllmom
ftbllmom
10 years ago

I lived in southern Japan for a few yrs and enjoyed the experience most of the time. On the flip side, it was the hardest 2 yrs of my life. As for the benefits and are they really necessary? Absolutely. This is an adventure, but a heck of a lot harder than everyone seems to think with the isolation, hard work, and stress. There is a reason people are compensated so well. They have to do this to get these employees. I was able to get ahead financially, but there was a price to pay. In the end, I’d do… Read more »

Bramalama
Bramalama
10 years ago

If you’re not a fan of the federal government then look in to NATO jobs too. Lots of the same benefits.

I spent 2 years at the NATO Programming Centre in Glons, Belgium while I was active duty AF. Easily the best assignment I ever had. Here’s a link to the NATO Jobs page: http://www.nato.int/wcm-asp/recruit-wide.asp

Michele
Michele
10 years ago

I’m as liberal as they come, but I can’t help but think of this in the context of government spending, and find it all a little excessive. I can’t think of any good reason why non-military Federal employees working overseas shouldn’t cover the cost of their own living expenses, considering how generous their compensation is to begin with. Perhaps a cost-of-living offset is warranted in some cases, where the COL of the host nation is exponentially higher than it is in the US, but 100% coverage of almost all living expenses? It just seems a little absurd, wasteful and unnecessary.… Read more »

sherry t
sherry t
6 years ago
Reply to  Michele

In a way I have to agree, however, the reality of some locations don’t let that work. Take my husband’s position in Iraq and Afganistan. He couldn’t live off base. Therefore he had to take onbase accomodations, which weren’t pretty at all, but the Army had to provide for them so part of the contract was the costs of housing and food. Pre-Middle East war times, a contractor in that part of the world lived on compounds for foriegn workers, which was the only place they were allowed to live.

Erica Douglass
Erica Douglass
10 years ago

I find it a little strange that you talk a lot about the job benefits but don’t say anything about the actual job. What did you do over there? Can you even talk about it?

Jon
Jon
10 years ago

@17 Michele: This is fairly standard compensation for overseas workers in the private sector as well. Living overseas is not easy. I’ve personally seen several people crack after a few months overseas and head back home–this is not cost effective. The incentives are intended to keep qualified workers living overseas. A simple COL adjustment is not going to provide incentive to get the right people to move half-way around the world from their friends and family. Further, private sector workers qualify for additional tax benefits such as the Foreign Earned Income Exclusion (due to taxation in another country), that federal… Read more »

Kathryn
Kathryn
10 years ago

This is something that my husband and I hope to do in the future. Right now his folks live with us, so we are not very mobile. I lived in Tanzania for 2 1/2 years teaching school, so I can concur that it can be very stressful living in a foreign culture, but it’s sooo worth it!

Barb
Barb
10 years ago

I agree that the reimbusement is normal for companies or anyone else. The reasoning is this-because you are overseas for often only a coupole years, you maintain your original residence. Ideally you would get a renter, but I can tell you tryhing to rent a house in many areas especially from afar is expensive and offten impossible. We did it, but we knew folks who left their houses empty, paid a mortage. It’s also worth noting that there are not enough people to fill those job, and most many necessary professional jobs overseas go wanting. My husband was the budget… Read more »

Tyler Karaszewski
Tyler Karaszewski
10 years ago

I couldn’t help but look up my federal income tax return for last year after reading this article. I paid $28,482 in federal income taxes in 2009. I hope you were doing something really useful over there on the other side of the pacific. Others mention this being fairly standard compensation for private companies’ overseas employees as well. That may be true, but I can elect *not* to purchase twenty-eight thousand dollars a year worth of services from all these private companies that do the same thing. None of this is to say I don’t think Mike’s compensation is fair… Read more »

rayray
rayray
5 years ago

do you like a safe country to live in w/ new Chinese migs flying overhead. Well then your welcome

Itinerant
Itinerant
10 years ago

Great story, thanks Mike! To be fair, his compensation/benefits sounds similar to military benefits overseas — so instead of focusing on this one job, consider the agency context. DOD usually has plenty of money to use, as evidenced by the “Death and Taxes” poster of the US budget: http://www.wallstats.com/deathandtaxes/

AC
AC
10 years ago

This seems more like a sales pitch to work for the federal government than anything else. Though there are a lot of criticisms from a lot of people about his compensation, I would argue that working in any sort of government organization is a great way to get rich VERY SLOWLY, because everything about your wage and benefits, et al are fixed with little room to negotiate after you accept that initial position and salary (unless you take another job). Please remember that this is just income. If you cannot manage your finances it doesn’t matter how much or how… Read more »

Nicole
Nicole
10 years ago

@22 Good luck not buying anything made from petroleum products. Just saying.

Adrian
Adrian
10 years ago

It sounds like quite the interesting and rewarding experience, Mike! It is an excellent money-saving alternative that addresses moreso changes to the lifestyle and needs rather than altering the wants (an approach based on making more money rather than cutting back expenses) which is a fairly unique concept. While I personally adore where I reside and simply could not see myself parting with the nostalgic and warm comfort and familiarity of my surroundings, it is nevertheless refreshing to hear a tale of one who has strayed from the common forms of savings, investments and other average personal finance lifestyles in… Read more »

Adrian
Adrian
10 years ago

P.P.S. # 22 Tyler K’s cynical critcisms are always entertaining to say the least lol…

Sunny
Sunny
10 years ago

Please consider that a lot of government employees in this day and age are actually helping to keep the U.S. and its allies free from harm and maybe even be grateful for those sacrifices.

Marcella
Marcella
10 years ago

@22 and others who are cranky that somebody is getting a good deal out there. You seem to have forgotten that government jobs don’t exist in a vacuum. These jobs are competing for candidates with the private sector, so the government does have to offer comparable benefits so that they can attract top people and, you know, do that excellent job you seem so keen that they do while over there spending your tax dollars. Is it really helpful to the discussion here to sidetrack it with a whine about how your tax dollars are spent? Equally it seems that… Read more »

Tyler Karaszewski
Tyler Karaszewski
10 years ago

@Nicole: Not all petroleum products are made overseas by companies with expensive foreign employees getting everything comp’ed. Even among those things that are, I do not buy $28,000/year worth of them (I do buy some). @Adrian: I did work for a federal government agency for a couple years. Some of the employees were very good. Many others had been there for decades and were just coasting along, finishing barely enough work to keep from drawing attention to themselves. These people are nearly impossible to fire anyway, so they don’t have to do a lot to keep their jobs. The *only*… Read more »

Tyler Karaszewski
Tyler Karaszewski
10 years ago

@Marcella: You hadn’t posted this when I started writing my last comment. You’re right. The government has to offer competitive compensation to attract employees. Like I said, I’m fine with that, as long as these people do good work. You’re also right that my experience in a single branch of a single federal agency is not necessarily representative. It could be the only agency in the entire federal government that’s not very efficient. I’ve heard a lot of other stories from other branches of government that are similar, though, and I bet you have, too. Is it *helpful* to discuss… Read more »

rb
rb
10 years ago

Great opportunity to travel, save, and appreciate not only another culture, but be grateful for what we have here in the USA.
Sadly so many of the comments show how others seem jealous that someone else found such a great lifestyle. Glad to see the government can appreciate your talents.

Patti
Patti
10 years ago

To Fontaine: I’m currently serving as a Civil Servant in Afghanistan. Trust me, it isn’t the lap of luxury. They do pay me Hazard Pay, (imagine that) and relocation allowance but I live in a metal container that is virtually a closet. My bathroom is down the hall and shared. I’m confined. I wear bullet proof vest and travel with shooters. So depending on the area, there can be perks at little cost to the gov’t. (We have someone who cleans our bathrooms, halls etc.) It is incentive for those of us who leave the US, our families, Friday night… Read more »

Deborah
Deborah
10 years ago

@grrlpup – the gov’t doesn’t include health care in this because of DOMA, but they are offering quite a few benefits to same-sex couples now: http://www.federaltimes.com/article/20100606/PERSONNEL01/6060307/1001
It’s not everything that it should be, but it’s improved a little.

Kate
Kate
10 years ago

@33-Patti – That advice about using the right keywords is helpful. I’ve applied to several jobs through USAjobs.gov and never gotten a response despite being qualified for the position. The site is a bear to set up, but it’s helpful to know what I can work on for the next opportunity I see.

Vernor
Vernor
10 years ago

@ 19: “Living overseas is not easy. I’ve personally seen several people crack after a few months overseas and head back home—this is not cost effective. The incentives are intended to keep qualified workers living overseas.” Pure rubbish. If they crack, they have no business living overseas. The incentives that you mention for fed workers living overseas is nothing but a gravy train for slackers. Case in point: South Korea. It’s a massive suck-hole for the US taxpayer. The DOD employees are hardly “qualified workers” that need special incentives yet they get them by the bundles. South Korea isn’t that… Read more »

Becky
Becky
10 years ago

Government jobs no longer compete with the private sector…that is to say, they compensate far above what the private sector offers when combining pay and benefits. In my field, everyone desires a Government job, but it is indeed very difficult to enter the civil service. Hundreds compete for the same job, and usually, the job recs are designed for a specific person, but the rec most be opened publically. Further, various classes are given priority over others. So, yes, it’s a dream job in many cases – the pay and benefits – the possibility for a PENSION! are fabulous. “Service”… Read more »

Nicole
Nicole
10 years ago

@30 Name one. Nope, you’re wrong. They’re interconnected into the giant international oil/gas/plastics system too. They’ve also got foreign overseas workers working here or US workers in another country. Anything you buy that’s not local (or that is local but is delivered by trucks, or fertilized with synthetic fertilizers, or by fertilizer delivered by trucks), anything you own that’s plastic. Any travel you do. All part of the oil conglomerate. If you spend 28K at all and aren’t Amish, chances are that all of that has been touched by the oil industry in some way. You’re stuck paying some 27… Read more »

Ely
Ely
10 years ago

My dad’s job transferred him overseas. We lived in France two separate times and he also spent a few years in China. In France he received a larger salary to compensate for the greater cost of living there; in both places he received additional compensation for working overseas. His employer also paid our tuition to the private American School of Paris. And I think he got more vacation time. It’s challenging moving to a foreign country as a child, and it can be difficult to be so far from friends and family, but it’s an amazing opportunity; if there’s a… Read more »

Jaime
Jaime
10 years ago

I don’t think it’s whining at all to question the value of paying so many benefits for someone to work overseas. All citizens have a vested interest in questioning how our tax dollar are spent. It has nothing to do with being ungrateful for any sacrifices that may have been made, it’s not whining and it’s not personal. It’s common sense. Personally, I loved this story and hope that I can someday experience a job experience that is very similar. I love learning about and experiencing other cultures, but I’ve only been able to do so in small doses (one… Read more »

Lura
Lura
10 years ago

I find this fascinating… I work for the Fed gov’t and really all you have to do is have an applicable education, maybe certifications, a good work history a decent personality … it was not that hard to get my job. I am also intrigued by the possibility of growing my career by working for the DOD someday Japan sounds awesome !! What the writer did not mention is your GS salary level is static when you are overseas with DOD– I don’t believe you get step raises, and the jobs that I have seen posted that I would qualify… Read more »

Frugal Texas Gal
Frugal Texas Gal
10 years ago

Laura, you do get step raises. Both my husband and I were DOD in germany and received regular step increases and raises. My husband also received grade increases and went from an 11 to a 13 while in Germany. I do have to say that as a civilian in Germany (cannot say for Japan), the only real “normally military” bennies that we felt made a difference other than LQA was the gas. Im a coupon cheapie shopper, so the px never saved me anything, either here or there. Oh….our leave time actually went further, because everything was in weekend driving… Read more »

mike
mike
10 years ago

I’m the “Mike” who wrote this post. To those that criticize the benefits for civilians overseas, I agree that it is healthy to question where tax dollars go. Fed employees are tax payers as well! The cost of living in Yokosuka, Japan, was very expensive and would be prohibitive for the majority of civilians without the benefits Uncle Sam provides. And until the economic downturn, not many people criticized our salaries, which (at least in my field) were not even close to the salaries of our counterparts in the private sector. We accepted lower salaries for the security and stability… Read more »

sandy
sandy
10 years ago

@ Eli, My kids went to the American School of Paris, also (2003-2004, lower school), paid for by my husband’s company. I was intrigued by the families with the DoD and USMilitary who sent there kids there (upwards of $30,00 per student!) Keep in mind, folks, that, outside of the US military, there are nearly 7 Million Americans who live all over the world. We’ve lived abroad as corporate relocations and studying. Did you ever hear the word “Exports”? Well, that is how American corporations get their products to market overseas..it doesn’t just happen by chance. When we were on… Read more »

Annie
Annie
10 years ago

What a cool story! Thanks for posting. I’ve kind of had government jobs in the back of my head during my job search, but I never really gave it much though until you posted this. I have been wanting to go abroad my whole life, and doing it concurrently with an awesome job (I’m one of those adventure seeking young singles) sounds like my kind of venue.

Thanks again!

Julie
Julie
10 years ago

@14 grrlpup,

Just FYI, the Forest Service has anti-discrimination language regarding gay employees. As a gay FS employee in a very conservative state where you can be fired for your sexual orientation, it is a little reassuring.

Henry
Henry
10 years ago

I’ve lived in quite a lot of places around the globe now. Just thought I’d add; there’s not much of a point specifically looking for a job somehow related to a U.S. government. You get the same type of benefits in the private sector, albeit I think they’re a bit more accommodating. When I lived in Zurich, my company gave me a “personal travel allowance” equivalent to the value of 4 round-trips to the U.S. on business class. Any business-related trips were on a separate post, this cash allowance was purely for personal travel. Most companies will cover all your… Read more »

mike
mike
9 years ago

@47 Henry –

Excellent point. I can only speak for my international experiences with the fed gov, but it is interesting to hear of the similar benefits in the private sector. I know a few fellow engineers that chose the petroleum industry out of school – excellent salaries and benefits.

Lynn
Lynn
9 years ago

I am a DOD nurse at a base overseas and love the opportunity. There are negatives if your are near, as I am, retirement age. The base pay is lower than in the US because you are not paid locality pay. Our retirement is based on the top pay we earn for three years-and our LQA is not figured into this like locality pay is in the US. Of course it pays to be frugal and bank as much as you can since you have most of your housing costs paid for. I find I have pretty expensive out of… Read more »

kaylee
kaylee
7 years ago

Hi Mike, I hope you are still monitoring this site, my husband has put in for 5 overseas jobs, we are just waiting for them to close and make a decision, We feel with his experience and years in that he will be offered a job. Can you tell us more details, and more tips on getting the most out of these jobs? The money is great, but he will have to maintain a home for his mom and we will hopefully be able to rent out our house, if not it will be costing us money. We are also… Read more »

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