Unintended Consequences of a Move

This Reader Story is from GRS reader Jon, who writes for MoneySmartGuides, a personal finance blog that helps educate people on personal finance so that they can reach their financial dreams. He focuses mainly on investing and paying off debt since those are the two of the most challenging personal finance topics we face.

Some reader stories contain general advice; others are examples of how a GRS reader achieved financial success or failure. These stories feature folks with all levels of financial maturity and income. 

Many of us dream of owning our own home. When we finally save up enough for a down payment and buy our first house, the emotions can be overwhelming. If I close my eyes, I can still see myself pushing the key into the lock on the front door of my house for the first time. I went right over to my new home after signing the paperwork. I walked through the empty house, overjoyed and with my mind racing with all of the things I was going to do to make it my own. I can even still smell my house. That was five years ago. I am now in a bigger house, planning on starting a family soon.

It's typical in our society to buy a “starter home” and then upgrade once the kids come along to accommodate the increase in family size or simply wanting to be in a great school district so our kids get the best education. In my neck of the woods, this usually means upgrading to a McMansion within a development. While the idea of moving for better schools or more room is good on paper, there are a handful of unintended consequences that get overlooked in a house move. In fact, these pressures, as I like to call them, can destroy you financially.

The Honda in a BMW Neighborhood

The first pressure that can result in moving is our own mind. Let's say you drive a Honda, which is a great car to own, but everyone in your new neighborhood drives BMW's. You might notice it at first, but you might start putting pressure on yourself to fit in. You'll hear the others talk about the deal they received on their new car or how fast it is. You look over at your five-year-old Accord and think that maybe it's time for an upgrade as well.

Suddenly, you are on the hook for $400 monthly payments for 60 months along with increased insurance premiums and repair and maintenance costs. Had you stayed in your previous house or moved to a different neighborhood, you might not have taken on this added debt.

The Pressure to Fit In Expands

Taking the analogy above one step further, the pressure to fit in expands beyond your own mind. This can come from both yourself as well as from your neighbors. When it comes from you or your spouse, you will hear Mr. Johnson talking about the incredible vacations his family is taking all of the time. Wanting to add to the conversation or fit in, you might start traveling more as well, regardless if you can afford it, just so you don't feel like an outcast.

Or, your spouse might see that Mrs. Smith has such amazing clothes. They are all designer brands, but they look so comfortable to wear. So, your spouse begins to buy designer clothes as well, regardless if you can afford them or not.

Then there is the pressure from neighbors. While some might not be as forward with it, some will tell you that so-and-so is talking behind your back because you drive a Honda and they wonder why you are living in this neighborhood, assuming you can't afford to be there.

Other times it will be more subtle and neighbors won't invite you over to want to spend time with you. They will exclude you from gatherings simply because you aren't one of them. No one likes being the outcast, so you might give in to the pressure just so you are liked and fit in.

Impact of Pressure on Kids

Of course, we can't forget about the kids. Many times children have a smaller filter than adults. Johnny might come home one day proclaiming that Bobby down the street said you're poor because you don't have a Lexus. You will have to answer the question of whether or not you are indeed poor.

If that conversation doesn't happen, then your kids will probably pressure you into buying them things to fit in. If all of the other neighbor kids have designer clothes or the latest smartphone, they will pester you for the same. Getting tired of their requests, you might give in.

Lastly, your kids could be teased or excluded from get-togethers as well. Kids can be brutal with name-calling and harassing, so the pressure on you to make sure your kids fit in can be costly.

I have personally seen this. I have a friend that moved to an upper-middle-class neighbor but lives very frugally. She bought her kids shoes at TJ Maxx. One day, her daughter came home in tears because one of her classmates made a comment that her shoes look like they came from Payless.

The Toll of Pressure

If you aren't careful, all of this pressure can easily lead into living beyond your means. Sadly, it happens more often than you think.  The next time you are with your neighbors who you think have it all, realize that most likely, they don't. They are just like everyone else in the neighborhood trying to fit. It's a case of the blind leading the blind. Everyone thinks everyone else has it all, and if they mimic those that “have it all,” then they will too.

In many cases, they are living beyond their means as well, adding debt every month. What seemed like a great idea moving to your dream house or a great school district for your kids, turns into a financial nightmare.

Combating The Pressure

So what can you do to offset the pressures outlined above? First off, be comfortable with who you are and be happy. If you know who you are and what your values are, you will have a better chance at not caving in to the pressure.

Next, live your life. Don't try to live life through someone else's eyes or try to please them. The only people you are accountable to are yourself and your family. It doesn't matter what the Smiths think of you. It doesn't matter if they choose not to be your friends either. In fact, if they are that shallow, count your blessings that you aren't friends with them.

Lastly, educate your kids that things don't equal happiness. For me, I am happy just being with my friends, eating dinner and playing board games. It may sound cheesy, but those experiences are priceless to me.

In the end, you have to be honest with yourself and what you want out of life. If you are always trying to please others or trying to fit in, you will be forever miserable. You'll get a temporary high from buying something new, but that that high will fade quicker and quicker, forcing you to buy more and more. Create a long term financial plan for your family and stick to it.

Readers, what other consequences are there from a house move? Do you have any suggestions for combating the pressure?

More about...Psychology

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Brian @ Debt Discipline
Brian @ Debt Discipline
6 years ago

I don’t let others people’s purchases pressure me into how I handle my money or what I purchase. Maybe those people are swimming in debt and are struggling to own the things they have. Unless I understand their personal financial situations it would be difficult to compare mine to theirs.

I think you always need to live with YOUR means, not someone else.

Jon @ MoneySmartGuides
Jon @ MoneySmartGuides
6 years ago

I agree 100%. They call it personal finance because you have to be concerned with your own finances. Unfortunately, too many people allow others to influence their spending decisions.

Jenny
Jenny
6 years ago

As my speech teacher used to say, never spend money you don’t have, on something you don’t want to impress someone you don’t even like. Words to live by.

Elaine
Elaine
6 years ago

It’s funny but I never even feel anything about what other people have or compare myself to them. I may NOTICE what kind of car they drive, but it does not make me feel any different about what I do drive (which is usually a honda and typically driven till it can’t be kept any longer for repair or other reasons). For example, the last one I had I owned for 19 years and I bought it new and kept it till I couldn’t any longer. It was well maintained, clean and ran great. Who cares what other people think?… Read more »

Jon @ MoneySmartGuides
Jon @ MoneySmartGuides
6 years ago
Reply to  Elaine

I like the idea of utility value. Very interesting. I got myself into credit card debt right after college and luckily realized that buying things doesn’t make me happy. Like you, experiences make me happy and I value them and the people that make those experiences so great.

Rob
Rob
6 years ago

I was looking forward to this article based on the title, since we are considering moving for better schools and a little more space. I would have liked to see a little more ‘nuts and bolts’ breakdown of unrealized costs besides keeping up with the Jonses generalities.

AMW
AMW
6 years ago
Reply to  Rob

Rob, as far as nuts and bolts…make sure you do your due diligence with respect to income taxes, property taxes, utilities, and the difference in insurance. When we moved 10 years ago we deliberately moved into a county where the insurance costs were lower and into a township because there were no income taxes. Our property taxes were a smidgen higher than the community next door but were off set by the huge savings in income taxes and insurance. The water and sewer were also billed differently and ended up saving money. In the end we ended up in a… Read more »

Jon @ MoneySmartGuides
Jon @ MoneySmartGuides
6 years ago
Reply to  Rob

Hi Rob,

I understand where you are coming from. I felt that other costs associated with moving – taxes, insurance, utilities, etc, are all accounted for (hopefully) by someone before deciding to move. I wanted to talk about some things that people might not think of, like moving into a higher income area and having your kids feel pressure to “fit in” with the other rich kids, etc.

Buy & Hold Blog
Buy & Hold Blog
6 years ago
Reply to  Rob

Rob,

I wrote an article on the true cost of home ownership. You may find that information useful.

http://www.buyandholdblog.com/the-true-cost-of-homeownership/

My biggest advice to people: try to get a 15-year fixed rate mortgage as that will save you a lot of money in the long-term. I personally have a 10-year mortgage and my interest costs are just around $4800 per year and going down every year.

Hope this helps.

Adnan @ Be Wise with Your Money
Adnan @ Be Wise with Your Money
6 years ago

I believe it has more to do with how we relate ourselves with the money. The moves we make directly relate with how we can associate ourselves with money and what influences we are ready to take. Mastering the money game, to me,is an inner game.. We need to look into our own circumstances rather than following others. If we spend to comfort our emotions, our money journey is going to be tough but it we learn how to master our emotions this journey will be lot easier..

CCH
CCH
6 years ago

According to my aunt’s 90+ year old mother, “The only people who care about driving a BNW (BMW) are people who drive a BNW.” I suspect depression era folks are more capable of ignoring peer pressure and are less concerned with keeping up with the Joneses.

Beth
Beth
6 years ago
Reply to  CCH

Wise woman 🙂

Beth
Beth
6 years ago

IMHO, if people won’t be happy driving a Honda in a BMW neighbourhood, then they shouldn’t move into a BMW neighbourhood. Bucking peer pressure takes a healthy dose of self confidence, humility and gratitude.

I wonder though if people are really that judgemental, or if people assume their neighbours are judging them? I don’t think I’d want to live in a neighbourhood where people were that critical of others.

Jon @ MoneySmartGuides
Jon @ MoneySmartGuides
6 years ago
Reply to  Beth

I’ve been in neighborhoods where there is the pressure to “fit in” and to keep up with the other families in the neighborhood. It was really sad. There was clearly something missing from their lives that made them think that material possessions would bring happiness.

Jen from Boston
Jen from Boston
6 years ago
Reply to  Beth

And then there are people who simply think their way is the right way, and heaven help you if you want to do something differently. You’ll just get non-stop nagging, teasing, and in some cases outright bullying.

Diane C
Diane C
6 years ago

You can find those types in any neighborhood, anywhere.

Laura
Laura
6 years ago

In our case, peer pressure doesn’t come from individual neighbors or co-workers (i.e., the actual human beings we interact with every day), but more from the warped picture of “success” held in front of us every day during our youth by society at large. Specifically, the fact that DH HAD to own a house like one from his childhood to feel successful in life – one that we really couldn’t afford. (OTOH, since rents skyrocketed, we can no longer easily afford to rent here either so we might as well “own” – about the same price for a lot more… Read more »

Adnan @ Be Wise with Your Money
Adnan @ Be Wise with Your Money
6 years ago

Most of us make decisions based upon emotions.. women specially are more prone to spending based upon their relations are at stakes.. same goes for making a move.. whether it is a decision to buy a new version of iPhone or replacing your Honda with BMW.. until we are not in control of our emotions, we may continue to make such moves and lose money..

Kelly @Try New Things
Kelly @Try New Things
6 years ago

This is a great reminder. I left the fast lane to do things that were closer to my heart. But I never stop wondering about the fast lane even though I am happier now.

I have a friend who tracked along with me in her career and I cannot help wondering as she rises in her field.

So this post is a great reminder to do what is right for me now.

Tyler Karaszewski
Tyler Karaszewski
6 years ago

“Suddenly, you are on the hook for $400 monthly payments for 60 months”

Tell me where this BMW dealership is because I’ll be right there.

El Nerdo
El Nerdo
6 years ago

Ufff! This brings back (bad) memories. Part of my childhood I grew up middle class in a rich people’s neighborhood (company-paid house for my professional dad). It was hard to make friends in this strange environment, so we just demanded to be taken to our grandma’s house every day where we had cousins and friends and we played all day. Later on, as my dad’s career reached new heights, and I was a teenager, we started moving into more hoity-toity social environments (country clubs, etc). This wasn’t in money-makes-status America, but in a place where class divisions were entrenched and… Read more »

Beth
Beth
6 years ago
Reply to  El Nerdo

I agree environment is important — it takes guts to live somewhere where your neighbours’ values are different than your own. People who are able to choose their lifestyle need to be very careful doing so. Moving from a Honda neighbourhood to a BMW neighbourhood is a choice for most people, not something they’re forced into.

Though I don’t understand what autism has to do with your argument.

El Nerdo
El Nerdo
6 years ago
Reply to  Beth

Meaning if one can’t read social cues it’s easy to dismiss them. I read faces like a kabbalist–every little detail tells me something. I get major overload from people. Once I worked as a waiter and it was overwhelming because each table was a cauldron of social forces and I could read every damn twitch. Their interpersonal dramas would consume my thoughts, and exhaust me. My dad on the other hand can’t tell a person who is truly friendly from someone who just wants something out of him (so my mom serves as his social compass). So he goes around… Read more »

Beth
Beth
6 years ago
Reply to  El Nerdo

Ahhhh, I get it 🙂 Thanks for elaborating! I grew up around people who had money and people who didn’t have so much — it was odd feeling guilty for being a “have” while feeling looked down on for being a “have not”. (It’s all relative, right?) One thing that left an impression on me was that the well-off were just as stressed about money as everyone else — but the difference was the stress was often self-imposed. There’s a difference between worrying about making ends meet when you have two houses and five cars than if you have one… Read more »

El Nerdo
El Nerdo
6 years ago
Reply to  El Nerdo

hey, no, i didn’t know about the existence of 1500 days– did a search and found it. sounds like you grew up middle class, which is mostly a good place to be in north america–but regardless, theres always that looking “up” to emulate someone who has more/better/bigger “stuff”– so the pressure is always there. ha ha, writing about these things reminds me of “rushmore”. i feel the urge to copypaste the bill murray speech [ALERT: SPOILERS]: You guys have it real easy. I never had it like this where I grew up. But I send my kids here because the… Read more »

Kalen
Kalen
6 years ago

It seems like there is always pressure when people try to “keep up with the Joneses”. Don’t give into that pressure! Remember, just because someone owns a BMW doesn’t mean they can actually afford that BMW. Don’t fall into the trap!

Danielle
Danielle
6 years ago

My husband and I are both frugal, living well within our means, and generally not caring too much what other people think of us or how we live. But we recently found ourselves surprised by peer pressure we were giving ourselves when our lease was up and the rent was raised on our old place. As we searched for a new apartment we knew we were looking for something with relatively low rent as we are trying to save well to buy a house down the line. But as our search continued we found ourselves looking at larger places, ones… Read more »

bap
bap
6 years ago

This is something Tom Stanley discusses in _The Millionaire Next Door_, in the context of raising financially independent kids: well-meaning parents sometimes handicap their kids by giving them large gifts or chunks of money, often enabling them to buy a house in a neighborhood with a lifestyle the kids cannot afford on their own.

cherie
cherie
6 years ago

The truth is we stayed in our ‘starter home’ for these exact reasons. Not that *I* couldn’t handle the peer pressure but I didn’t want to raise my kids in an environment where their views would be skewed by that thinking – and it’s DEFINITELY a part of the culture in those great public schools in areas we considered – I know folks who live there and who are of a like mindset to us, not materialistic, thrify and such, and their kids have suffered for it. Our choice instead was to stay where we are, in a neighborhood where… Read more »

Buy & Hold Blog
Buy & Hold Blog
6 years ago
Reply to  cherie

Cherie,

You have spoken my mind. We also entertained the thought of moving from a starter home to an upgraded home. But, decided against the move exactly for the reasons you mentioned above. We too are planning to send our kids to a private school all the way through where we can provide them with the best educational foundation for life. Our oldest is in Pre-K now and newest one is just a month old.

Thanks.

Patty@homemakersdaily.com
6 years ago

Very good post. Those are definitely some things that could catch you by surprise. And even if you can handle it, maybe your kids won’t be able to. Being a kid is tough enough, but living in a neighborhood that might be a bit above your means could be hard on them. On the other hand, it could teach them to be strong. But before moving, it’s definitely something to think about.

Diane C
Diane C
6 years ago

Pressure? What pressure?? It could be said that I have just moved into a similar neighborhood. This new house required different-sized furniture than the old one. Virtually everything came from a consignment store. I have no problem telling people where I got it when they admire my home (and ask). Recently, we threw a Holiday Open House so we could meet more of our new neighbors. I printed invites on paper I had and hand delivered them. I baked hundreds of cookies. I decorated with whatever I had on hand. It was a blast and now I’ve met almost all… Read more »

Rail
Rail
6 years ago

Didn’t we (U.S.) just play this game out the last 30 yrs. or so? Mix up the materialistic peer pressure and Narcissim, thrown in with a large helping of greed and envy. Bake in the oven of a Plutacracy and you have the turd pie economy and meltdown of 2008. To paraphrase George Castanza from “Seinfeld” “GRS readers have Hand.” We are the ones that don’t care what the neighbors think, and don’t live to impress others or live in a material junk world. If you think about it we kind of have something in common with the Amish!!!! 🙂… Read more »

Anne
Anne
6 years ago

Rail,

I was thinking the exact same thing. I couldn’t tell you what one single person on my block drives. And at a quick glance I can’t tell designer duds from nicely bought second hand clothes.

I think it’s possible that certain people are simply tuned into what their neighbors think, but a whole lot of us are not.

I also don’t believe I’m “autistic.”

Beth
Beth
6 years ago
Reply to  Anne

I wonder how much of “keeping up with the Joneses” is perceived judgement rather than actual judgement. Or a fear of being left out.

My social circles don’t really care about designer/luxury anything — but man, the pressure to get married and have kids is an entirely different matter!

El Nerdo
El Nerdo
6 years ago
Reply to  Anne

Autism is a spectrum, not an on/off thing, and it comes in many forms, . Yes it can cause social isolation and anxiety and depression, but it can also be “good” for some things– Asperger’s syndrome, which is an autism spectrum “disorder,” can be great for people in fields like math, science, engineering, music etc. Autism is a type of human diversity, like ADHD or dyslexia, and not an insult.

ps- see here: http://www.wrongplanet.net/article112.html

or better yet:

http://nymag.com/news/features/47225/

Scott W
Scott W
6 years ago

Great points Linda, thank you for sharing. Couple quick thoughts: 1) Most people who own BMW’s probably don’t OWN them. 2) I agree with several other posts that I worry more about my kids dealing with peer pressure than me. I’m blessed, I truly don’t care what people think but it is tougher for kids. 3) I purposely bought a house I could easily afford and in a very mixed neighborhood in terms of home prices. The one downside I will say is that some don’t keep up their yards and house. I believe in some cases because of a… Read more »

rubymermaid
rubymermaid
6 years ago

I just wish I could afford the start home… 26 years old living in southern California… Accountant (CPA in process) and I don’t think I can ever afford even a condo.

I’m happy with my used corolla. Only thing I could see myself getting other than a toyota or honda sedan is a truck for camping/hauling more stuff.

Screw BMWs. I would never. If someone gifted me one I would sell it and buy a used Toyota truck and bank the difference.

El Nerdo
El Nerdo
6 years ago
Reply to  rubymermaid

Not sure where you live or if you’d be a DIYer (the desire for a pickup suggests “yes”), but strawbale construction is legal/ has a code in California.

http://www.dcat.net/resources/California_Straw_Bale_Code.pdf

Plenty of how-to info with a little google-fu. I’d suggest starting here:

http://www.greenhomebuilding.com/strawbale.htm

(I’ve been obsessively reading about this stuff lately. Sorry if it doesn’t apply to you– but maybe it could!)

Diane C
Diane C
6 years ago
Reply to  rubymermaid

Oh rubymermaid, you can do it! I got my start in SoCal too. I’ll share my specifics in the hope that it will encourage you. I saved my a** off during my twenties. By the time I was 30, I had a year’s salary in the bank. I wanted to buy real estate, but was living in West L.A., where nothing was affordable. I bought a 3+2 house in Riverside, where I grew up. It was not a practical location for my work, so I rented it out. The tax breaks were awesome, which enabled me to continue to save… Read more »

AnnieP
AnnieP
6 years ago

We moved from an ordinary suburb to one of the most upscale suburbs in Dallas/Fort Worth on the advice of a financial adviser. After 8 years, we moved back to our original suburb.

The thing we had not expected is what we called the “Southlake upcharge” — every service we used was automatically more expensive because of our address.

Carole
Carole
6 years ago

In my experience, people don’t interact that much with their neighbors to be very influenced by them. Most people try to maintain the level of outside appearance of the neighborhood but other than that it’s every man (family) for himself.

Alexandria
Alexandria
6 years ago

Our experience is the complete opposite. We moved to a lower cost area and so when we were like 24 we ended up buying a home in an upscale neighborhood. (Housing costs were about 1/3 of where we were from, so our dollars could afford much more). We initially had some second thoughts. What are we doing in this high-end neighborhood with our 20-year-old cars?? We felt a wee bit out of place. 😉 As we acclimated to our new city I found young people in worse neighborhoods who had our means. Their spending was *ridiculous*. We had come from… Read more »

Cujo
Cujo
6 years ago

Perhaps, but it’s the neighbors who envy us when they learn that we have no car payments, nor any other debt aside from our mortgage.

I’ve told my kids ever since birth that the biggest secret I know to being happy is: Don’t worry about what other people think.

Jen from Boston
Jen from Boston
6 years ago

I had a slightly similar experience to this. When I bought my condo I was one of the younger owners, and all the other households had a higher income than mine. Since it was a new development we had to decide whether to create a reserve or not (I STRONGLY recommend that you do!!!). One of the owners said, “No, let’s keep the fees low. We can just do an assessment if something pops up.” That’s when I had my mini-panic! I couldn’t afford to get smacked with a four-figure assessment!!! I worried I had bought into a condo association… Read more »

phoenix1920
phoenix1920
6 years ago

Good article! I think one of the greatest dangers is normalizing expenditures in a more upper-class neighborhood. If your neighbors have maid service and they rave about how it saves time or discuss the great deals on a Lexus, it can normalize these type of expenses–and that is harder to notice than a desire to “fit in.” The only thing I wanted to add was in reference to kids because this sounds like my childhood–but a “tough-it-out” approach can backfire and create a child who tries to overcompensate for something she or he was denied growing up. I grew up… Read more »

Mary
Mary
6 years ago

I don’t think it takes a move to notice that people fall into the pressures of living above their means for the sake of putting up a front about how well they are doing. My sister in law, who is 23, purchased a used 2010 BMW after my husband and I purchased our used 2010 VW Jetta. We purchased our car after our old car completely died. With two kids, we knew we needed a more reliable car and couldn’t risk throwing money towards a car off the street again. Anyway.. I set myself a budget of $15K and got… Read more »

Ely
Ely
6 years ago

I think this article would have been much more valuable if it had included what the writer experienced and what he did about it, as opposed to the generic hypotheticals.

Patrick
Patrick
6 years ago

Sure are a lot of BMW haters out there. While I’ve never owned one, I wouldn’t be opposed to driving one. There are a lot of GM, Ford and Honda’s that cost more than some of the BMW’s. As long as you have the money, buy what makes you happy. It’s kind of funny how some people buy BMW’s to “fit in” with a certain crowd and how some people would never own a BMW in order to “fit in” with a certain crowd.

Marie
Marie
6 years ago

We have very little to do with our neighbors as adults, but we really felt the pressure during our college years, being scholarship students at a private school. Dorm living is so “in your face” compared to being able to walk into your house and shut the door to the Joneses. You live with someone you didn’t get to choose, interact with people based on what they study, and all the while everyone is taking mental notes on everything you wear and drive. Exhausting!

Sam
Sam
6 years ago

We live in a historic neighborhood that includes all kinds of folks, working class, professional yuppies, gay couples, retired, etc. We like our neighborhood b/c (1) we feel like we are doing well compared to our neighbors; (2) working class neighbors remind us of where we are in our journey and how grateful we should be. But, I also live in very close proximity to super wealth (Town of Palm Beach and other pockets of my county). Saying one pays no attention to those around you sounds nice, but the studies show that most people do pay attention (perhaps not… Read more »

Babs
Babs
6 years ago

My father was a contractor. My parents ran their own business in a relatively small town. Dad used to say that the bigger the house, the harder it was to collect what was owed. Doctors and lawyers with BEAUTIFUL homes could not afford to pay their bills. From a young age, I understood: just because a person “owns” something, it doesn’t necessarily mean he can afford it.

Increase Credit Limit
Increase Credit Limit
6 years ago

I think the biggest thing is just not to move into that big house in the fancy neighborhood, if that is not what you want or can afford. It’s easy to say to just educate your kids that things don’t mean happiness, but it’s a lot harder for them to believe it if the kids around them don’t believe it.

Taylor
Taylor
6 years ago

Great article. I really believe that social pressure has more to do with financial decisions than people realize or like to admit and social media makes it worse. My Facebook feed is FULL of people bragging about purchases, new jobs, money etc. Sometimes I do get tempted to find an excuse to spend that extra dollar because everyone else is doing it. Your situation may not be the same, but a guarantee a part of you is influenced by what the Jones’ are doing.

Diane C
Diane C
6 years ago
Reply to  Taylor

Oh my goodness, Taylor, you hit the nail on the head. Years ago, when one of my BFF’s gave up FB for Lent, I knew I could learn from her experience and just say NO to FB completely. It reminds me of the classic mom gem: “If all your friends jumped off a roof, would you jump, too?” Don’t need it, don’t want it and I have managed to live a happy life without it.

Taylor
Taylor
6 years ago
Reply to  Diane C

I’m glad you agree! I was embarrassed in the past and thought I was the only one who felt the green envy monster when browsing Facebook. I wish I could delete mine, but I use it for marketing purposes. I’ve committed to using it a lot less and I don’t feel the same social pressures anymore to over consume.

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