Traffic violations and your auto insurance

California newspaper The Daily Breeze recently published an article about a man who was issued a $35 ticket for failing to come to a complete stop, which became a $234 ticket after added penalties. (State legislators have been adding new penalties, such as a “state conviction fee,” since 2009, thanks to a $10 billion budget deficit. The base fine for running a red light is $100 in Los Angeles County, for example, but after added penalties the ticket will cost a grand total of $480.)

Even if you live in a state without these hefty additional penalties, the cost of a traffic violation doesn't end with the cost of the ticket. If you want to keep the infraction off your driving record, there's the added cost of a traffic school fee and the cost of the traffic school course. If you choose to pay the ticket and not attend driver's ed, your ticket might get even more expensive — you'll incur the long-term costs of higher auto insurance.

Violations can Raise Premiums by 50 Percent

According to an Insurance.com analysis of more than 32,000 insurance policies, drivers who purchased a one-car, single-driver policy in 2010 and had one violation on their record paid about 18% more on average than drivers without any violation. Drivers with two paid 34% more for their policy, while drivers with three violations paid a staggering 53% more for auto insurance than those with zero violations.

The following are the average annual premiums paid, according to the analysis:

  • No violations: $1,119
  • One violation: $1,318
  • Two violations: $1,497
  • Three violations: $1,713

Violations aren't equal in the eyes of the insurance company, of course. A speeding ticket might not bump up your premium much, but two in quick succession could and might even get you dropped by some insurers. More serious offenses, such as driving while intoxicated, will send your rates up even more. The Insurance.com analysis lists the following as violations that can raise your insurance rates:

  • Speeding
  • Driving under the influence
  • Reckless driving
  • Running red lights
  • Failure to yield or stop
  • Fleeing from police
  • Driving the wrong way
  • Improper passing
  • Illegal u-turn
  • Failure to use proper child restraint

The cost of each type of violation will vary by state, insurance company, and driving record. Also, not all traffic violations will affect your insurance rate. More than likely, tickets for offenses like talking on your cell phone while driving (a violation in some states) and parking citations won't raise your premium.

What to Do if Your Insurer Raises Your Rates

If your rates go up after a traffic violation, take steps to see if you can lower your premium, such as the following:

  • Shop around to compare several car insurance quotes. It's easy enough to compare quotes from different companies to find the lowest rate. First, figure out how much auto insurance you need. Compare it to your current coverage and rate, then start making calls for quotes.
  • Don't discount your current insurer too quickly. Shopping around is always a good idea, but if the savings turns out to be negligible, there are good reasons to stay put. First, some violations will affect you more if you're shopping for a new insurance policy than if you stay with your insurer. Why? A prospective insurer will pull your driving record, but your current company won't necessarily check to see if you've had recent violations because it's simply too costly to check up on every customer every year. Second, some insurance companies offer accident forgiveness policies and will waive accident surcharges for their long-time customers. If you find much lower rates with another company, however, you're probably better off switching.
  • Complete a defensive driving class. In some states you can expunge marks on your record, called ticket masking, if you take a driver's safety course. If you live in one of these states, your insurance company might be required to lower your rate after you've successfully completed the course. Note that you can only take defensive driving to expunge points once in a set time period (usually 18 months). If you get another ticket within that time period, your rates will probably increase.
  • Increase your deductible. If you're willing to take on more risk, you can lower your annual premium by raising your deductible. This means you'll need enough money in savings to pay the deductible, so consider your financial situation carefully before deciding if it's the right move.
  • Maintain (or improve) your credit rating. The majority of auto insurers consider a low or bad credit rating a sign of greater risk when it comes to auto insurance, and hike rates accordingly. While there doesn't seem to be solid evidence of the link between the two, the bottom line is that bad credit likely means a more expensive car insurance premium. Maintaining or improving your credit score can save you money on auto insurance.

Even if you have a few points on your record, you should be able to find a policy, though it'll be a more expensive policy than if you had a clean driving record. There also are additional tips in this past GRS article on lowering car insurance rates, such as removing extras like towing and car rental from your policy.

I think a combination of luck and being a decently cautious driver have spared me from many a ticket. To date, I've had one speeding ticket, and I took an online defensive driving course to keep my driving record clean. (Despite being online, it was still a time-consuming experience that I don't want to repeat!)

Do any of you have experience with lowering your premium after a traffic violation? Leave your tips in the comments!

More about...Transportation, Insurance

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Megan
Megan
9 years ago

Great article! I’m really interested in the correlation between “bad driver” and “bad credit score.” I read the Bankrate article that April linked to in her article, and it really doesn’t explain the correlation, either.

heather
heather
9 years ago
Reply to  Megan

My husband is an insurance agent and his company uses credit checks. The companies have studied the relationship between poor credit and high claims (bad driving). Basically it boils down to those who generally don’t take care of their financial items are more like to not take care of their driving record (also relates to property ie home insurance).

Jason
Jason
9 years ago
Reply to  heather

I’ve done a lot of statistical analysis over the years, and credit score is one of the best predictors of behavior that’s available. It applies to almost everything in a person’s life. A few years ago Suze Orman used it to predict the winner of The Biggest Loser – just because it has a pretty good correlation with how responsible and dedicated a person is. Even with insurance companies, the credit rating can determine 50% of the premium charged. Also, in addition to checking your credit rating, I recommend checking your C.L.U.E. report, which insurance companies will pull when getting… Read more »

Michelle
Michelle
5 years ago
Reply to  heather

I would have to really disagree with that comment that if you don’t pay your bills you are a bad driver. I am 41 years old and have had one ticket in my live. My credit scores sucks and it has to do with my son and all his medical problems and all the surgeries and hospitalizations. Some people can’t take care of the hospital bills at once and they get turned in. At that point you have to decide do you pay electric, car payment, or rent or a hospital bill that can’t even be paid off just a… Read more »

James
James
6 years ago
Reply to  Megan

You have to earn you way to a good credit score by being responsible with how you handle money. And if you mess up just once or twice, you pay big time.

Earning and maintaining a good driving record also is hard work and an indicator of how responsible you are to not only yourself but to others on the road. While there may be no negative correlation (that is, poor drivers can still have a good credit score) – it appears that there’s a strong positive correlation.

Michelle
Michelle
8 months ago
Reply to  James

You know, that is really a bunch of bull. Your credit has nothing to do with your driving record. Then running credit checks on anyone should be a violation of your privacy. First off I had great credit most my life until I was fired from my job of 27 years for no good reason except to be able to pay someone else less. I couldn’t get another job because my job caused me to get tendinitis in both my hands and my age of being close to 60. So I ended up having to go on SSI. We had… Read more »

Max From Liquid
Max From Liquid
9 years ago

One of the best ways to save on auto insurance is not buying a new car every three years. I drive an 11-year-old Infiniti. It’s a great car; I make sure it’s well maintained, so it’s trouble-free. Not only do I save money by not making car payments, but also it’s not that expensive to insure. It still looks great and I love driving it. Why would I want to trade it in and increase my insurance rates? BTW, I once turned right on red in an unfamiliar area where it wasn’t legal. I didn’t see the sign until I… Read more »

Diane
Diane
9 years ago

Not always true about keeping the old car. I just replaced my husband’s 2002 Hyundai Elantra, with a 2011 Mini Cooper Clubman S (yes, that’s considered a sports car).

I had just liability on the Elantra (250,000/500,000/250,000), and I saved $56 for the year adding the new car with complete coverage.

Why? Because the old car didn’t have certain safety features of the new car.

Jason
Jason
9 years ago
Reply to  Diane

This has been my experience as well. Most older cars don’t have electronic stability control, but newer models (like your Mini Clubman do), and getting a car with electronic stability control lowers the risk of a deadly crash by 33% and single-vehicle rollover by 73%. Insurance companies know this and often discount their premiums because of it. (source)

NooraK
NooraK
9 years ago

I replaced my 2000 Honda Civic with a 2008 Ford Escape (brand new, prior to getting smart about money), and my insurance actually went down. One of the reasons I was told was because the foreign car’s replacement parts would be more expensive if it had to be repaired. I belive the Civic was also at the top of the list of most frequently stolen cars.

Leah
Leah
9 years ago
Reply to  NooraK

Interesting that your Civic was labeled as “foreign.” I’m not 100% sure about Honda, but I know that Toyotas are almost entirely built in the US and therefore essentially US cars despite the foreign ownership.

Kate
Kate
9 years ago
Reply to  Leah

I think the theft jacks up the Honda prices more than the foreign issue. Even old (early 1990s) Hondas in the neighborhood where I go to school get jacked.

Michael
Michael
9 years ago

Definitely consider hiring an attorney who defends moving violations (civil infractions). They know the rules the police must follow in charging drivers (e.g., calibrating radar guns, etc.), and many have high success rates in getting tickets dismissed entirely. For a flat fee, you might be able to avoid the expenses that follow a ticket, no driving school required. I don’t do this type of work but know an attorney who has a 100% success rate on behalf my coworkers and acquaintances.

Suzanne
Suzanne
9 years ago

And some municipalities are more ticket-prone than others. Chicago is out of control! They have reduced the timing of yellow lights to 1.5 seconds (this is far shorter even than the suburbs, which is short by national standards). In SF people park any which direction, but in Chicago if your car is facing the wrong direction that’s proof of a violation. My hefty, and seemingly unavoidable, fines were one reason I finally gave up my car. No car, no car insurance! As for the credit score link, I’ve known that for years and what a pity. Surely there must be… Read more »

SLCCOM
SLCCOM
9 years ago
Reply to  Suzanne

Cutting yellow light times is illegal, and also seriously unsafe. It will lead to more red light running, which, when coupled with people too stupid to check traffic before entering the intersection when the light turns green, will lead to injuries and deaths. It will also lead to a lot more rear-ending collisions.

Definitely get an attorney for those! Although you can videotape the light yourself, and check state statutes on how long the light must be yellow and skip the attorney.

Suzanne
Suzanne
9 years ago
Reply to  SLCCOM

Studies have already shown that the red light cameras in Chicago cause more accidents. But no one cares about safety, it’s about revenue. I haven’t heard of anyone fighting the tickets successfully – it’s been all over the news and people are pissed, but I think it’s legal.

Robert
Robert
9 years ago

Megan: Frankly I think the insurance companies linking a customer’s credit score to their driving skills is an example of them finding ways to squeeze more money from their customers. Unfortunately short of getting the legislature in each state to change the laws (unlikely since the Insurance industry has more money to throw at the politicians) there is little that can be done to object to this practice.

Eileen
Eileen
9 years ago

We recently contact our car insurance provider to ask some questions about moving violations that our college aged kid has (trying to determine if they “stay” with us or “go” with him should he buy his own car/policy). Anyway – one thing I discovered is that since we’ve been with this company (State Farm) for so long, and have used them for our home AND auto insurance, we have a no-longer-offered Guaranteed Renewal status. They will not drop us unless there is criminal activity. If you have been with your insurance provider for a long time (I think my first… Read more »

Rosa
Rosa
9 years ago
Reply to  Eileen

With State Farm, my experience was that different offices gave me different answers – I had one awful office that wanted to charge me for citations my little brother got when we were both on my mom’s insurance, but didn’t credit me for those years as a customer. Switched to another State Farm agent, they took the bad marks from my brother’s driving off AND gave me a discount for having been with the company 10 years.

Eileen
Eileen
9 years ago
Reply to  Rosa

Sounds to me that the first office you spoke to was just bad at their job. Why would anyone be charged for a sibling’s citations?

We’ve never had problems with State Farm, but perhaps we’ve just had good agents.

Rosa
Rosa
9 years ago
Reply to  Eileen

I actually paid the higher premium a few months, before I thought to really check into what they were doing. And they wouldn’t refund the difference when I discovered the errors, even when I escalated it to the office manager and threatened (and then followed through with) going to a different agent entirely.

So when I moved the next time, i checked 3 different offices – each one gave me a different quote. They all had the same information in front of them. I don’t know how to explain it, but I’m wary now.

Crystal
Crystal
9 years ago

I’ve only been ticketed once for speeding (65 in a 60…grrrr…), but Texas does let you take defensive driving like April mentioned. Woot for no record, lol.

Keep in mind that if you take a defensive driving course to simply lower your insurance rates, even if you get a ticket the next week, you can take it again to have the ticket “masked”. You just can’t take it to get rid of tickets more than once every 18 months like April said. 🙂

Leah
Leah
9 years ago
Reply to  Crystal

And the timing of ticket masking frequency varies from state to state (and, in Washington state, penalties and whatnot vary by county). I masked a ticket there a few years back, and it’s something like 5 years before I could do it again.

sheri
sheri
9 years ago

I recently received a speeding ticket. The fee is $360. If I attend traffic school it’s $445! It’s an outrageous amount of money.

Eileen
Eileen
9 years ago

Between my husband and myself, we’ve been driving for over 60 years. Neither of us has a speeding ticket.

Not speeding is probably the best way to save money on this topic. Much like having an “emergency fund” brings you peace of mind, choosing not to speed brings you peace of mind that you won’t incur the time and expense of such a violation.

As someone who doesn’t speed, I’m not concerned about the cost to those that do..and get caught.

Nancy L.
Nancy L.
9 years ago
Reply to  Eileen

I’ve always been a very defensive driver. I was taught to assume that all drivers would make the worst possible decisions rather than expect them all to drive well–it’s an approach that’s had me labeled as a fuddy-duddy because I won’t do things like pull out onto a road if I’m not sure I have clearance, and because I’ll take a little extra time to make a series of right turns if it’s safer than trying to cross left against traffic. But the one thing I always used to do was speed. Lately I’ve been doing a lot of long-distance… Read more »

lawyerette
lawyerette
9 years ago
Reply to  Nancy L.

Great points, ladies. On top of all that, slower speeds give your car better fuel economy. The average car uses 28% more gas at a speed of 80 mph vs. 55 mph. The time saved doesn’t make up the difference. Drive slow homies! You’ll save money all around!

Jaime B
Jaime B
9 years ago
Reply to  lawyerette

Don’t forget there is such a thing called “going with the flow of traffic”. If you’re going significantly slower than the traffic around you then you can become a danger to other drivers AND be ticketed in some cases (like if there is a long line of cars piled up behind you). If you’re going 55mph in a 65-70mph zone (for whatever reason), please put your hazard lights on to help the traffic around you. Also, if you’re on a highway with 3+ lanes, please try to stay to the center as much as you can to keep from interrupting… Read more »

Kate
Kate
9 years ago
Reply to  lawyerette

Unless you drive so slowly that people driving the speed limit are liable to crash into you. I cannot tell you how many times one person has caused a total cluster*%&$ on the highway near me by driving 45 mph in the middle lane under absolutely safe weather conditions.

Brian
Brian
6 years ago
Reply to  Eileen

So your the one holding up all the traffic!!

Fat Daddy, Esq.
Fat Daddy, Esq.
9 years ago

Not all states require driving school attendance to keep a ticket off your record. So even if you don’t want to go through a driving program it would be helpful to call an attorney (or the court clerk yourself) and see if there is a way to keep the ticket from getting sent in. Sometimes there is an additional fee but sometimes a prosecutor will agree to defer the ticket if the regular fine amount is paid, depending on your driving record.

No Debt MBA
No Debt MBA
9 years ago

I received a speeding ticket a couple years ago but it didn’t impact my insurance rates. My best guess is that the state I got the ticket in doesn’t share information with my home state.

Tanya
Tanya
9 years ago

This article is just a great reminder; I often think about “how will this or that affect my credit?” but don’t often consider how it will affect my insurance. My insurance rates are good; this article just reminds me to keep them that way!

AndrewB
AndrewB
9 years ago

Switching is not always as easy as getting a better auto insurance quote with another company. I have an umbrella policy which is added on top of auto insurance. I cannot get the umbrella policy without the auto policy, so when I am shopping for quotes I need to get quotes for both coverages and determine if the total is better than others competitors quotes. Six months ago I switched to a national auto insurer because their umbrella coverage was half that of my previous carrier. The auto coverage was about the same. Six months later (this month), they have… Read more »

Megan E.
Megan E.
9 years ago

And then there’s the times where there wasn’t much you could do…. I had a spin out and roll over of my car a few months ago. I got a $100 ticket for going “too fast for conditions” (since I rolled, ANY speed would have been too fast) AND I totaled my car. The damage hasn’t hit my insurance yet but I doubt shopping around will help me since a major accident and ticket like that will raise anyone up. The worst part? I was 3 months away from my 5 year accident forgiveness…. Now I take the bus more.… Read more »

Jim Z
Jim Z
9 years ago

One of the best ways to save on insurance is to switch vehicles or switch insurance companies from time to time. For instance, when you buy a car, they set a rate. Does that rate really ever go down? Five years down the road, your car is worth a fraction of what it was when you first insured it, yet they are still charging you the same insurance rate. I once had a 2001 Camaro Z28. I had it for ~3 years. I got tired of it, and wanted a manual, so I traded it for 2002 Camaro Z28 with… Read more »

El Nerdo
El Nerdo
9 years ago

Some years ago I “invested” (ha ha) in a radar detector ($300). I’m not a crazy speeder, but I was doing long road trips and you never know what’s behind the next hill just as you’re passing a row of 18-wheelers. Handy.

And here in GRS is where I first found out about Cockeyed, and beating a traffic ticket in court. Enjoy: http://www.cockeyed.com/lessons/court/traffic_court.html

Amy
Amy
9 years ago

There are a number of studies that successfully link someone’s credit score to their propensity for receiving a traffic violation. Insurance companies use that to rate their policies more fairly, giving breaks to people who are lower risk and charging more for people who are higher risk. To me it just makes logical sense but I know a lot of people find it controversial. Here is a link to one such study but there are plenty of other ones out there.

http://www.progressive.com/shop/EPIC_CreditScores.pdf

Ivanski
Ivanski
6 years ago
Reply to  Amy

I had pretty good credit for a long time, I ended up getting very sick and ended up in the hospital for 4 months and racked up over $100K that I could not pay. Because of that I had to file bankruptcy and my credit now sucks. Now my CAR insurance is higher because I got very sick, not really because I am not financially responsible. Tell me how that is fair?

Claire
Claire
9 years ago

It’s worse than the article states. We live in NC. Two adults on a policy with one older sedan and a small SUV. No infractions on either license. Our auto insurance was ~$950/year. We were in a 70 mph zone in VA and were pulled for going 81 mph. It doesn’t matter that we were less than 15 mph over the speed limit; once you hit 80 mph, it’s considered reckless driving. We went to court, I think it got taken down to under 80 mph for the infraction, and the guilty took a safety course on top of that.… Read more »

Nick
Nick
9 years ago

Didn’t Joni Mitchell say it best? “Don’t it always seem to go that you don’t know what you got ’til it’s gone.” As young adults, we fail to realize the full consequences of driving recklessly or damaging our credit score. Unfortunately, we end up paying for this our entire lives! Our society is structured around easy credit. Americans pay for cars, clothes, homes, and travel on credit. But with a low credit score, you pay MORE for all of these items, including car insurance. The total student loan debt has surpassed credit card debt in this country and is about… Read more »

ali
ali
9 years ago

You can find out when certain infractions will stopped being counted against you. I had a really bad driving record it was stupid stuff compounded by stupid decisions and my insurance was $220/month for a 12 year old car. I couldn’t get insurance from any of the major insurers. BUT It finally came off and I shopped around. Now I’m paying less than $30/month. Also consider if you have other insurance that can be bundled with your car insurance. For example I get an extra discount because I have renter’s insurance and auto insurance through the same people. As for… Read more »

Nick
Nick
9 years ago

I find it surprising that insurance companies typically don’t consider talking/texting/distracted-driving a rate-hiking factor. Surely that’s more dangerous, and a better statistical indicator of future accidents, than something like a minor speeding infraction?

Tyler Karaszewski
Tyler Karaszewski
9 years ago
Reply to  Nick

The laws are so new for this sort of thing that there probably *isn’t* a correlation to future accidents. If you have a “driving while texting” ticket, you almost certainly got it fairly recently. Even if that makes you highly prone to have an accident in the future, chances are that you haven’t gotten into one yet.

Ornella
Ornella
9 years ago

I find that if you can pay for your insurance 6 months at a time you will save money, too. In addition, when I switched to Progressive (after searching online) I saved about $30. If you choose to raise your deductible, then save the difference in case you do get into an accident and will need to pay the higher deductible.

Jamison
Jamison
9 years ago

This site has given a lot to me int eh past so I will give back now. On Easter Sunday, A state trooper pulled me over. I was going the same speed I have gone down the road outside my neighborhood for 10 years. He was driving in the opposite direction. In my younger days I was no stranger to tickets. He calmly explained how to pay and I simply said “I know the drill, I’m a frequent flyer” and that was that. The next morning, on the way to work, the same trooper caught me speeding down another road… Read more »

Joshua
Joshua
9 years ago

I was ticketed in another state as I was traveling. Because of the conditions I had to show up in court. I did my research, even called my insurance (which said my rates would not go up for this one infraction – yay!) and dressed up for court. Because I was well dressed (in the Alabama court most were dressed very poorly for the occasion) and clearly communicated my side of the story, the judge threw out the infraction and did not even charge me the standard court fee of $125 (which should have been there reguardless of the outcome… Read more »

Chuck
Chuck
9 years ago

I have been humbly lucky. I received a DUI 6 years ago and my rates did not go up at all. I still dont know why my insurance didnt find out. I pause my breath whenever I think about it. Other than that life learning episode, I am a pretty decent driver and I never speed. The older I get (41 now) the more I feel things like speeding are not even worth the thought.

Ace
Ace
9 years ago

Just wanted to chip in my two cents on fighting tickets in court. DO NOT DO IT. You will lose. While in law school, I worked at a county court and have seen hundreds of traffic court cases. It is like shooting fish in a barrel. Some people will claim that cops don’t show up or won’t remember your case. True, if the cop doesn’t show up, you will win. But if he does, you are dead in the water. What you want to do is call the city attorney’s office where you got the ticket and tell them you… Read more »

Eileen
Eileen
9 years ago
Reply to  Ace

Don’t the laws differs state to state? There seems to be a lot of conflicting experiences just in the comments here. In NC, they offer a “prayer for judgment” which is basically a one time “do over” (for a period of time, per household) as long as you keep your nose clean. I know why you included the following: “drive carefully for a year”, but the real takeaway should be that there’s no real defensible reason to be a habitual speeder. It can be dangerous, it can add costs to your vehicle, and it can cost you in fines AND… Read more »

SLCCOM
SLCCOM
9 years ago

People who are saying “I was driving a safe speed” even though it exceeds the speed limit, are not correct. Traffic laws are based on community standards. When you exceed the speed limit, you make it difficult for other drivers to know how much time they have to get across an intersection. You endanger them, and especially young drivers and pedestrians who do not have the experience to recognize that you are speeding and that they need to get across more quickly. “Rolling stops” are a huge problem, too. I found myself doing that decades ago, and found a simple… Read more »

Rob
Rob
9 years ago

A couple of quick things: 1) Check out rates at several different companies. Especially in the past year, companies have been doing all kinds of stuff to deviate from industry pricing standards. 2) When you apply don’t make your effective date that day, make your policy start in a couple of weeks. 3) Look into an annual policy, especially one bundled with a homeowners policy. 4) If your employer has a deal with an insurance company, check it out. These rates are typically lower overall, especially if you’ve been with your employer for a while. 5) If you are a… Read more »

fetu
fetu
9 years ago

Some credit unions offer a discount on car insurance. My college also offers a discount with a certain company for alumni.

Jamison
Jamison
9 years ago

Two times I almost died while driving in my 16 years of being a licensed driver: 1) someone going (literally) 5mph on a 40 mph road. I nearly rammed them full speed in my truck with no air bags. 2) me driving maybe 5 miles over teh speed limit. Someone pulled out in front of me from their driveway (they didn’t look both ways) and I swerved into he path of a Mack truck. Number of times I have almost died going 10 miles over the speed limit: 0. “dangerous speed” is relative to the driver. Carl Petty could drive… Read more »

SLCCOM
SLCCOM
9 years ago
Reply to  Jamison

No, Jamison, “dangerous speed” is not relative only to the driver. “Dangerous speed” is relative to conditions. This includes condition of the driver, traffic, weather, and the opportunities for others to interact with you. Speeding five miles an hour over can be the difference between missing a kid running into the street, and killing them. Or even missing someone crossing the street legally, who maybe can’t move so fast. They were relying on you to obey the speed limit when they set out, but you don’t see any reason to do that! Others sharing the road rely on you (and… Read more »

jon
jon
9 years ago
Reply to  SLCCOM

I believe it’s somewhat relative. If not, why would speed limits vary between states? In Virginia, going 80mph anywhere (even with 70mph speed limit) is reckless driving. Some places in Utah and Texas, the speed limit is 80. Are you saying those states allow drivers to drive recklessly? I have seen city streets with many driveways and intersections that have a 45mph limit. Another straight street with no intersections, 35. Where is the consistency? The German autobahns (with no speed limit in some stretches) have less than half the fatalities per distance than the US: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/German_autobahns#Safety. How does that correlate… Read more »

rus
rus
9 years ago

Being an insurance agent for 7 years, I see the following happen often. People look at price only. You need to understand your liability limits. I am amazed at the limits people have when I get declaration pages (these disclose the limits of the policy). Especially from these online companies. Some companies are notorious about giving you the absolute minimums limits required by law just to be “cheaper”. These minimum limits could ruin all the savings and fugal living you have done over the last 5 years with one bad car accident. Example would be having $25,000 property damage limits… Read more »

jim
jim
9 years ago

Here’s a tip: Obey traffic laws.

It saves you a lot more money than getting tickets and then fighting them.

I’m disappointed the article and many comments seem to have a scofflaw attitude.

jay
jay
9 years ago

I’m disappointed too. Luckily there are passing lanes so I can go faster than you.

Glenn
Glenn
9 years ago

I have had a couple of tickets forgiven by doing deferred disposition. I live in Texas, so I am not sure if it is an option in other states. Basically I plead guilty and paid the fine plus a little extra. If I did not have another infraction in X amount of time, then the ticket was never reported to the state and didn’t hit my driving record. Both tickets were issued in tiny towns <500 people. My guess is that the town receives more revenue by allowing deferred disposition as opposed to allowing defensive driving.

pam cook
pam cook
7 years ago

My son got a ticket for his 6 year old cousin not having a booster seat. The parents don’t use one cause he’s almost 5′ tall. The city cop was doing a quota check and pulled him over to check for seat belt. Everyone was buckled in but the cop didn’t report the passengers was family which could get my son in trouble with DMV. My sons getting dooped and so will I my insurance will be going up..

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