Suze Orman hates the FIRE movement. She hates it, she hates it, she hates it.

Yesterday, my pal Paula Pant published a podcast interview with financial guru Suze Orman. Based on reader requests, Paula asked what Suze thought of the FIRE movement. (For those unfamiliar, FIRE is a a term used to talk about folks who have achieved financial independence or retired early.)

As it turns out, Suze Orman does not like the financial independence movement. In fact, she hates it. She hates it, she hates it, she hates it. Take a listen to this one-minute teaser:

 
 
 
 
 
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Ho. Lee. Moly. Listen to this. Then subscribe to hear Suze Orman elaborate. Search the “Afford Anything” podcast. Episode coming out on Monday!! #suzeorman

A post shared by Paula Pant (@paulapant) on

In my little world — the world of financial bloggers — this interview has exploded like a bomb. While a lot of folks are focusing on the content of Suze's comments, what I find fascinating is what her comments represent.

“Why do you think Suze hates the FIRE movement?” somebody asked me last Thursday night. (A few of us knew this interview was coming, and we knew what was going to be said. We could guess what the audience reaction would be.)

“I think she feels threatened,” I said. “Suze represents not only the old financial media, but also the world of traditional financial advice. The FIRE movement is an organic thing, one that's being led by bloggers and podcasters and YouTubers. And a big part of our platform is that you can do this yourself, that you don't need help from the Suze Ormans of the world. You can invest your money, and you can do it without paying anyone for help.”

“Interesting,” one of my friends said. “Do you think anyone will hear this interview?”

I laughed.

“Are you kidding? Based on what I know, this interview is going to blow up. Not only will every FIRE blogger share it with their audience, but so will tons of regular money bloggers like me. I wouldn't be surprised if this interview doubled Paula's audience.”

I haven't listened to the interview yet — because, hilariously enough, I've been spending time with Paula here in Clearwater — but I'm dying to do so.

I'm willing to bet that Suze, who is a smart woman and actually has lots of great advice, makes some valid points in the interview. (Paula has been doing her best to defend her, I should add.) But man oh man, her attitude toward financial independence comes off as not only ignorant, but elitist. It's going to be very interesting to watch how this all plays out.

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Dave @ Accidental FIRE
Dave @ Accidental FIRE
1 year ago

Yep, ignorant and elitist were two words that came to my mind while I was listening to the interview. It was actually very hard to get through the whole thing.

VinTek
VinTek
1 year ago

Let’s see. You used the words “ignorant” and “elitist” without addressing a single statement made in the interview. You think maybe those terms could apply to you, given the nature of your post?

Dave @ Accidental FIRE
Dave @ Accidental FIRE
1 year ago
Reply to  VinTek

Ok, I’ll bite. She’s ignorant of the movement since she numerous times referred to FIRE folks as not wanting to work after they “retire”. I don’t know of any who want to do nothing. They want to do passion projects for work, and if those passion projects make money, then great. But it’s good to be in a position where you don’t need the money. But they will work, and she’s ignorant for not doing basic research to find that out. It’s on our blogs, read them. She’s elitist because of the numerous references to her millions and her private… Read more »

Dave @ Accidental FIRE
Dave @ Accidental FIRE
1 year ago
Reply to  VinTek

And oh by the way “ignorant” and “elitist” were JD’s words from the post that I quoted and agreed with. Did you even read the post?

VinTek
VinTek
1 year ago

But you said they came to your mind too. So you claim those words were your impression but disown them when called out on them? Really?

BTW, you still haven’t addressed the issues she raises up.

Dave @ Accidental FIRE
Dave @ Accidental FIRE
1 year ago
Reply to  VinTek

I gave you my reasons, you choose not to respond to my points.

Have a superb day!

Financial Samurai
Financial Samurai
1 year ago
Reply to  VinTek

I would say Suze is super confident, which I respect, but to the point of borderline arrogance and narcissism. It’s OK to say you are rich and the matriarch of finance once to establish your presence and build your brand on the podcast. But saying it multiple times feels off. What do you think?

I lean towards Suze’s view that it’s best to have more money and retire a little later. I think the sweet spot is 41-45 years old to maximize happiness and minimize regret.

The key is to run the numbers and be realistic.

Sam

Dave @ Accidental FIRE
Dave @ Accidental FIRE
1 year ago
Reply to  VinTek

@Financial Samurai – Oh I agree as well it’s best to have more money, in all cases. And probably best to retire a little later if possible. Another aspect is that she repeatedly portrayed all FIRE folks in the podcast as in their 30’s. That’s super early. I’m semi-retired in my mid 40’s, but someone who retires at 50 is still an early retirement. So she does the typical tactic of pointing the finger at the extreme, but in reality FIRE folks in their 30’s are not the norm. I’d say it’s mid-40’s. Lastly Paula gave her the hypothetical of… Read more »

VinTek
VinTek
1 year ago

Dave, You want me to respond to your points, here it is. Quite frankly, her manner is irrelevant. Her shtick has always been that “Suze knows best.” It’s all self-promotion and how much she has or her lifestyle isn’t relevant to me. What *is* relevant is that a lot of FIRE folks haven’t really experienced enough life to understand what kind of risks they’re taking on. Sh*t DOES happen, and a lot of people in the FIRE movement haven’t experienced it in enough depth to adequately prepare for those events. So let’s get down to the nitty-gritty. Leaving out her… Read more »

Dave @ Accidental FIRE
Dave @ Accidental FIRE
1 year ago
Reply to  VinTek

I do disagree and you can read here. And again, HAVE A GREAT DAY!!!!!!

https://affordanything.com/why-i-hate-the-fire-movement-says-suze-orman/#comment-367817

VinTek
VinTek
1 year ago

I dunno, Dave. Calling one of the most successful personal finance gurus in the country “Captain Obvious” doesn’t exactly strike as humble (the opposite of arrogant). But since your personal style isn’t relevant either, let’s just leave it at that. I think you’re right in that FIRE folks are better prepared for risk. But at the same time, I think that position puts you in a place where it’s a lot easier to be overconfident. You haven’t really refuted her point by point, just issued a blanket statement that you guys are in a better position than folks who are… Read more »

Bob
Bob
1 year ago
Reply to  VinTek

You know VinTek, I too see a few FIRE people underestimating risk, mostly younger folks, but Dave is not one of them! He knows more about risk in his little finger than most “risk managers” could ever dream. He called the Suze interview as he saw it and he is absolutely right. I lost all of the little faith I had in Suze after listening to that interview. She is fear mongering and praying on people that may not be thinking rationally. It was completely ridiculous.

Mysticaltyger
Mysticaltyger
1 year ago
Reply to  VinTek

Oh, the irony of VinTek calling people in the FI movement overconfident!

Katelyn
Katelyn
1 year ago
Reply to  VinTek

VinTek – I’d be curious to learn how the financial advisors that football player undoubtedly paid fared while all his commercial real estate holdings dragged him down into bankruptcy. I bet they did just fine, and that’s because financial advisors often prey on athletes’ deep pockets, young age/naivete, and ego to make themselves rich at the expense of their clients (there are several well known documentaries you can watch on this phenomenon). If that football player was overconfident as you suggest, it’s because he trusted the advice he was receiving from “experts” like Suze. There is risk whether you’re in… Read more »

VinTek
VinTek
1 year ago
Reply to  VinTek

Katelyn,

I suspect that the football player did indeed get his advice from financial “experts,” but not ones like Suze Orman, David Bach or other advisors of that nature, who advocate living beneath one’s means and investing in index funds. Seriously, I don’t think most *personal* finance advisors have or seek multi-millionaire clients. Do you seriously think all financial advisors are alike?

Ever hear of The Aperio Group? Here, check out their document on how to invest:

https://img1.wsimg.com/blobby/go/d592b2bc-ff7e-413f-930d-e686c77a7783/downloads/1cmggqjef_867126.pdf

VinTek
VinTek
1 year ago

But Bob, people even smarter than Dave are not immune to underestimating risk. Let me relate to you the story of LTCM, so told by William Bernstein. [quote]In 1994, former Salomon Brothers executive John Meriwether assembled the most brilliant group of financial experts ever seen, including Nobelists Myron Scholes and Robert Merton, into a firm called Long-Term Capital Management. Not only did his partners understand the mathematics behind their options-related strategies as well as anyone on Wall Street, but they were in many cases the inventors of these techniques. For a few years, their strategies worked like a charm and… Read more »

Mysticaltyger
Mysticaltyger
1 year ago
Reply to  VinTek

Honestly, if a $2M portfolio of 60% stocks and 40% bonds like Vanguard Balanced Index crashes and burns, we’re all going to have bigger things to worry about. At some point, you have to say “enough is enough”. There’s a limit to how much security money can bring in this world.

Mysticaltyger
Mysticaltyger
1 year ago

Yep, ignorant and elitist were the perfect descriptions for that interview. Paula did an awesome job maintaining her composure. She gave Suze all the rope she needed to hang herself, and that’s just what Suze did.

VinTek
VinTek
1 year ago
Reply to  Mysticaltyger

Yeah, yeah. No details. So where’s the irony of talking overconfident? Details, my man, details. I gave details of what could (and historically has) happened. Where are *your* details?

You sound like the little pig in the stick house laughing at the little pig in the straw house, while claiming that the little pig in the brick house is overcompensating.

Liz@ChiefMomOfficer
1 year ago

I’m looking forward to listening. I’ve decided I’ll keep an open mind. And go Paula for scoring the interview!

Eileen
Eileen
1 year ago

I listened to it. Granted, I’m not part of the FIRE community (in my 50s, kids just finished college, still working, still saving), but I didn’t find it outrageous. Her being opinionated is part of her deal, her persona, her “business”, so that didn’t offend/surprise me at all. I found the suggestion that someone needs 5-10 million in order to retire early a bit ridiculous, but I think her whole point is that: given the role she’s played in the financial advice community, she’s heard horror stories about what can ruin people financially. So the idea of a lean FIRE… Read more »

Freedom 40 Plan
Freedom 40 Plan
1 year ago

It’s an interesting interview. For me it shows that more than anything Suze doesn’t really understand the FIRE movement. She talks in circles during the interview, one moment berating FIRE, and the next moment espousing the merits of living within your means, paying off your mortgage, and enjoying time with loved ones. There is a lot of fear-mongering in the interview – which I guess is Suze’s way of trying to convince people they need to work forever and listen to people like her? At the end of the day – I think Suze is actually a FI supporter, but… Read more »

Eileen
Eileen
1 year ago

And one additional comment. I don’t think she hates the financial independence movement….she hates the Retire Early part of it.

RBD
RBD
1 year ago

JD… Starting the podcast with 3X “I hate it” probably got Suze off on the wrong foot for this crowd. But wow, such a compelling intro and kudos to Paula for immediately taking the conversation in that direction. Suze’s message was certainly not friendly toward the FIRE community, and I thought she went a little off the rails with the statements about AI and 25% unemployment in the future. Her numbers were all over the place. But Suze is very experienced at this and has spoken to many people about money over the years. So we should pay attention to… Read more »

Cindi
Cindi
1 year ago

Since you haven’t listened to the podcast yet, you have no entitlement to make a comment about Suze Orman. What she discusses, AI, Artificial Intelligence, is a very new concept breaking out onto the employment scene. Suze, as well as another well known retirement financial expert, Ric Edelman are about the only two I know discussing this soon-to-be phenomenal. Get with the program, everybody! AI is going to change the way people work, if they can get a job at all in the very near future. Granted, Suze is a very rich person and has no understanding that a person… Read more »

Tkat
Tkat
1 year ago
Reply to  Cindi

“Most of us will never have to face a hefty bill like that in our lifetimes. And many of us won’t be taking care of our parents.”

Sorry, but if you have parents & you live in the U.S., you probably *will* be taking care of them in their old age. Medicare doesn’t pay for long-term assisted living. America has no safety net. This is something most folks in the FIRE community forget about, either their family’s or their own long-term healthcare costs.

MK@Mompowered Life
1 year ago
Reply to  Tkat

I have to agree that many WILL be facing hefty medical bills and helping fund aging parents who have nothing saved. So many Americans do not have substantial retirement savings and are depending on social security and Medicare alone. It is NOT enough to support long-term care in many states, which is paid for out of pocket. That is why people like Suze Orman encourage these folks to work until 70, so that they can max their social security benefits and try and save some extra. At 35, I am in the sandwich generation raising three children and having to… Read more »

Cindi
Cindi
1 year ago
Reply to  Tkat

Both my parents have passed. My mom at age 58. My dad, at age 92. My father was a multi-millionaire. He remained in his home till 3 weeks before his death. My sister hired a live-in to care for him, cook and clean. She paid the assistant $600 a week, from my dad’s own money. As I said, most of us do not have to face a hefty bill such as Suze did. And yes! my parents saved for their own retirements. Unfortunately, my mother never got to enjoy it. As Ms. Orman stated, the people who earned $50K a… Read more »

Eileen
Eileen
1 year ago
Reply to  J.D. Roth

Of all the takeaways from the interview, her feeling “threatened” is not one of them. She makes money writing and speaking about money. I can’t imagine the FIRE community will ever put a dent in that revenue stream should she choose to tap into it from time to time.

VinTek
VinTek
1 year ago
Reply to  J.D. Roth

What is the value of your opinion on a particular subject if you are willing to pass judgment on a person (as “threatened by the FIRE message”) who has a different opinion before you even hear what they have to say?

VinTek
VinTek
1 year ago
Reply to  J.D. Roth

But I’m not sure that they really feel threatened (as a class). As much as I admire the FIRE movement, it barely scratches the kind of audience the big mainstream financial advisers get. The gist of Suze’s argument is that the FIRE movement hasn’t really been tested over time the way conventional advice has. People who’ve retired early tend to be young (that’s why there’s an “E” in FIRE) and you only hear from those who haven’t yet encountered post-retirement adversity. Those that do not survive adversity are not heard from (survivor bias), so you don’t typically hear those stories.… Read more »

VinTek
VinTek
1 year ago
Reply to  J.D. Roth

JD,

Sent you an e-mail relating to one of the kinds of things that could happen (and in this case, did happen) to an individual. Things turned out alright for him, but it’s a cautionary tale about what could happen to some FIRE advocates as they (and particularly, their parents) get older. You may find it interesting.

HeadsCarolinaTailsCalifornia
HeadsCarolinaTailsCalifornia
1 year ago
Reply to  Cindi

Have you taken a look at the trinity study? The money tends to grow over time, it’s not just the same flat amount you started with because the 4% rule is fairly conservative. Also if we need to get with the program… how am I supposed to keep working if AI will take my job whether I retire early or retire at 70. It just sounds like I can’t get a job either way…

Spencer
Spencer
1 year ago

Just a nitpick on your last sentence, if the assumption is technology will put many out of work, we should earn as much as we can now as we will not have that luxury in the future. If we retire now and the funds run out, the job options won’t be there in the future, etc. In reality though, society would not be able to support 25% unemployment so something would need to change (i.e. universal income). Love the name by the way. Currently a bay area native, but looking to get out of the rat race and North Carolina… Read more »

Joe
Joe
1 year ago

I’ll check it out. I like Suze. She’s one of the better old time gurus. I’m sure she has some valid points. Her message is geared toward the masses. Maybe that’s why she doesn’t like FIRE. It doesn’t work for everyone.

Fred Leamnson
Fred Leamnson
1 year ago

It was a fascinating interview, to say the least. To me, it was a typical Suze Orman interview. She’s masterful at getting media attention. She sprinkled in several promos for a book, her show, and various other things. Like many media personalities, this was all about Suze, not the FIRE movement. Another commenter said her problem is with the retire early part of it. I agree with that. If FIRE would remove the RE and just advocate for financial independence, I think they would be better off. Suze, or anyone else for that matter, would be hard pressed to argue… Read more »

Frank
Frank
1 year ago
Reply to  Fred Leamnson

THIS!

Morgan
Morgan
1 year ago

I don’t pay any attention to Suze Orman anymore. She came to popularity when I was in my 20s and for a while I read her stuff. But then I realized something: she’s all about credit scores! The fact is that if you have enough cash, your credit score won’t matter.
There a great documentary about her on YouTube that really does a good job of showing how she’s all about her partnerships and making money, even if the advice she gives and the crap she hawks is crap.

Willie
Willie
1 year ago

Suze is the definition of someone who will never have enough.

Even though she’s nearly 70, has amassed more than enough for her and her heirs presumably for the rest of their lives, she’s still pushing propaganda in order to earn herself and her business more clients. That’s all this is. Pure GREED. She’s worried about the FIRE movement taking prospective clients away from her.

In the words of a great man by the name of Bogle, unlike most else in the investing/financial world… He’s got ‘…enough.’. Suze will never have enough.

VinTek
VinTek
1 year ago
Reply to  Willie

So when she does it, she’s greedy. But when FIRE advocates continue to blog (all the while getting ad money) and saying by definition, that they’re financially independent, they’re passionate. Okay…

Eric @ Flip n Finances
Eric @ Flip n Finances
1 year ago

Suze hates the RE movement because of the pain it can bring to people who don’t properly plan for everything or for the unexpected. She states that you shouldn’t retire early with a net worth of $2million or less. As with all financial advice, everyone’s situation is different and you need to do what’s right for you. Plan for the worst. Hope for the best. What is the cost you’d have to care for your parents for 20 years? Do they already have money set aside for that? If not, how will you pay for it? Proper life planning and… Read more »

Jen G
Jen G
1 year ago

I subscribe to Paula’s podcast and was pleasantly surprised to see the interview pop up. Suze Orman was the first financial guru that I followed. And as much as I love and appreciate what I’ve learned from the FIRE community, I get tired of the same voices and everyone interviewing each other. There is a lot of self congratulation going on. But, man….it was cringy! She seemed desperate and out of touch. I hate to say it, but her rants reminded me a little of Trump. I was out on a run while I was listening and I kept thinking,… Read more »

Jacob G.
Jacob G.
1 year ago

This podcast and a lot of the comments reinforces to me, who granted is not part of the FIRE movement and in one of those $50k/yr public service jobs Suze talks about, just the need to be prepared if you’re going to undertake something like this. Of course catastrophes happen, and you need to have some way to account for that like plenty of insurance to protect that as well as protect your assets. I’m sure that’s something very natural and priority #1 for FIRE people, though. The talk about the $30,000 a month for her mother’s care though strikes… Read more »

Jim
Jim
1 year ago

“Two million bucks is nothing! It’s Pennies” say wha?

Jim
Jim
1 year ago
Reply to  Jim

she also seemed to focus on a static $80K per year, not assuming a 4% withdrawl rate that should increase as the value of the portfolio increases.

Luke Calvano
Luke Calvano
1 year ago

Her argument boils down to the fact that ER people draw down their account over a longer horizon and so they are more susceptible to long-term capital impairment (market crash, medical emergency, communist overthrow)…. “Golly Gee Suze, that simple mathematical concept never occurred to one of us before…” said nobody ever. This is mostly fear-mongering. Content wise, her diatribe is often defensible, but she’s condescending in delivery. She shames instead of shares. When she finally talks about finding a passion/profession that you want to do until the day you die, she seems to miss the vital concept that early retirement,… Read more »

S.G.
S.G.
1 year ago
Reply to  Luke Calvano

“You can always go back to work. ”

I disagree with this statement. Often the reasons you would go back to work would preclude your ability to do so.

Angela @ Tread Lightly Retire Early
Angela @ Tread Lightly Retire Early
1 year ago

The most interesting bit to me was that I think she would applaud the FIRE community if it was just about FI. I’d dare say we are more likely to have contingency plans and be set up for unknown future disasters than the average, and there are plenty of us who don’t see leanFI as the ticket to escaping our jobs forever.

Paula was fabulous.

Steveark
Steveark
1 year ago

She is crazy like a fox! That interview with Paula has done just as she intended, it has gone viral and even the elite of the elite, which would be you of course, are helping pull her out of retirement by noticing someone who had literally dropped off the world’s radar in disgrace over a couple of really off the wall business ventures that forced her into obscurity. I’ve observed Suze when she isn’t on stage and she is a genuinely warm and kind person but she is also a brilliant business woman and she’s back. Just think of her… Read more »

Patrice
Patrice
1 year ago

I haven’t listened to the podcast, but isn’t she doing what people all over Fincon were telling us to do last week? HAVE AN OPINION AND BE CONTROVERSIAL. She’s doing exactly that and getting tons of attention for it. It’s also a huge win for Paula.

S.G.
S.G.
1 year ago
Reply to  Patrice

Shhhhhhh!

First rule of Fight Club, yo!

Eileen
Eileen
1 year ago
Reply to  S.G.

These 2 posts are very interesting.

S.G.
S.G.
1 year ago
Reply to  Eileen

I wasn’t there. I just figured it’s a bit of inside baseball the rest of us aren’t supposed to realize.

Sara Mayo
Sara Mayo
1 year ago

Gail Vax Oxlade is another female financial guru who feels similarly to Suze. I saw an article somewhere else where Gail was asked about early retirement and she thought it was, um, unnecessary. They can think whatever they want, I don’t want to work until I’m 60. I don’t think it’s purely selfishness on their part, I think people interested in financial independence are probably more likely than most to buy their books and watch their shows.

Coopersmith
Coopersmith
1 year ago

I am not a fan of Suze and it is not that I hate her but the times that I have watched her half of her advice was OK and the other half was way off base. Her good debt bad debt taking the one time was awful advice. Debt it debt and to take on debt is taking on debt no matter how you look at it. Just because I could qualify for a “good debt”loan on a house for $250k does not mean I should. As a matter of fact I only took on $120k instead of the… Read more »

Jaime
Jaime
1 year ago

I listened to the interview and it was a mixed bag for me…she talked about Artificial Intelligence taking off (which is a legit concern), but I’ve also heard economists say that when AI comes there will be old jobs that will go away and new jobs that will come in. The argument I’ve heard economists say is that this has happened throughout history many times with new technology is coming in. By the way the AI concern has been around since at least the 1800s, this is not a new concern. I’ve read up a looot on AI because I’m… Read more »

Cathy
Cathy
1 year ago

I thought the podcast was really interesting and Paula did a great job. While I think Suze had some really good points, she didn’t do a good job explaining them. She had that knee-jerk reaction to retirement that I see so much in the media. “Don’t you dare take a penny of your Social Security a minute earlier than you absolutely have to!” There is a lot of bias about that in the media and it’s hard not to get frustrated because the truth is a lot more nuanced. She also had that attitude toward retirement that it’s somehow morally… Read more »

Financial Samurai
Financial Samurai
1 year ago

It was a great interview. Suze has super confidence and insights. But she’s a little too narcissistic for me.

It’s true though that bad things that cost money tend to happen more often as we age. At least, we need to take care of our parents.

I’ve put together an after-tax investment amount guide by age to help folks who want to retire early. It took FOREVER to put together. Love to get some feedback. The numbers are important. Don’t just wing it folks!

Sam

zzzzzz
zzzzzz
1 year ago

JD, the FIRE movement existed long before blogs, podcasts, and YouTube, although without the acronym.

I can remember reading a lot of articles about it 25 to 30 years ago in magazines like Money, Kiplinger’s, and Smart Money.

Bob
Bob
1 year ago

My God, I tried to listen to it but had to skip around a little bit just to get through it. I think she might be loosing her marbles. She was just ranting on and on with inconsistent irrational numbers and always looking at all the horrible things that could happen. I thought she might eventually say something about planning and saving enough in case an ateroid hits earth. The only thing intelligent she said is to try and find a job that you like to do while you are working.

SL
SL
2 months ago
Reply to  Bob

Agree. I think she has a valid point to some extent, but articulated it horribly.

S.G.
S.G.
1 year ago

I think her numbers were off, likely due to the fact that she was throwing them out off the cuff as well as her own experience being skewed high due to her wealth, but I think many of her points were valid. For starters she was working from a different definition of “retire”. This goes back to the word police: you have to agree on definitions before you disagree on the higher points. And in this case she is talking about someone who a) stops work entirely, b) doesn’t start a new business/job/etc. and c) withdraws their 4-5% per year.… Read more »

Suz
Suz
1 year ago
Reply to  S.G.

Writing in as a Canadian, I was shocked at the 30k figure for her moms healthcare. Is there insurance in the states that covers extended care? I can’t imagine how your average person regardless when they retire could cover such expenses. Even at 10k per month.

Adam
Adam
1 year ago

I keep seeing this argument that you won’t be able to go back and get a job if things don’t go exactly as planned after FIRE and it doesn’t make much sense. We spend a lot of energy on getting our expenses down to a small percentage of our incomes. Once I reach FIRE, if there’s a massive bust and I need to work to preserve capital what sort of job do I need? Do I need the job I had before that enables saving 75% of income? No, i need a job that earns just enough to cover the… Read more »

S.G.
S.G.
1 year ago
Reply to  Adam

It’s not just the economy. What if its an injury ornillness that has increased your expenses? You may be unable to work.

And maybe you could be a barista. But I am not convinced a wildly overqualified person with no job history for the last 2 decades looks as good to a hiring manager as many seem to think.

VinTek
VinTek
1 year ago
Reply to  Adam

Remember that you’re not only competing for that barista job with other FIRE practitioners, but everybody who was laid off in the bad economy. In bad economies, there are usually more applicants than jobs. What makes you think you can actually get that job standing on your head? It’s not as if your particular skillset is going to set you apart from other candidates if you’re looking to be unskilled labor.

SL
SL
2 months ago

It has been a while since I watched that interview, but I recall is that Orman had a valid point, but articulated it horribly. I think what she intended to say (or at least what I would have said) is that retiring in your 20’s or 30’s is probably not going to work out in the long run. The long run being the 60, 70, or 80 years that you will have to live off of whatever nest egg that you were able to accumulate in the first 10-20 years of your working life. When you think about life changes… Read more »

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