The war on work

I write a lot at Get Rich Slowly about Financial Independence, by which I essentially mean early retirement (or semi-retirement). That is, accumulating enough money that I no longer have to work. To me, escape from work has always seemed like the ultimate goal.

This is probably because my father held out retirement as a sort of Promised Land. He worked hard — if not always effectively — and he always made retirement and the end of work seem like the goal of life. And the sooner one reached retirement, the better.

But whenever I write about early retirement or Financial Independence, I get e-mail and comments from readers who never want to stop working. They love their jobs. Others write to say that we're not supposed like the work that we do, but we're supposed to do it anyhow. It builds character, and helps us pay the bills.

I've never found these arguments convincing. To me, early retirement has remained the goal.

Dirty Jobs

Last week, Eileen e-mailed a link to a video with a one-line explanation. “This video is WEIRD and COOL and speaks to many GRS ideas like working and satisfaction,” she wrote. Yesterday, I finally had a chance to watch it. This video made me pause to reconsider my notion of work:

I didn't know what to think at first. Mike Rowe, the host of Discovery Channel's Dirty Jobs and the voice of Deadliest Catch, starts by relating an anecdote about castrating lambs with his teeth. “What does this have to do with Get Rich Slowly?” I wondered — but because his story was so compelling, I kept watching for all 20 minutes, 34 seconds. Turns out there is a connection.

It takes about half the presentation for Rowe to make his point, but eventually he does. “People with dirty jobs are happier than you think,” he says. “As a group, they're the happiest people I know.” And his work on Dirty Jobs has led him to realize that there are a lot of misconceptions about work in the United States.

Example: Rowe notes that a lot of people say that you ought to “follow your passion”, and that if you do then things will work out. But that's not always the case. Millions of people chase their dreams but never reach them. Meanwhile, millions more do work they're not passionate about, but which brings them fulfillment (and sometimes riches) anyhow.

We hear these messages over and over and over again so that we, too, come to believe that work is something to be fought against. It's something to be avoided or escaped. Work has been marginalized. It's looked down upon. In essence, there's a war on work.

The War on Work

“We've declared war on work. As a society. All of us,” Rowe says. “We didn't set out to do it […] but we've done it. And we've waged this war on at least four fronts.” The war on work is being fought:

  • In Hollywood. “The way we portray working people on TV — it's laughable,” Rowe says. “We turn them into heroes, or we turn them into punch-lines.” Television and movies don't do a good job of making work complex and three-dimensional.
  • On Madison Avenue. The central message of so many commercials is, “your life would be better if you could work a little less, if you didn't have to work so hard, if you could get home a little earlier, if you could retire a little faster, if you could punch out a little sooner.”
  • In Washington. Lawmakers use work as a political tool, exploiting our notions of work for their own gain. And the policies they implement shape the way we view work.
  • In Silicon Valley. New technology changes the way we think about work, and changes the way we actually do our work. Not all of these changes are bad, Rowe says, but overall technological advancement contributes to the war on work.

“The collective effect of all of that has been this marginalization of lots and lots of jobs,” Rowe says. “Somebody needs to be out there talking about the forgotten benefits [of work].” He believes that what's needed is a PR campaign for work.

Rowe says that the war on work has casualties, just like any other war. For one, the U.S. infrastructure is a shambles. To make matters worse, trade school enrollment is dropping fast, meaning we won't have enough workers to rebuild that infrastructure. In order for this to change, we have to stop marginalizing work and start talking about the benefits.

The Forgotten Benefits of Work

I'm disappointed that Rowe's presentation ends before he can explore this topic further. I'd like to know more about what he thinks are the hidden benefits of work. After thinking about it most of the day, I have a short list of my own:

  • Work gives us meaning. I know plenty of people who hate their jobs. I've had shitty jobs too — jobs I've hated and wanted desperately to leave. But almost without exception, the folks I know who are happiest are those who work hard, even if they don't have jobs they love. And those who are unhappiest? They're the ones without jobs for one reason or another. Does the unhappiness lead to the lack of work? Or does the lack of work make people unhappy? I'm not sure, but they seem to be connected.
  • Work gives us money. For most people, their career will be the single largest source of income they have in their life. Your health is your most important asset, but your career is a close second. Your career is your cash machine, which is why I stress the importance of networking and learning how to negotiate your salary. Without work, you probably don't have the resources for anything else either.
  • Work builds relationships. Again, for most people, their jobs are their primary social activity. I'm not saying this is good or bad, but it's true. When you spend 40 hours a week with a group of people, you come to know them. In many cases, your co-workers become your friends. And work also teaches you how to build other relationships, especially through networking.
  • Work builds skills. And, of course, work teaches us to do stuff. I wasn't born knowing how to write. Sure, I learned some theoretical stuff about writing in all of the classes I've taken, but most of what I know (which still isn't much) is a result of tens of thousands of hours of actual writing. By doing the work, I've built the skills. The same is true of any work we do.

Though I found Rowe's presentation entertaining and thought-provoking, I don't agree with him completely. (I rarely agree with anyone completely.) For one, I still think that you ought to follow your passions, if it's feasible. Yes, people can get into trouble if they're slavish to this advice, but I truly believe that work you love can be tremendously fulfilling.

Still, I may have to re-evaluate my dogged pursuit of Financial Independence. I've already been shifting my aim from an ideal of early retirement to one of simply semi-retirement (in which I'd continue to work in some fashion). Maybe work isn't the enemy. Maybe there are reasons to keep doing something I love.

What do you think about work? Is it marginalized in our society? Do you think there's a war on work? If so, what should we do about it? What sorts of benefits does work provide? Do you love your work, or do you hope to retire as soon as possible? Or both?

More about...Career

Become A Money Boss And Join 15,000 Others

Subscribe to the GRS Insider (FREE) and we’ll give you a copy of the Money Boss Manifesto (also FREE)

Yes! Sign up and get your free gift
Become A Money Boss And Join 15,000 Others
guest
129 Comments
Oldest
Newest Most Voted
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Andy
Andy
9 years ago

I ‘m not sure I agree that work has been devalued. I think we have a work ethic that encourages people to work for the sake of work, and I’ve lived that to some degree. At the same time, this idea of working hard as the savior has made us hate work. So work is supposed to be both incredibly important and full of suffering at the same time. I think often the people with the ‘dirty’ jobs are happiest because they don’t obsess about work. In a way, the best job I had was doing manual labor for a… Read more »

leslie
leslie
9 years ago

I have never thought of work as the enemy but I do still aspire to retire someday. But for me, retirement isn’t about quitting work. It is about have the OPTION to quit work if I want to. Or go part time. Or change my work to something that pays less but that I want to try out. It is about having choices. Giving myself flexibility. No matter how much I may love my job, I may not always be able to work full time for some reason (my health, a loved one’s health, ageism etc. etc.). I am always… Read more »

Kent @ The Financial Philosopher
Kent @ The Financial Philosopher
9 years ago

As with everything, I believe there is a balance that one must find. If you work in a job you hate, waiting for the end of the day, the end of the week, the vacation, and retirement, you are not living, you are surviving: You are in the future and wasting the present, which is where life is…

No matter what one does for a living, whether it is short-term or long-term, if there is life balance and attention to the present moment, one is enabled to LIVE the day, not just survive it.

Kate
Kate
9 years ago

I got my dream job (the one I had been dreaming of since I was a kid) when I was 23. I’ve been there ever since. A few thoughts on it: 1) All is not always sunshine and roses, even at your dream job. Dream jobs occasionally come with crazy bosses, for example. My mum used to say “if you like 80% of your job, that’s enough. You’ll never love 100% of it”. 2) We (royal we) have set ourselves up on a strange treadmill. We spend elementary school preparing for high school, high school competing to get into a… Read more »

leslie
leslie
9 years ago

Sorry…I apparently have a lot to say about this topic today… Another thing to consider is that what you are passionate about or what you consider your dream job today can change dramatically. Our lives are not static – circumstances change. I said above that my work in advertising was not my passion. However, when I graduated from college getting a job in advertising was my idea of a dream job. It was fun and exciting for awhile. Then I decided I wanted to have kids. Working in an ad agency is a grind – I routinely worked 10 –… Read more »

Jennifer B
Jennifer B
9 years ago

Don’t usually nitpick the grammar and spelling on a website, but thought I’d point out something the spell checker missed:

“accumulating enough money that I know longer have to work.”

I’m pretty sure that’s supposed to be “I no longer have to work”

Andrew
Andrew
9 years ago

I believe the ultimate goal in life is not necessarily retirement, but complete control over one’s actions. For me at least, my unhappiness at work stems mostly from tasks I “have to do” while I actually enjoy the moments where I’m free to work on something I choose to do. I want to feel like I’m controlling my own destiny.

Everyday Tips
Everyday Tips
9 years ago

I think the view on work has shifted in the United States. I was talking to someone last week that was complaining about their job, and I know I complained plenty about my job when I was working. During our discussion, I thought about my friend’s father that worked in a steel mill. He NEVER complained about work. It was something you did, and you accepted it. It wasn’t a requirement that work emotionally and intellectually fulfilled you. It was a means to provide for your family. I think people are looking for their job to fulfill so many aspects… Read more »

Nicole
Nicole
9 years ago

Financial independence doesn’t necessarily exclude work or even work for pay. It means being able to do what you want rather than what you have to do for money. In YMoYL the authors talk about how FI can make the job more pleasant because you’re more willing to take risks or do what you want because walking away isn’t a bad option anymore. That can lead to being a better worker. I did finish a rant on following your dream career last night, but it’s queued up for our blog sometime in October. Really most people aren’t passionate enough about… Read more »

J.D. Roth
J.D. Roth
9 years ago

@Jennifer B (#6)
Oh, good grief. That’s terrible! I’m not sure how I even made that error. It always amazes me how I can make the stupidest mistakes sometimes. 🙂

Fortunately, you folks are pretty good about letting me know when I have a blatant spelling or grammar mistake. I appreciate it.

Sandy L
Sandy L
9 years ago

That was one of the best motivational speeches I think I’ve ever seen. Wow, Mike Rowe is a great public speaker. My opinion is that we need to be constantly reminding ourselves that we should appreciate the jobs we have and learn to value the things that are fun about them. All jobs have aspects that are grueling and stressful, but if they are more good than bad, then that’s good enough for me. We need to get rid of entitlement. It wasn’t that long ago when people worked until the day they died. People didn’t retire, they wore out.… Read more »

ami
ami
9 years ago

What a thought-provoking post. Like some of your readers, I have thought that pursuing one’s passion as a career is the pinnacle of success (especially if you get paid well to do so). This can be a limiting belief if you start to tell yourself that you cannot be satisfied doing work that is NOT your passion. The idea of doing tough work AND being satisfied even if it’s not your passion opens up a lot of possibilities. For one thing, you could do hard work outside of your passion – AND work on your passion during non-work hours –… Read more »

Melissa
Melissa
9 years ago

I want the freedom to not have to be in a job I don’t like. I’ve had jobs where I was frustrated, where my talents were not appreciated, where I had to wear things I hated to work and had a couple of bosses who were really verbally abusive and just bizarre, and my co-workers and I had to pretend it was normal. They were dysfunctional jobs! I have my own business now, and I work hard. It’s a lot of stuff I enjoy, like marketing houses and renting out properties to people. There’s also bad parts, like having to… Read more »

Greg
Greg
9 years ago

I think the war on work has less to do with not working and has more to do with having meaningful work. One thing you have to ask yourself is why do we work. Let’s remove the “passion” part of the equation and look strictly at the monetary aspect. We work to live and provide for ourselves and our family. None of us wake up with the option to choose not to work unless you come from a family of wealth. So understanding that work comes from necessity then it would seem that if we have to work, let’s atleast… Read more »

bon
bon
9 years ago

I definitely fantasize about having a blue-collar job, something that I can create or change at the end of the day instead of the rather abstract consulting work that I do. I also think that I am coming from a position of privilege (read: choice) in this, in that I have the experience and education to exercise the option to not have a blue-collar job. I really think that JD, you hit it on the head for me when you mentioned building a skill. I can absolutely build skills in my current area, but those skills are so abstract and… Read more »

imelda
imelda
9 years ago

What a magnificent post, JD. I think it’s absolutely true that we have waged a war on work. Some of the commenters above me made some excellent points: #8 said “He NEVER complained about work. It was something you did, and you accepted it.” And Sandy in # 11 said “We need to get rid of entitlement.” Victor Hugo wrote in Les Miserables “Work is the law of life, and to reject it as boredom is to submit to it as torment.” As Ami says in #12, I think many of us fantasize about finding our “dream job” and let… Read more »

Paul
Paul
9 years ago

The best advice I ever got: “Do what you are good at for a living so you can afford to do what you love” I don’t love my job. But I am very, very good at it, and I make a very good living doing it. That good living allows me to do the things I love. The goal of retirement I think is too simple. The goal should be the ability and independence to do what you want, instead of doing it because you must. Put yourself in a financial position where if you were to get laid off… Read more »

Lindsay
Lindsay
9 years ago

Infrastructure is failing because people don’t want to work? Really? So if you wanted to repair all the bridges in the US and put out some job adverts, you wouldn’t get thousands of replies, then?

Colleen
Colleen
9 years ago

Russel Honore, Work is a Blessing: This I Believe: http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=101267379 Work is wonderful and fulfilling and good in so many ways. But I watch myself constantly that work does not become my life or who I am. My father did that, and he spent the last five years of his life, those years when he was no longer strong enough to work, miserable. He would walk around telling anyone who would listen how awful retirement was. The real issue was that he never had any sense of accomplishment or achievement outside of his job. As one of his seven children,… Read more »

Shalom
Shalom
9 years ago

Everyday Tips (@8) – good point; I agree. And I think it’s culturally expected that we complain about our work. And it’s dangerous for me to complain, or to listen to coworkers’ complaints, too much, because the complaints become self-fulfilling. I like my job better when I just try to do it well, and avoid the bitching. I also like Sandi’s comments (@11). Nicole (@9) – I strongly agree with your last paragraph! I often feel like I’m in some defensive underclass of people, The Ones Without a Guiding Passion. The whole “follow your bliss” thing used to tie me… Read more »

Kent
Kent
9 years ago

I think our society has devalued general labor and the importance it has as a “cog in the wheel”. We have taken the stand that everyone has a right to attend college and turned it into everyone should attend college. Some trades I would contend don’t warrent a college education and we desperately need people to do them. But this has been frowned upon to the younger population as a less than desirable career. Funny thing is some of the wealthiest people I know are not college educated but highly skilled through years of experience in general labor fields, such… Read more »

Nicole
Nicole
9 years ago

@20 There just aren’t that many positions available for sleeping in and reading novels (my passions…) And you’re right, life is a lot better if you can be happy doing many things rather than only ever trying out one specific thing. If you can find employment doing it, great, but there’s something to be said for flexibility and variety and quiet happiness. Not that there’s anything wrong with passion, but nobody wants to burn out either. The best kind of marriage is domestic bliss punctuated by short bouts of passion. (And it’s more socially acceptable to change partners or have… Read more »

Wayne Mates
Wayne Mates
9 years ago

A thought provoking article. Work is without question one of the necessities of life. We work and exchange our labor for the fruits of other people’s labor. Shortly after I graduated from college, I set a goal to retire at 50. I missed that goal by 4 months! I spent a year in retirement and that turned out to be the most boring year of my life. I hadn’t planned what to do and so just drifted from travel to projects to staring at the TV. I went back to work. When I worked previously, I had worked in my… Read more »

James Bailey
James Bailey
9 years ago

I think there is a war against hard work. I believe a lot of young people over the past 10-15 years that grew up working with their fathers, grandfathers, and uncles in a skilled trade like carpentry, concrete, plumbing, house building, etc. have abandoned the family trade to get into high tech jobs or other non-labor related careers.

trb
trb
9 years ago

I was definitely happiest when working construction jobs – there’s a feeling of accomplishment on site, and then the whole evening was available for personal growth. But, we need to recognize that most of the folks in the jobs Rowe is talking about will HAVE to retire at some point. The body can only take so much physical work before it begins to break down. That’s why I shifted to grad school and white-collar career, to make sure I can work long enough to support myself. The reason retirement was the big dream at the end of the road for… Read more »

Frugal Texas Gal
Frugal Texas Gal
9 years ago

Ive not read all the responses. I think for many people, retirement means working if and when you choose, rather than because you have to. Personally, im not financially independent and never will be even in retirement, but that seems to be the general consensus. That said, I have a brother whose a Salmon fisherman on the alaska coast. He’s forty nine. If you asked him, he would tell you that it’s what he does and he loves it.

Paula
Paula
9 years ago

I think the point is that once you reach Financial Independence, working becomes a choice rather than an obligation. Retirement is not freedom FROM work, but rather freedom TO work (if you so desire.)

Megan
Megan
9 years ago

I’m with #13. When you work at a job you loathe, it doesn’t matter what you are actually doing from 9-5. It’s the attitude of the workplace that makes a huge difference.

That being said, I was taught that work = paycheck, and nothing more. I think that leads to a dismal attitude, and that it will be almost impossible to come in to work every morning.

MutantSupermodel
MutantSupermodel
9 years ago

I’m going to say, to me at least, there is a stigma involved with “work” and I blame media. Also I have a feeling it’s only going to get worse before it gets better. We see on TV, the internet, magazines and newspapers millions of stories of people who “made it” with a get rich quick scheme or a lucky break (right place right time syndrome). We see athletes, actors, and musicians with enormous decadent homes living these completely indulgent, above the law lifestyles. We are constantly blasted with images of these people who seem to be doing what they… Read more »

Eileen
Eileen
9 years ago

I followed my passion, which was languages, and I went to grad school to become a linguist. It didn’t work out because this interest of mine did not translate into work that I liked or was good at. Then I went to library school. This was a professional degree with hands-on field work and training. I got a job that I love, but which I leave at work when it’s time to go home. Then I wrote a novel about a linguist, a fiction of work, which has taken more energy and focus than most of my at-the-office tasks. I… Read more »

Chris
Chris
9 years ago

The Bible right from the start says that God created work for us. First in Genesis 1:26… Then God said, “Let us make man in our image… By being made in His image we like to work too. Further on, in Genesis 2:15… The LORD God took the man and put him in the Garden of Eden to work it and take care of it. There is never any mention of “retirement” in the Bible. In fact, after Adam and Eve sinned, God says is Genesis 3:17… To Adam he said, “Because you listened to your wife and ate from… Read more »

Sam
Sam
9 years ago

It is called work no fun for a reason, something someone told me along the way. I generally enjoy my career and the work that goes along with it, but I spend too many horus at work and too much time working (my boss and my clients expect me to repond to e-mails 24 hours a day, on weekends and on vacation). My schedule has gotten more demanding during the recession since we have been doing more with less. We did finally hire a couple of new people which over time will help. I’m not sure what I would do… Read more »

Michele
Michele
9 years ago

I do think that work – specifically “labor” – is undervalued in America, both literally and figuratively. In the most general sense – amongst people with college degrees and non-labor intensive jobs – the idea of working as a tradesman or otherwise performing manual labor is anathema. These jobs are often seen as menial – despite the fact that they usually require a tremendous amount of training, effort, skill and artistry. However, I think much of the “fault” for this lies with the people who made careers of these jobs and raised their children to strive for and expect more.… Read more »

LoveBeingRetired
LoveBeingRetired
9 years ago

I think along the lines of Leslie #2 and Melissa #13 (love Melissa’s want for “freedom to not have a job I don’t like”). The option to leave the working world and retire is what I am looking for. The option to follow my passion without having to worry about the money being generated except as a nice-to-have. In numerous positions throughout my career, I have had to force myself to get out of bed each morning, not knowing what awaited me when I walked in the door but fearing the worst. There were always benefits such as the people… Read more »

PB
PB
9 years ago

I love what I do, but have been doing it for the past 32 years, 26 of them in my current position. I have about 8 years to go to retirement, and now that the kids are grown, want to do something else. It isn’t really feasible to leave at this point, and actually, we don’t want to do so. I am taking graduate classes now in a related field, so that when we retire, I can take small contracts around the country, and we can go live different places and explore different areas without going much into our retirement… Read more »

Gabriel
Gabriel
9 years ago

Interesting that I’m finishing up Atlus Shrugged right now. I got a “This is John Galt speaking…” vibe from this entire article.

“There is no such thing as a lousy job — only lousy men who don’t care to do it.”

wendy
wendy
9 years ago

this was a very thought provoking article for me. i am currently unemployed and looking. my situation has caused me to re-evaluate the very concepts you are talking about. i don’t want to be that schlep that works at a job i hate for thirty years just to get the retirement benefits. i would rather do the things i want to do now, rather than wait for a retirement that may or may not come. i have always believed, up until now, that work is something you are not supposed to like but do because you have to. fortunately for… Read more »

elisabeth
elisabeth
9 years ago

I think that JD’s four benefits are all equally available in retirement: MEANING: Perhaps if I’d been a brain surgeon I might have found more meaning in what I did, but really, defining myself through my job would not have provided much meaning for me. It’s only since I’ve retired that I’ve been able to pursue most completely the real meaning of my life. I’m more myself, more able to “know myself” as the philosophers encourage us to do, and I’m more aware of what is important in life (surprise — it doesn’t seem to be meeting meaningless deadlines!). MONEY:… Read more »

Turling
Turling
9 years ago

I remember my first real thinking about work years ago when I was reading John Grisham’s The Firm. In it, there is a piece from the main character where he talks about how his life will go. Paraphrasing, it goes something like I’ll work 100 hours a week for 10 or 15 years and then retire a rich man. I thought about this section quite a bit. First of all, 100 hours a week sounds miserable no matter what you’re doing, except perhaps breathing. Second, he must hate being a lawyer, his chosen profession for those of you who didn’t… Read more »

Mark
Mark
9 years ago

As someone who was a manager at a Fortune 100 company, the biggest problem I had with my employees was finding enough *meaningful* work for them to do. At the end of the day, most of the people that worked for me felt like they had accomplished nothing, as our group was caught up in the bureaucracy and inertia that comes with working for any large organization. I think what it really comes down to is this: no one wants to be stuck in a job they can’t quit (for whatever reason — mortgage, student loans, family obligations, etc) which… Read more »

lijakaca
lijakaca
9 years ago

I’m also getting an Ayn Rand vibe from the comments more than the article, and frankly it seems myopic. Yes, the trades have been devalued throughout the years, but don’t blame that on the government. Corporations have continuously eroded consumer rights and consumer information (by buying up media until even the news is owned and operated by partisan interests) through the decades, while keeping downward pressure on low to middle-class wages and trying to force out unions – the same unions whose members, blue-collar workers in the thousands, fought and stood up for their rights. It seems that many people… Read more »

Brenton
Brenton
9 years ago

I’ve loved reading the comments, they have been as thought provoking as the original post. I do what I do because I was good at it when I started my career. I dont like what I do, though, and because of that I havent kept up on the latest and greatest theories, practices, and technology. Now, I just sort of cruise along, working just hard enough to keep my job. I peruse the want ads on a weekly basis, looking for something I *want* to do that pays close to what I make now. I also fantasize about a blue… Read more »

Nicole
Nicole
9 years ago

@41 Great comment! There never was a rosy back-in-the-day. Like the Daily Show pointed out, back-in-the-day you were a kid, and being a kid everything seems a lot simpler. I’d also like to add that I never heard my grandfathers complain about work, mainly because they were dead long before I was born. Not saying that heart attacks at prime age are work related, but… And back-in-the-day a lot of women weren’t allowed to work, especially if they were married. It’s hard to complain about something you’re not allowed to do. And my grandma did occasionally complain about her job…… Read more »

Gabriel
Gabriel
9 years ago

“Yes, the trades have been devalued throughout the years, but don’t blame that on the government. Corporations have continuously eroded consumer rights and consumer information (by buying up media until even the news is owned and operated by partisan interests)…”

How can you not blame that on the government? You said it yourself that the media and news were bought up and are now owned and operated by partisan interests.

Rosa
Rosa
9 years ago

I think there’s been a war on work waged by managers – they want to think that their employees are all replaceable, unskilled, and lazy/needing to be constantly micromanaged and harangued, because that makes the supervisors and managers feel like their own work is more important. I’ve had a number of jobs that were automated out of existence – but the automated version is not better. It’s not even always cheaper. And it hardly ever makes the customers happier (just try using any company’s “voice recognition” call router and see how you feel – phone receptionist was the first job… Read more »

Jem
Jem
9 years ago

There is no concept of “work-life balance”; “work” takes priority, and that’s the end of it. Work is how you earn money and contribute to the community and form your identity. People have no qualms about staying until 7 or 8 o’clock. Most of the time, I think this is insane. But observing them, reading this post and listening to Mike Rowe make me wonder if perhaps I’ve got it wrong. As an American, maybe I’ve gone too far to the other extreme, expecting to do only what makes me happy. We actually aren’t tipping the other way in the… Read more »

Carla
Carla
9 years ago

Work is not my enemy, but since I am on disability (don’t plan to stay on it forever) I do view it differently than it did a few years ago. My physical health is a factor now. Retirement with financial stability would be grand, but I’m only 31. Growing up yes, I didn’t hear my elders complain about the work they had to do. My mother started working when she was 13 in convalescent hospitals and my dad was a sharecropper in the south (picking cotton daily since he was a small kid). They didn’t complain per se, but it… Read more »

Daria
Daria
9 years ago

Really good article. Thank you for reminding us that work is actually a good thing! We will likely spend 40 years doing it, 5 days per week…we’d certainly be happier if we looked forward to it than always trying to get out of it.

Thanks again.

Stacy @ Grow With Stacy
Stacy @ Grow With Stacy
9 years ago

I believe that working is very important to a fulfilling life and it should be something that we can take pride in. But at the same time I don’t believe that it should be something that takes over the majority of our lives. I work at home because I would resent any job that kept me away from my family for long hours. I also think that anyone who has the desire for financial freedom should pursue that dream. My grandpa had the dream of early retirement because his parents died young and he achieved that. He spent many years… Read more »

Nancy
Nancy
9 years ago

Our economy shed over 8 million jobs in this recession and a lot of them are not coming back. There is a LOT of pain out there. People who desperately need and want jobs to keep from falling off a cliff, and they don’t really care if they are personally fulfilled or not!

shares