On the road to nowhere: The true story of the worst job I ever had

Your job is one of your most important assets. It gives you earning power. It can bring you personal fulfillment. But what happens when you're stuck in a job you hate? Here's the true story of the worst job I ever had.

Unlimited Income Potential

I made some poor choices at the end of my college career; as a result, I graduated without a prospect for work. No matter — I lived off my credit cards for a few months, basking in the glow of adulthood. Eventually I realized that I needed to find a job.

My father, a life-long salesman, and always a sucker for other salesmen, set me up to meet with an insurance guy who had tried to sell him a policy. We met in a Denny's on the far side of Portland early on a Saturday morning. The guy gave me long, slick pitch, touting the job's “unlimited income potential“. He needn't have bothered. I needed work and was dumb enough to think that this was a perfect. I signed up.

I underwent two weeks of training, during which I learned how to sell crappy insurance (though I didn't know it was crappy insurance at the time). I spent two days learning why this was the most marvelous insurance product in the world. I spent another two days role-playing the door-to-door sales technique: I'd pretend to be the salesman and the 55-year-old chainsmoker seated next to me would be the customer. It was so easy! I sold him a policy every time.

I spent a couple more days learning “rebuttals”, the magic scripts that would turn a prospect's objections against himself. Our goal was to sell the customer whether he needed the insurance or not. We were to create the need.

Awakening the Giant Within

This training period was life-changing. I had awakened the giant within. I was a new man. I began to cast aside the skin of my existing life and take on that of another:

  • I broke up with my fiancee.
  • I bought a brand new car. (A car that I could not afford, obviously.)
  • I bought a new wardrobe, paying full price at trendy stores.
  • I ate out every morning, every noon, and every night.
  • I bought a brand-new Super Nintendo and a Gameboy.

In one training session, we were required to cut up magazines to make a collage depicting our goals. I cut out a big photo of a log cabin in the woods and declared, “I'm going to retire a millionaire when I'm thirty.” The older folks in the class — they were all older, and all over thirty — stared with vacant, hollow eyes as I made my presentation.

That night I went out for a fancy dinner.

After training, I spent a week shadowing my manager (the man who had hired me), watching how door-to-door insurance sales worked in the real world. We drove to rural Oregon (Enterprise, in the far northeastern corner) and set up shop in a motel. That Monday morning, we met for breakfast in a local coffee shop. I bought my manager eggs and coffee. We drove out and began knocking on doors.

At every house, we'd introduce ourselves: “Hi. I'm J.D., and I believe this will interest you also. For only fifty-eight cents a week, should any accident whatsoever require hospital confinement…” and so on. My manager was slick. He signed up three people that first day. He'd made $120!

The next day, it was my turn to try. And suddenly my enthusiasm ran smack into the reality.

“You Can't Quit”

It wasn't a game anymore when I was the one trying to convince the little old lady with the oxygen tank that she needed to buy my policy.

“I'm on a fixed income,” she said, and I had no response. I wasn't going to try to convince her that she needed this. She didn't. She needed to hold on to her money. But my manager saw her weakness, and sensed my hesitation — he stepped in and smoothly countered her objections and wrote the policy for her. He let me keep the $40 for the sale.

“You can't let them make you feel sorry,” he told me. “Your goal is to get a signature and a check.

Actually, my goal was suddenly unclear. My goal had been to make a million dollars by the time I was thirty, to own log cabin in the woods. But not like this. Not selling policies to little old ladies. I went back to the hotel and called my dad. “I want to quit,” I told him.

“You can't quit,” he said. “You've only been doing this two days. You don't know what you're talking about. Don't be an idiot.”

I called my ex-fiancee. “I want to quit,” I told her. She wasn't surprised. I'd just broken off our engagement, so why would I stick to a job?

I talked with my manager. “I want to quit,” I told him. He frowned, and then he smoothly countered my every argument. The one that made me change my mind was this: “Look how much you've spent. You bought a new car. You bought new clothes. You're paying all this money for food and lodging. If you quit now, that money is all wasted.

I believed he was right, and so I stuck with it. I threw good money after bad.

Throwing Good Money After Bad

For the next two months, I travelled with the other salesmen, spending a week at a time canvassing the small towns.

“Hi. I'm J.D., and I believe this will interest you also. For only fifty-eight cents a week, should any accident whatsoever require hospital confinement…”

I was a terrible salesman. I did not believe in my product. It was a crummy policy pitched in a slimy method to people who didn't know any better. I felt dirty.

I sold some policies, it's true, but my income was a miserable $280/week or so. My expenses were much more than that. I had reconciled with my fiancee, and so was paying rent for an apartment with her. I was also paying rent for an apartment in Portland because I was required to live close to the office. (Why? We were never there!) And I was paying for hotel rooms four or five nights a week.

I was essentially paying for three sources of lodging. And for a new car. And for a shocking amount of gas. (I put 20,000 miles on that car in three months.) And for food.

It was during this period that my problems with food began. I was stressed, mentally conflicted. I began to eat poorly. In the morning, I would buy a box of old-fashioned donuts and a quart of chocolate milk, drive to some secluded spot, and down it all while thinking of my ruined dreams. I don't even want to think of how many calories I consumed every morning. I gained twenty pounds in three months. I charged $10,000 in credit card debt. I bought a brand-new $10,000 car.

My life was a disaster and I was only twenty-two years old.

Hitting Rock Bottom

The nadir came on a drizzly Friday. I was selling policies in hilly country west of Portland. It was early morning, and I had just driven up a long gravel road to make a futile pitch to an old farmer. He was getting ready for work, and didn't want anything to do with me.

“You need to leave,” he told me, and so I did.

I drove my brand-new car further up the gravel road to a fork in the road. I could have continued straight, but I took the road less traveled by (and that made all the difference).

I drove downhill and around a corner. The road narrowed and the gravel vanished. The road ended. I considered backing up, but instead decided to make a three-point turnaround. I had pulled forward into a newly-plowed field. My tires sunk in the mud. Cursing my luck, I attempted to rev myself out of the jam, but that only dug the tires in deeper.

I got out to survey the situation. The drizzle had turned to rain. I believed I could push the car back onto the road, so I rolled up my pant legs, took off my sports jacket, and tried not to worry about my muddy shoes. I went to the front of the car and pushed. The vehicle moved slightly, so I pushed some again. I rocked the car back-and-forth, and soon it rolled free.

Gravity doesn't care about bad days or crappy jobs.

When the car came free, it rolled in the opposite direction from what I had intended. Because it was resting on a slope, it rolled toward me. I dove into the mud, and watched as my car rolled fifty feet downhill, where it struck a fallen tree with a crunch.

I lay still for a few moments, trying not to think about the ruined clothes and the damaged car. I was in shock. I got up and walked up the hill, back to the farmer's house.

“What do you want?” the farmer asked me. I explained my predicament. I think something about the situation must have moved him to pity, because his features softened, and his voice mellowed.

“Stay here,” he told me. “I'll get a tractor and pull you out.”

I drove home (to one of my two apartments). I took off my wet and soiled clothes and took a hot bath.

And yet I still did not quit the job.

This, my friends, was the worst period of my life in nearly every way: emotionally, physically, mentally, and financially.

The Moral of the Story

There are good jobs, and there are bad jobs. And then there are shitty jobs. You should strive to work only at good jobs. Sometimes you'll have to endure bad in order to meet a greater goal. But you should never put up with a shitty job.

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jc
jc
14 years ago

When and why did you decide to look for another job, then? I would really like to know about that part of the story!

J.D.
J.D.
14 years ago

Ah, good question. That’s worth another entry, but I can provide a capsule summary: No one thing made me quit selling insurance. It was an accumulation of things: the work that made me feel like I was violating my principles, the weeks away from home, and the lack of fulfillment. I quit abruptly on a cold evening in December and drove all night to get home. I had no job and no prospects. For a couple of weeks, I took assigments from a temp agency. Eventually I did what I had sworn I would never do: I went to work… Read more »

Tiffany
Tiffany
7 years ago
Reply to  J.D.

You would make an awesome author. I hope one day at least you would write a book. Your words, no matter what you are writing about draw people in. I came here to prepare for an interview as an insurance agent and not only have you completely thrown me off course because I couldn’t stop reading your words, but you have swayed my opinion on the profession.

gus
gus
5 years ago
Reply to  Tiffany

tiffany,you may not be involved with this websites,since your comment was back in 2013.However,if so, did you decide to continue on as an insurance agent?Finally,whats your story?Thx

makingitbig
makingitbig
14 years ago

Wow, that’s quite a story. You live, you learn, I guess.

Snarla
Snarla
14 years ago

Oh my god. Another reason I could never work in sales. Everything about it just seems so unctuous.

So were the insurance policies complete scams?

Roger
Roger
14 years ago

I think anyone thinking of going into sales should watch this clip:

http://youtube.com/watch?v=TROhlThs9qY

If you can be Alec Baldwin (the guy speaking), go for it. But most of the rest of us are the Alan Arkin, Ed Harris, or Jack Lemmon characters.

Roger
Roger
14 years ago

Oh, that clip is NSFW due to language, which, in my experience, is the real language of sales offices everywhere.

David
David
14 years ago

Thank you for sharing.

J.D.
J.D.
14 years ago

MakingItBig has it right: you live, you learn. “What does not kill me makes me stronger.” Though I loathed the job, I would not be who I am today without the experience, and for that I am grateful. @Snarla I wouldn’t say the insurance policies were scams. They really did what they said they would do, and there was nothing secret about how they worked. It just wasn’t very good insurance. It didn’t pay much and didn’t cover much. It wasn’t a useful product for most people (though it was great for some), and I felt duplicitous trying convince people… Read more »

Delly
Delly
5 years ago
Reply to  J.D.

Become a writer. I am an avid reader of all things that may cast more light on self improvement. Your story was riveting. I agree, as long as you can take the good out of a bad situation, and make DECISIONS and go with them. Bad decisions should be quickly replaced with better ones. Then you have learnt. Brilliant penmanship, write a book please

Him
Him
14 years ago

Eloquently written! Too bad it was about your young demise…

Thanks for sharing. Hopefully your story can serve as an example for someone, somewhere.

EC
EC
14 years ago

Very interesting and well-written. I can identify with many aspects of your story, although I’m long out of college and (thank goodness) never had to try selling insurance! (I did office temp jobs for a year, myself.)

Oddly enough, I just recently came across a little essay about how if you have money in the bank you can afford to walk away from that kind of situation. I thought of it immediately when I read your tale of woe.
[url]http://rebirthofreason.com/Articles/Setzer/Saving_for_Greatness.shtml[/url]

The really odd thing is, it appears the essay is being handed out by salesmen. Still…

laura
laura
14 years ago

Wow, great story

Taylor
Taylor
14 years ago

Thanks so much for sharing. I sold Kirby Vaccuums for awhile, and although it never got this bad, it hit home.

Schizohedron
Schizohedron
14 years ago

A deeply honest and well-written post. Sadly, many people do not come to the same conclusion you did until well into middle age. Thanks very much for this entry!

Laurie
Laurie
14 years ago

I recently graduated from college and was recruited by four or five different national banks for their “financial planning” departments…i.e. thinly veiled insurance schemes and retirement/investment products. This is not a job you need a college degree to do (obviously) but they make it seem really slick, like a job in banking.

So anyways….this stil happens today.

B. Peterson
B. Peterson
14 years ago

Great life story! I too had an experience in this kind of sales routine, only I was trying to sell industrial lighting. Oh my God! I had to learn a script and once we got into a business (usually by the back door) and introduced ourselves, we began reciting this script and did not give the person a chance to speak until we were done. The key I was told, was to not let the person get a word in edgewise. I only lasted a week, Thank God.
That was long ago….. We live and learn.

finance girl
finance girl
14 years ago

Wow, wow, wow! Quite a story, well, I am so glad you are not doing that job anymore. It’s amazing though, the way we can trap ourselves into a job (usually has to do with not being able to afford quitting)

dalton
dalton
14 years ago

Wow – that sounds a lot like my early twenties. It took me many years to dig myself out of the emotional and financial pit I dug for myself between the ages of 20 and 25. Only now do I feel healthy, happy, and reasonably financially stable. There really needs to be a “real life” curriculum in high school and college (home ec doesn’t count), where they teach you the ins and outs of personal finance, job seeking, and having healthy relationships. At least, I could have used it.

prlinkbiz
prlinkbiz
14 years ago

A job, or someway of bringing in money is important, but it is not an asset. An asset is generally something that puts money in your pocket, most likely passively, that you can turn around and sell.

Selling is a skill that we all need- too bad many of us learn throuhg unpleasant experiences! lol

xiaohua
xiaohua
14 years ago

I picked the link on your story from http://www.bearmode.com

it is a web site that allows members to rank financial and business stories. It also has a category on personal finance.

Your story is an interesting one and it reminds the first job I had which I hate.

Thanks.

daedal
daedal
14 years ago

Great story. Really made me think of what I’m doing and where I should be. Good stuff.

HC
HC
14 years ago

I’m really glad you came out on the other side. I walked out on a typical “college sales” summer job presentation (the one with the knives), because it seemed really cult-like. I suspect a lot of high-pressure sales places are probably the same.

I hope somebody who is looking for their first job finds this and reads it thoroughly.

Jay
Jay
14 years ago

Excellent story. Very nicely written.

PixelHead
PixelHead
14 years ago

It sounds like the same company I worked for. I did that after the knives…lol. Good training, and definetly makes your skin a lot thicker. My demise was not nearly as bad as yours though, well I did end up in the hospital. Hopefully it only served to make you stronger and wiser.

Spoonman
Spoonman
14 years ago

I feel for you, I really do. I tried my hand at sales a few times, and failed each one about as miserably as this story. However, none compared to the place I worked that lead to my site. 🙂

Spoonman
Spoonman
14 years ago

Oh, one more question: that fiance of yours…is it your current missus? 😉

lordmarcovan
lordmarcovan
14 years ago

You might’ve been a dud at selling sleazy insurance, but you’ve got a gift for writing. I enjoyed your clear, honest narrative style.

Steve
Steve
6 years ago
Reply to  lordmarcovan

Exactly what I was thinking.

JD, your talent/gift is in writing. Lot of people can sell insurance, build boxes, etc.

Very few can write like you.

That’s where I’d plant my flag in the ground.

scammed mother of 1
scammed mother of 1
13 years ago

just get out while you can. I did the same deal, but “giving away” security systems, it ruined my career life, and set me back really far with my family. I thought I was the gifted “one in a million” who was going to be making 300,000 by the time they turned 22, bs.I never broke even and my boss was a scum bag. I quit a very nice job to work there, and the way the boss was there, I had to start the next day or the deal was OFF, so being as young as I was at… Read more »

Polly
Polly
13 years ago

I just read this piece to learn more about insurance sales for the novel I’m writing; not only did the author teach me about insurance, he showed me some [email protected]#ned-good narrative writing, as well!

tarits
tarits
12 years ago

your story sounds eerily familiar…

Alittlebita
Alittlebita
12 years ago

I too have had a shitty job. I would as a childcare worker for abused and neglected adolescents. The kids were bad, the hours and environment, and pay were worse, and since I had a part time job I ended up working two jobs with little pay on opposite schedules. I learned then you learn what you are willing to get paid to do, and working with this population of kids was not one of them for me.

LS
LS
12 years ago

Fantastic post! Very enlightening! I have been to a similar place and back. Once i had graduated i had the world at my feet, excellent job prospects and i could work anywhere in the world i wanted. However due to bad choices, and worse money management skills i ended up taking the first job that came my way. Which ended up being a shitty job, i was bullied, worked in a place i use to have nightmares about at univesity, which lead me to spend money to make me happy. Once i eventually left the job, i was in more… Read more »

jakc
jakc
12 years ago

Great story.

Is it weird that I think this section is the nadir, rather than the car crashing?:

In the morning, I would buy a box of old-fashioned donuts and a quart of chocolate milk, drive to some secluded spot, and down it all while thinking of my ruined dreams.

I want to frame that quote and put it on my bathroom wall.

Andrew
Andrew
12 years ago

J.D, thank you for the story. It was written with great detail and clarity, making it easy for me to empathize. I’m currently in the process of looking for a new job after being laid off from my previous one, the first job I’ve ever had. It was a good job, in management consulting, but it really didn’t make me excited or energized to get up every morning. And although I didn’t accumulate financial debt, I definitely incurred an “emotional debt” through the level of second-guessing and self-criticism I’ve put myself through as I didn’t succeed as much as I… Read more »

Nicole
Nicole
12 years ago

This was a fabulous post! I’ve been a subscriber to GRS for several months, and I’ve learned a great deal during that time. I do want to make a cautionary comment based on what others are saying: Not all sales people (insurance or otherwise) are sleazy and focused on separating old ladies from their money! My new favorite book is “Top 10 Distinctions Between Millionaires and the Middle Class” (by Keith Cameron Smith) He says to ask yourself (when evaluating a business opportunity): 1. Do you LIKE the people that are doing this already? Can you see yourself being around… Read more »

Heidi
Heidi
12 years ago

Nicole, you sound like the you’d be the company I’d love to work for. I’m currently working as a sales associate in a high-sales retail store. We’re expected to harass our customers to help them better get the computer/printer/digital camera/etc. that suits their needs. I have no problems helping people, and we do sell products I firmly stand behind, the only problem I have is that I have to semi-lie to the customer and tell them they’ll need a new Microsoft Office Suite with their new computer. This is a lie because the computer comes with a trial and you… Read more »

Nicole
Nicole
12 years ago

Heidi, That sounds like a really tough job; I can’t imagine having to recommend something that I *know* isn’t the best product or service in the marketplace! Telling customers the truth doesn’t make you a ‘bad’ sales person…just an ethical one! I’m crazy enough to believe that those still exist, and I’m lucky enough to have several of them as my business partners! I don’t have any employees, so I’m sorry that I can’t offer you a job. What I can share with you is how you can do the same thing I am doing: helping people with high-quality services… Read more »

Morgan Thomas
Morgan Thomas
12 years ago

Listen to this nightmare: That sounds like an experience I had in the early 80’s after graduation, except it was under my Dad’s company, training with an old, chain-smoking, fast talking and gifted salesman also. I was treated like the “little rich kid” and never really taken seriously at all. I was treated like the Male Tori Spelling of the insurance world! They were very similar in their sales approach in that “everybody needs the policy-get the signature”, etc. Problem was, I was too honest for the job, or something close to that. They had me driving all over creation,… Read more »

Steve
Steve
6 years ago
Reply to  Morgan Thomas

Morgan, as a father of three now-grown children myself, I’m speechless at the actions of your father.

What could he have been thinking.

My sympathies, and hopes that life got better for you.

222111222
222111222
12 years ago

The worst I ever had was at Vantage West Credit Union, formally DM. Unpaid overtime, no days off, managers unethical behavior and etc is all you will get working there.

Melissa
Melissa
12 years ago

I, too, was in sales for a summer, selling security systems. It was simultaneously the best and worst summer of my life. I was outside, meeting lots of people and living in a really nice apartment that the company provided (sort of). But I was bad at sales, working in a difficult area, for a company that filed bankruptcy the following January. I ended up without the promised “back-end” bonus check and no way to pay my tuition. So even though I got the job specifically so I wouldn’t have to go into debt, I ended up getting a student… Read more »

omfg
omfg
12 years ago

I was enjoying the stories until I came upon the one who works at a “high-sales retail store” – just say you work for Best Buy. It’s okay, we’ve all had shit jobs. The kicker for me is the poster Nicole who responds with sagely advice then completely invalidates any point she has made by selling Pre-Paid Legal. Christ. Do not listen to this person. Ask yourself this, why would any legitimate business not operate out of an office but solicit other people to be sales people for a joining fee of $250? And guess what, that recruit’s money gets… Read more »

Cynthia
Cynthia
7 years ago
Reply to  omfg

Sounds like this is a case of an individual not willing to do what it takes to meet the goals of success. There is no such thing as a “shitty job” because work is work. This is not the 1700’s where you are forced to work for free. ??? The negative comments on this about sales in general is coming from ignorance. Sales makes the world go around-nothing happens until a sale is closed in every industry. Being the sales curator (or salesperson) may not be a role you are suited for but just because you are not suited for… Read more »

Greg
Greg
6 years ago
Reply to  Cynthia

Well said Cynthia I was waiting for some positive feed back for I am interested in the insurance field. Its not for everyone and not everyone can be good at it, nor do our drive and hard work compare to be equal. Sounds to me, because he failed that hes bitter that selling insurance is over bad in general compeletly false and absurd. He gave up when times were tough and confused the profession with his short comings.

Steve
Steve
5 years ago
Reply to  Cynthia

I sold for over 20 years in all levels of income and areas that test one’s morals. Take it from me, sales can be the most fun easiest way to earn a living and it can be a job that’s shitty in a big way. Any job that forces you to manipulate the buyer into buying an inferior product at an high price when they can’t afford it and really don’t need it is just a boiler room sales job – and those jobs come a dime a dozen. It’s easy to identify them after being around the block, but… Read more »

Josette
Josette
12 years ago

Hi there, that’s a nice story. I’m feeling quite aimless now. Currently, I’m studying in uni. I’m 20 but I feel that my resume seems pretty empty. I’m considering taking up some part-time job while studying but am not sure whether I can cope or not. Another thing is I have trouble sticking to something for long. I have to work on that.

Thanks for the story. I enjoyed reading it.

erik
erik
11 years ago

J.D.,

This was the post that got me hooked on Get Rich Slowly about a year ago or so, and after finding out that I was getting laid off 2 weeks ago, (this is my last week) it was good to come back and read it again. I’ll take from this that sometimes life throws you lemons, and what doesn’t kill you makes you stronger. Keep on writing!

Alexis
Alexis
11 years ago

Hey. I’ve just come back home from a day of training EXACTLY what you were doing. & Basically, everything you said was right. Its a con. I felt really bad ‘mithering” old people & other people to do shit like that. & The hours are ridiculous. I spend 9 hours on my feet knocking on doors asking people to donate to such & such. There is also a lot of lying involved. Like you said you feel dirty. Also, if you dont get a sale…You dont get the money. I got the job given to me today. But my parents… Read more »

Victor
Victor
11 years ago

I feel his pain.
It happens EXACTLY the same to me in Florida 3 months ago selling ” free windshield” for cars.
Doors to doors is a BIG pain in the a**, and usually a scam.My situation them was worst than ever.

You live , you learn every day..

Facia Bella
Facia Bella
10 years ago

The job you describe has Combined Insurance all over it. Here is a company that dictates where you work, pressures you daily about sales and sales quotas…and YET….you provide your own automobile, own computer, supply all the gas and they don’t even pay unemployment insurance on you?
Been there, did that, got a negative balance in my bank and in my personal life to prove it.
They are the most evil employer on the planet.

Somone Selling Life ins.
Somone Selling Life ins.
10 years ago

J.D. It’s been a few years since you wrote this, but it sounds like what i’ve been doing over the past 2 1/2 yrs. The paycheck is a rollercoaster and it has almost ruined my spirit. The only time there is respect or recognition is for the ‘Flavor of the Month’ which is the salesperson who sold the most of the month. It sucks. And I can’t wait to get out of it!!! Because of the commission, timing of the fundings, the nature of the beast is what keeps you there. Waiting for your paycheck, waiting for the sale, waiting… Read more »

aerialmeds
aerialmeds
10 years ago

“In the morning, I would buy a box of old-fashioned donuts and a quart of chocolate milk, drive to some secluded spot, and down it all while thinking of my ruined dreams.”

This sentence was a punch in the stomach. Glad to know you’re much better off and happier now.

@Somone Selling Life ins: Its not much, but my prayers are with you. Keep hope.

Kaitlyn
Kaitlyn
10 years ago

I really liked this article. Just last week I had to decide whether I would keep my crummy receptionist job at a property management company (aka slum lords) or go to work for a domestic violence shelter. My receptionist job was 4 minutes from my house, consistent hours, and paid a decent wage. The shelter job is 40+ minutes from my house, on an as-needed basis, and pays a full dollar per hour less. I think it would have been “logical” to stay at the receptionist job to offer stability and convenience while I attend graduate school this fall. On… Read more »

Steve
Steve
10 years ago

Wow. This really resonates with me (and many others, it seems). I was fortunate to be at the worst job I ever had for only three months. During my second year of college my small town didn’t have a lot of openings, but there was a new chain restaurant opening up in the next town over. I applied and interviewed to be a Server Assistant, which was explained to me as someone who assists the servers until they learn the ropes and becomes a server themselves. I wasn’t going to be tipped directly, but I’d get minimum wage ($5.25/hr at… Read more »

Christina
Christina
10 years ago

I love this story because I completely understand how that must have felt. I quit my “worst job ever” on August 6th and have not looked back. My strangest realization thus far has been this: I was eating between 10 and 15 full-sized candy bars per work week in an attempt to deal with the stress at that under-staffed retail bank with mostly commercial customers. I have already lost EIGHT pounds since quitting, and I am finally almost feeling de-stressed. I have suffered that amount of stress before for reasons that meant something to me (father’s illness and subsequent death… Read more »

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