What’s the value of work-life balance?

I was really struck by Kristin Wong's recent article “Overwork and the illusion of a ‘high-paying' job.” It's not something that I've had to deal with personally, though I've seen people close to me wrestle with it. As an attorney, Jake makes a six-figure salary at his new job, but probably works 80+ hours in a week.

While this is undoubtedly tough (on his health, on his personal relationships, on his sanity), it's also the norm in his industry. He tried going out on his own for awhile, but it turned out that he didn't really work any less. He just spent his time on different things, primarily administrative tasks. And he was making less than half as much.

He concluded that if he had to work that much anyway, he might as well make the big salary that goes with it. And this time around he's much more focused on paying off his student and consumer debt as quickly as possible. Because of my own employment situation, however, I'm going to approach Kristin's question from the opposite angle: How much of a reduction in pay are you willing to take for the sake of work-life balance?

My Day Job

I now make $42,000 per year. When I took this job way back when, I viewed it as purely transitional. I needed to make money right away, and this was the first job I was offered. But I believed that I would get another job, making significantly more money, within three years.

I've interviewed for other jobs since then. I've even received an offer that I decided not to take, since they low-balled me by quite a bit. Like April Dykman, I attempted to negotiate but was shut down — hard. Was it because I'm a woman? Who knows. However, after my experience, I vowed not to apply for a position unless the low end of the posted salary range was at least 10 percent more than my current position.

But these days there's more to it than that. You see, in the beginning I had no choice but to scrimp and save and pay down my great big debt on my (relatively modest) salary. Since I started my day job, I've paid off more than $15,000 in consumer debt. When I started writing for GRS, I was down to the last $5,000 or so — I'd already paid off over 10 grand! I've also paid off over $8,000 in student loans.

I've finally reached the point where, after saving for retirement, paying my bills, and allocating some money for fun, I have $300 or so left over each month. At the moment, some gets saved and some is used for extra student-loan payments. Additionally, I've been expanding my side gigs so, while I do need my day job, I don't rely on it for everything.

The Beauty of Debt Payoff

Take Kristin's original hypothetical …

“Let's say you have a choice between:

“A) 40-hour-a-week job that pays $100,000 a year, and

“B) 75-hour-a-week job that pays $100,000 a year.”

… and let's modify it a bit. Say, instead, you have a choice between:

A) 40-hour-a-week job that pays $50,000 a year, and

B) 80-hour-a-week job that pays $100,000 a year.

IMO, that's when you get to the really interesting questions. How much do you enjoy your job? How much do you need the money? Do you feel a duty to live up to your potential? Are you willing to sacrifice spending time with your family and loved ones? Give up your hobbies? Is time worth more than money? How much more?

As J.D. and many, many others on GRS and elsewhere have pointed out, the beauty of paying off debt is that you're able to live on less. These days, I've got a bit of a cushion. I'm happy to say that it's been years since I cried after going grocery shopping or didn't wash my hair for a month because I couldn't afford shampoo. Yes, both of those things happened.

I undoubtedly still have a long journey ahead of me. However, having some of the debt-related pressure taken off me leaves me free to enjoy a corporate culture where work-life balance is truly valued. I also enjoy feeling confident that I can handle any situation that arises. I both like and trust my colleagues. While I do keep my eyes peeled in case an exciting job opportunity comes along, I don't feel pressured to take another job just because of the salary.

All Your Time Has Value, Not Just the Time You Spend Working

As Kristin pointed out in her article, there are many people who don't struggle with this choice. Why? Because, well, for them, it's not a choice. Maybe they can't get the “high-paying” job for whatever reason. Maybe they're in too deep and have to take the “high-paying” job even though they hate it. Everyone's journey is different, and there are lots of valid reasons for that.

But I keep thinking about this quote: “If I had no money, and I was struggling to pay my debts, and I lost my job, I'd definitely take the first job I could find. I just think, if we can, we should strive for more than that .” But more than what, exactly?

The obvious implication is that we should strive for more money. And sure, there's nothing inherently wrong with that. Sometimes it's even necessary. However, ultimately money is just a tool to get us the other things in life that we want. It can buy Stuff. Meh. It can buy Experiences. Better. And it can buy Time (not the magazine). Yea!

And fortunately, there are a couple of different ways to buy Time. One way is to save up enough in advance to achieve Financial Independence. Then you can choose not to work at all, or to only do work that interests you in whatever amount you desire. That way has been achieved by some people and is a goal for many more.

I think there's another way to buy Time, though. I get to leave work by 5 p.m. every day and I don't need to think about it until I get in the next morning. I get all the federal holidays plus generous sick and vacation time. Yes, you can get those things by “paying your dues” until you're important enough to demand them. But there are other ways.

What's worth more to you — time or money? Why?

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Dee @ Color Me Frugal
Dee @ Color Me Frugal
6 years ago

Great post. I have actually been debating this a lot lately, and I’m thinking about cutting down my hours somewhat this fall (which will involve making less money). As my hubby and I keep saying to each other, we need to increase our happiness factor, NOT our salaries.

A-L
A-L
6 years ago

Sometimes it’s not just a matter of increasing the hours. I’m a teacher (definitely more than 40 hours) and the way for me to significantly increase my salary would be to become a principal. Except in my ALEC-driven state, working in education is increasingly more a nightmare. For each of the last two years, about 20% of principals in my district have been fired. Not because they’re not doing a good job, but either because they didn’t play politics well with the superintendent, or they didn’t meet the mandatory 10% minimum improvement in test scores (there were principals with 9%… Read more »

Honey Smith
Honey Smith
6 years ago
Reply to  A-L

In the majority of professions (as far as I’ve observed), management is the route to pay increases. And yes, that’s usually a totally different job than whatever you were doing before! I think management’s also more stressful for a variety of reasons. Though it sounds like principals have it pretty touch where you are :-/

William @ Drop Dead Money
William @ Drop Dead Money
6 years ago

Great post. There’s something more you alluded to, but didn’t highlight: how “nice” is the job — and what’s that worth?

Every job doesn’t bring you harmony with your co-workers and boss, not to mention all Federal holidays and a culture of work-life balance. That is part of “quality of life.” In sheer hours, that’s a huge part of your life.

What is THAT worth to you, especially when the trade-off is the debt burden and a crimp in the money part of life?

Beth
Beth
6 years ago

Interesting points, but this post doesn’t feel complete to me. My challenge isn’t with my day job — it’s what happens AFTER the day job. PF blogs are constantly preaching to have a side gig or build your own business but we never really discuss the personal, professional or health consequences. We all know Honey is a freelance writer and does SEO on the side, yet she only talks about her day job here. I would have loved to hear more about how her side gigs impact her life. IMHO, you get a better sense of work/life balance when you… Read more »

Honey Smith
Honey Smith
6 years ago
Reply to  Beth

I think about this, too. If I were a full-time freelancer then I’d feel really pressured to say yes to everything because you never know where your next job is coming from (or if your next job is coming). By having a day job that can cover everything (with a tiny cushion) then I can reserve my side gig money toward rapidly funding other goals. And if I’m having a tough month at my day job (which seems cyclical at least to me, and some months I just work harder than others) then I can say “no” to a few… Read more »

Laura
Laura
6 years ago
Reply to  Beth

Beth, thanks for raising this point. I struggle with this – PF advice is to have multiple income streams via a PT job/blog/business. But I already have little free time. My day job is enjoyable but demanding and my commute sucks; I’m rarely home before 7:00 pm, and 8:00 pm is more common. Then factor in things like chores and errands and maintaining a marriage and parenting a teen…also friends and spiritual practice and occasionally reading a good book. I don’t mind the time invested in my day job; I’m paid relatively well for what I do and have excellent… Read more »

Beth
Beth
6 years ago
Reply to  Laura

Yes, thank you. There are only so many hours in the day. How you feel after working your day job makes a big difference in what you can handle in your afterwork hours.

Beth
Beth
6 years ago
Reply to  Beth

Apparently there are two of us 🙂 First Beth here.

I’ve noticed a lot more people at my current workplace do freelance work than at my old company because my employer has a culture that allows for a work life balance. But in some cases, the side gig is impacting their day job because they’re stressed and burning out.

To me, the “life” part of “work/life balance” doesn’t involve more work!

Kat
Kat
6 years ago
Reply to  Beth

Excellent question! My husband has faced this question recently. He has a musical hobby that earns us some fun money, but as he has become more in-demand at his day job, it has become increasingly difficult for him to accept gigs. When he was just starting out at work making entry-level pay, he would accept almost any gig. As his pay went up, the value of his time went up as well, so the price he charged for gigs went up. Otherwise, it wasn’t worth giving up his weekend, even if it was his hobby and he enjoyed it. It… Read more »

adult student
adult student
6 years ago
Reply to  Beth

Agreed! I don’t make much, but I really value spending my evenings and weekends with my husband and friends, and when I do have side gigs (two to three seasonal ones this year), I miss that evening and weekend time a lot. Apparently, getting in the best financial shape possible just isn’t my top priority, because I am glad not to have extra jobs throughout the year, even though we don’t have much extra money to put toward student loans and retirement.

imelda
imelda
6 years ago
Reply to  Beth

This is what drives me crazy when people – including NYTimes columnists – present this as the New Normal. In the new economy, we all have to be entrepreneurs who hustle nonstop. For some people that’s natural; for most of us, it’s exhausting.

Jon @ Money Smart Guides
Jon @ Money Smart Guides
6 years ago

When I was younger, it was all about the paycheck. I wanted the biggest paycheck I could get. But now that I am older, I value my time much more. I would rather have a job that I can leave at 5pm everyday and still enjoy my nights. I never would want to work a job where I got home just in time to go to bed and get up the next morning and do it all over again. I did this for a few weeks at a previous job to help us through tax season and I hated every… Read more »

Mike in NH
Mike in NH
6 years ago

I think there is a different way to answer the question of what is more valuable than simply saying time OR money. For me this starts with figuring out what your time is worth both to others and to yourself. In the case of others, this may be what you get paid. To horribly oversimplify the equation I’d take my annual salary and divide it by 2080 (40 hours per week x 52 weeks…yeah yeah I’m a type I personality and don’t pay attention to details so if you are a type C personality you can spend the time tracking… Read more »

Mrs PoP
Mrs PoP
6 years ago

I think a lot of it can depend on where in your career you are. I did the 80+ hour work week for a six-figure paycheck relatively early in my career and it put me in a very powerful position negotiation-wise for my next step. I was able to negotiate a 40 hour workweek (< 50% of what I was previously working) for about 70% of what I was making before (more when you take into account overall compensation since my benefits are better). In the 5 years since, my salary has increased from there, but my hours have not.… Read more »

Ruchi
Ruchi
5 years ago
Reply to  Mrs PoP

This sums up my dilemma so perfectly. Whether I choose a higher paying job at this crucial point in my career (I’ve got decent work ex and can now command a higher pay) or a risky offer at a start-up, which has around 20% less money and a lot of work, but offers great flexibility in terms of work from home. I’ve worked super hard all these years at not very high wages, have almost been on the verge of burning out, and now is the time to reap rich rewards. How wise to take up a job with a… Read more »

Sally
Sally
6 years ago

I found this article very relevant. Although I graduated grad school in science with zero debt, there is an expectation in science that you should postdoc until you make it into a tenure track (TT) position. Aside from the lack of benefits, the uncertainty, and the lousy salary as a postdoc (60-80hrs wk for a salary that is perhaps 40K), I’d have to continue in that 60-80hr week position as a faculty member. I ran the numbers. As a faculty member, if I considered my likely hours working, my end compensation would be around $24-35/hr. Right now, I work 40… Read more »

Honey Smith
Honey Smith
6 years ago
Reply to  Sally

I do know some very successful faculty who leave every day at 5 and also don’t work on weekends. However, they have to be TOTALLY “ON” every minute they are at work, which presents its own challenges!

I originally thought I’d go tenure track, and I’m so glad I got this “transitional” job — I’d never had work that didn’t follow me home before. It blew my mind!

John C @ Action Economics
John C @ Action Economics
6 years ago

Finding that perfect balance is difficult. My career provides an excellent balance now, I have about 20 – 26 weeks of the year where I work 72 to 84 hours a week, and the rest of the year off, which allows me to stay at home with the kids, while my wife increases her hours from a shift or two a week to 3 to 4 shifts a week. I’ve been offered year round jobs with substantially more pay, but at the end of the day, having half the year “off” is amazing, especially with young kids.

Stefanie @ The Broke and Beautiful Life
Stefanie @ The Broke and Beautiful Life
6 years ago

I agree, I think people forget that they can have time now AND later. My boyfriend is a freelance theatrical carpenter who typically makes around 80k. Last year, he and I spent a lot of time traveling together, so he took on fewer gigs. He only made 50k but looking back on the year, we both agreed that it was worth the reduced salary to have the time NOW.

El Nerdo
El Nerdo
6 years ago

I value time infinitely more than money– time is life itself, money is just a tool. To have no time is to be dead. As long as I enjoy the work I do, and I can self-direct, I can work as long as I need to work, regardless of the money. Doing something I hate or under someone else’s orders however really kills me. The difference has more to do with mission and environment than with the task itself. I remember working in offices with horrible people (K Street in DC), and come Thursday I’d start burning my paycheck at… Read more »

Honey Smith
Honey Smith
6 years ago
Reply to  El Nerdo

Honestly, wearing shoes is one of the big downsides to any “regular” job. I really, really hate to wear shoes.

Laura
Laura
6 years ago
Reply to  Honey Smith

LOL! I’m with you – can’t wait till summer and I can wear sandals to work. One of the huge (to me) perks of my job (office admin) is that casual dress is allowed. I show up in blue jeans nearly every day (no dry-cleaning bill or expensive suits), with sandals in summer and athletic shoes in winter, and no one cares one whit. It’s all about how well I can do my job.

Anne
Anne
6 years ago
Reply to  El Nerdo

“To have no time is to be dead.” Absolutely superb.

And I also totally agree with the oppression of working with/under really awful people. I never had a “job” itself that was unbearable, but I have had co-workers/bosses that fit into that category.

johnbebad
johnbebad
6 years ago

I think it helps if you can to the point where you are making a larger salary if it affords you financial flexibility with sanity. Also typically it will open more doors for you and you will be less likely to be reporting to as many bosses especially in matrixed managed environment. I have found if you are unhappy with the people who you report to you either need to leave or be the person who people report to. The further up the food chain you can the more you can impact change as opposed to becoming a victim of… Read more »

lmoot
lmoot
6 years ago

I really liked this article. This is definitely something that has consumed my thoughts for the last couple of years since I made the decision of what I want out of life. I recently moved to a non supervisory position because it wasn’t worth the stress to me, and I knew I never wanted to take the expected “next step” into a higher position; it was a lateral move so I got to keep my pay, win! I don’t get the raise % I qualify for each year b/c I’m at the salary max but I don’t care. What’s an… Read more »

Brian @ Luke1428
Brian @ Luke1428
6 years ago

In this stage of my life I’m valuing time more. I have four children ages 5 to 13, so only a limited amount of time left where they will be living under my roof and affected by my influence. The chance to earn more money will still be there once they are gone.

Hoping to Adopt
Hoping to Adopt
6 years ago

I am in the same place as you. I have a young child (and hopefully another one soon). Even 40-hour weeks with minimal commute time leaves me feeling like I don’t have enough time for the things I want to do, like spending more time with my son.

Daria
Daria
6 years ago

in 2000, my husband stepped away from a six figure job that with overtime was requiring him to put in 80 hrs per week. His boss would not okay hiring help because accounting is a cost center not a profit center. We couldn’t be involved in bible study together or have people over or expect him to show up at the kids activities because we didn’t know when he was going to be expected to stay late or come in early. He said we couldn’t afford for him to leave his job but started looking anyway. I slashed expenses to… Read more »

Kristin Wong
Kristin Wong
6 years ago

Hmm, I don’t think my point was to strive for more money. It was to strive for more value for my paid time. To clarify, when I wrote: “we should strive for more,” I meant more value for our time, not just more money. More money is actually kinda the opposite of what I was saying in that article. For example, the way you decided to only search for jobs that paid 10 percent more than your current position, that’s awesome, and that’s striving for more! Maybe my point about valuing paid time didn’t come through clearly in that article.… Read more »

Honey Smith
Honey Smith
6 years ago
Reply to  Kristin Wong

Thanks for clarifying! This is really helpful as I think through these things. There’s a really big difference between being simply paid more and being valued more that’s at the heart of what we are discussing 🙂

Natasia
Natasia
6 years ago

I am actually right in the middle of this situation. I have been in a decent paying job for over 2 years and I have hated every minute of it. During the holiday season I decided to get a second job in retail to have something fun to do. After working there through the season, I was offered to stay on full time. I love working there and decided fun at work, or at least enjoying your working hours was worth more than any salary. I have now been offered a full time position and am giving up the “good… Read more »

Kristin
Kristin
6 years ago

RE: Jake’s situation. The one thing that you have not considered is HOW MUCH MONEY HE IS MAKING FOR THE FIRM AS OPPOSED TO HIMSELF. Unless he’s got a good partnership deal, as an employee/associate of a law firm, one is expected to make far more for the firm than one is earning oneself, even when benefits are considered. For those of you who are not familiar, this is through billing requirements, typically 1600-2000 hours of BILLED TIME per year. Not just time in the office. BILLED TIME. So let’s say that associate is being billed out at a modest… Read more »

sarah
sarah
6 years ago
Reply to  Kristin

But, he is able to make so much for the firm because of the support they provide. Everything from his desk chair to office administrators, post-it notes, advertising, liability insurance, and so on. I’m a licensed clinical social worker. I work for an agency that bills around $100/hour for my time, I’m required to bill about 24 hours/week which means they make $120k+ and I get paid $40k. I might be able to strike out on my own and make a little more but it would be at the expense of spending a LOT more of my time advertising, billing,… Read more »

Helen
Helen
6 years ago
Reply to  sarah

This is very true! The first commenter has forgotten that, before Jake makes any money for the firm, he has to bring in enough to cover his salary + his share of overhead – which includes all the things you mentioned plus the costs of his assistant, IT support staff, rent & utilities for their office space, office equipment – photocopiers/fax machines/computers etc – the list goes on. Not to mention things like professional development courses/conferences covered by the employer. I recently became a partner in a professional services firm and I was surprised to discover how long it takes… Read more »

Kristin
Kristin
6 years ago
Reply to  Helen

I am well aware that associates have to pay for themselves, their assistants, post-its, etc., first. And having those things provided is a big advantage. I’d still rather keep all the profits for myself than make money for someone else.

Honey Smith
Honey Smith
6 years ago
Reply to  Kristin

A lot depends on the firm (as with any job, I suppose). The job Jake quit would penalize employees who didn’t hit billable hour goals and would show him graphs with how much in the red he was in terms of what he was bringing in the firm. Not coincidentally, he was assigned cases by partners when the client fell behind on their bills and didn’t have any choice in the matter. His new job assumes he is an investment and while there are billable hour goals, it is more like “you get a prize if you hit your goal”… Read more »

G
G
6 years ago

When your young I think everybody worries about money and tries to get as much as possible but as you get older and realize you have less and less time then you realize time is more important. You can’t use money after your dead. I have seen both ends of the spectrum regarding money from friends and family. Those who don’t make enough lack the resources to maximize their happiness. Those who make too much don’t really need the money and in my opinion waste it on these like kitchen upgrade, bigger/better house or car which is a waste because… Read more »

Money Saving
Money Saving
6 years ago

I have many friends that are in this situation. They make $30K – $80k more than me, but they work 80 hour weeks, constantly travel, and have no time for exercise, relaxation, or family time. I think that’s a recipe for disaster if you ask me.

I’ll pick the lower (decent) salary with something closer to 40 hours every time. Slow and steady wins the race 🙂

curious
curious
6 years ago

Hi Honey,

I’m not sure if you covered this in the past, but do you and your husband consider each of your loans the responsibility of the individual? Do you take a holistic view of both of your situations and put shared money toward the highest interest loans, for example, or do you tackle each on your own with whatever income you have?

Either way, I’d like to hear how you decided to take the path you chose.

Honey Smith
Honey Smith
6 years ago
Reply to  curious

We keep separate finances, at the moment. I don’t have any consumer debt and all my student loans were accrued prior to getting married (in fact, prior to us even moving in together).

All Jake’s student loans were also accrued prior to moving in together, as was almost all of his consumer debt (and what consumer debt is post-move in, was pre-marriage and not accrued for joint expenses).

So, debt payments are individually managed by the person who accrued the debt. We divide the rent proportionally to income and split everything else 50/50 at the moment.

Chuckie G.
Chuckie G.
6 years ago
Reply to  curious

I’m not honey but I did some soul searching on this. Quick situation overview. Wife’s student loans upon graduation totaled $105K for a degree in education ::gasp::. My student loans totaled $55K for a business degree ::slightly less of a gasp::. Wife’s current occupation: homemaker/side gigger. My current occupation: businessman. My gut jerk inclination when staring down the barrel of a six figure debt load I did not rack up was to think that each was to take care of their own. That was about the dumbest conclusion I have ever made in my life. Money has this nasty tendency… Read more »

Ely
Ely
6 years ago
Reply to  Chuckie G.

My husband feels differently – he doesn’t want to saddle me with his old debt. Of course, neither of us is a homemaker, and we don’t count pennies, so the problems that worry you have never come up.

Chuckie G.
Chuckie G.
6 years ago
Reply to  Ely

Since this is working for you two, that is awesome! While I do not mean to discount your personal experience, this does not resonate with me. One way to spin this is that one does not want to saddle the other with the old debt. So they take the honorable approach and go at it alone. Another way to spin it is that one harbors shame for the consequences of past failures. So they shield their mate from their flawed past and suffer alone. I have no desire for my spouse to suffer alone for the sake of shielding me… Read more »

phoenix1920
phoenix1920
6 years ago

I don’t believe it’s possible to truly work 80 hours a week on a yearly basis, for any long-term basis. To put in 80 hours of work, you have to be at work more than 12 hours a day, 7 days a week, assuming you are not calling the time it takes to eat breakfast, lunch, and dinner as “work”. Add in the time it takes for commuting, showering, and getting ready for work, one is generally up to 14 hours a day, if not more. Perhaps, there are some jobs where this is possible, but from my experience in… Read more »

Ely
Ely
6 years ago

I’m in much the same position as Honey – I make about the same, with similar benefits, and my job is pleasant and comfortable and doesn’t follow me home. I like it. I have two friends who took on more ‘interesting’ and ‘challenging’ jobs this year; one has already quit, and the other is quickly burning out. No thanks. I make enough, and I’m sufficiently engaged at work, and I don’t need more. I do have a fair amount of free time, which prior to this year I filled up with school. (Paid for by my employer, another benefit.) Now… Read more »

Nicole
Nicole
6 years ago

Isn’t that always the kicker? I’ve seen this happen so many times, to myself included. They could have kept a good employee but lost him and then increased staff anyway. Corporations are really stupid a lot of the time.

Marcus
Marcus
6 years ago

Health = Wealth and if there is no time to engage in activities that take care of your health (both physical and mental), you may end up as a “cash rich poor person”. To me a Porsche-driving person who suffers from insomnia and depression is poor. Activities that promote health include, but are not limited to time for your family, time to dream, time to exercise, time for yourself, time for friends, time with and for your partner, time to travel, etc. (not necessarily in this order and you may have other activities that are important to you). If you… Read more »

cgten
cgten
6 years ago

Once you’re salaried, it’s hard to say how many hours you really work. I like my job, and I think about it all the time. Sometimes because I’m excited about stuff (a portion of my work is creative), sometimes because I’m stressed (I had to lay off people recently, my first time, and that was an incredibly difficult process and kept me up at night). I make $180k, so I am well-paid. I like the people I work with, and I don’t need to be in the office more than about 50 hours a week, but including the time I… Read more »

Jay
Jay
6 years ago

I make just 50k in one of the most expensive cities in the US, but I wake up looking forward to work and have amassed hundreds of thousands in the bank. I’m home for dinner every day and enjoy a lot of leisure time. So it’s not how much you earn, but what you keep through diligence and commitment (dying words in the American lexicon, it seems!), so my vote is time rather than money.

Kate
Kate
6 years ago

This was a real scenario for us two years ago, only the decision went the other way. My husband was increasingly stressed in his management position, where he was understaffed, overworked, unsupported and needing to go into work to make decisions 7 days a week. After the stress started to impact his health and his family life, we took a serious look at what we could do. He didn’t want to leave the company – he has good benefits there and good holiday time (when he could take it) thanks to many years of service. So he stepped down. To… Read more »

freebird
freebird
6 years ago

I think there’s another important factor here, and that is how much do you enjoy your job? So if we modify the original hypothetical– Let’s say you have a choice between: A) 40-hour-a-week job that pays $100,000 a year [a job that you hate], and B) 75-hour-a-week job that pays $100,000 a year [a job that you love]. then the choice becomes less obvious because it depends on what part of your life you want your work to represent. If you want to have more time to do things outside of work, then choice (A) may be best for you,… Read more »

Crystal
Crystal
6 years ago

It took me most of my 20’s to realize that my time is way more valuable to me than anything else. I rather enjoy how I make our living money than make more in a job that I can’t stand. This is coming from someone that wasted 6 years with a dead-end low-admin position and now is self-employed.

George
George
6 years ago

That’s a good question for us all to ask ourselves, do we work to have more time? Or to make more money? I like the way you modified the question to working for one salary, or double the pay but with double the time. I’d like to modify it again another way. Would you rather work: A) 40 hours a week – making $100K a year – doing a job you can’t stand B) 80 hours a week – making $100K a year – doing a job you love By choosing A) you save half the time, making the same… Read more »

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