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Money Hacks


  • How I use negative feelings about finances to my advantage (14 comments)
    This article is by staff writer Kristin Wong.

    I have never had much patience for dwelling. Time is a limited resource and I want to use it in the best possible way. Dwelling is a waste. I also have little patience for sweeping things under the rug and pretending to be happy when I’m not. Ignoring a problem is a great way to ensure it will come back to haunt you later. Plus, in…

  • Ask the Readers: Are there 1776 ways to get rich slowly? (50 comments)

    This article is by editor Linda Vergon. In honor of Independence Day, I thought it would be fun to see if we could come up with 1,776 ways to get rich slowly. After all, reaching “financial independence” these days does require some of the spirit our founding fathers had when they stood up to a tyrannical king and announced to the world that they were going to create a new nation. Freedom is worth the…

  • Improve your negotiation skills with BATNA (21 comments)

    This article is by staff writer Sam. Sam spent 13 years working in Equities on Wall Street and discusses financial independence strategies on Financial Samurai. Sam is also the founder of the Yakezie Network, the largest personal finance blog network on the web. If you want to know how to get the best deal possible, learn this simple acronym: BATNA. “BATNA” stands for “Best Alternative To a Negotiated Agreement.” Often times the bulk of money…

  • How to negotiate when you hate negotiating (19 comments)

    This article is by staff writer Kristin Wong. In an ideal world, you wouldn’t need to go negotiate. In an ideal world, the weather would be perfect, there would be no war, and your employer would simply say, “Hey, your value to our company has increased. Here’s ten thousand dollars.” If only, right? When it comes to earning more, negotiating is usually a necessary part of the equation. The negotiating masters among us have a serious leg…

  • Ask the Readers: Do you stress-test your finances? (23 comments)

    This article is by editor Linda Vergon. As J.D. Roth put it, “Failure is okay.” We all experience it, and we each have to figure out how to deal with it. Some people even study it. In fact, studying failure is a very productive thing to do. A stress-test can be used to study failure in a proactive sense. It can help predict how and when failure will occur within the confines of a safe,…

  • Money challenges: Why I’m OK with them, and a few of my favorites (51 comments)

    This article is by staff writer Kristin Wong. I’m not usually a fan of gimmicks. But if the sole purpose of a gimmick is to save some extra cash, I guess I’m OK with it. We talked about this recently, but there seems to be a heightened interest in frugality lately. Maybe that’s why I’ve noticed a whole crop of money-saving challenges popping up all over the Internet, from personal finance blogs to Pinterest. And then,…

  • 8 hacks to help you keep your resolutions (35 comments)

    This article is by staff writer April Dykman. When I was in the first stage of personal finance, I had two obvious goals: Pay off my credit card Save $10,000 for an emergency fund It was by no means easy. But, I had a plan, and I hit my goal, and it felt so great. And then I set another goal: automatic deposits into a Roth IRA. And I did that too, gaining more confidence and…

  • Spare change: Spending studies, money hacks, and Tina Turner (23 comments)

    This article is by staff writer April Dykman. I tried to finish my Christmas shopping early, both to avoid crowds and to save money. For instance, my gift to my youngest niece was a baking kit. The girl watches Cake Boss religiously, and every time I see her, she immediately asks if we can bake cupcakes, which she will then douse with sprinkles. So my husband and I bought her the really good baking stuff,…

  • Ask the Readers: Which Concepts Have Contributed Most to Your Financial Success? (57 comments)

    Note: This article is from J.D. Roth, who founded Get Rich Slowly in 2006. After a year off, J.D. is once again writing here at GRS. His non-financial writing can still be found at More Than Money. Over the past few months, I’ve been brainstorming ideas about future book projects. It’s been four years since I started writing Your Money: The Missing Manual, and I’m eager to delve deeper into the subject of personal finance….

  • Reader Stories: 5 money-savvy tips for recovering from a divorce (13 comments)

    This story comes from reader Julia Lawrence. Julia thoroughly enjoys writing about finances, pop culture and selling diamonds! When she isn’t hard at work writing, she spends her time wither with an absolutely adorable Mini Golden Retriever, Jake, and her [new] husband, Mr. Julia Lawrence. Follow Jules at Google+ & @DiamondLining. Some reader stories contain general advice; others are examples of how a GRS reader achieved financial success or failure. These stories feature folks with…

  • Reader Stories: The shocking truth about medical bills that can save you thousands (236 comments)

    This reader story is by a longtime GRS reader Sumitha from afineparent.com, a blog founded on the simple belief that “Good Parents Are Made, Not Born.” Some reader stories contain general advice; others are examples of how a GRS reader achieved financial success or failure. These stories feature folks with all levels of financial maturity and income. Want to submit your own reader story? Here’s how. How much would you think it would cost to…

  • How to save money on vet bills (60 comments)

    A few years ago, a little orange cat showed up on my front porch, and I fed him. You can probably guess what happened next. Yep, he never left. But as with any “free” pet, Hans cost a lot of money. This was especially true in the beginning when we had to have him neutered and vaccinated. We also paid for a six-month supply of flea treatment. Then, Hans injured his paw. It swelled to…

  • Reader Stories: Adventures in negotiating (34 comments)

    This post from Cortney Jansen. Cortney is 29, works as an engineer in the Bay Area and has been reading GRS for a couple of years now. She’s in the third stage of personal finance: debt-free and trying to figure out the best balance for multiple savings goals. This post is part of the Reader Stories series. Some reader stories contain general advice; others are examples of how a GRS reader achieved financial success or…

  • Reader Story: How I Use Superfrugality Month to Curb Lifestyle Inflation (52 comments)

    This guest post from Marisa Bell-Metereau is part of the “reader stories” feature at Get Rich Slowly. Some stories contain general advice; others are examples of how a GRS reader achieved financial success or failure. These stories feature folks with all levels of financial maturity and income. Want submit your own reader story? Here’s how. Every year in February, once the holidays are over and life is slowly returning to normal, my boyfriend and I…

  • How to Buy Brand Name Items at Generic Brand Prices (42 comments)

    This is a guest post from Halina Zakowicz of Your Money and Debt. Like many of you, I’m always looking to save money on brand name items. Aside from drug prescriptions, generics have just never quite “done it” for me — the generic soda I bought went gone flat in hours, the generic toilet paper I’ve purchased has either shred in my hands or never come off the roll, and the generic snack items I’ve…

  • Free Money from Banks! (But Watch the Fine Print) (53 comments)

    This post is from GRS staff writer Donna Freedman. Donna writes a personal finance column for MSN Money, and writes about frugality and intentional living at Surviving And Thriving. I earned $200 in less than an hour the other day, without removing any of my clothes. A bank gave me the money (or will, a few months from now) in exchange for opening a business checking account. Why would a bank or a credit union…

  • Reader Story (and Question): Saving Time and Money with Autopay (95 comments)

    This guest post from Jason is part of the “reader stories” feature at Get Rich Slowly. Some stories contain general advice; others are examples of how a GRS reader achieved financial success — or failure. These stories feature folks from all levels of financial maturity and with all sorts of incomes. Jason and his wife run Gravity Switch, a company that does web development and iPhone/iPad development. In addition to doing the grocery shopping, I…

  • The Mighty Power of the Lowly Coin Jar (or, How I Saved $723 in Seven Months Without Effort) (132 comments)

    This guest post is from Danny Iny, an author, strategist, serial entrepreneur, and co-founder of Firepole Marketing, the program that teaches expert marketing for non-marketers. If you like what you read here, check out his free video course or follow him on Twitter. In January, I started an experiment, a savings experiment. The experiment was designed to save money for my “emergency cushion” account without feeling the loss from my pocket or budget. I figured…

  • A Primer on Finding Unclaimed Property (69 comments)

    This post is from staff writer Sierra Black. Sierra writes about frugality, sustainable living, and raising children at Childwild.com. Finding free money lying around with your name on it seems a little too good to be true, doesn’t it? That’s what I thought when I learned about Missing Money, a website that offers to help you track down unclaimed property that may belong to you. Sometimes free money is for real, though. The site is…

  • My Financial Roadmap and Making Course Corrections (58 comments)

    This post is from staff writer Sierra Black. Sierra writes about frugality, sustainable living, and raising children at Childwild.com. One of the hazards of blogging is that you can’t always be right. When you’re wrong, you get to be wrong in front of a lot of people. Which can be embarrassing — but also a great learning experience. In April, I wrote about my “frugal” decision to let my broken shower languish, and the critical…

  • A Penny Saved is a Penny Spurned? What to Do with Pockets Full of Change (176 comments)

    This post is from GRS staff writer Donna Freedman. Donna writes a personal finance column for MSN Money. She also writes about frugality, intentional living, and life in general at her own blog, Surviving And Thriving. I regularly empty the change from my wallet. Pennies, nickels and dimes go into a pink piggy bank. Quarters go into “Mr. Nest Egg,” a bank shaped like Humpty Dumpty. The quarters are for when I finally get around…

  • Spare Change: Turtles vs. Rabbits Edition (42 comments)

    Blarg! The deadline for this year’s video contest was Sunday night, but we may have run into some technical difficulties. Some folks are reporting that their submissions were reported as “received”, but they’re not showing up in the pool of contest entries. This is Not Good. If you submitted an entry to the video contest, please check the list of entries. If your submission isn’t there, contact me directly or leave a comment on this…

  • Spare Change: Twilight Edition (18 comments)

    I haven’t read (or seen) Twilight, but Forbes magazine thinks the fictional characters in that universe have read Get Rich Slowly! According to a recent Forbes slideshow listing the richest characters in fiction, Carlisle Cullen (who is apparently a billionaire vampire) is a huge fan of Get Rich Slowly. This may or may not be the case. (Kris and I use a lot of garlic.) I’d rather think that the richest character in fiction —…

  • GRS Video Contest Update (12 comments)

    Time is winding down on the 2011 Get Rich Slowly Video Contest. For a while, I was worried that nobody was going to play along. But digging through the archives, I see that last year we had a similar entry pattern: We only had five entries in the first few weeks, but the videos poured in during the last week. I suspect that’s what’s happening this year, too. Whatever the case, it’s fun to watch…

  • Spare Change: Contest Reminder Edition (7 comments)

    Here’s your weekly reminder that the 2011 Get Rich Slowly Video Contest is under way. We have a few entries, but to be honest: If you’re willing to take the time to produce a two-minute video about money, your odds are pretty good right now that you’ll win something. With three $500 prizes and only a handful of entries, you have a much better chance than by playing the lottery! The contest closes on April…

  • Spare Change: Marketplace Money Edition (17 comments)

    Just a reminder that the 2011 Get Rich Slowly Video Contest is under way. As last year, entries have begun to trickle in. If 2010 is any indication, these will turn into a torrent by the time the contest ends on April 15th. But you’ll make my life easier — and yours! — if you submit your videos sooner. Make an awesome two-minute video, and you could win $500. How cool is that? Mine isn’t…

  • Win $500 in the 2011 Get Rich Slowly Video Contest! (4 comments)

    Last spring, Get Rich Slowly hosted a video contest. Fifty-seven GRS readers submitted short videos sharing financial tips and success stories. From these, I picked a handful of contest winners. I had so much fun with the contest that we’re doing it again. Starting Tuesday the 15th, the GRS Video Contest is officially underway! 2011 Get Rich Slowly Video Contest Entering the contest is easy. Simply create a video under two minutes in length. Your…

  • Spare Change: Paranormal Romance Edition (7 comments)

    Last week, Novelr profiled Amanda Hocking, whom they dubbed the very rich indie writer. Hocking is a 26-year-old woman who writes “paranormal romance” novels and publishes them herself through Amazon’s Kindle store. She’s been very successful, and has made a lot of money. Her success has led to all sorts of speculation — as success will do — and comments from folks who think they could do what she does, too. They think she’s an…

  • Spare Change: Tweetchat Today! Edition (2 comments)

    Wow. No matter how much I try to prepare, coming back from a long vacation is always a lot of work. It’s very difficult, for instance, to sort through hundreds of e-mail messages to find the ones that are most important. Meanwhile, there’s a blog that needs to be written! Not to mention all of the other miscellaneous things that go along with this site. For example, today features another Get Rich Slowly tweetchat. If…

  • Geographic Arbitrage: Save Money by Leaving The Country (76 comments)

    This is a guest post from Gary Arndt, who has been traveling around the world non-stop since March 2007 and has visited over 80 countries. He blogs at Everything-Everywhere.com, which was named one of the 25 Best Blogs of 2010 by Time Magazine. Let’s start with the obvious: Costs aren’t the same everywhere. You may already be aware of this on some level, but until you’ve traveled extensively, it isn’t something you really understand. The…

  • Teaser: The 2011 Get Rich Slowly Video Contest is Coming! (1 comment)

    Can you feel it in the air? It’s almost time for the second annual Get Rich Slowly video contest! Last year, to celebrate this site’s fourth anniversary, we invited readers to submit short videos sharing financial tips and success stories. We received 57 submissions, from which I picked a handful of contest winners. 2010 Video Contest Winners As a reminder, the winner in the Success Stories category was Jessica, who had No Regrets for delaying…

  • Nine Lessons in Wealth-Building from The Millionaire Next Door (98 comments)

    This is a guest post from Robert Brokamp of The Motley Fool. Robert is a Certified Financial Planner and the adviser for The Motley Fool’s Rule Your Retirement service. He contributes one new article to Get Rich Slowly every two weeks. Want to become a millionaire? Then perhaps you should start by studying the behaviors of people who have done it. But don’t worry – you don’t need to stop the next Mercedes you see…

  • GRS Housekeeping: Comments, Follow-Ups, and Tweetchats (22 comments)

    It’s a busy week for me. I’ve been writing and editing like mad, trying to prepare for my upcoming trip to South Africa. Things are going well, but there’s still lots more work to do. In the meantime, I realized there are a handful of housekeeping points I need to mention: I’ve changed how I’m responding to comments. I’ve begun to reply “in-line” (for lack of a better term), when I have time. That is,…

  • Spare Change: The King is Dead Edition (20 comments)

    O, happy day! The FedEx man brought me a package this morning containing The King is Dead, the new record album from The Decemberists. The Decemberists are a Portland band, and have been my favorite group for several years. I love that they put their new music out on vinyl, so that I can listen to it on my ancient phonograph player. The King is Dead is mellower than much of their past stuff. I…

  • How to Take Control of Your Finances in 2011 (58 comments)

    The new year is upon us! I’ve talked to a lot of folks lately who have resolved to make this the year they get out of debt. Or start an emergency fund. Or earn more money. These resolutions don’t mean a whit, though, if you don’t have a plan. For the past five years, I’ve shared the following road map, adding one new tip every January. Many GRS readers have used this info to plot…

  • GRS Blogger Profile: Donna Freedman (24 comments)

    Get Rich Slowly started as a place for J.D. to write about money. Over the past five years, it’s grown beyond that. It’s now a multi-author blog. This week, each of the authors will share a brief bio to give readers a little background. Enjoy! I was raised with relatively little information about finances. Here’s the attitude I saw modeled all around me: Work hard, live frugally, pay the bills and if there’s any left…

  • Getting Paid to Tell Lies: Mystery Shopping as a Frugal Hack (56 comments)

    This post is from new GRS staff writer Donna Freedman. Donna writes the Living With Less personal finance column for MSN Money, and writes about frugality and intentional living at Surviving And Thriving. Two persistent rumors about mystery shopping: It’s a scam. It’s not a scam — and you can get rich doing it! Allow me to set these rumors to rest: Mystery shopping is not a scam. (Well, sometimes it is. More on that…

  • Finding Financial Benchmarks and Milestones (115 comments)

    In last Wednesday’s link round-up, I pointed to an article over at Gen-Y Wealth in which RJ has listed 20 financial milestones you should reach in your twenties. “I like this list,” I wrote, “and I’d actually love to see similar lists for different age ranges. People could use it as a sort of road map to where they ought to be.” What sorts of milestones were on the list? Things like: Pay off your…

  • Spare Change: Stock-Market Genius Edition (17 comments)

    I’m a stock-market genius! On December 1st, I wrote about an idiotic USA Today article, which tried to convince readers that investing on the first day of the month was a sound strategy. “Stock investors looking for a trading pattern that all but guarantees a profit need look no further than the first trading day of a new month,” the author wrote. He pointed out that in ten out of twelve months this year, the…

  • How to Build Your Own Personal-Finance Manual (27 comments)

    When I started writing Your Money: The Missing Manual, I had problems finding a focus. I couldn’t figure out who my intended audience was. To get over this hump, I eventually hit upon a cunning plan: I would write the personal-finance book that I wish I’d had back when I started my personal-finance journey. I’d pack the book full of the info I’ve found most useful over the past five years, and include links to…

  • Spare Change: Faster Stronger Farther Edition (25 comments)

    This afternoon I did a very non-J.D. thing. I drove to Duniway Park here in Portland, and I timed myself to see how fast I can run a mile. After nearly six months of Crossfit and nearly 40 pounds lost, I decided it was time to see where things stood. As an adult, I’ve been a non-athlete. Mostly, I’ve been a fat slug, sitting behind the computer all day long. (I spent nine hours in…

  • Spare Change: Multi-Author Blog Edition (23 comments)

    On April’s post this morning, Shannon left a comment: “Does JD even write on this blog anymore?” Of course I still write here! I was on vacation for most of October, but since returning on October 25th, I’ve written thirteen of the twenty posts that have appeared at GRS, and have done tons of behind-the-scenes work. When I’m not on vacation, I’m the primary author at Get Rich Slowly, and I’m the editor of the…

  • Personal Finance Links: Domain Speculation Edition (46 comments)

    A few people have asked, so I thought I’d confirm that I still hope to re-launch my “making money from a blog” project in January. Stay tuned. Meanwhile, here’s a brief look at some of the drama behind the scenes. This week, I found a fantastic idea for an awesome blog, one that I’d love to run, one that I think people would love to read. And I came up with the perfect name, too….

  • Money Magic That Really Works (15 comments)

    This post is from staff writer Sierra Black. Sierra writes about frugality, sustainable living, and getting her kids to eat kale at Childwild.com. It’s Halloween, the season of ghosts, ghouls, and witches! To celebrate, I thought I’d share a little money magic with you that really works. It’s an old Southern folk magic spell called Money Stay With Me. This version is adapted from Cat Yronwood at Lucky Mojo, a hoodoo shop in California. This…

  • Daily Links: Facebook Fan Page Edition (10 comments)

    Sometimes I’m slow on the uptake. It took me a long time to start using Facebook to stay in touch with my friends, and it took even longer to set up a Facebook page for Get Rich Slowly. And it’s taken me even longer to mention the page exists here on the blog! Sheesh. How dumb can one guy get? If you’re active on Facebook, “liking” the Get Rich Slowly page is a great way…

  • Daily Links: Holiday Weekend Edition (14 comments)

    Labor Day weekend begins tomorrow afternoon in the U.S. It’s the traditional end-of-summer holiday, and most folks will get Monday off as a paid holiday. My own vacation is going to be a bit different: I’m going to take tomorrow off instead. This will be the last post until Sunday evening. But as always when I take a short break, I’ll actually be working behind the scenes. Next week is Book Week at GRS, so…

  • How to Replace Six Vital Documents (29 comments)

    This post is from GRS staff writer April Dykman. Could you produce your birth certificate, car title, or an old tax return at a moment’s notice? You’re supposed to store vital documents in a fireproof box or keep them in a safe-deposit box, but how many of us actually do that? We may not need these papers often, but when we do need them, we really need them. You need vital documents to sell your…

  • Talking About Money with Family and Friends (47 comments)

    What does a blogger’s spouse do while the blogger is out of town? Hang out with other bloggers and their spouses, of course! While Chris Guillebeau was off playing with the tigers in Thailand, his wife Jolie spent some time with Kris and me. Last Friday morning, we picked peaches (and then Kris and Jolie canned them). In the evening, the three of us had dinner with Erica (from erica.biz) and her husband Richard. As…

  • How to Find Unclaimed Money (and Unclaimed Property) (72 comments)

    July 21st was the fifteenth anniversary of my father’s death. He died of cancer at age 49, just ten days shy of his fiftieth birthday. When Dad died, he left behind a meager estate. Aside from the custom box business (which, admittedly, was not “meager”), he managed to leave each family member with $5,000 in life insurance proceeds, and that’s about it. His personal finance skills had never been great, and that included estate planning….

  • Pay Yourself First with a Coupon Booklet (19 comments)

    Is budgeting a hassle? Do you sometimes forget to make your Roth IRA contribution or to transfer this month’s installment for the new car you’re saving for? Do you wish there were some way to make the process easier? One way to reduce human error is to set up a separate savings account for each of your goals. You can then set up automatic monthly transfers to each of these accounts (and to each of…

  • How to Safeguard Your Social Security Number (57 comments)

    This post is from GRS staff writer April Dykman. In articles about how to prevent identity theft, I’ve often read that one should never give out his or her social security number (SSN) unless absolutely necessary. That sounds like good common sense. But I recently found myself asking, in what situations is it actually necessary? I’ve mentioned that my husband and I own land on which we are starting to build a home. The land…

  • Ask the Readers: Methods for Effective Money Management? (132 comments)

    On Monday I confessed that since I stopped tracking my spending, I’ve actually had some trouble paying my bills. It’s not that I don’t have the money — I have plenty! — but that I no longer have a system in place to remind myself to take care of routine financial tasks. Quicken was my system, and when I stopped using it, order vanished. In the comments on Monday’s post, Rob Bennett made an astute…

  • Taking Care of Business: Expense Reimbursement (51 comments)

    This post is from GRS staff writer April Dykman. Most employees have to submit expense reports at some point — be it for out-of-town travel, client dinners, special events, or other expenses you incur due to your job responsibilities. Keeping track of these expenses is important, otherwise you’re losing money while on the job and probably not endearing yourself to your company’s finance department, which relies on accurate records and timely reports from employees. It…

  • Save Money by Carrying a Water Bottle (63 comments)

    I’ve intended to begin featuring entries from the recent GRS video contest, but things keep getting in the way. Let’s change that! Starting today, I’ll use Saturdays to highlight some of my favorites, both winners and not-winners. To begin, here’s a tip that didn’t win a prize. Austin from Foreigner’s Finances is teaching English in Japan. He says that one of his favorite ways to save money is to always carry a water bottle with…

  • Money Hack: When You Save Money, Actually Put It in Savings (33 comments)

    As part of the publicity push for Your Money: The Missing Manual, I’ve been a guest on a couple dozen radio shows around the country. This morning, for example, I spent an hour chatting with Joy Cardin of Wisconsin Public Radio. I was nervous about these appearances at first — I’m a hesitant public speaker, as I’ve said — but after the first few, I got the hang of it. Now I actually think they’re…

  • Get Kitchen Gadgets for Less at the Local Restaurant Supply Store (24 comments)

    My pal Chris Guillebeau is out of town on another one of his around-the-world jaunts. While he’s living the high life in Equatorial Guinea, his wife Jolie (the artist behind my Kermit painting) is left to entertain herself here in Portland. What does she choose to do? While away her hours with me and Kris. On a whim, yesterday the three of us made a trip to the local restaurant supply store. This wasn’t my…

  • Living The Examined Life: Personal Data Collection is a Powerful Tool for Change (27 comments)

    This post is from staff writer Sierra Black. Sierra writes about frugality, sustainable living, and getting her kids to eat kale at Childwild.com. Machines are, in some respects, much smarter than we are. Specifically, their ability to collect data about us far outpaces our own ability to know who we are and what we do. Your computer can’t tell you why you eat, spend money, sleep, or watch TV. But it can tell you with…

  • Busting the Myths: Why Coupons Are a Valuable Part of Your Financial Arsenal (112 comments)

    J.D. is on vacation in Alaska. This is a guest post from Tara Kuczykowski, who is introducing the basics of couponing to a new generation of coupon clippers through her money-saving blog, Deal-Seeking Mom. Tara is teaching readers across the U.S. how to stretch their budgets in order to make room for occasional splurges. Living the good life while spending less is possible with just a little effort! I was a deal seeker long before…

  • GRS Video Contest Winners (29 comments)

    Over the past two weeks, I’ve had a chance to filter through the 57 submissions to the Get Rich Slowly video contest. Contestants made two-minute videos sharing a financial success story or a favorite money tip. Nearly every submission was interesting or amusing or insightful. You guys did awesome! Although it was tough, I’ve managed to whittle things down to a handful of winners (you can view all video entries here). Here, then, are the…

  • New from the IRS! Use Your Tax Refund to Buy Savings Bonds (29 comments)

    Here’s something cool I learned at Mapgirl’s Fiscal Challenge. Apparently you can now use your tax refund to automatically buy I-series bonds from the U.S. government. As recently as three years ago, I was a huge fan of tax refunds. Despite the arguments against them, I liked getting a tax refund because it was the only way I’d found to save. I’m able to save on my own now, so I no longer aim to…

  • How to Get the Best Rates on Your Savings — Safely (64 comments)

    Over the past year, one of the frequent questions I get is: “Where I can safely invest my money to get a decent return?” For example, Joseph wrote in November: Around February/March I should have $5,000 to invest. My debts are under control and my wife and I have lowered our monthly expenses. I was wondering if you had any advice on ways to invest $5,000? I don’t want a savings account because the interest…

  • Mastering the Art of Haggling (53 comments)

    Last weekend, The Washington Post published an article from Mike Rosenwald about the recent resurgence of haggling. To get a feel for the art of the deal, Rosenwald spent a week putting haggling to work in his own life: For consumers like me who have spent decades shopping at full retail, getting a deal on previously no-deal items is liberating and invigorating, as I found out during a recent week I spent haggling. At first,…

  • Reader Tip: Pay Your Bills as They Arrive (99 comments)

    Andy sent me a tip by e-mail the other day. This isn’t long enough to be a reader story, but I think it’ll be useful advice for some GRS readers. Andy says he’s learned that if he pays his bills as they arrive, he feels a lot less stressed than if he puts them off to the end of the month. When he got his first credit card, Andy made a habit of paying his…

  • 9 Sneaky Expenses That Eat Away at Your Income (58 comments)

    This article is by staff writer Adam Baker. Baker is a founding member of Untemplater.com, a new multi-author blog focusing on personal finance, entrepreneurship, and life design for people in their 20′s and 30′s. Few concepts have had as great an impact on my family’s financial decision-making as learning how to calculate our real hourly wage. The concept was introduced by (or at least popularized by) the amazing book, Your Money or Your Life. This book…

  • Wallet Garden Helps Protect You from ID Theft (42 comments)

    I had lunch with my friend Matt last week. Matt runs the popular community blog Metafilter, where the seeds of Get Rich Slowly were sown. As we ate our pre-Christmas tamales, we chatted about our respective websites. I mentioned that Charlie Park, who runs PearBudget, is acting as a technical reviewer for Your Money: The Missing Manual. “You know,” I said. “Charlie and I both launched our projects at about the same time. And we…

  • 10 Steps to Financial Success in 2010 (51 comments)

    Ah, the new year. The perfect time to get your life back on track. If one of your goals for 2010 is to take control of your finances, this crash course in financial basics can help guide the way. Here are ten simple but effective steps you can take to build a better financial future. Step #1: Track every penny you spend The authors of Your Money or Your Life urge readers to “keep track…

  • How I Cut my Comcast Cable Bill by 33% (Without Losing Any Service) (250 comments)

    Last week, I wrote that you can negotiate anything. This guest post by G.E. Miller gives a real-life example of using negotiation to save money. For more from G.E., check out his personal finance blogs 20somethingfinance.com and microfrugality.com. For the third of the country who has no choice but to turn to Comcast for cable television, the thought of price haggling is about as appealing as a root canal. Comcast has a notorious reputation for…

  • My Advertising Crash Diet (62 comments)

    This post is from GRS staff writer April Dykman. Thanksgiving might be my favorite holiday, and in large part that’s because I spend it camping in Terlingua Ranch and hiking, backpacking, or kayaking in Big Bend National Park (about 15 minutes away from the ranch). I get mixed reactions when I tell people that’s how my family celebrates the holiday. Yes, we do have turkey — slow-cooked over a fire no less. Yes, we do bring…

  • Obsessive Consumption (17 comments)

    To take control of your spending, you must first be aware of your spending. This mindfulness can be difficult for many people to achieve. GRS reader (and awesome artist) Tsilli pointed me to the work of Kate Bingaman-Burt, who has a unique way of being mindful of the money she spends: She draws it. Bingaman-Burt teaches graphic design at Portland State University, but for the past eight years, she’s also been documenting her spending habits…

  • Master Your Money with a Financial Health Day (28 comments)

    This is a guest post from Robert Brokamp of The Motley Fool. Robert is a Certified Financial Planner and the advisor for The Motley Fool’s Rule Your Retirement service. He contributes one new article to Get Rich Slowly every two weeks. Today at 3pm Eastern, Robert will by leading a live discussion about money and relationships at BlogTalkRadio. Howdy, folks. I’m writing you from a hotel room in Charlottesville, Virginia. All alone. My wife kicked…

  • 9 Ways You Can Knock the Socks off Your Next Landlord (41 comments)

    This article is by GRS staff writer Adam Baker. Currently, Baker is fat and in debt. We all know how to rent a typical, cookie-cutter apartment or house. Find a contact number. Set-up a walk through. Fill out the application. Pay your fee and wait for a response. But sometimes typical just doesn’t cut it. Maybe you’re looking to secure a unique apartment in an irresistible location. Or you might be seeking the only house for rent in a certain…

  • Green Sherpa: An Online Cash-Flow Management Tool (21 comments)

    A couple of months ago, I posted a list of 16 alternatives to Microsoft Money. GRS readers left nearly 200 responses evaluating the various personal finance programs available on the web and for the desktop. One feature that many users crave is the ability to project their future cash flow. While it’s important to track where your money’s gone, some folks find it valuable to predict where money will go in the weeks or months…

  • How to Earn Free Plane Tickets and Cash Back by Shopping Online (100 comments)

    This is a guest post from April Dykman, an avid GRS reader, and a writer and editor by trade. April is a potential Staff Writer for Get Rich Slowly. In her first article, April described how she discovered freedom from mindless spending. April is an active commenter at this site. When my husband and I went to Italy in 2006, we spent $2500 on plane tickets. We’re planning to spend much less for our next…

  • How a Haircut Led to a Handy Acronym (104 comments)

    This is a guest post from Lynn, a long-time reader of personal-finance blogs. Lynn is a potential Staff Writer for Get Rich Slowly. In her first post, she explained where to find free activities and events in your area. Lynn is the CFO (Chief Financial Officer) of her family, and is working hard to increase her financial health after years of many poor financial choices. From my toddler years on, I’ve had long hair. There were…

  • Online Banking: 13 Choices for Higher Interest Rates and Increased Security (86 comments)

    In its July 2009 issue, Consumer Reports Money Adviser published a brief overview of the best online banking options according to their research. “Online banking, despite a rocky start, is becoming the rule rather than the exception,” the article says, noting that online banking can net savers better interest rates and increased security. I’d love to be able to point you to an online version of this article, but none exists. And I’m not about…

  • Prepaid Cell Phones Can Save You Money (148 comments)

    Last week, I spoke with personal-finance writer Greg Karp about how young adults can save money. We brainstormed ideas for one of his upcoming newspaper columns. “I’m willing to bet that many young people can save money by cutting back on their cell phone,” I said. “It’s kind of shocking how these have become a Need instead of a Want.” “Yeah,” Karp said. “And what about prepaid phones?” “I don’t know anything about them,” I…

  • Want to Spend Less? Carry Bigger Bills (44 comments)

    In a study that will appear in December’s issue of the Journal of Consumer Research (but which was published online last month), Priya Raghubir and Joydeep Srivastava argue that “the denomination effect” makes us less likely to spend large denominations (a $20 bill, for example) than small denominations (such as twenty $1 bills): The results suggest that the denomination effect occurs because large denominations are psychologically less fungible than smaller ones, allowing them to be…

  • The Neighborhood Plant Swap (19 comments)

    This is a guest post from Kris. Earlier this month, I shared the notion of SwapLucks. Kris recently participated in a similar event, trading plants with friends and neighbors. Last weekend, my friend Rhonda hosted a Plant Swap. It was so successful that she’s decided to make it an annual event. Although this story is specifically about gardeners sharing plants, the process could easily be adapted to parents sharing kids’ clothes and toys, cooks swapping…

  • The Per-Diem System: An Easy Way to Budget Your Spending Money (54 comments)

    This is a guest post from Spencer, a GRS reader in New York. As a guy who just finished paying off $14,000 in credit card debt, I wanted to share one tip that helped me get over the bad debt hump. I allocate my spending money on a per diem system. At the beginning of each cycle of my monthly budget, I set aside funds for: Every fixed expense that I have (rent, cable/internet, groceries,…

  • WhiteFence Helps You Find Deals on Utilities (37 comments)

    I’m a huge advocate of calling your utilities to ask for rate reductions. But some people are uncomfortable making these sorts of calls. It would be helpful if these folks had a way of using the internet to find better deals. WhiteFence is a web-based service that allows users to do just that. From the about page: WhiteFence is a free service that helps people who are moving or looking to find the best deals…

  • Continuous Service? Dumb Moves from Smart Money (314 comments)

    As part of my ongoing effort to bring you interesting and informative personal-finance information, I subscribe to several magazines, including Smart Money. Smart Money isn’t my favorite money magazine, but it has some useful articles. In 2005, I paid $20 to subscribe to Smart Money for two years. In 2007, I paid $20 to subscribe for another two years. Today I received my latest issue, which included this wrap-around “cover” announcing that “as part of…

  • Safe Money in Tough Times: Questions and Answers with Jonathan Pond (58 comments)

    My wife is a public broadcasting fanatic. I recognize its value, but mostly I just tolerate it. (I often joke that NPR is “noise pollution radio” — I can’t think when it’s on.) Usually the television pledge breaks annoy me, but one night last week, the local station employed a clever tactic. They had a financial expert answer viewer questions between pleas for more money. Jonathan Pond bills himself as “America’s financial planner”. He runs…

  • 25 Useful Financial Rules of Thumb (100 comments)

    Lately I’ve found myself using more and more financial rules of thumb. A rule of thumb is a general guideline, an easy way to approximate a value quickly. It’s not meant to be completely accurate. On a whim this weekend, I gathered together many of the general rules I’ve been using, as well as several others I found online. Thanks to those who follow me on Twitter, who also contributed suggestions. For example, @FourPillars wrote,…

  • Money Hack: The Monthly Checkbook Sweep (70 comments)

    At dinner the other night, T.S. told me about a new trick she’s developed to force herself to save money. It used to be that she’d just spend whatever she had in her checkbook. She didn’t spend more than that, so she wasn’t accumulating debt. But like many people, she wasn’t saving either. She spent whatever she had on hand. Because T.S. wants to save, she’s opened an account at ING Direct. She wants to…

  • Save on Cell Phones with Employee and Student Discounts (48 comments)

    Consumer Reports is one of my favorite personal-finance magazines, and for a variety of reasons. Not only does it help readers find quality products at great prices, but it also gives tips for saving money by changing behavior. Even the CR letter column is great! For example, in the most recent issue (March 2009), there’s a letter from Richard Guibilo that offers a tip for saving money on cell phones: Your January report “Best Cell-Phone…

  • Save Money with The Scrooge Strategy (77 comments)

    Ramit Sethi from I Will Teach You to Be Rich introduced his new project today. The Scrooge Strategy is an extension of his recent 30-Day Challenge, during which he urged readers to make meaningful changes to their financial lives. “I hate most frugality tips,” Sethi writes. Instead, he wants to save big: Many frugality tips focus on things like saving $10 per month for a huge amount of effort. That’s just not worth it. If…

  • Ask the Readers: Are Local Banks Better Than Big Banks? (109 comments)

    Personal finance is about more than just money. People make financial choices because of emotion, of course, but they also make decisions based on their principles. Some people are guided by their faith. But that’s not the only way a person’s conscience can guide him. Josh recently wrote with a question about finding a bank that better matches his personal philosophy: I’ve been doing a lot of reading about the economic crisis, and about the…

  • The Kiplinger’s Personal Finance 2008 “Best List” (23 comments)

    Fast on the draw, Kiplinger’s Personal Finance published their “2008 Best List” earlier this month. While this is a quick and easy read in magazine form, the Kiplinger web site makes it almost impossible to peruse on the web. I’ve mucked through the lousy popup slideshows to find direct links to the individual parts of this report: Best financial services. I was surprised to see the Kiplinger’s pick for “best online savings account”. Though FNBO…

  • Can You Save $1,000 in 30 Days? (54 comments)

    Ramit at I Will Teach You to Be Rich has announced his Save $1,000 in 30 Days Challenge. During the month of November, he’s urging people to get off the couch and actually take steps to reduce their spending. Here’s what he writes: Right now, people don’t care about proper asset allocation or understanding average stock market returns. The people I’ve talked to want to know how to save money right now. [...] Each day…

  • Back Up Your Computer to Save Time and Money (112 comments)

    Here’s a public service message: Back up your computer regularly. This has more to do with your pocketbook than you might think. Not only was I sick this week, but the hard drive on my laptop crashed. It’s gone. The Apple Geniuses (that’s what they call themselves!) cannot salvage it. I was able to pull the single most important document (the GRS spreadsheet) and a few posts-in-progress, but I lost a hell of a lot,…

  • Despite Confusion, Quicken Online IS Free (26 comments)

    Quicken Online recently ditched its monthly subscription fee to become a completely free service. Over the weekend, however, GRS readers reported seeing alarming messages about possible charges. I contacted the folks at Intuit to find out what was going on. Here’s their response: Due to regularly scheduled maintenance of the Quicken Online connections to several financial institutions, the former paid subscription screen was inadvertently inserted prompting some customers with messages around a free trial or…

  • How to Compute Your REAL Hourly Wage (39 comments)

    Like many Get Rich Slowly readers, I credit Your Money or Your Life with changing the way I approach my personal finances. This book transformed my relationship with money, and helped me to understand that by spending beyond my means, I was sacrificing a secure future for today’s passing pleasures. One of the book’s key insights is that time really is money. Or, approaching it from the other direction, money is time. The authors write:…

  • 10 Unconventional Money-Saving Tips (65 comments)

    For me, the hardest part about learning to save was changing my relationship with money. I understood intellectually that I needed to spend less than I earned, and I could see the debt accumulating as I spent, but money management isn’t just about knowing the math. It’s mostly about knowing yourself. It’s about building self-discipline, and about learning to see money in new ways. While browsing at Passion Saving the other day, I discovered an…

  • How to Save Money on Your Wedding: ASK! (62 comments)

    I had breakfast at a local diner the other day. Over my blueberry pancakes, I eavesdropped on the next table over. (It wasn’t difficult — these folks were loud.) Eight people from the wedding industry had gathered to swap hints, tips, and stories. They talked about networking, about wedding expos, and about dealing with problem customers. They also talked about some of the financial aspects of their business. “I was really worried about how this…

  • A Few Ways to Raise Cash Quickly (40 comments)

    Disclaimer: After some strong feedback from GRS readers (and from my wife), I’ve made the rare move of heavily editing this article after publication. My hope is that the re-write makes it clear that I am not advocating all of these ideas. Yes, payday loans are on the list, but they’re at the bottom of the list. They’re the worst possible option for scaring up cash. The September issue of Money features an article by…

  • Daily Links: GRS Forums Edition (12 comments)

    The Get Rich Slowly discussion forums generate a lot of great conversations in which readers do their best to help each other. Alas, I don’t get a chance to stop by as much as I’d like. Fortunately, forum administrator Jericho Hill has agreed to highlight interesting discussions now-and-then. This week, he recommends: Amyrobynne has both debt to pay down and a goal to renovate her home.  She asks, with those competing goals, how do you…

  • Daily Links: Emergency Funds, Job Offers, and a One-Dollar House (15 comments)

    Though I’ve been preaching the mantra “nobody cares more about your money than you do” lately, my favorite personal finance saying remains “do what works for you”. There are a lot of people out there offering money advice, and much of what you hear is contradictory. It’s important to find strategies that work for your situation, that help you to achieve your goals. It doesn’t matter if the experts say a particular strategy is wrong…

  • Daily Links: Grocery Shopping, Stuff, and the Value of a College Education (23 comments)

    Now that I’m back to writing full-time after a couple weeks off, I’m overwhelmed by the things I have to share. I don’t know where to begin. And while I was busy with other priorities, you folks kept sending me great story ideas. I’m not going to be able to highlight all of them, of course, but I’ll try to feature some of the best. Meanwhile, I’ll mention a few others in upcoming link roundups….

  • Daily Links: Back to Work Edition (17 comments)

    Thanks, everyone, for your patience over the past week. I’m pleased to report that my mother is doing well. She’ll remain in the hospital for another week at least, but she’ll be home soon enough. We’re no longer tense and worried — just a little anxious. Part of our new-found optimism is because mom’s insurance is awesome. As I was researching expected costs last week, one hospital employee told me, “Your mother’s insurance is great….

  • Daily Links: First Book Edition (4 comments)

    I am an avid reader. I love books. I believe that literacy is one of the most important gifts we can give our youth. First Book is a charity that provides children from low-income families the opportunity to read and own their first new books. First Book is now inviting readers from around the world to share the name of the first book from their childhood that made reading fun. What book got you hooked?…

  • Ask the Readers: Should I Chase Higher Interest Rates? (88 comments)

    Almost eighteen months ago, I wrote a post listing the best on-line high-yield savings accounts. Over 750 comments later, the discussion is still going strong. Kyle recently chimed in with a question many people have: In January, before I started reading Get Rich Slowly, I opened a high-yield investor checking account with Charles Schwab. The interest rate was around 3.75%, but it’s fallen to 2% now. After starting to read your site, I decided to…

  • Use a No-Spend Month to Become Mindful of Money (45 comments)

    Yesterday, Amy Jo pointed me to a site called SmallNotebook.org where Rachel is nearing the end of a self-imposed No-Spend Month. Though the name is something of a misnomer — this exercise is more of a Spend Less Month — it’s still an interesting concept. For the entire month of July, Rachel’s family of three set a budget of $250 to spend on food, gas, clothing, household items, and entertainment. They’re doing this “to stretch…

  • Daily Links: Safe Banks, Pets, and Financial Literacy (24 comments)

    “Are we a nation of financial illiterates?” asks Stephen J. Dubner over at the Freakonomics blog. Yes, he answers. And no. High school students are getting more economics education than ever before, yet their basic personal finance competency is dropping. Dubner interviewed Annamaria Lusardi, a professor of economics at Dartmouth, about financial literacy. It’s an interesting conversation, but I think she misses the boat. What she believes are the important things for kids to know…

  • Daily Links: Chocolate Chip Cookies Edition (13 comments)

    My wife isn’t a big blog reader. She reads my sites and the sites of our friends, but that’s about it. Recently, though, she’s become hooked on two new blogs: This Garden is Illegal (which I’ve mentioned before) and Orangette. (These blogs are new to us, not new to the world.) Orangette is an amazing blog about amazing food. One recent entry contained euphoric praise for a recent New York Times chocolate chip cookie recipe….

  • Turning $5 into Thousands (62 comments)

    I love to read about the little tricks people use to force themselves to save money. Apparently I’m not the only one. Yesterday Jeff sent me a brief story from The Boston Globe that describes how Marie Franklin saves every five dollar bill she receives. She’s been doing this for three years, and in that time she’s managed to save $12,000. She writes: This idea will only work if you are disciplined. When I decided…

  • Daily Links: Too Many Good Articles Edition (14 comments)

    I keep finding articles for these link roundups that are worthy of entire posts. The trouble is: they’re not the sort of thing I usually write about. For example, I recently discovered an essay from 1945 about the economics of a POW camp. It’s great stuff. But it doesn’t have anything to do with balancing your checkbook. I’m going to take a chance that you’ll find this stuff interesting, too. I’ll share a couple of…

  • Daily Links: Wii Death Edition (10 comments)

    At a couple of my other sites, I’ve mentioned that our Nintendo Wii died recently. “What happened?” people have been asking. “How did it die?” I don’t actually know what caused the problem, but it stopped reading discs. (I suspect it died from overuse or from cat fur — or perhaps from a combination of the two.) The repair process has been simple and only moderately expensive. If your Wii dies, you visit the Nintendo…

  • Daily Links: Secluded Spot Edition (22 comments)

    When we were in England last year, I came to love the quiet secluded spaces I found in certain parks and gardens. It occurred to me that if I were creative, I might be able to create such a spot on our property. A few days ago, I took the time to pick up debris and pull out weeds in a 15-foot diameter area underneath some overgrown laurel and lilac in our front yard. It’s…

  • Daily Links: Food and Inflation Edition (6 comments)

    Even writers need a break. I spent the long holiday weekend doing all sorts of things — but I didn’t write a word. I did a lot of other stuff instead: Kris and I spent many hours in the yard, trimming hedges and pulling weeds. We also picked our first blueberries and raspberries. I ran sixteen miles on Saturday. I had dinner with friends. (Twice.) I cleaned my office. I read the first half of…

  • Money Tips from Consumer Reports (19 comments)

    The August 2008 issue of Consumer Reports — one of my favorite personal finance magazines — features two articles that may be of interest to readers of Get Rich Slowly. The first offers tips for cutting expenses. The second gives a brief overview of budgeting. Cut your spending by $500 per month The Consumer Reports Money Lab looked for easy ways for the average American to save money. They came up with six suggestions and…

  • Daily Links: Scott Burns and Quality Edition (6 comments)

    On Thursday I’ll be interviewing personal finance columnist Scott Burns. Burns may be best-known for his “Couch Potato” investment portfolio. He’s also the brains behind Asset Builder and the co-author of the new book Spend ‘Til the End, which explores the notion of “consumption smoothing”, or how to maintain a stable standard of living throughout your life. If you have you have personal finance questions you’d like for me to ask Burns, please let me…

  • The Nonconformists’ Guide to Personal Finance (84 comments)

    This is a guest post from Chris Guillebeau at The Art of Non-Conformity. It’s long. It’s good. If you can’t read it all now, bookmark it and come back later. It’s worth it. Earlier this week, Chris released a short (and free) e-book called A Brief Guide to World Domination. It’s all about rejecting mediocrity and pursuing a higher purpose. I recommend it highly. My short life as a daytrader In my second year of…

  • Daily Links: Mileage Reimbursement Edition (14 comments)

    Charlie from PearBudget dropped a line to point out that the U.S. Internal Revenue Service is increasing the mileage reimbursement mid-year. The rate is 50.5 cents per mile right now, but will see a 16% jump next week. Here’s the official IRS notice: The rate will increase to 58.5 cents a mile for all business miles driven from July 1, 2008, through Dec. 31, 2008. This is an increase of eight (8) cents from the…

  • How to Avoid Bank Overdraft Fees (45 comments)

    Last fall, I discovered my Quicken data file from the mid-1990s. It contains all my transactions from 01 January 1995 until 06 April 1998. There are many fascinating insights to be gleaned from my crazy spending a decade ago, but as I was looking through my checkbook register, one thing in particular stood out. Before nearly every paycheck, my bank balance would dwindle to $12.33 or $7.14 or something similar. When I was paid, the…

  • Subscribe to Craigslist Search Results to Grab Great Deals (26 comments)

    You’ve been watching Craigslist for a good deal on a hedge trimmer, but you just aren’t having any luck. By the time you find a good listing, it’s been up for an hour and the HedgeHog XR is long gone. You could sit and refresh the farm+garden category constantly, but that’s a waste of time. (Besides, what would your boss think?) Fortunately, there’s a better way. Did you know it’s also possible to watch Craigslist…

  • Daily Links: Money Saving Tips Edition (12 comments)

    Remember my fender-bender with a rental car back in March? All of the paperwork finally went through and my insurance — both from the credit card and my normal automobile policy — will cover everything without me having to pay a dime. My insurance premium didn’t even increase (though it still may this autumn). However, this whole process has been a colossal pain in the ass. It’s been such a bother that I may actually…

  • Ask the Readers: How to Cope with Financial Disaster? (22 comments)

    The floodwaters in Iowa have crested and begun to recede, but they’ll leave a swath of devastation in their wake. Trent at The Simple Dollar — who lives near the flooding — recently shared a list of seven things you can do to help flood victims. But Elisabeth wants to know what these people can do to help themselves. She writes: I live in eastern Iowa (yes, you’ve seen my town on TV recently), and…

  • Personal Finance Made Easy: Pay Yourself First (84 comments)

    Yesterday I shared some financial tips my father gave me when I was a sophomore in college. He didn’t stop there. After I graduated, he continued to offer advice. One of the things he told me was, “Pay yourself first.” To explain, he gave me a copy of George Clason’s 1926 classic, The Richest Man in Babylon. I didn’t read it. In retrospect, I ought to have been a little less stubborn. It took years…

  • The Benefits of Barter (24 comments)

    This is a guest post from Andréa Coutu. So you’ve got big ideas but no way to pay for them: a home renovation, weekend getaway, successful business, dream dinner date, leaner body, new bedroom suite…the list goes on and on. Maybe your bank account has seen better days, or maybe you just don’t want to tie up more money in pursuing a dream. Well, money is just one medium of exchange. By using barter, you…

  • Daily Links: Interviews and Investing Edition (15 comments)

    It’s been a crazy week. The electrical contractor has been here every day. I’ve had appointments every day. And so I’ve been behind every day, struggling to provide new posts. Things should return to normal next week. One of my appointments was with a television crew. I was interviewed yesterday for a segment on the local evening news. It was a fun experience, especially behind the scenes. Both the reporter and the cameraman seemed to…

  • The 13 Commandments of Savvy Consumers (33 comments)

    Last week I wrote about the 2008 Consumer Action Handbook. This freely-available guide from the U.S. government is packed with useful information. I was leafing through the book again this morning before I put it away, and I noticed that the good stuff starts on page one with a list of thirteen quick consumer tips. I’ve transcribed these tips below, quoting verbatim from various sections of the book (which is in the public domain), as…

  • Daily Links: Crying Librarians Edition (51 comments)

    A Get Rich Slowly reader pointed me toward a hilarious post at FAIL Blog, one that will make librarians everywhere weep. The forum post they’re mocking says: book rental service? was just thinking. my sister does -alot- of reading, and spends like $1000 a year on just books alone. most of them she reads once then never looks at again. is there any kind of like…video rental store but for books? would make things alot…

  • Current Deals and Contests from Online Banks (41 comments)

    The Get Rich Slowly online banking thread lay dormant for several weeks, but recently has bubbled back to life, with plenty of comments and feedback regarding the best internet banks. Because interest rates are now so closely packed now, the banks are resorting to contests and incentives to differentiate themselves. Some are temporarily boosting yields to attract new customers. Here’s a rundown of current deals. ING Direct’s Automatic Saver Sweepstakes Since January, ING Direct has…

  • 2008 Consumer Action Handbook (11 comments)

    Every year, Kris and I place an order with the Federal Citizen Information Center in Pueblo, Colorado. The FCIC is a small department in the United States government with a mission to distribute free and low-cost Federal consumer publications. In other words, it’s a government office that offers lots of free (and cheap) pamphlets about all sorts of cool stuff. Many of these publications are freely availabe online in electronic format. Here are just a…

  • Daily Links: E-Book Edition (8 comments)

    Sometimes when it’s quiet around here, it’s only because I’m working on other projects behind the scenes. Recording and transcribing my interview with Timothy Ferriss, for example, took a lot of work. I’m also experimenting with short video segments. I’m pleased to announce that one of my largest projects from the past few months is finally complete. I’ve collated some of my key posts about Roth IRAs and created an e-book called simply The Get…

  • Daily Links: Fundamentals Edition (10 comments)

    Things are slowly returning to normal after a long holiday weekend. I only plan to post once per day at Get Rich Slowly this week, but I’ll resume my normal schedule next Monday. In the meantime, here are some other personal finance stories from around the web. Several people sent me a recent New York Times article spotlighting five basics for building a solid financial future. New columnist Ron Lieber lays out his philosophy: Investing…

  • Daily Links: Blind Money, Check Fraud, and Economic Stimulus (26 comments)

    Amber dropped a line yesterday to share a story that might seem minor to some people, but which is important to her and many others. A U.S. Federal appeals court has ruled that paper money is unfair to the blind, which may force the Treasury Department to redesign our currency. “This has been a big issue in the blindness community for a number of years now,” Amber writes. “I am curious to hear what you…

  • My Paperless Personal Finance System: A Work in Progress (128 comments)

    Last summer, as a part of my quest to get rid of clutter, I began to move toward paperless personal finance. I had planned to share my system only once I’d perfected it, but yesterday Daniel e-mailed to ask for a glimpse of its current state. To go paperless, you might need a scanner (or some other way to convert your documents to digital files). I also recommend using a shredder to dispose of paperwork….

  • Daily Links: Close Shave Edition (24 comments)

    Over at Free Money Finance, a guest poster recently wrote about how to save money with straight razor shaving. Because I’ve been at war with my facial hair for twenty years, I read this piece with interest. The author writes: Straight razor shaving is like fly fishing: if your aim is to catch a fish or get a shave, you can get by with fairly inexpensive stuff, but if your goal is to pursue the…

  • Daily Links: Money Stories Edition (18 comments)

    Earlier this week I wrote about Mary Hunt’s notion of a Freedom Account, a second checking account for handling irregular expenses. This isn’t really an emergency fund, but a separate account to keep things like insurance bills from thwarting your finances. VH at Funny About Money posted a response describing how she uses targeted accounts for the same purpose. “When savings for specific purposes are collected in separate accounts, to tell how much you have…

  • Daily Links: Multi-Level Marketing Edition (10 comments)

    Sometimes the articles I post generate a flood of comments. Sometimes they only generate a trickle. And sometimes it just takes a while for the conversation to get started. The latter seems to be the case with yesterday’s guest post about scams and pyramid schemes. Things started slowly, but today the comments have been interesting. For example: Veteran Military Wife buys MLM products on eBay for a fraction of their price. (Love it!) M! says…

  • Use a Freedom Account to Prepare for the Unexpected (54 comments)

    My wife has always maintained a sizable savings account, but having extra cash is new to me. Until recently, I had always lived paycheck-to-paycheck, often treading close to a zero dollar balance in my checkbook for months at a time. Now, though, I’ve not only established an emergency account, but set up a couple of targeted accounts as well. (One is for vacations, and the other is for a new car.) My method works for…

  • Daily Links: Technical Difficulties Edition (23 comments)

    Some of you will wake tomorrow to find the same post at GRS you saw briefly on Tuesday morning (the bike metaphor). You’ll be confused. “Is this a re-run?” you’ll wonder. It’s not. It’s a technical glitch, for which I apologize. This site runs on WordPress, a popular blogging platform. There are many good things about WordPress, but the software was recently upgraded, and frankly WordPress 2.5 sucks. There’s a lot of behind-the-scenes suckage from…

  • Daily Links: Fulfillment and Inflation Edition (13 comments)

    I often ponder which direction I should take Get Rich Slowly. Build the site? Write a book? Convince that other J.D. Roth to develop a television show around the premise? My latest harebrained idea (which I’m only sharing because I’ve dismissed it) is to start a chain of Get Rich Slowly stores. I’d stock them with great personal finance books, magazines, and software, employ smart people who want to help others succeed at personal finance,…

  • Daily Links: Twitterpated Edition (17 comments)

    I’m simultaneously an early adopter and the last one to the party. I signed up for a Twitter account long ago, but never did anything with it. I didn’t see the point. Now, though, it seems to have hit some sort of critical mass. Even my non-geeky friends are using it to keep in touch. I’ve been updating my Twitter account once or twice a day for the past month, but haven’t yet turned it…

  • Daily Links: Deal or No Deal Edition (47 comments)

    I’ve received several questions about credit cards recently, and have been struggling with how to handle them. When I started Get Rich Slowly two years ago, I was firmly in the anti-credit card camp. I still believe credit cards are dangerous, but now recognize that they can be cool tools if used responsibly. (“Credit cards don’t buy crap — people buy crap.”) But am I really ready to write a post about the best rewards…

  • Don’t Underestimate the Value of Comparison Shopping (40 comments)

    Consumers underestimate the power of comparison shopping, claims a five-year-old report from the Consumer Federation of America. “Consumers often do not realize that, for most products, a wide range of prices are available and, therefore, consumers often pay too much for the items they buy.” [The study] results show that most consumers need a far lower price savings to persuade them to comparison shop than can actually be obtained from shopping around. These findings are…

  • Daily Links: Reader Art Edition (8 comments)

    Ever since discovering Action Girl’s Guide to Living, I’ve used it as a sort of inspiration for my own life. I especially like point #2: Support others’ actions. Support what other people do; spend your time and money on things done for something other than profit. This doesn’t mean you can’t buy the new U2 album — but try to buy things from that cool local band, too. One way I try to do this…

  • Daily Links: Great Comments Edition (20 comments)

    I’ve added a new feature to the comments at Get Rich Slowly. Whenever I spot a reader contribution that I particularly like, I’ll highlight it so that others are more likely to notice it. My choice of great comments is entirely subjective, and dependent on time. (I’m highlighting comments manually.) Some days, I may highlight a dozen comments. Other times, I may go a week without highlighting one. For now, great comments can be identified…

  • How One Reader Uses Haggling to Save Big Bucks (66 comments)

    Last week, Jason shared a guest post on how to negotiate to save money. Daylily Diva wrote to share her own experiences, which I’ve reproduced here with permission. I love haggling — it’s second nature to me.  If I’m buying bagged mulch at the garden center and some sacks have small puncture holes,  I negotiate a discount because the sacks are damaged.  I negotiate on everything. For one thing, I’m in the antiques business, and…

  • Daily Links: Most Inspiring Edition (20 comments)

    Congrats to my colleagues JLP and Jonathan. The latest issue of Money magazine named JLP’s All Financial Matters as the most sensible money blog, writing, “In a scary market, his sober posts on index investing, asset allocation and sticking to your guns are strangely comforting.” Jonathan’s My Money Blog was dubbed the most voyeuristic money blog: “This blogger, a 29-year-old IT engineer in California who prefers to remain nameless, aims to be a millionaire by…

  • Daily Links: My Favorite Stories from the Past Two Years (9 comments)

    To celebrate the second anniversary of Get Rich Slowly, I thought I’d do something a little different with my links round-up. Rather than share new finds from around the web, I’m going to point to some of my favorite stories from the archives. And that’s what these are: stories. You won’t find hints on how to set up a budget here, nor advice about Roth IRAs. My favorite entries to write are the ones that…

  • Daily Links: Allergy Attack Edition (32 comments)

    Yikes! Allergies! I came home from marathon training today to work in the yard. But the moment I began to mow the lawn, I was floored by a terrible sneezing attack and a drippy nose. I took some Claritin, but it didn’t really help. Instead, I spent a warm afternoon in utter misery, doing my best to complete our outside chores before the Oregon rain returns. We did get our berry canes tied up, though,…

  • Daily Links: Podcast Interview Edition (12 comments)

    Soon after I started Get Rich Slowly, a reporter from The Wall Street Journal called for an interview. I was a terrible subject. I was wary of him. I thought he was out to trip me up, to find some secret flaw. Looking back, all I did was make the poor guy’s job difficult. I’m still not completely comfortable with interviews, but I’m getting better. I’ve even participated in four or five podcasts now, the…

  • Negotiate Once, Save Thousands Every Year (22 comments)

    This is a guest post from Jason, who is the author of World Fitness Network, a blog that will teach you how to lift weights, live strong, and change the way you look and feel. Sometimes a few simple actions can save you money year after year. The negotiation process is definitely one of those times. Negotiating works especially well when you deal with a salesperson who is paid by commission. These salespeople often have…

  • Daily Links: Marathon Training Edition (18 comments)

    Yesterday I began training for the Portland Marathon — I joined a local group for a slow four-mile run. Not a bad start. Now I have just six more months of training before I’m ready! (My friend Leo at Zen Habits recently completed his second marathon. Go Leo!) You guys have been sending me a lot of links lately, more than I can ever hope to share. Here are some of the best: Ramit at…

  • Daily Links: Question Kiyosaki Edition (35 comments)

    Robert Kiyosaki is perhaps the best-selling personal finance author of the last decade. His Rich Dad, Poor Dad was one of the books that spurred me to take control of my own personal financs. However, Kiyosaki has many vocal critics, some of whom have valid complaints. His ideas are unconventional and controversial. Kiyosaki has agreed (in principle) to participate in an e-mail interview with me. I’d love to use questions from readers. I intend for…

  • Daily Links and a Few Words About Ads (12 comments)

    Aside from Bacon Salt, I don’t usually call attention to the advertising at Get Rich Slowly. However, for the next two weeks there will be a couple of ads in the sidebar that deserve an explanation. The first is labelled “8 secrets your credit card company doesn’t want you to know”. I think it looks a little scammy, but I assure you it’s not. When this ad first appeared in February, I checked out the…

  • A Meeting of Minds: Ten Personal Finance Bloggers Talk About Money (15 comments)

    Yesterday I attended a workshop in San Francisco devoted to personal finance and personal finance tools. This gathering — sponsored by Strands, Expensr, and NetworthIQ — brought together a handful of bloggers to discuss the financial challenges our readers face, and the things they’re looking for in a personal finance tool. (Thus my question on Thursday.) Though I’m interested to see what sort of application these three companies eventually produce, the highlight of the event…

  • Would You Make a Ten-Minute Phone Call for $57? (35 comments)

    GRS reader Dan recently wrote to share a story I hear often. Many people are afraid to ask for a better deal — they think it’s not worth the effort. Dan has decided that it is: I thought I’d share a short story about credit cards.  I’ve been using them for eight years now, and have always paid my bill in full every month.  I use Quicken to keep track of what I’ll owe at…

  • Ask the Readers: How Do You Manage Your Money? (193 comments)

    Tomorrow I’ll be participating in a brainstorming session about online personal finance tools. The people behind this workshop want to know what the average person is looking for when she chooses a tool to manage her money. I promised to poll GRS readers for suggestions. How I manage my money For years, I’ve used Quicken to manage my money, both on Mac and PC. I’m using the Mac version now, and it’s way behind its…

  • Daily Links: Non-Conforming Happiness (11 comments)

    Two long-time Get Rich Slowly readers recently let me know that they’ve launched new blogs. Chris Guillebeau has opened The Art of Non-Conformity, a site dedicated to unconventional strategies for life, work, and travel. “My site features unconventional ideas for remarkable people,” Chris writes. “Along the way, I visit every country in the world and profile other nonconformists.” Sounds intriguing. Meanwhile, Karl Staib has started a site called Work Happy Now, which explores ways to…

  • Daily Links: Ask the Bacon Salt Guys about Entrepreneurship (16 comments)

    Remember my fascination with Bacon Salt? Well, I’ve been e-mailing the Bacon Salt guys, and they’ve agreed to answer questions from GRS readers. Many of you have expressed an interest in entrepreneurship — now is your chance to interview two guys who are staking their future on a dream: At one point, I walked into Starbucks, Microsoft and two other companies that I was doing consulting with and told them that I couldn’t finish their…

  • Daily Links: PearBudget Edition (9 comments)

    My buddy Charlie at PearBudget dropped me a line to ask Get Rich Slowly readers to go try the latest version. PearBudget is a new web-based application based around the envelope system of budgeting. Charlie writes: We’re getting ready to come out of beta (maybe a week away?). If your readers want to try PearBudget for free, now’s the time to do it! They’ll still be able to create a spending plan for free after…

  • Daily Links: Alltop Edition (6 comments)

    It’s been a busy week for me, though most of the work has been behind the scenes. I’m gradually finding my way into life of a full-time writer. Mostly, I’m catching up on old e-mail and preparing my workspace for maximum productivity. And, of course, I’ve been editing guest entries. Here are some recent articles I’ve enjoyed on productivity and personal finance: First off, master-marketer Guy Kawasaki dropped a line to let me know about…

  • An Introduction to Time-Banking (77 comments)

    In this guest post, Loretta B. describes a unique way to build social capital and to save money. Two weeks ago my boyfriend and I enjoyed a rare night out on the town. We dressed up in our best clothes, had dinner at a special restaurant, and headed off to the symphony. This was my first time at a symphony, and we had a fantastic time. Our tickets were worth $75 a piece. Make no…

  • Daily Links: Catching Up on Guest Posts (8 comments)

    Full-time blogging has already paid off! I finally found time to begin editing the stack of guest posts I’ve received over the past few months. There’s some great stuff here, but there’s too much of it. (I still have articles that were submitted in October!) In an effort to get caught up, I’m devoting this entire week to submissions from your fellow Get Rich Slowly readers. While I continue to work behind the scenes, you’ll…

  • Daily Links: Home Office Edition (42 comments)

    I’ve spent a lot of money over the past few days. Most of it has been for business (I’m finally turning my home office into an actual office), but still…it’s not as fun as it used to be. There was a time that spending would give me a rush, even if I were buying on credit. Every purchase I make now causes me a little pain. I’ll be happy when this is finished. Have I…

  • Daily Links: Daily Bread Edition (11 comments)

    As an aside in a recent guest post, my wife mentioned that I had purchased eight loaves of bread for an article I never wrote. Well, I’ve written it now. Over at Get Fit Slowly, I’ve posted my examination of which whole wheat bread is best. I looked at cost, nutrition, and taste in an effort to find the best value. (Based on reader feedback, I picked up a couple more loaves today. I’ll post…

  • Daily Links: Bacon Salt Edition (41 comments)

    Here’s a sad (but true) case of advertising at work. For reasons I have not yet discerned, ads for a product called Bacon Salt have been appearing on Get Rich Slowly. Yes, Bacon Salt — salt that tastes like bacon. (The company’s slogan? “Everything should taste like bacon.”) Being a man who loves both salt and bacon, I visited the web site. I wanted to try the stuff. It turns out that my hometown sandwich…

  • Daily Links: Inspiration Edition (6 comments)

    My friends Tim and Mark at Soul Shelter posted a great article last week about how what we think creates our reality. Though I think wishful-thinking books like The Secret are hogwash, I do believe that our thoughts and attitudes play a huge role in defining our life. In his post, Tim shares several quotes: “If men define situations as real, they are real in their consequences.” — William Isaac Thomas “A man is literally…

  • Daily Links: True Geek Edition (18 comments)

    What’s better than Star Trek? How about free Star Trek? I’ve spent the past few months working my way through the original classics featuring Kirk, Spock, and McCoy. Some of the episodes are worse than I remember — some are better. But they’re all fun. I spent about $50 per season to purchase these shows on DVD. But now CBS is offering every episode of the original Star Trek series for free via streaming video….

  • Daily Links: Ask Tim Ferriss about His 4-Hour Work Week (27 comments)

    Monday’s interview with Adam Shepard was the first installment of an irregular series here at Get Rich Slowly. Since starting the site, I’ve wanted to interview people about money. Not just money gurus, but average people, people like you and me. As I move closer to blogging full-time, this dream can become a reality. If you have some suggestions for future interview subjects, please let me know. In the meantime, my second interview will be…

  • Daily Links: Wealth and Thrift Edition (16 comments)

    I want to clarify something after yesterday’s discussion: I am neither liberal nor conservative. My political ideals are all over the map (though they make perfect sense to me). I am not a registered member of any political party. I don’t have a liberal agenda, but I don’t have a conservative one, either. Consequently, I’m not trying to push any particular platform or ideology at Get Rich Slowly — I’m simply trying to provide inspirational…

  • Daily Links: Protestant Work Ethic Edition (27 comments)

    Take heed! The Consumerist warns that your account is never really closed at Bank of America. This sort of thing makes my blood boil. (Thanks, Sasha!) Earlier today, JLP at All Financial Matters posted about Brian Tracy’s 40 plus formula to advance your career. This is classic Tracy: If you work only 40 hours per week — if you work only the number of hours that are required of you — then all you will…

  • Daily Links: Macs, Interviews, and Big-Ticket Items (12 comments)

    Despite training a new box salesman all day and maintaining Get Rich Slowly all night, I recently found time to participate in a couple of e-mail interviews. First, I took part in Alex Shalman’s Happiness Project, in which selected bloggers answered questions about the nature of happiness. Other participants include: Mark Frauenfelder of Boing Boing Leo Babauta of Zen Habits Brian Clark of Copyblogger I’m honored that Alex chose to include my overly verbose response…

  • Daily Links: Ask Metafilter Edition (7 comments)

    It’s been a while since I mentioned Ask Metafilter, one of my favorite web sites. Metafilter members (it costs $5 to join) can ask questions of the group, and then other users do their best to provide helpful answers. Recent examples include: Can someone please explain the The Second Law of Thermodynamics to me, with examples? I need a seriously gigantic novelty toothbrush. Meditation – what is the point exactly? Naturally, many people have questions…

  • Daily Links: Time and Money (20 comments)

    Despite several recent posts on broad issues like the economy, Get Rich Slowly is a blog about personal finance. I have little interest or expertise regarding politics and economics. I’ve received e-mail about the Presidential campaign and about various tax schemes, but I don’t intend to post much (if anything) about these subjects because, frankly, I’m not interested in dogma. I’m interested in helping you save money day-to-day. I will, however, occasionally point to articles…

  • Money Hack: Use CDs to Beat Falling Interest Rates (42 comments)

    When the Federal Reserve cuts short-term interest rates, as it did yesterday, you feel the pinch in your savings account. My ING Direct account, for example, has dropped from 4.50% when I opened it to 3.65% today. It may drop again. Brian from The Job Bored dropped a line with a money hack for those who like to chase the highest interest rates. “Why not buy protection?”, he wonders. Here’s how: Since ING makes it…

  • What Are Debt Snowballs Made Of? Debt Snowflakes! (53 comments)

    During the twenty years I carried consumer debt, I made several attempts to change my habits. Every time I decided to lick the debt monster, I would follow the advice in the financial books: I’d arrange my debts in order, listing the one with the highest interest rate first. I’d pay extra on this bill for a couple of months, but then give up in frustration because I didn’t seem to be making any progress…

  • Daily Links: One Equals Two Edition (3 comments)

    Ah, the cold has arrived. There’s a two-week window at the end of January and the beginning of February during which the Portland/Salem area usually gets the coldest weather of the year. It’s not tremendously cold so far, but temperatures are expected to drop to about -5 celsius tonight. That’s cold enough! Here are a few personal finance stories from elsewhere to keep you warm: Jonathan at My Money Blog — one of my favorite…

  • Great Ways to Earn More Money (28 comments)

    The fundamental law of money is: To gain wealth, you must spend less than you earn. If you want to increase your wealth, you must spend less or you must earn more. (Doing both is even better.) Often personal finance writers focus on the “spend less” half of the equation. Frugality is quick and easy to implement, and it’s something that anyone can practice. For good or ill, self-denial is easier for people than self-promotion….

  • Daily Links: Leftover Loot, Ready Cash, and the Vacuum Cleaner Museum (14 comments)

    On Thursday, I shared a web site that helps users find unclaimed property. I hoped some readers might find it useful, but I didn’t expect it to be nearly this successful. Commenters report finding $50, $100, or even more missing money. J.L. wrote: Since your blog yesterday, I have been personally responsible for finding for co-workers and family over $5000 in unclaimed property. Everyone in my office wants to thank you for the post yesterday….

  • Missing Money: Finding Unclaimed Property (43 comments)

    On Monday, I received a strange letter in the mail. It was addressed to my father, but sent to my home. My father has been dead for twelve years, and he never saw the house we live in now. The letter purports to be a settlement of some sort of $400 annuity. (I’m unclear on the details and don’t have it with me right now.) Though I’m deeply skeptical that this is anything but a…

  • Daily Links: Positive Cash-Flow Edition (19 comments)

    This is my first month without debt obligation. (I eliminated my last non-mortgage debt at the beginning of December.) I didn’t realize how much money I’d been throwing at debt recently — a combination of frugality and hard work created a significant positive cash flow. Now I’m reaping the rewards of that, getting to see my bank account increase instead of sending the money off to repay debt. It’s a fantastic feeling! Here are some…

  • Daily Links: Money Tricks and Career Advice (36 comments)

    Kris and her sister went “thrifting” this afternoon. I tagged along. While they shopped for cheap clothes and kitchenware, I hunted for personal finance books. Thrift shops and used book stores are outstanding places to find self-help books of all sorts. If you arm yourself with a list of the titles you want, you can usually find three or four good books for about ten bucks. I made a fine haul today, including Po Bronson’s…

  • Daily Links: Car Talk Edition (9 comments)

    Thanks to everyone who offered advice on my car troubles. It’s too bad most of the repairs were already completed when the article went live — you guys could have saved me some big bucks. But I’ve learned for next time. Soon, I’ll look for a reliable independent mechanic in my neighborhood. I already have a couple leads, including some from the Car Talk Mechanics Files, which several readers recommended. I also like the idea…

  • Daily Links: NPR Edition (16 comments)

    My wife is a big fan of NPR, National Public Radio. I used to listen to it, too, but lately I’ve come to think of it as “noise pollution radio”. I’m often lost deep in thought — but when NPR is on, I can’t hear myself think. All I can hear is the maniacal laughter of the Car Talk guys, or Carl Kasell‘s honeyed voice. Give me silence! Nevertheless, NPR does offer fine personal finance…

  • 8 Ways to Take Control of Your Finances in 2008 (59 comments)

    The new year is a time for goals and resolutions. If one of your goals in 2008 is to take control of your money (instead of letting it keep control of you), this crash course in financial basics can help guide the way. Here’s a summary of everything I’ve learned about personal finance. Track every penny you spend The authors of Your Money or Your Life admonish readers to “keep track of every cent that…

  • Is a 6.25% Checking Account the Best Deal in Portland? (48 comments)

    I’m a recent convert to the world of online high-yield savings accounts. Now that I have my debt paid off, I can finally afford to save some money. It was difficult for me to choose an account: Should I go with the highest interest rate? Or should I opt for the best customer service? I’m not a rate-chaser, so I chose ING Direct. Their current 4.10% rate is lower than most places, but I’ve heard…

  • Daily Links: Taxes, Batteries, and Frivolous Purchases (13 comments)

    Today was the day: my first official day at home, beginning my transition from box salesman to full-time writer. For the present, I’m spending every Tuesday at home working on this site. (Yes, I know today is Wednesday.) My first task was to get some back-up entries written for when I’m too busy to generate new articles. Also, I’ve been digging through the 650 e-mail messages that need answered. I made it through about 100…

  • Daily Links: Good-Bye, 2007 Edition (5 comments)

    Kris and I are preparing to ring in the New Year. Before we close out 2007, here are a few links that I’ve been collecting in my mailbox. First, Flexo at Consumerism Commentary has some suggestions for getting your finances on track in 2008. Among his tips: take advantage of higher IRA limits, focus on high-interest debt, and automate your bills and savings. Look for my own tips later this week. Lifehacker recently published an…

  • Daily Links: Hack Yourself! (8 comments)

    I hope you all had wonderful Christmases. My extended break has been great: filled with friends, family, and time for myself — I’m taking time to recharge my batteries. I still plan to be scarce around here until after the first, but meanwhile here are a couple of stories from elsewhere: “You can be happy. You can live the life you want to live,” writes Michael Montoure at Hack Yourself. “You can become the person…

  • Asking for a Better Financial Future (27 comments)

    This is a guest post from Daiko, who previously shared how to feed yourself on $15 a week. Asking questions can be a powerful tool for developing financial resilience. Two weeks ago, for example, I received an overdraft charge from my bank. My first reaction was to curse and pound my head against the desk, but after taking a deep breath I thought: “Why not ask them to remove the charge?” I called the bank,…

  • How to Buy and Sell Gift Cards (14 comments)

    Did you get a lot of gift cards for Christmas? Would you rather have cash? Would you rather have a card for another store? Richard O. Johnson at the fascinating Beyond Barter has created a page highlighting smart gift card strategies: how to best acquire or dispose of them. This page offers a wealth of sound, practical tips about gift cards, including information on: Why you should beware of bank gift cards Gift card traps…

  • The Architecture of Personal Finance: Choosing the Right Materials (14 comments)

    Nearly three years ago, in the original Get Rich Slowly post, I compared smart personal finance to building a house. This is the first part in a series that will explore that analogy. In his excellent Weinberg on Writing: The Fieldstone Method, Gerald Weinberg describes a simple metaphor for the writing process. Writers, he says, gather fieldstones (ideas) and use them to construct walls or buildings (finished stories). But each stone is different, and so…

  • Daily Roundup: Final Frontier Edition (12 comments)

    Every day after work for the past few weeks, I’ve been watching a single episode of Star Trek on DVD. It’s great fun to relive these old shows (which were a huge part of my childhood). But they never talk about money! Fortunately, I have a tendency to browse the web, where everyone talks about money. For example: On Monday I shared links to some payroll calculators — U.S. payroll calculators. In the comments, Jillian…

  • Paycheck and Withholding Calculators for Year-End Money Moves (14 comments)

    Ah, winter. It’s the time of year that a young man’s thoughts turn to taxes. It used to be that I would rough out our tax situation as soon as the forms became available. Because I insisted on having too much withheld from my paycheck, I was anxious to know how large my tax refund would be. (This was the only way I could make myself save.) Paycheck calculator Next year my financial situation will…

  • Carnival of Personal Finance: Naughty or Nice Edition (66 comments)

    Ho ho ho! Merry Christmas! Have you all been good boys and girls? No naughty, all nice? Well, Santa’s here with some presents to share. In fact, you might call this a carnival — a carnival of personal finance. Collected here today are presents from personal finance blogs all around the world. Here are 89 articles about personal finance, all wrapped in pretty packages and tied with bows. There are so many, in fact, that…

  • Daily Roundup: PriceProtectr Redux (4 comments)

    Last week I wrote about PriceProtectr, a free site that alerts you when prices fall on items you’ve recently purchased. This allows you to take advantage of “price protection” guarantees. I still haven’t used the site myself, but I’ve received several comments and e-mails from readers who rave about the service. For example, Jennifer wrote: I read about PriceProtectr on your site last week, and so far have had more than $40 refunded from Amazon…

  • Track Shared Bills and Expenses with Buxfer (18 comments)

    Do you have a roommate? A partner? A friend to whom you’ve loaned money? Buxfer is a fantastic web-based tool for anyone in a situation with shared expenses. The site’s programmers write: As graduate students, having food almost always meant eating out with a bunch of fellow sufferers somewhere on Craig Street. With such a high rate of accumulating bills, our memories and scraps of paper were just not enough. So we wrote a small…

  • Daily Roundup: Cold Santa Edition (6 comments)

    As expected, I’m running behind schedule. I’m playing Santa Claus at the box factory — delivering goodies to our best customers — and have social engagements in the evening. I may need to use an extra guest post or two, or perhaps share some of the best posts from my now-defunct Money Hacks site. Meanwhile, here are some personal finance articles that caught my eye today: Penny Nickel at Money and Values has compiled a…

  • Gift Card Tips and Tricks (33 comments)

    This morning’s post on the pros and cons of gift cards generated some great discussion. GRS readers seem fairly evenly divided on the topic. Some of you like gift cards, but many do not. My favorite parts of the conversation were the various gift card hacks people shared: Greg noted “You can frequently get 90-105% of the cash value of a gift card on eBay. For example: here and here.” I’ll suggest this to my…

  • The USDA Food Stamp Nutrition Connection (21 comments)

    The United States government has a host of useful web sites. Even the IRS site is informational. I’ve written about various government resources in the past, such as: The U.S. Department of Labor’s statistics on minimum wage workers. The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s information on the cost of food. Today I discovered another USDA site: The Food Stamp Nutrition Connection. Though ostensibly designed for low-income audiences, this site is probably worth visiting for others interested…

  • Track Price Drops with Price Protectr (14 comments)

    Alan wrote to tell me about a new site he discovered. Price Protectr is a smart little web app that helps consumers save money after they’ve purchased big-ticket items. There are lots of stores out there that offer price protection policies — when the price drops on an item you’ve purchased, they’ll refund you the difference. But there’s a catch…it’s up to you to watch prices. Price Protectr makes it simple to keep track of…

  • Weekend Update: Dark and Stormy Night Edition (4 comments)

    It’s dark and stormy here in the Pacific Northwest. Some wet and windy storms have begun to move across the region, and we’re getting even more rain than normal. I worry that another one of our trees might fall over. (We lost one a couple years ago, and it was a pain.) Meanwhile, here’s a quick round-up of some of the best articles last week across the Money Blog Network: The Mighty Bargain Hunter continues…

  • Daily Roundup: Glasses, Grinches, and Great Vacations (2 comments)

    I’ve received a lot of e-mail lately about very specific financial situations. Remember: I’m not qualified to give financial advice. I can share my experiences with you, and I can summarize the things I learn, but I’m not a trained financial adviser. And I don’t have time to reply to every e-mail. If you want people to kick around ideas with, drop by the Get Rich Slowly discussion forums. The forums are a great place…

  • Daily Roundup: Doomsday and Piggy Banks Edition (9 comments)

    I finally have the guest-post situation under control — I’ve created a spreadsheet to track submissions. That means I’m ready to accept new articles from you folks. For example, if you have an interesting money-related Christmas story, or tips to save on the holiday season, please drop me a line. But be aware that for non-topical posts, there’s a about a two-month backlog. I’m not willing to change my once (or twice) a week guest…

  • Reader Tip: The Warranty Scam Buster Account (65 comments)

    The one-year warranty on my MacBook Pro expired last week, presenting me with a choice: sign up for an extended warranty or live without it? I’ve never been an extended warranty kind of guy. They’re cash cows for the companies that sell them. Anything that is a cash cow for manufacturers and retailers is generally a poor deal for consumers. According to the Washington Post, $15 billion in warranty premiums were charged to U.S. consumers…

  • Weekend Update: Thanksgiving Edition (3 comments)

    It’s early on a cold Sunday morning. One of the squirrels has found his way on top of the house, and he’s skittering across the roof, pausing occasionally to thump thump thump at something. Silly squirrel. The holiday week meant it was a little quiet in the Money Blog Network (and beyond). Still, there were several articles of note: My favorite story this week comes from Dawn at Frugal for Life. She writes about Kyle…

  • Personal Finance Sites from Around the World (2007 Edition) (43 comments)

    While my U.S. readers are spending their Thanksgiving holidays eating turkey, watching football, and visiting with family, it’s the perfect time to perform another roundup of personal finance sites from around the world. It’s been ten months since I last updated this list. As usual, if you know of a non-U.S. personal finance site, please let me know. Some of these are of higher quality than others. I haven’t screened the wheat from the chaff….

  • Daily Roundup: Dedication, Education, Innovation (3 comments)

    As always, there’s plenty of good stuff out there about personal finance and personal success. Here are some of my favorite recent articles: Three Bean Salad shares “How I increased my net worth by $12,000 when I make only $21,000.” The secret? Saving, saving, saving. I love that the author’s #1 change is “looking for additional income streams”. She’s doing some babysitting, she served as a personal chef, and she sold some of her stuff…

  • Weekend Update: English Majors Rule! Edition (18 comments)

    Later today, I hope to share a lost classic from the 1970s: The Incredible Secret Money Machine. For now, however, here are highlights from the past week around the Money Blog Network. “Major in English if you want,” writes the Mighty Bargain Hunter. Don’t follow the money — follow your dreams. If you’ve been reading GRS for a while, you won’t be surprised that I love the final paragraph of this piece: Advice is almost…

  • Turning the Tables on Telemarketers (102 comments)

    It’s been an annoying day here at the box factory. November 15th must be some sort of telemarketing celebration day. I’ve been handling three or four calls an hour from these bozos all day long. It drives me nuts. I have little patience for spammers of any sort. Telemarketers are the worst. I have filters that can handle most of the e-mail and blog spam I receive. But there’s no way to filter the telemarketers….

  • Daily Roundup: Materialism, Hobbies, and Financial Autopilot (6 comments)

    I’ll be taking a mini-vacation next week, visiting family in Central Oregon. Have no fear! This is a great chance for me to finally share some of the guest posts I’ve been accumulating. (If only I had a book review to mix in with the stories I have lined up…) In the meantime, I’ve collected a few interesting personal finance articles from around the web: Here’s a story I wish I had more time to…

  • Money Hack: Prepay Your Monthly Bills (72 comments)

    Note: While I think this is a good idea, it’s clear that many readers strongly disagree. Before deciding whether to try this, please read the arguments in opposition. Earlier this year, on a whim, I did something a little odd: instead of just paying my monthly cable and internet bills, I wrote large checks, pre-paying for several months of service. I didn’t have a reason for doing it at the time. I had a momentary…

  • Ten Principles of Economics, Translated (14 comments)

    The following is a video presentation from Yoram Bauman, who bills himself as “the world’s first and only stand-up economist“. All I know is he’s hilarious. It’s been a l-o-n-g time since I made regular posts to the funny money category at Get Rich Slowly. Too long, actually. I’ll try to rectify that by sharing fun stuff like this video every now and then. Laughter is good. (If you know of something that would be…

  • Ask the Readers: What to Do When Money and Ethics Clash? (51 comments)

    Here’s a personal finance truism: if your employer offers a 401(k), be sure to take advantage of any matching funds. That’s a terrific idea, but what if doing so presents an ethical dilemma? Eric wrote looking for advice on a sticky situation: My employer is moving our 401(k) accounts from one investment firm to another. The new investment house is condemned by human rights groups because their investments facilitate the genocide in Darfur. What am…

  • Daily Roundup: Radio Interview Edition (4 comments)

    Bruce Barber of The Real Life Survival Guide chatted with me about budgets and spending plans last week. This 7-1/2 minute interview will air Sunday on WNPR, Connecticut Public Radio, but you can listen to it now. While you’re there, take a look around. Bruce has some other great interviews, including this conversation about “bargains” with Edgar Dworsky of Consumer World. In other news, David sent me an article about the subjectivity of wine. Turns…

  • The Costco Trade-In and Recycle Program for Old Electronics (17 comments)

    I used to collect computer components. While doing computer consulting in my spare time, I accumulated a room full of hard drives, computer cases, video cards, and monitors. At first it made me feel wealthy to look at all the computer parts I had. It didn’t take long for me to realize that this junk was precisely that: junk. Eventually I recycled all of this stuff, but I had to pay to do it. I…

  • Weekend Update: Go Ducks! Edition (7 comments)

    The Oregon rain is taking a break, which means Kris and I spent several hours today in the yard today chipping yard debris. I remember when we first saw this house. “I love all the mature trees and shrubs,” I said. HA! If only I knew how much work they entailed. Here are some of the highlights from the Money Blog Network over the past week: Flexo at Consumerism Commentary warns that you should always…

  • Daily Roundup: Unspotted Leopard Edition (11 comments)

    I succumbed to upgrade fever today, and purchased a copy of the latest Macintosh operating system, code-named Leopard. No problem, right? Wrong. Barely ten minutes into the install on my laptop, the machine hung. I’m now sitting in the local Apple Store, installing the upgrade under supervision from the Genius Bar. That gives me plenty of time to browse for other personal finance stories from around the web! Starting in the Get Rich Slowly discussion…

  • Daily Roundup: Bringing Home the Bacon Edition (17 comments)

    I’ve finally begun reading your feedback on how to improve Get Rich Slowly. To my surprise, most of you actually like the daily roundups. I’d been steering away from them because I thought they were unpopular. Posting links several times a week would also give me a chance to highlight some lesser-known sites. I’ll work on making these a more regular feature again. First up today, congrats to Trent at The Simple Dollar on the…

  • A Brief Overview of Estate Planning Software (21 comments)

    It’s that spooky haunted time of year — my annual post about estate planning! Last year I shared a brief guide to creating a will. Today I’m going to look at a recent New York Times article by Christine Larson that provides an overview of will preparation software. Larson writes, “Recently, the increasing sophistication of software and services for estate planning, combined with growing consumer comfort with online financial management, has led to a boom…

  • Weekly Roundup: Mind vs. Money Edition (25 comments)

    Here’s a roundup of recent articles from around the Money Blog Network (and beyond). Ramit at I Will Teach You to Be Rich has the post of the week, writing about an annoying e-mail he got. One of his readers wrote: This is nothing personal against you, because every personal finance author I’ve read says the same thing, but your advice is not for real people like me. The “spend less, save more” theory is…

  • Build Wealth with a “Virtual Employer” (40 comments)

    Here’s the longest “money hack” I’ve ever posted. This is another reader comment from our recent discussion about the transition from “becoming debt-free” to “living debt-free”. In this guest-post from James, who is new to GRS, he describes how he created a “virtual employer” in order to limit his natural spending habits. By playing games with himself, he was able to go from $20,000 in debt to having over a million in savings in just…

  • Daily Roundup: Extreme Debt Edition (17 comments)

    Rob M. recently forwarded an MSNBC article which proclaims life is harder now, some experts say. By “some experts”, the author means Elizabeth Warren, whose ideas I both love and hate. “Warren’s theories fly in the face of conventional wisdom and those crowded malls,” the article says. Her theories also fly in the face of my personal experience. Sometime I’ll sit down and read a lot of Warren’s writing at once so that I can…

  • Daily Roundup: Mars and Venus Edition (4 comments)

    Too many open browser tabs! Must share links! First up: Smart Money magazine is having a contest in which they’re “retiring the word ‘retirement’”: Today’s retirees are more active than ever, moving forward with their lives and pursuing a wide variety of interests and passions. Suggesting retreat and withdrawal, the word “retirement” no longer does this lifestage justice. SmartMoney is on a quest to find a new word or phrase to replace the word “retirement.”…

  • Weekend Update: PF101 Edition (7 comments)

    Kris and I had dinner last night with Mandy from Personal Finance 101. Mandy is a personal finance coach and the most active member of the Get Rich Slowly discussion forums. (She posts there more than I do!) Mandy’s money classes sound awesome. I hope to sit in on one in the future. Here’s the weekly look at highlights from around the Money Blog Network (and beyond): The Mighty Bargain Hunter had a response to…

  • Ask the Readers: Best Brick-and-Mortar Banks? (94 comments)

    Last March I shared a list of the best online high-yield savings accounts. Rates have been dropping, and I intend to post an update. Meanwhile, I’ve received a couple of questions recently about the best choices for brick-and-mortar banks. Alex wrote, “I would love to see a write-up on the best banks for regular checking accounts (in terms of customer service, minimum balances, overdraft fees, etc.).” Paul has a similar question: My wife and I…

  • Daily Roundup: Contest Edition (10 comments)

    First up: While everyone else was writing about the environment on Blog Action Day, Nickel was putting his money where his mouth is. He’s raising cash for the Conservation Fund. From now until Friday, Nickel will match up to $1000 in donations to this charity. For more information, visit his site. Wow! I hadn’t expected so many responses to Michael Mihalik’s guest post about financial security. The discussion has been great. Thanks. In appreciation, I’m…

  • ShopSmart: Five Eco-Friendly, Wallet-Friendly Sites (32 comments)

    While waiting in line at the supermarket the other day, I succumbed to an impulse purchase. I picked up a new magazine called ShopSmart. “No hype. No ads. Just great buys!” the cover touts. Inside are reviews and tips for everyday products. But ShopSmart differs from its parent publication, Consumer Reports, in several ways: it offers no extensive product ratings, it’s specifically geared toward helping consumers get the best deals, and its target audience is…

  • Weekend Update: Sunbreak Edition (5 comments)

    The Oregon rain set in a little early this year. It’s been wet for the past couple weeks. Today, though, the sun came out. Kris and I spent several hours in the yard trying to reduce the huge mass of limbs and leaves we’ve accumulated in the three years since we bought this house. Tomorrow I may be able to give the lawn one final mow before winter. Meanwhile, here are some interesting recent posts…

  • Daily Roundup: Oprah, Gumball Machines, and Underearning (9 comments)

    I’ve read several fascinating articles lately, but don’t have the time to cover them in greater detail. Each of these is highly recommended. >> Genius Types: The Best Deal I’ve Made Yet Last weekend I was researching entrepreneurship and passive income when I stumbled upon this story about gumball machines, eBay, and an unexpected fortune. I don’t know anything about the bulk candy business, but after reading this story, I’d like to learn more. (If…

  • Weekend Update: Lazy Sunday Edition (1 comment)

    Wow. Kris and I slept in until 9:43 this morning! That hasn’t happened in years. I almost didn’t get my fantasy football lineup altered in time. I’ve spent the last hour-and-a-half lounging in bed, catching up on other personal finance sites. Here are some of the articles I found: At The Simple Dollar, Trent asks, “How can a frugal person buy expensive items?” I think Trent does a great job of differentiating between cheap and…

  • Always Check Your Receipts (30 comments)

    IKEA opened in Portland recently. I’d never been to IKEA before, but had heard that it’s a great place to pick up inexpensive furniture and gadgets for the home. One recent Friday afternoon, Kris and I decided to go on a date to the new store. Not very romantic, perhaps, but oh-so-practical. IKEA stores are huge. Each one is laid out like a giant maze. You don’t browse aisles, but instead walk from the start…

  • Daily Roundup: Money Myths, Going Organic, and DIY Halloween Calendar (10 comments)

    Here are some articles I’ve had open in browser tabs for the past couple of days: London Telegraph: 50 Myths About Money “Most myths are harmless, but some are potentially dangerous: believe them and you could end up out of pocket.” Some of the myths explored: I’m too young for a pension. Blue chip stocks are low risk. The more credit cards you apply for, the better your credit rating. I’m too young for life…

  • Weekend Update: Sinus Infection Edition (7 comments)

    I’ve been sick all weekend, so I haven’t felt much like writing. I have, however, found time to browse other personal finance web sites. Here are some of the best recent articles from around the Money Blog Network: Many GRS readers have asked me what I think of Mint. To be honest, I haven’t had time to take a look at it. Sasha at Consumerism Commentary loves it, though, and recently posted an extensive review…

  • RetailMeNot: A Smart Source for Online Coupon Codes (30 comments)

    Coupon codes are a great way to save money while shopping online. But how can you find the best deals for the sites you frequent? Googling isn’t reliable — search results yield too many spammy sites and too many outdated codes. Matt Haughey writes that there’s a better way: [While searching for coupon codes,] I remembered the BugMeNot people did a coupon site last year, so I went to bugmenot to find it and found…

  • Museum Day: Get Free Museum Admission This Saturday! (2 comments)

    Jonathan from Deal Locker wrote to tell me that this Saturday is Museum Day in the U.S. — a chance to get into local museums for free. This event has been put together by Smithsonian Magazine and Hyundai. According to the magazine’s web site: Museum Day is a nationwide event taking place on Saturday, September 29, 2007, where participating museums and cultural institutions across the country offer free admission to Smithsonian readers and Smithsonian.com visitors….

  • Daily Roundup: Car Insurance, Cheap Desks, and More (5 comments)

    Finally, after three months, I felt like things at Get Rich Slowly were back to normal today. That means I was actually able to spend some time replying to reader e-mail, as well as checking out other personal finance sites. (I spent almost three hours reading about money merge accounts, only to learn that nobody agrees on them — more on that in a few days.) Here are a few articles that may be of…

  • How to Use the Amazon Marketplace for Fun and Profit (58 comments)

    This is a guest post from Cady. You can read more from Cady in her fiscal fitness journal in the Get Rich Slowly discussion forums. While rearranging my music collection recently, I decided to pull out anything I hadn’t listened to in a year. I had quite a stack. I looked at some of my titles and decided to sell them. I’d never really considered it before, but since I buy most of my new-to-me…

  • Weekend Roundup: Found Money, Luck, and Really Old Beer (5 comments)

    Get Rich Slowly passed its 3,000,000th visit last night — its 5,000,000th pageview and 31,000th subscriber came earlier this week. These numbers are nice, but what’s really important are the contributions from readers like you. You folks send me great story ideas, interesting web sites, and puzzling money questions. You also keep the place lively with insightful comments and great discussions in the forum. Thank you. Here are some of the stories I liked last…

  • Daily Roundup: Retirement Planning, Free Credit Reports, and Structured Procrastination (25 comments)

    Folks, I don’t like this new layout. It’s ugly. There are too many ads. It doesn’t feel like home. Unless there’s some surprise outburst of popular support, I’m going to revert to the old Get Rich Slowly layout over the weekend (which may mean you’ll have to reload, reload, reload to get it to display correctly again). Someday, when I’ve paid off my debt, I actually plan to pay for a professional custom blog design,…

  • Weekend Roundup: Hamburgers, Investing, and Windfalls (1 comment)

    Thanks to everyone who has offered help with my server woes. I think I’ve got things under control: I’ve selected a place, we’ve moved all the files, and now I just need to test to be sure nothing’s broken. When I’m certain everything is as it should be, we’ll flip the switch to complete the server transfer. Get Rich Slowly may be unreachable for a couple of days as the new server address propagates throughout…

  • Daily Roundup: The Cult of Credit, Free Software, and DIY Home Improvement (18 comments)

    Here are some personal finance stories submitted by readers like you: W.C. Varones pointed me to Dr. Housing Bubble’s article about the invisible mortgage hand, an analysis of a society that forces you into debt. The author looks at the cult of credit scores; the cost of cars, education, and housing; and at the median U.S. family income. “Is it any wonder that we are in a massive credit bubble?” he concludes. (Ignore the mega-annoying…

  • Daily Roundup: Tips and Tricks from GRS Readers (9 comments)

    While organizing my text files this afternoon, I stumbled upon a batch of tips and tricks that got lost in the shuffle. Here are some clever ideas submitted by your fellow Get Rich Slowly readers: Russell Heimlich wrote to share his method for organizing bank statements. He uses a three-ring binder, a stapler, and a hole-punch. I really like this method — it reminds me how we handle the finances at work. It’s a vast…

  • Daily Roundup: Paperless PF, Adult Allowances, and Home-Made Toys (9 comments)

    I may have taken Labor Day weekend off from writing about personal finance, but that doesn’t mean my colleagues did. Here are some recent articles I found interesting: At Blueprint for Financial Prosperity, Jim followed our recent discussion of paperless personal finance with an article of his own. He says there are two primary reasons to go paperless: it’s good for the environment and it saves you money. Since Jim writes a personal finance blog,…

  • Daily Roundup: Groceries, Quicken Hacks, and a Decluttering Trick (7 comments)

    We’ve finally got some August-like weather here in Portland; maybe Kris’ tomatoes will ripen after all. While we work in the yard and declutter the house, here are some quick-and-easy money articles from around the web: The DIY Maven at Curbly has 20 tips for shopping at the grocery store. You’ve heard many of these before, but it never hurts to review. Some of these should be mantras: Make a list! Eat first! Shop the…

  • Daily Roundup: Resumes, Charity, and Living Rich (24 comments)

    So many links, so little time. There have been a lot of great personal finance articles on the web lately. Here are a few: How to write a resume This is a fairly comprehensive guide to writing resumes, covering different goals and methods. I like that the post includes a huge bibliography of other web pages about resumes. I don’t like the emphasis on an “objective statement”. As an employer, I have to tell you…

  • In Pursuit of Paperless Personal Finance (66 comments)

    I’m swamped with paper. This is partly because I’m a packrat, but mostly it’s due to the never-ending bills, statements, receipts, policies, and special offers that flood my desk. The paperless office once seemed like a silly goal to me, but lately it’s become a holy grail. Spurred by Leo’s adventures in minimalism and my own desire to get rid of clutter, I’ve begun to explore ways to move my money into the 21st century….

  • Daily Links: Intelligence, Dreams, and Big Hammers (6 comments)

    Time for me to eat a little crow. Last week I wrote a tepid review of personal finance magazines, concluding that they’re worth the subscription cost, but that they’re hit-or-miss with their content. The September issue of Money arrived in my mailbox yesterday. It’s all hit. This issue includes several pieces on money management for college students, a one-page comic (!!!) about dealing with contractors, a review of personal finance software, a brief overview of…

  • Daily Links: Your Money or Your Life, and Benjamin Graham (3 comments)

    It’s been a rough week behind the scenes at Get Rich Slowly. My hosting company experienced unexpected trouble, which meant that this site was only intermittently accessible for the past three days. Meanwhile, I’ve been busy and had little time to write. Here are a couple of interesting articles that came across my desk recently: Your Money or Your Life: Step Nine Revisited Last Friday, I mentioned the Crossover Point, that point in time at…

  • Daily Links: Debt Reduction, Stupidity, and Mutual Funds (2 comments)

    No Credit Needed is hosting the 100th edition of the Carnival of Debt Reduction. Go drop in to find great advice on eliminating debt. Among my favorite contributions are: Golb Guru explains how to get rid of debt without worrying about the latte factor. Plonkee argues that

  • Purge Clutter with a De-Accumulation Bag (35 comments)

    Megan P. dropped me a line over the weekend to follow-up on our discussion of Stuff, writing: Raised by a packrat, Stuff drove me crazy. Until a few  years ago, this was the solution: keep a bag of “de-accumulation” and fill it as full as possible every week. Give it to charity once a month. All four bags. It quit working for me when I began watching TV and reading fashion and home decor magazines. …

  • Free Professional Financial Checkup on August 17th (4 comments)

    I write often about the need to save for retirement — it’s one of the most important steps you can take to assure financial success. The best time to start planning your future is now. But how can you be sure you’re making the right choices? Here’s a great opportunity for readers in the United States. Next Friday, August 17th, you can receive free, professional retirement advice by phone courtesy of Kiplinger’s Personal Finance: Whether…

  • Daily Links: Compound Interest, Web Income, and Happiness (18 comments)

    Here’s another collection of personal finance links submitted from readers like you. The power of compounding is subtle and filled with nuances. In a comment on yesterday’s daily links, Wayne wrote: One final thing to think about… say you were to borrow at 100K at 6.5% rate, and get an average annualized return of 9% over a long period of time. This will result in far greater appreciation than you had you not borrowed at…

  • A Quick Trick for Tracking Credit Card Expenses in Quicken (29 comments)

    Some readers are worried about my change in stance regarding credit cards. Misuse of best rewards credit card was the chief reason I came to be buried in debt. For years after coming to my senses, the only way for me to cope with credit cards was not to have one. I still believe that this is the proper course of action for anyone who hasn’t gained control of her finances, and I would never…

  • Daily Links: Pets, Films, and Mortgage Savings (6 comments)

    I’ve spent the last couple hours replying to your e-mail messages, sorting through the links you sent me while I was on vacation. I kept wishing that I had a way to share more of these with GRS readers; then I remembered my early-morning “daily links” section! Here, then, are some stories passed along by your fellow readers: Business Week: The Pet Economy “Americans spend an astonishing $41 billion a year on their furry friends,”…

  • How to Find Great Deals on eBay (29 comments)

    My friend Lisa is something of an eBay addict. I’ll be at her house admiring something or other and she’ll smile confidentially and whisper, “I got it off eBay.” She recently showed up at a dinner party wearing a smart cocktail dress. When the other women admired it she smiled confidentially and whispered, “I got it off eBay.” At Christmas she made some crafty little things that amazed and delighted the recipients. When we asked…

  • Money Day: Your Personal Finance Holiday (22 comments)

    I opened my first checking account on the day I entered college. During registration, local banks set up tables at one end of the room. They all seemed the same to me. I chose the bank that gave me a free Frisbee. I did business with that bank for seventeen miserable years. I loathed that bank. They were constantly finding new and interesting ways to charge me money. If I hated it so much, why…

  • The Co-Op Network: Another Reason to Consider Credit Unions (26 comments)

    This is a guest-post from long-time reader MikeVx. For many people, access to automatic teller machines (ATMs) is an important factor when choosing a financial institution. With the growth of the Co-Op Network of ATMs, most credit union members now have access to more no-cost ATMs than any several large banks put together. If your credit union is a member of the Co-Op network, you have surcharge-free access to most of the credit union ATMs…

  • Daily Roundup: Fireworks Spectacular (8 comments)

    It’s time for bed, but there’s no sense sleeping. Our neighborhood is crazy about fireworks, and this year the guy next door has purchased an arsenal of illegal — and very loud — explosive devices. The bombs will continue bursting in air for several more hours. Kris is staying up to read Harry Potter; I’m using the time to share a few links that Get Rich Slowly readers have forwarded. Writing for Newsweek, Robert Samuelson…

  • Daily Roundup: Cars, Cars, Cars (45 comments)

    Alfonso Piñate has cars on the brain. He didn’t just forward one car-related article — he sent me three! And they’re all good. From Jalopnik, here’s an “Ask the Readers”-type question: “Your car recommendations for broke, flakazoid car-ignorant friends?” Author Murilee Martin says: “I always recommend the same three cars.” Those are, in order: 1987-1990 Nissan Sentra 1987-1990 Toyota Tercel 1984-1987 Honda Civic But don’t stop there. This thread is loaded 101 reader comments on…

  • Daily Roundup: Interviews, Charities, and Bike Mortgages (14 comments)

    I’ve been swamped by stories from GRS readers lately. I’ll do my best to get most of these posted before I leave for Europe. Earlier this month we debated whether it’s better to invest or to prepay a mortgage. On a related note, Lynn at The New Homemaker has a nice introduction to the bi-weekly mortgage. It’s worth reading if you’ve considered going this route. Jim from Blueprint for Financial Prosperity and FMF from Free…

  • Daily Roundup: Financial Literacy Videos, Library Hacks, and Moving Sales (4 comments)

    During the month of April, Get Rich Slowly featured a series of videos about financial literacy. These short clips were created by Michael Fischer, a finance professional and author of the book Saving and Investing. Michael dropped a line yesterday to ask for requests. I just wanted to touch base as I am planning to release a series of videos in the coming week. Topics that I intend to cover include: fiscal and monetary policy…

  • links for 2007-06-19 (3 comments)

    If you’re still having trouble getting the new layout to load, try clearing your browser’s cache. As I mentioned, the sidebar will widen further as soon as I find the time to monkey with it some more. >> How victim snared ID thief: She chased down woman who had given her 6 months of hell << This is an amazing story. Imagine having your identity stolen. Imagine the culprit making off with thousands of dollars…

  • links for 2007-06-15 (2 comments)

    >> My struggle: Spending on food is really about motivation << Flexo at Consumerism Commentary writes about his mental block against “brown-bagging” lunch. “I don’t like spending time preparing my food. The supposed motivation of saving about $5 a day, or $100 a month, is apparently not enough to [for] me.” >> How to become wealthy << At Clayton Cramer’s personal site, he ran a series of entries in 2003 about “how to become wealthy”….

  • links for 2007-06-14 (0 comment)

    >> What aspects of personal finance bring you happiness? << Trent at The Simple Dollar asks a fantastic question. I preach about the psychological aspects of personal finance because I’ve experienced them myself. I know the joy of paying off a debt. I know the need to allow some wiggle room in the budget. Trent and his readers share the things that have brought them joy.

  • A Yard Sale Checklist: Ten Tips for Garage Sale Prep (59 comments)

    Our annual neighborhood garage sale was held this past weekend. During last year’s sale I offered ten garage sale tips: A group sale is better then selling alone. More stuff draws more traffic. Be prepared. Be ready to go the night before so that you don’t have to rush around in the morning. Plan your sale layout with customers in mind. Use marketing tricks to make your customers more likely to purchase your stuff! Price…

  • links for 2007-06-12 (1 comment)

    >> Curbly: This story could save you thousands of dollars in real estate commissions << For those of you buying a house, the DIY Maven explains how to save thousands of dollars by making a purchase without a real estate agent. >> What is a sound financial lifestyle? << Over at the Mint blog, Cap surveyed seventeen different personal finance bloggers, asking them what they thought a sound financial lifestyle meant. The three top answers:…

  • links for 2007-06-10 (2 comments)

    One of my favorite personal finance blogs, Money and Values, has returned from a hiatus. Penny writes about the way our personal values affect our relationship with money. Good stuff. >> The Digerati Life: 5 different ways to build an emergency fund << The Silicon Valley Blogger takes a look at five ways to start your emergency fund: three get thumbs up and two get thumbs down. >> American Airlines Miles: Use ‘Em or Lose…

  • links for 2007-06-08 (1 comment)

    >> The massive personal finance resource list << Brett has pulled together a ton of useful stuff here, including online money management tools, offline software, investing tools, spreadsheets, books, and more. Well worth bookmarking. >> Getting Finances Done: Why you shouldn’t trust home mortgage lenders and mortgage calculators << “Banks will tell you that you can afford up to 41% of your gross income as debt (sometimes referred to as the front-end ratio) — If…

  • links for 2007-06-06 (2 comments)

    >> AskMetafilter: Is consumerism bad? << “Should I feel guilty about wanting the things that I do?” See also: How do you stop feeling guilty for what you have? and Please help me with my struggle between materialism and minimalism. I have similar inner dilemmas. >> Liz Pulliam Weston: Money trouble? It’s your own fault << “If you’re having money problems, you probably have good reasons. [...] Here’s the thing, though: Reasons have expiration dates….

  • links for 2007-05-31 (0 comment)

    In our discussion about socio-economic class on Tuesday, Angie mentioned a series of articles from Liz Pulliam Weston (my favorite personal finance guru). Each of these describes what the average financial situation is like for a particular age group. Your 20s: See how your wealth measures up — “You’re poorer than you’ll ever be again, but you can lay the groundwork for a prosperous future. Here’s how your finances compare to others your age.” Your…

  • links for 2007-05-30 (0 comment)

    >> Curbly: Salvage and season cast-iron cookware << “Cast iron is incredible. It’s like nature’s non-stick surface. I have a 12” skillet, a round griddle for tortillas, and a large, rectangular griddle/grill pan, all of which I absolutely baby, adding flavor layer by layer, and avoiding soap, and many times water, at all cost. So, I was stoked to find this cast iron Dutch oven at a thrift store for $4. All it needed was…

  • links for 2007-05-29 (4 comments)

    >> Prosper personal lending update << Many of you enjoyed Frykitty’s post on investing with Prosper, the person-to-person microloan service. Here’s an article at PF Blog that describes the author’s experience underwriting 163 loans for a total of $14,880 over the past year. Based on the average interest rate (17.6%), I’m guessing that most of these were relatively high-risk loans, which might explain why the author hasn’t had much success. >> Free summer movies for…

  • links for 2007-05-25 (1 comment)

    >> Commitments Unlimited << Commitments Unlimited is a new wedding blog from GRS reader Sally. (Sally contributed the guest post on how to eat vegetarian on the cheap.) Her site is devoted to “having the wedding you want at a price you can afford”. She’s been publishing a great budgeting basics series describing how to plan for wedding finances. (As I was posting this, Bill sent me a link to money management tips for newlyweds.)…

  • Optimize Your Bank Accounts with a Periodic Review (2 comments)

    You know that it’s a good idea to ask utility providers for better deals once or twice a year. But did you know that you can apply the same principle to be sure you’re getting the best deal at your bank? If, like me, you still use a brick-and-mortar bank (or credit union), ask your teller to point out any improvements that could be made to your accounts. Every few months, research: Better interest rates…

  • links for 2007-05-23 (2 comments)

    >> Advice for purchasing a home? << Regular GRS reader (and active commenter) Kevin has decided he’s ready to buy a house, but he doesn’t know where to start. “What are the best resources you have found on the web to guide us through buying a house? What are some of the best blog posts you have read about the subject, or about people’s experiences in general?” >> Small portions and healthy grocery lists <<…

  • links for 2007-05-22 (8 comments)

    >> How to beat the stock market: Buy companies with high customer satisfaction scores << The Consumerist links to a report that indicates “companies at the top 20% of the the American Customer Satisfaction Index (ACSI) greatly outperformed the stock market, generating a 40% return. From 1996-2003, the portfolio outperformed the Dow Jones Industrial Average by 93%, the S&P 500 by 201%, and NASDAQ by 335%.” >> Generation gap? About $200,000 << “The growing divide…

  • links for 2007-05-18 (4 comments)

    Lots of good personal development links today! >> 60+ improvements to make in your life << Dumb Little Man gives a list of some siple things you can do to make life better. “Life is a never-ending improvement process. No matter what you do or how perfect your life seems, there is always something to improve.” This is a great little list. (Jay, your sidebar is broken in Safari!) >> The difference between experts and…

  • Quicken Hacks: 25 Hints, Tips, and Tricks (32 comments)

    I use Quicken to track my personal finances. Back in the olden days, I used Andrew Tobias’ Managing Your Money, but that hasn’t worked on my Macs for nearly a decade. I’d still use it if I could. Quicken on the Mac is a pale comparison to the Quicken on the PC. I feel like I should be able to get more out of the program, so I went on a scavenger hunt, scouring the…

  • Personal Finance Chat Today at 1pm Pacific (0 comment)

    This just in! The Los Angeles Times web site has a blurb on many of its pages this morning announcing that personal finance columnist Kathy Kristof will be answering questions in an online chat today (Thursday, May 17th) at 1:00 pm. Pacific. (Which is 4:00pm Eastern.) You can find her in the LA Times personal finance chat area. If you have a burning personal finance question, drop by and ask an expert. (If you get…

  • links for 2007-05-17 (2 comments)

    >> Compact fluorescent lightbulbs are your friends << Paul at Green Capitalism describes his quest to “go green” while saving money. “Using less energy is good. Switching to CFL Bulbs that use less electricity is one way to accomplish that goal.” But not everything as easy as changing a light bulb. “Hot water is reported to take up 11% of the energy bill. The hot water heater is a mystery to me. Do we wrap…

  • The Rule of 72 (and Friends) (9 comments)

    Remember the rule of 72? You can use this rule-of-thumb to estimate how long it will take to double your money under various scenarios. To do this, you simply divide the annual rate of return into 72 to determine how many years it will take to double your money. For example, if you assume an average 8% return on your Roth IRA, its value should double every nine years. (This doesn’t consider additional contributions, of…

  • links for 2007-05-16 (2 comments)

    >> The Motley Fool: 10 Things I Hate About Finances << “When it comes to finances, there’s no shortage of tasks to dread… But ignoring the niggling details is even worse than the drudgery of getting them done… Wipe that sour look right off your face and read on for the 10 things we all hate about finances, along with 10 ways to get them out of the way faster.” >> Wheaties for Your Wallet:…

  • Don’t Just Save Your Quarters — Save Your Dollars, Too! (36 comments)

    Many people save their change at the end of the day. When they get home, they deposit their coins into a jar or a piggy bank or a similar container. Some people roll their change and deposit it into savings every month. Kris and I let our change jars fill completely before we take them in. But if you really want to see your savings grow, don’t just save your coins — save your one-dollar…

  • links for 2007-05-15 (2 comments)

    >> Five things your financial advisor knows (but will never tell you) << Justin looks at some of the dirty secrets of financial advisors. My favorite tip is “if you don’t know anything about personal finance, then don’t hire a financial advisor”. Clients often say to me, “I don’t know anything about money.” My first thought it often to postpone taking that client on, and then simply referring him/her to some of my favorite personal…

  • Five Money-Saving Blogs from Consumer Reports (2 comments)

    Consumer Reports — my favorite personal finance magazine — is publishing a series of blogs devoted to various consumer topics. Since most of the Consumer Reports web site is behind a paywall — even for magazine subscribers (lame!) — these blogs are a handy way to keep tabs on some of the organization’s recommendations. The CR Shopping Blog “enables us to zero in on the latest product information, news, trends, and sales figures, and reveal…

  • links for 2007-05-14 (0 comment)

    >> The $140 Homemade Scarf << Stephen J. Dubner and Steven D. Levitt, of Freakonomics fame, write about the joys of menial labor, about how some of us make a hobby out of what used to be considered work. “What makes a certain activity work for one person and leisure for another?” Why is it that we enjoy cooking, or gardening, or knitting on our own time, but not if it’s a job? The comments…

  • The Privacy Rights Clearinghouse (1 comment)

    The Privacy Rights Clearinghouse, a nonprofit consumer information and advocacy organization, has a collection of freely-downloadable consumer form letters and opt-out information. (What a mouthful!) Here’s how they suggest these letters be used: Send your letter by Certified Mail-Return Receipt Requested. If possible, fax the letter first. Make a copy of your letter for your records before sending. To locate the proper party to send this letter to, check for a mailing address included on…

  • links for 2007-05-11 (3 comments)

    >> The Simple Living Newsletter for May-June 2007 << The Simple Living Network is an excellent source for information on voluntary simplicity. Bill Mize wrote to tell me that SLN publishes a bi-monthly newsletter. The latest issue is out. It contains articles on how to survive a layoff, gardening, Hugh Chou’s free financial calculators. (Last summer I purchased all of Chou’s calculators for use at GRS, though I haven’t actually implemented them.) >> What is…

  • The Consumer Reports Mother’s Day Gift Guide (7 comments)

    Mother’s Day is just around the corner. If you’re still struggling with what to get your mom, check out the Consumer Reports Mother’s Day gift guide. The guide includes articles on mail-order flowers (CR recommendation: order from a florist near mom), as well as free access to past reports on: Jewelry Candy Mail-order baskets (probably too late for this) Digital cameras Pots and pans Note that this gift guide gives free access to articles only,…

  • links for 2007-05-10 (5 comments)

    One benefit of creating this daily links section is that I can also toss in miscellaneous administrative content now-and-then. For example, I forgot to announce the winners of the “join the discussion forum” contest. Andrea, Gnashcick, Pszalapski, Emlombardo, and Siobhan were each randomly selected to win one personal finance book. Long-time reader RJ was the grand-prize winner. He received five personal finance books. Thanks to everyone for participating. (And if you haven’t joined the GRS…

  • Visual Personal Finance Calculators (3 comments)

    I see a lot of financial calculators while researching money stories. Most of them are the same: fill in some boxes, get a result. Last week, I stumbled on a “visual calculator” that adds a nice twist to the formula. Mainstay Investments offers a “Saving for a goal” tool that uses the traditional text boxes for data input, but also allows users to make changes by adjusting sliders. It’s subtle but, for me at least,…

  • links for 2007-05-08 (6 comments)

    After several months of using automated posts from del.icio.us, I’m going to experiment with making the daily links more robust. You folks seem to have a love/hate relationship with these — I’m hoping to make them more palatable to the “hate” crowd. >> Carnival of Personal Finance #99 << This week’s carnival is hosted by Golbguru at Money, Matter, and More Musings. Highlights from this edition include: KMull looks at “keep the change” programs from…

  • links for 2007-05-05 (5 comments)

    Free Comic Book Day May 5th 2007 Yes, it’s true: all around the world, comic book stores are giving away free comics. These are all mags printed for this giveaway. And, of course, it’s a ploy to get you in the stores. But still: FREE COMICS! (tags: funnymoney)

  • links for 2007-05-04 (10 comments)

    Stay-at-home mom’s work worth $138,095 – Personal Finance – MSNBC.com (tags: parenting work career) The Simple Dollar » The Day After: My Immediate Actions When I Reached Financial Armageddon What happens when you hit rock bottom? Trent shares how he dealt with financial failure, the immediate things he did to stop the bleeding and begin the healing. (tags: debt)

  • No Impact Man: Save Money, Save the Earth (24 comments)

    Maybe it’s because I grew up poor in rural Oregon. Maybe it’s because I love adventure fiction (you know: “man against nature”). Maybe it’s because I have a lot of my father in me. For whatever reason, I’ve always been fascinated by people who go “off the grid“. In the GRS forums, Benbr pointed to No Impact Man, a blog run by Colin Bevan, who describes himself thus: A guilty Liberal [who] finally snaps, swears…

  • links for 2007-05-03 (4 comments)

    Venerable finance game abandons cash for credit – Los Angeles Times Visa is sponsoring The Game of Life, which upsets people for a variety of reasons: the emphasis on credit instead of cash, the presence of advertising in a children’s game, etc. [via Macdaddy] (tags: advertising consumerism children kids marketing creditcards) Tim Ferris – The 4 Hour Work Week – An Interview I’ve been hearing about this book from EVERYWHERE lately. The concept intrigues me….

  • links for 2007-05-02 (3 comments)

    » Two Years of FiveCentNickel and a Big, Huge Giveaway @ fivecentnickel.com Nickel is giving away some big prizes (including two iPods) in celebration of his site’s second anniversary. It’s easy to enter! While you’re there, check out his site. (tags: pfblogs contests) sew green A blog about simplicity, sustainability, and reducing consumption. This is a collaborative site from a group of 14 craftbloggers. It covers a wide range of topics from gardening to greenhouse gases. I…

  • links for 2007-05-01 (0 comment)

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  • Free Paper Shredding Tomorrow (Saturday, April 28th) (7 comments)

    In the forums, Brad points out that Shred-it, a document shredding company, is offering its services for free at dozens of sites around the U.S. tomorrow. According to the company’s site: Shred-it®, Office Depot® and Crime Stoppers USA® are helping consumers fight identity theft by organizing the 2007 USA National Community Shred campaign. Community Shred events will be held at 100 Office Depot stores across the country on April 28, 2007 from 10 a.m. to…

  • links for 2007-04-27 (2 comments)

    Scott H Young » Get a Reality Check “Whether you have clearly defined goals with deadlines or just a strong feeling about where you want to be, you need to do reality checks frequently to stay on track.” This is advice I need to heed. (tags: motivation self-development GTD) Digmann.com » Blog Archive » Study to be a Chartered Financial Analyst Dustin found something neat at Investopedia: study guides to a financial analyst exam. The…

  • Common Money Mistakes and How to Correct Them (3 comments)

    Everyone makes mistakes — it’s a part of being human. But it’s those who learn to minimize their mistakes who are able to fight debt and to build wealth. Paul L. forwarded a Reuters article by Linda Stern that explores common money mistakes and gives advice on how to fix them. Stern warns that if you have chronic money problems, you’re basically subsidizing those that don’t: Not everyone handles their money badly. [...] But some…

  • links for 2007-04-26 (7 comments)

    » I Buy Generic Brands and Store Brands Sometimes on Consumerism Commentary: A Personal Finance Blog Flexo lists the things he’s willing to buy generic. I’ll buy many things generic, especially if they’re not “favorites”. For favorites, I want the highest quality possible. (tags: food shopping frugal frugality) Identity Theft Grows; Tips to Protect Yourself I just got a call from a merchant yesterday to verify that I was trying to sign up with them….

  • links for 2007-04-25 (0 comment)

    The Simple Dollar » The Simple Dollar Giveaway #4: Five Free Books! Trent is holding a book giveaway, too: Find a post at his site that really evokes a response in you and makes you think, whether you agree with it or not, and write a fifty word response. (tags: free books pfblogs) I Will Teach You To Be Rich » Tell me a story about your debt Ramit asks his readers: “How much debt…

  • Saving and Investing: Three Enemies of Growth (3 comments)

    This is part seventeen in a series that will occupy the “money hacks” slot at Get Rich Slowly during April, which is National Financial Literacy Month. Through Michael Fischer’s video series, we’ve come to understand that the sooner we invest our money, the longer it has to compound, and to grow to large sums. But things aren’t that simple. Compounding has some enemies. One of these enemies is taxes: Taxes and compounding (4:36) Because taxes…

  • links for 2007-04-23 (1 comment)

    How to Build a Perfect Credit Score Quickly There’s some great advice here, especially for young adults. But be careful. The article advocates using credit cards to build your score. If you do so, make sure to use the responsibly! (tags: creditcards creditreport credit youngadults) Trimming the attention sails at Like It Matters “You are what you pay attention to.” I’m going through a phase where I’m trying to reduce the amount of stuff I…

  • Saving and Investing: The Difference Between Active and Passive Management (1 comment)

    This is part fourteen in a series that will occupy the “money hacks” slot at Get Rich Slowly during April, which is National Financial Literacy Month. First, Michael Fischer introduced us to mutual funds. Next, he described the various types. Today he looks at the difference between actively- and passively-managed funds. What are active and passive management? (4:27) In a way, passive management is like “autopilot” — the fund manager feeds parameters into a computer,…

  • links for 2007-04-19 (1 comment)

    Why is economic growth necessary? | Ask MetaFilter This is a question I’ve often pondered, too. (tags: economics)

  • links for 2007-04-18 (0 comment)

    Investors go on automatic pilot – USATODAY.com “Target funds, which gear your investments toward your retirement date, have been the hottest new breed of mutual fund in years. But before you put your portfolio on autopilot, check the fund’s flight plan.” [via Flexo] (tags: mutualfunds investing investments planning retirement) » Ten Fundamental Concepts in Personal Finance  on Blueprint for Financial Prosperity Jim gathers together all the advice you hear again and again into a single post….

  • links for 2007-04-17 (2 comments)

    plonkee money: tourist in london town “London is an absolutely fantastic city, but it sure ain’t cheap. Here are my best ideas for getting more for your money.” We’re visiting London later this year. I asked Plonkee for tips and this is her reply. (tags: UK travel tips) SNL Skit: Don’t Buy Stuff You Can’t Afford – Consumerist I posted the transcript of this skit last summer, but Aaron H. pointed out that Consumerist has…

  • Saving and Investing: The Importance of Diversification (3 comments)

    This is part eleven in a series that will occupy the “money hacks” slot at Get Rich Slowly during April, which is National Financial Literacy Month. The next video in Michael Fischer’s series on Saving and Investing is about mutual funds. However, I think it would useful to have an introduction to diversification first, so I’ve bumped that video ahead in the lineup. Here’s Michael’s explanation of this important concept: Diversification (4:35) In his book,…

  • Ask the Readers: Cheap Places to Live? (91 comments)

    Money Minx has decided to make a frugal leap of faith, to move to another city in order to save money. But she has one stipulation that’s causing problems. She’s come to Get Rich Slowly readers for help: My fiancee and I have cut back on spending and gotten better paying jobs and in addition have each taken on 2nd and 3rd jobs.  It’s still not enough, so the only thing left to do is…

  • Tomorrow is Ben & Jerry’s Free Cone Day! (4 comments)

    Whatcha doin’ tomorrow? Wanna get some free ice cream? Head on down to your local Ben & Jerry’s scoop shop for their annual “free cone day”. According to the wikipedia: Ben & Jerry’s Free Cone Day is an annual event, held in late April or early May, in which Ben & Jerry’s scoop shops give out free ice cream cones all day. Over one million free cones are given away each year. Charitable organizations are…

  • links for 2007-04-16 (1 comment)

    StopBuyingCrap.com » HOWTO: Protect What’s Left of Your Consumer Privacy (tags: privacy) Become a Google Finance Power User: 13 Tips and Hacks I often find online stock tools overwhelming. This little article provides some good info to make Google Finance more usable… (tags: web finance tools)

  • links for 2007-04-13 (2 comments)

    How to get your credit score up, and how not to care | zen habits (tags: creditreport credit finance finances money tips)

  • 7 Essential Skills to Protect Yourself from Scammers (19 comments)

    Sabino sent me an MSNBC article about the unfolding subprime lending crisis. The piece provides a glimpse at the deceptive practices used to prey on people like Kerrie Russo, who chose to refinance her mortgage on a promise of lower payments. When she failed to read her loan documents closely, she found herself deep in expanding debt. Though the mortgage broker lured her into this loan, she signed the papers. Because she didn’t know how…

  • links for 2007-04-12 (1 comment)

    No Credit Needed » Blog Archive » Preparing For Life Without A Credit Card NCN talks about the steps he took to letting go. Me? I just went cold turkey. You don’t *need* a credit card. (tags: creditcards) Money game reveals our inner Robin Hood – being-human – 11 April 2007 – New Scientist “Overall findings indicate that people have ‘an inherent taste for equality’.” (tags: wealth psychology economics money) As kids get savvy, marketers…

  • links for 2007-04-10 (0 comment)

    miles’ allowance on Flickr – Photo Sharing! One approach to allowances for children. [via Amy Jo] (tags: kids allowances education) Ten Commandments for a Simpler Way of Life at Ririan Project “I’ve sifted through this huge onslaught of information and picked out the ten best tips I could find to help you simplify your life.” (tags: inspiration motivation self-improvement psychology simplicity)

  • links for 2007-04-09 (2 comments)

    44+ million uninsured people in America… | Ask MetaFilter “Will a $6,000 bill from the ER completely cripple my credit score for the next ten (plus?) years if I don’t pay it?” (tags: creditreport debt health bills)

  • links for 2007-04-08 (0 comment)

    AllFinancialMatters » Blog Archive » MORE S&P 500 Index Stats JLP provides some tables that demonstrate the long-term value of stocks. They also show that stocks don’t *always* provide stellar returns. (tags: investing investments)

  • Saving and Investing: What is Leverage? (24 comments)

    This is part five in a series that will occupy the “money hacks” slot at Get Rich Slowly during April, which is National Financial Literacy Month. In today’s episode of “Saving and Investing”, Michael Fischer explains a concept I’ve heard mentioned a lot, but have never understood. The term “leverage” is used in many financial books and articles, often referring to real estate investments. The concept has always puzzled me, even when I looked it…

  • links for 2007-04-06 (1 comment)

    Teaching My Kids the Value of Work and Money » What’s Gotta Stay (tags: kids values money)

  • Saving and Investing: The Difference Between Debt and Equity (2 comments)

    This is part four in a series that will occupy the “money hacks” slot at Get Rich Slowly during April, which is National Financial Literacy Month. Yesterday Michael Fischer differentiated between providers of capital and users of capital. Today he explains the two ways in which these groups interact: through the exchange of debt and the exchange of equity. Equity and Debt (5:57) When a provider of capital loans money to a user of capital,…

  • links for 2007-04-05 (0 comment)

    How to invest when you’re broke – MSN Money A lot of you have told me: “Fine, fine, I get it — I need to invest. But how?” I’m working on an article to cover this subject. I’ll post it by the end of the month. Meanwhile, here’s an overview. (tags: investing money finance howto) ryanwaggoner.com » Investing For Young Adults: Introduction From reader Ryan: “This series [is] for those in their twenties who know…

  • Ask the Readers: When Does This All Pay Off? (97 comments)

    Annie is a young woman who seems to be making all of the right moves. She has an emergency fund, she’s saving for retirement, she’s living frugally, and she’s paying off her debt. But she’s beginning to find the lifestyle overwhelming. She wants to know when the payoff comes. (And what should she do in the meantime?) I’m 28, I make $43k per year, and I’ve been putting 9% away in a 401(k) since age…

  • links for 2007-04-04 (3 comments)

    I Will Teach You To Be Rich » Nicole’s Bridal and Formalwear at Tanforan has poor customer service Ramit has a poor customer service experience. Stuff like this boggles my mind. In business, and in your personal life, BEING NICE pays dividends. Sure it costs more now, but it pays in the long run. (tags: shopping philosophy attitude) » Guest Post: Gradual Frugality on Consumerism Commentary: A Personal Finance Blog Leo offers some advice on…

  • links for 2007-04-03 (5 comments)

    10 Things Your Boss Hates About You | Work | Guardian Unlimited Money As an employer, I especially loathe attendance problems and lying. (tags: work job career business) Does more money bring more happiness? – April 1, 2007 (tags: philosophy happiness)

  • links for 2007-03-31 (1 comment)

    Kids conjure up riches in ‘Fairy Godmother Tycoon’ – USATODAY.com “A hilarious new business simulation.” Actually, anything that gets kids thinking about money and entrepreneurship gets the thumbs up in my book… (tags: games kids entrepreneurship money)

  • Cool Money Tricks (13 comments)

    Several weeks ago, Liz Pulliam Weston at MSN Money pulled together a list of 12 cool money tricks. Some of these have come up here before, but it never hurts to review them. Here are a few of the ideas she shared: The four-penny hack: always carry four pennies with you so you don’t get pennies in change. (This one only works once per shopping trip.) Learn to use online shopping tools like MyBargainBuddy.com and…

  • links for 2007-03-29 (8 comments)

    Cheap but great dates | zen habits I wrote an entry about this subject for Valentine’s Day, but never posted it. Maybe next year. (tags: frugal dating romance frugality cheap) The Simple Dollar » The Simple Dollar Guide To Shaving Trent advocates an old-fashiones safety razor, badger brush, and shaving soap. I have shaving issues, so I’m willing to give this a try. High initial cost, but low residual expenses… (tags: grooming lifehack lifehacks) My…

  • Save Money with Your Feet! (22 comments)

    Tiara wrote with the following money hack: This is aimed at people who generally drive or take public transport to work/university/etc, but who could easily cycle or walk the same distance. Each time you cycle/walk instead of driving/using public transport to your destination, pay yourself the equivalent fare. If it costs you $2 for a bus to the city, for example, and you’ve decided to walk there instead, keep the $2 in a savings box….

  • links for 2007-03-28 (2 comments)

    Your Broker Is Just As Confused As You Are – Consumerist (tags: investing investments) Ask Lifehacker: How do I get started using Quicken? – Lifehacker (tags: quicken software tools howto lifehacks)

  • links for 2007-03-27 (0 comment)

    Being a millionaire just isn’t the same these days – CNN.com “These days, a millionaire is … likely to be the guy or gal next door who saved carefully…” [via several readers -- thanks!] (tags: saving money wealth) With mutual funds, you get what you don’t pay for – MarketWatch “If there’s such a thing as a ‘right’ answer in this squabble, it has almost nothing to do with the funds and virtually everything to…

  • A Simple Budget Spreadsheet (15 comments)

    Wanting to start a budget? Intimidated by all the choices? Just want something simple to get you going? Stephen P. created his own budget spreadsheet, and he’s offered to share it with Get Rich Slowly readers. He writes: I have something for Money Hacks. It’s a simple budget spreadsheet that I made in Excel when I was making $30,000/year and struggling to live paycheck-to-paycheck. It helped me to keep things in perspective. Things you can…

  • links for 2007-03-26 (0 comment)

    » Teaching Kids the Value of a Dollar @ raising4boys.com “I’ve been thinking about ways to teach our kids more about the value of money. We’ve found that it’s far better to give them a bit of real world experience than it is to just talk to them.” (tags: kids money reallife choices values) Online Checking Accounts Offer Higher Yields – News – CNBC.com I’m posting this as a follow-up to our discussion earlier in the week……

  • links for 2007-03-25 (0 comment)

    Can you afford to follow your dreams? Can you afford NOT to? | Wise Bread “This weekend, we decided to give up pursuing the ‘sure thing’ career for him so that he can use his time to develop the speaking/seminars/consulting business he’s always wanted.” (tags: goals priorities choices stories inspiration motivation)

  • Free Book Chapter: ‘Money Day’ (3 comments)

    Last December, Ramit at I Will Teach You to Be Rich produced an eBook called Ramit’s 2007 Guide to Kicking Ass. The book features guest posts from a couple other bloggers, including JLP of All Financial Matters. I contributed an article entitled “Money Day”, in which I encourage readers to take one day off from life to get all of their finances squared away. Ramit has just released this as a free sample chapter, which…

  • links for 2007-03-23 (10 comments)

    Attention: You Cut Your Electric Bill By Almost Half! – Consumerist “Reader Melissa writes in to tell us that using tips from Consumerist and other sites, she cut her (admittedly outrageous) electric bill down to size.” (tags: bills energy conservation housing tips) » Geico Cavemen: The Sitcom on Consumerism Commentary: A Personal Finance Blog “The line between entertainment and advertising is fading…” Everything is an ad. (tags: consumerism entertainment advertising television iamold) Credit Scores –Yes,…

  • links for 2007-03-21 (2 comments)

    Telemarketers – Kill the Calls How to sue telemarketers in small claims court. The author claims that it’s a profitable way to get the calls to stop. (He’s earned ~$6,000 for ~3 hours of work.) (tags: funnymoney revenge consumerism telemarketers) 10 day survival pack for your vehicle for just $25 by Jeffrey Yago, P.E., CEM Issue #104 (tags: emergency survival safety)

  • Save Money on Laundry Day (19 comments)

    At Curbly, the DIY Maven has posted advice on how to save money on laundry day. When the Spray ‘n’ Wash runs out, make your own. If you use dryer sheets, only use half at a time. If you’re shopping, consider a front-loading washer. Pick up a pair of dryer balls. (I’d never even heard of these before reading this.) I confess to having no idea how much it costs to do laundry. My wife…

  • Basic Personal Finance: Shop Around for the Lowest Price (18 comments)

    Tony forwarded an eye-opening post from Stephen J. Dubner at the Freakonomics blog. Most shoppers assume that prices on a given product will be roughly the same from store to store. This is not always the case. Dubner cites research from Cyril Wolf, a Houston doctor who is upset that many generic medications are too expensive for his elderly patients to afford. Wolf began snooping around and found that two chains, Costco and Sam’s Club,…

  • links for 2007-03-19 (1 comment)

    Free Money Finance: How a Bicycle Saved My Life “I’ve probably spent $3,000 on cycling in the past three years. Has it been a good investment? I think so.” (tags: fitness health) How To Build A Treasury Bill Ladder: A Visual Guide » My Money Blog I’ve written about CD ladders before. This is a similar idea. (tags: investing investments finance)

  • links for 2007-03-18 (0 comment)

    Food For Thought – Education Is A Great Economic Leveler at Money, Matter, and More Musings (tags: education income)

  • links for 2007-03-17 (2 comments)

    Nine Steps to Acing a Job Interview (tags: job career work)

  • links for 2007-03-16 (5 comments)

    Ten Ways to Improve Your Quality of Life – lifehack.org (tags: productivity lifestyle happiness health) The American Spectator – The Nation’s Pulse: Terribly Exciting Ben Stein writes: “Here is what’s new and hot and exciting (or terrible) in the world of money today.” It’s not what you think. (tags: economics business philosophy culture poverty benstein)

  • links for 2007-03-15 (2 comments)

    Why Paying down Your Mortgage Is a Bad Idea at Real Estate Mega Book This in response to the GRS question yesterday about whether to save for a down payment or to pay down a HELOC… (tags: realestate house homebuying mortgage choices) Amy Dacyczyn – They Call Me The Frugal Zealot The editor of “The Tightwad Gazette” tells how she cured her love for spending (tags: frugal frugality interviews)

  • links for 2007-03-14 (0 comment)

    The Myths of Starting a Business >> Dumb Little Man (tags: entrepreneurship)

  • Money Hacks Now at Get Rich Slowly (7 comments)

    I believe I’ve switched the Money Hacks RSS feed so that it’s drawing from the new money hacks category at this site. If you’re reading this via the Money Hacks feed, then everything worked. If the money hacks end up being a poor fit at here, they will return to their own site. This is an experiment. I think it’ll work, but who can tell? So far these entries are much lower rated than the…

  • links for 2007-03-13 (0 comment)

    Daily Record – Warren Boroson – Cramer a trader, Buffett investor Interesting comparison of Jim Cramer and Warren Buffett, and the way they approach the stock market. (With a stab at Kim Kiyosaki’s new book near the end.) [thanks, Vintek] (tags: investing investments)

  • Use Your Grocery Receipt as a Cue to Save (5 comments)

    Reader R. McCall forwarded a syndicated piece from Humberto Cruz: “Finding creative ways to save” discusses the importance of building an emergency fund, offers a fun way to do so, and then refers to a contest sponsored by the Consumer Federation. This is a variation on the wife’s favorite money hack, rounding up to the next dollar. That earlier tip didn’t sit well with some readers who thought she was just deceiving herself. (She’s not.)…

  • links for 2007-03-11 (5 comments)

    Baby Cheapskate: Five Rules that can Save You Hundreds on Premium Diapers I know this article probably isn’t useful to many GRS readers, but it could really help those with infants save a lot of money. [via Parent Hacks] (tags: children shopping coupons saving)

  • links for 2007-03-10 (1 comment)

    zen habits: 10 Habits to Develop for Financial Stability and Success Good advice from GRS-reader Leo. (tags: money tips) The Simple Dollar » Why Johnny Can Read: Simpson’s Paradox and the Greatly Exaggerated Death of American Public Education Trent explains why private schools are no better than public schools. Don’t drop $50,000 on a private school education, he says. “The best investment you can make in your child’s education is to be involved.” (tags: education…

  • The Prioritizer: A Unique Personal Finance Calculator (5 comments)

    CNNMoney has a series of articles entitled Money 101 — a step-by-step guide to gaining control of your financial life. There are some good lessons here, including controlling debt, hiring financial help, and buying a home. Each lesson contains several pages of information, links to other resources, a glossary, and a self-test. Many of the lessons also include a financial calculator related to the subject. My favorite lesson is actually the first one, setting priorities,…

  • The Bargainist (3 comments)

    Via the always-wonderful Parent Hacks (which you should be reading if you have small children) comes word of The Bargainist, yet another “web deals” site. From the About page: The Bargainist finds the best deals around on just about everything. From gadgets to home furnishings, you’ll always read about the hottest bargains, sales, coupons, and freebies right here. The Bargainist updates multiple times per day, so stop by often to check out the latest deals….

  • links for 2007-03-08 (2 comments)

    Frugal For Life: 30+ Ways to Save a Dollar a Day (tags: frugal frugality lifehacks) Senators grill bank execs on ‘unfair’ credit card fees – USATODAY.com This is directy related to the MAXED OUT review I posted earlier this week. That film takes aim at high credit card fees. I think they’re merely a symptom, but still any progress is good. (tags: creditcards credit banks economics)

  • links for 2007-03-07 (0 comment)

    Does it pay to be a jerk? | Wise Bread An interesting piece on why it can be profitable to be abrasive. I’m not encouraging anyone to be a jerk. I’m just fascinated by this article. (tags: psychology motivation) I Will Teach You To Be Rich » Chicken Little and Kooks Who Don’t Know What They’re Talking About “We see people confusing global geopolitics with personal finance…” Ramit’s take on the “market is falling” hysteria…

  • links for 2007-03-06 (4 comments)

    To find a path for your career embrace instability » Brazen Careerist “The people who are most adept at dealing with transition are the people who will do best in their career and in their life.” (tags: work career job philosophy) How to Haggle Like a Pro via Lifehacker (tags: shopping money tips) YouTube – My Kids Are Not Walking Advertisements I know that many people feel strongly about this issue. I can see their…

  • links for 2007-03-05 (1 comment)

    Christine Kane – Blog- You Teach People How to Treat You This is not directly related to personal finance-related, but it’s very important. “The biggest risk involved in teaching people how to treat you is the risk that some of them might go away.” (tags: self-improvement self-development success psychology) The Editorialiste: Journalism Internships Are A Joke (Financially). Period. From reader Andrew N.: “Journalism internships are inhumane because they completely ignore the basic living needs of…

  • Are You Ready for Some Money Hacks? (45 comments)

    For the past six weeks, I’ve been running a second personal finance site. Money Hacks offers one short tip most weekdays. I started the site in response to a post at 43 Folders. Merlin wrote: Funny thing — in the last week or so, I’ve gotten email from three different people asking me which site I’d consider to be the ‘43 Folders’ of money management. By this, I think they mean they’re looking for some…

  • links for 2007-03-02 (1 comment)

    Feministe » Help Us Help Ourselves: March 2007 Edition “Help Us Help Ourselves is a project where bloggers contribute their suggestions, advice and tips on how to do anything and everything. There’s an emphasis on saving money, but HUHO can offer help on just about anything” (tags: blog carnivals frugality saving hints tips lifehacks) Mapgirl’s Fiscal Challenge / “Is Style Only for the Upper Class?” (tags: style class)

  • The New Math: Cheap Alternatives to Cable Television (148 comments)

    Here’s one of my dark financial secrets: even as I write about saving money by asking for rate reductions or cancelling services you don’t use, even as I post guest entries about the evils of television, I am paying $65.82 every month for cable TV that I rarely watch. The High Cost of Cable Our cable television bill is $65.82 per month. That’s $789.84/year. Comcast divides these charges as follows: $9.95 for a Digital Classic…

  • links for 2007-02-28 (0 comment)

    Money Smart Life » Payback Time for Payday Loans – Share Your Story and win $50 Ben is taking $50 from a Payday loan advertiser and giving it to a commenter who has lost money to high interest borrowing in the past. Sneaky. DEADLINE IS TODAY. (tags: pfblogs contests) AllFinancialMatters » Blog Archive » Just How Expensive is a Payday Loan? The verdict: VERY EXPENSIVE. (tags: debt loans) Frugal Lunch by Clever Dudette at Clever…

  • links for 2007-02-27 (1 comment)

    Warranties Official FTC site, via Lifehacker. (tags: consumer shopping warranty reference) What Does it Mean to Be Rich? | Money for the Rest of Us “If one of your goals is to ‘get rich,’ I would suggest trying to define what exactly you mean by this.” (tags: wealth values philosophy) How does a busy student turn more coin? | Ask MetaFilter (tags: youngadults work school) How an 8-year-old crafted a simple, winning, ‘lazy’ portfolio –…

  • Sometimes a Cheap Meal is Expensive (20 comments)

    My sister-in-law, Tiffany, called yesterday. “Do you guys want to have lunch at the new Thai place?” she asked. We did. Kris and I are eager to find another cheap restauarant close by. We picked up Tiff and drove to the Thai place, but it wasn’t open. Instead, we walked over to Sully’s, a small diner nearby. The place was full. “It’ll be ten or fifteen minutes,” the hostess told us. We didn’t want to…

  • links for 2007-02-26 (0 comment)

    I don’t want to be Tom Hanks in the Money Pit | Ask MetaFilter “How to hire and work with a contractor on a remodeling project?” (tags: home remodeling) “What do you mean poor people aren’t lazy?” | Ask MetaFilter “Point me toward some interesting statistics, graphics, videos, or other materials about the causes and extent of social inequality in the world or in the US.” (tags: economics poverty philosophy)

  • links for 2007-02-23 (0 comment)

    Getting Finances Done » The Easiest Way to Organize Your Budget (tags: budgets GTD organization money) » Tips for Purchasing a Musical Instrument for the Non-Professional on Consumerism Commentary: A Personal Finance Blog It is one of my life’s regrets that I never pursued music in school. I love music, but can’t sing well, and can only tinkle the piano. (tags: hints tips shopping) Home buying: Buy now? Or wait for prices to drop? –…

  • links for 2007-02-22 (1 comment)

    NPR : Strategies Available to Fight Credit-Card Fees “Credit-card fees have been rising in recent years. But what many people don’t know is that you don’t always have to pay those fees.” [via Vintek] (tags: creditcards fees tips hints) CrazyAuntPurl: Stop Buying Crap: My One Week Progress Report “At the first of the year I made a resolution to stop buying all non-essential stuff for three full months, from January first to April first.” [via…

  • links for 2007-02-21 (1 comment)

    Queercents » Money Mondays: Should You Hire a Tax Pro? Sometimes it’s easy to know if you should seek tax help. Sometimes it’s not. This guide can help you determine what’s right for you. (First of an ongoing series.) (tags: taxes) The Finance Buff: What Happens When a Bank Goes Out of Business (tags: banks) Why work? | Ask MetaFilter “Is it possible to be a well-respected and fulfilled person without having a career?” (tags:…

  • links for 2007-02-20 (2 comments)

    Declutter Your Desk $33.42 (Canadian) to de-clutter a desk? Sounds like a bargain! (tags: DIY GTD productivity lifehacks home howto) The Budget Wino “Wine reviews and tips for the $10 and under crowd.” This site is perfect for me –I find it difficult to spend more than $10 for a bottle of wine. (tags: food wine blog frugal frugality) 10 don’t-miss tax breaks – Feb. 14, 2007 (tags: taxes)

  • How to Organize Your Finances in Four Easy Steps (22 comments)

    You’ve heard that to take control of you finances you sould track every penny you spend. You’d like to try this, but it sounds like such a pain. There’s so much paperwork involved. You lose receipts. You forget when bills are due. It’s hard enough making sure the bare necessities are tackled — who has time to track every penny? I’ve been there. My financial life used to be a mess. Whenever a bill was…

  • links for 2007-02-19 (0 comment)

    Top Five Socially Responsible Investing News Stories of 2006 I get a requests for info on socially-responsible investing. This collection of stories may interest some of you… (tags: investing investments choices SRI) Costco: The ‘anti-Wal-Mart’ – MSN Money “The warehouse-club retailer ‘has figured out the big, simple things’: Hold down expenses and prices, treat employees well, make discount shopping fashionable and keep shareholders happy.” (tags: business shopping values)

  • links for 2007-02-18 (0 comment)

    2blowhards.com: Risk, Reward and the New Class “Society might see a lot more entrepreneurship if it adjusted income taxes for the downside risk associated with a given level of earnings.” More economics than pf, but intereseting. (tags: work employment entrepreneurship taxes philosophy)

  • links for 2007-02-15 (0 comment)

    Credit Cards: can’t live with ‘em A story from a GRS reader who got behind on her credit cards, but then tried to catch up by paying early, but without the intended effect. Funny, but in a sad sort of way. (tags: creditcards debt funnymoney) Cutting through the clutter to get things done – CNN.com A profile of David Allen [via Lifehacker] (tags: GTD productivity interviews)

  • links for 2007-02-14 (2 comments)

    Selling Your Digital Photos – Page1 – MSN Tech & Gadgets – How To One approach at turning a hobby into something that produces income. (tags: photography entrepreneurship howto) Living ‘poor’ and loving it – MSN Money “Your most important money-management tool is your brain. Use it to follow three simple rules that can change your life.” (tags: psychology choices motivation) 10 big deductions too many people miss – MSN Money “If you don’t know…

  • links for 2007-02-12 (0 comment)

    They got older too | Money Magazine Money Magazine “asked the pop icons you grew up with what they’ve learned about money.” [via Consumerism Commentary] (tags: advice funnymoney) Walking Sticks – A Money Making Hobby Here’s an example of the sort of thing a person can do to make a little extra money. (tags: entrepreneurship hobbies)

  • links for 2007-02-11 (3 comments)

    22 Tips for High Self-Esteem at Ririan Project No, it’s not personal finance. But I believe many poor money choices are actually reflections of poor self-esteem. Regardless, this is an excellent collection of ideas. (tags: happiness health motivation productivity self-improvement lifehacks)

  • links for 2007-02-09 (1 comment)

    Quiet, frugal janitor hid his generous heart | Chicago Tribune READ THIS. I don’t advocate this sort of extreme frugality. But I think this is a wonderful story, and frugality is a part of it. I especially like the part about grape soda and chips — nice. (tags: frugality frugal stories values)

  • links for 2007-02-08 (1 comment)

    Tips for an Inexpensive Valentine’s Day (tags: frugality choices money) LED lightbulbs: not ready for primetime | A Whole Lotta Nothing “Maybe in five years or so the technology will mature, but at the moment, save your money and stick with CFL bulbs instead.” (tags: energy choices home) The Sinful Dollar >> Monstrocipe: Ramenloaf The Sinful Dollar is an anonymous parody of personal finance blogs. Some people think it’s mean, but I think it’s hilarious….

  • links for 2007-02-07 (4 comments)

    Getting Rid Of Your Debt Without Worrying About The Latte Factor » Money, Matter, and More Musings This advice is similar to that of Elizabeth Warren: you can make a bigger difference in your finances by cutting back on the big stuff (housing, cars, etc.) than by pinching pennies on small stuff. (tags: philosophy choices money)

  • links for 2007-02-06 (9 comments)

    Don’t rush to pay off that mortgage – MSN Money “A recent study suggests these households blow more than $1.5 billion a year, or $400 per household, by accelerating their mortgage payments.” I don’t know…. (tags: choices housing homebuying mortgage) FrugalVillage.net » Creating a Garden Journal “Planning ahead with a garden journal can save you time and money. Starting a garden journal now will serve as a reference later on what worked well and what…

  • links for 2007-02-04 (1 comment)

    Greek nuns on the run, chased by bad debts – New Zealand’s source for oddstuff “A group of Greek nuns abandoned their convent and went into hiding after running up debts of more than 600,000 euros (396,000 pounds) from a knitting business that went bust.” (tags: debt funnymoney) Consumers Have Allies on the Web – New York Times This article looks at Consumerist and Lifehacker, and also references to Get Rich Slowly. A nice introduction…

  • links for 2007-02-02 (1 comment)

    zen habits: How to Stop Living Paycheck to Paycheck First stop the bleeding, then bind the wounds. Nice piece. (tags: debt money saving minimumwage)

  • 24 Craigslist Tips, Tricks, and Resources (42 comments)

    Yesterday The Consumerist pointed to a couple of Curbly posts about how to buy stuff on Craigslist [one, two]. These articles have some good tips, but I think there’s more to say. My Craigslist experience Cragislist is one of the seven wonders of the internet. You can use it to find a job, buy a car, get a date for Saturday night, and sell that old couch. The site is free to use for almost…

  • links for 2007-02-01 (0 comment)

    Money Blogger Podcast: Rachel Kesel of The Compact interviewed Awesome — Scott finally returns with another personal finance interview. His past podcasts have been excellent, filled with insight into how others work with money. (tags: interviews pfblogs money books) 3-D Model of World Economic Activity This is an interesting look at the distribution of economic activity. Read more about the project here: http://gecon.yale.edu/ (tags: flash economics map reference)

  • links for 2007-01-31 (0 comment)

    Should my wife and I (with drastically different incomes ) file taxes together or seperate? | Ask MetaFilter It’s AskMetafilter Day in the daily links… (tags: taxes tips) RESP…still don’t know what it means for me | Ask MetaFilter “College savings: Does the government care how you spend a college savings plan in Canada?” (tags: college savings planning) Living in a Van | Ask MetaFilter “I want to quit my job and travel around living…

  • links for 2007-01-30 (0 comment)

    Stylehive – Blog: Top 5:  Piggy Banks, Stylish Savings Me? I use a Mason jar. (tags: funnymoney change) Senate targets credit card practices – Jan. 26, 2007 “Restoring small annual fees on cards used by ‘non-revolvers’ would bolster revenues for card issuers, who then in turn might not make life so expensive for those with revolving balances.” (tags: politics creditcards news)

  • links for 2007-01-29 (5 comments)

    Reader Poll: What kind of affluent would you rather be? – Lifehacker Would you rather be rich with time or rich with money? I think an argument can be made that they’re the same thing (“time is money”), but if I had to choose, I’d choose “rich with time”. (tags: philosophy values money) Polls indicate youth value materialistic items more than ever before – Diversions (tags: values consumerism)

  • Reminder: Free Financial Checkup Today (1 comment)

    This is just a reminder that Kiplinger’s Personal Finance is offering a free financial checkup today. You can obtain professional money advice by dialing 888-919-2345 before 6 p.m. Eastern. More details here.

  • links for 2007-01-26 (1 comment)

    Don To Earth A blog written by a 93-year-old-man. There’s more to wealth than money. Health, long life, and happiness are more important, in my book. This is awesome. (tags: history inspiration personal web culture) Mapgirl’s Fiscal Challenge / Unsacrificed Travel “I had the opportunity to travel to Greece in high school. And this is the story about how I found a way to pay for most of it.” (tags: goals travel saving motivation planning)

  • links for 2007-01-25 (2 comments)

    Why Americans love to shoplift meat. – By Brendan I. Koerner – Slate Magazine “Why is meat the most shoplifted item in America?” (tags: funnymoney psychology food) MattHutter.com » Blog Archive » My Experiment With Paying Cash “The banks plow millions of dollars each year each year into television, radio and print advertising in an effort to alter consumer behavior.” (tags: creditcards choices)

  • Free Professional Financial Checkup This Friday (2 comments)

    Whether you’re twenty or sixty, saving for retirement is one of the most important financial steps you can take. The best time to start planning for your future is now. But how can you be sure you’re making the right choices? Here’s an amazing opportunity for readers in the United States. This Friday, January 26th, you can receive free, professional retirement advice by phone courtesy of Kiplinger’s Personal Finance: Get free, personalized answers to your…

  • links for 2007-01-23 (4 comments)

    Money management: It’s never too late to start – Monday Money – MSNBC.com “You’re over 40 and you haven’t started seriously saving for retirement. Despite what you might think, it isn’t too late to get on track.” (tags: retirement saving motivation money) Five Millionaires Tell How They Did It : Yahoo! Finance “Keep your eye on your goal, take calculated risks, and enjoy what you’re doing” (tags: wealth planning success) One Frugal Girl: Three purchases…

  • links for 2007-01-22 (0 comment)

    Gaming the Credit System: Managing Your Finances Part II Partly in response to my recent declaration that I do not use credit cards, GtCS created a guide to using credit cards and using them RESPONSIBLY. This site is worth exploring. (tags: creditcards credit tips) Small Business Free Training and Podcast Library >> Dumb Little Man I don’t write as much about entrepreneurship as I should. It’s one of the best ways to help your finances….

  • links for 2007-01-20 (1 comment)

    10 ways to come up with a down payment (Page 1 of 2) “You’ve found the perfect house. Interest rates are are still low. There’s just one thing standing between you and your dream home: a down payment.” (tags: house homebuying planning saving) Going to the Mattresses  – By Seth Stevenson – Slate Magazine “How to cut through the marketing gimmicks of Sealy, Serta, and the rest” [via Jeff V — he and Vintek send…

  • links for 2007-01-19 (4 comments)

    Carnival of Investing on Martin Luther King Day – The Sun’s Financial Diary I haven’t linked to many carnivals lately because I haven’t been contributing. I’m writing some investment articles, though, so this one caught my eye. (tags: investing investments pfblogs carnivals) Morningstar.com – Your 2007 Personal Finance Calendar This is a nice idea: setting aside a little time each month to tackle individual personal finance chores. (tags: planning personalfinance money gtd)

  • links for 2007-01-17 (0 comment)

    The Dividend Guy Blog – Good Books for New Investors A list of five books DG recommends for new investors. I haven’t read any of them, though I have “Learn to Earn” out from the library. (tags: finances investing investments money books dividends) Young and Broke: Cutting TV costs (tags: frugality tips entertainment) Working poor need cash too! | Ask MetaFilter “My underpaid mother is in serious need of some extra income without quitting her…

  • An Introduction to Get Rich Slowly (0 comment)

    Welcome, new readers! This site has seen an influx of visitors over the past two days, particularly from BoingBoing and StumbleUpon. What can you find here? Get Rich Slowly is devoted to helping you make the most of your money. I write about budgeting, investing, credit cards, debt, and all that boring stuff. But I try to make it fun. Everyone dreams of getting rich quickly — but few people notice the slow, sure path…

  • links for 2007-01-16 (3 comments)

    How Disorganization costs Money – by Dumb Little Man (tags: planning advice money) Online Education Free Whoa — nice. Very nice, indeed. [via Frykitty] (tags: free online education learning reference) Top Gear: James and the impractical classic “If there’s anything wrong with your car – anything – stop what you’re doing and go and sort it out. Now. Same goes for your house. There’s probably a loose doorknob or a damp patch that needs fixing….

  • Custom Movie Listings with RSS (15 comments)

    Kris and I went to see The Queen yesterday at a local second-run movie house. It’s an older theater, and it reminds me of the places we used to go when I was a kid. It’s clean, cozy, and the snacks are reasonably priced. Parking is easy. “Why don’t we come here more often?” I asked after the film. “I don’t know,” she said. “I guess it’s because we never know what’s playing here.” She’s…

  • links for 2007-01-14 (1 comment)

    Network Security Journal: The Fight Against Phishing: 44 Ways to Protect Yourself via lifehacker (tags: scams security) The top 10 advantages of low-rent living “One of the biggest threats to happiness at work is having too many fixed expenses at home.” (tags: renting housing home simplicity choices)

  • links for 2007-01-13 (10 comments)

    PC World – This Blog for Hire “Some bloggers pitch products for pay, often without telling their readers.” My promise to you: Get Rich Slowly will NEVER do this. NEVER. (tags: scams)

  • links for 2007-01-12 (2 comments)

    PC World – Just Cancel the @#%$* Account! “It’s hard to find a Web service that doesn’t offer a free trial. But just try canceling. We did, and the results weren’t always pretty.” (tags: consumerism scams tips internet) Living On A Dime – Free Recipes, Money Saving Tips, Debt Free Living (tags: frugal frugality hints tips)

  • links for 2007-01-11 (1 comment)

    Top 25 Personal Finance Myths (tags: philosophy personalfinance finance) FORTUNE: Warren Buffett: Beware brokers who want your money – Mar. 6, 2006 “In his 2006 letter to Berkshire Hathaway shareholders, Warren Buffett explains how costly it can be to let advisors come between you and your money.” (tags: buffett investing advice) Apple went to great lengths to keep iPhone a secret – Jan. 10, 2007 Okay, I know this isn’t typical GRS fare, but I…

  • links for 2007-01-10 (0 comment)

    Publications Catalog – Federal Reserve System Via my wife. I’ve linked to these before, but they’re still fun: free pamphlets about Federal monetary policy. Fun for everyone! (tags: free economics money politics) More Price Tag Codes Decrypted – Consumerist via a zillion of you folks (tags: shopping lifehacks)

  • links for 2007-01-09 (1 comment)

    50 of the best personal development blogs Similar to my own list of excellent personal development sites. Some good stuff here, though I get the impression the author was cramming to fill the list instead of filtering for quality. (tags: personal self-development productivity lifehacks) If You Don’t ask, You Won’t Receive – by Dumb Little Man *AWESOME* post about something I like to preach: it never hurts to ask. This is an e-mail about how…

  • Carnival of Personal Finance: Financial Superheroes Edition (42 comments)

    Greetings, true believers! Your mission, should you decide to accept it, is to read these exciting tales of adventure from your favorite financial superheroes. Ninety-two people submitted money tales to astonish even the bravest reader. Not all of them survived. Gape as Lulugal faces down the monster of debt! Thrill as the Savvy Steward creates a budget! Tremble as the Money Tortoise explores the mysteries of behavioral finance! Marvel as the Super Saver takes apart…

  • links for 2007-01-08 (1 comment)

    You’ve been approved! | Ask MetaFilter “During the course of the conversation he mentioned he has a credit limit of about eighty grand spread over several cards… Why would I need $80,000 in credit?” (tags: creditcards credit debt) Ways to Make Money – Lessons Learned From Jobs I’ve Done | Art Of Money (tags: job work money) Poll Results: How Do You Budget? – Consumerist (tags: budgets)

  • Win a Free Consultation with a Financial Planner (0 comment)

    Ben from Money Smart Life is holding a contest. He’s offering a one-hour consultation with a certified financial planner, which is the perfect way to kick-start your 2007. I teamed up with a financial planner, Kristine McKinley, to offer professional financial advice to the winner. Buying financial advice for someone else is my charitable contribution to the blogosphere for 2006. She is a great advisor and is giving me a break on the price in…

  • links for 2007-01-06 (1 comment)

    Play 3rd World Farmer Game Online – Arcade Town .com This game evokes personal finance while reminding one to be grateful for having been born in the land of opportunity. Plus it’s a fun game. (tags: culture finance game politics poverty)

  • links for 2007-01-04 (0 comment)

    Real Estate: Is going eco-friendly worth the cost? – January 1, 2007 (tags: choices philosophy environmentalism energy) Late utility bill could jolt credit – 01/03/07 – The Detroit News Online “The late utility payment knocked his all-important credit score down by 100 points — and pushed the interest rate on his new mortgage up.” (tags: credit creditreport bills) WeddingDepot’s Nonresponsive, Passive Aggressive, Customer Service – Consumerist AMAZING tale of short-sighted customer (disservice). The mind boggles….

  • links for 2007-01-03 (0 comment)

    Is it fair to break up with someone over the ‘business side’ of a relationship? (tags: relationships money finances choices psychology)

  • links for 2007-01-02 (0 comment)

    2006 LifeHack Review: Best 50 hacks for your Life – lifehack.org There’s a treasure-trove of personal develoment gems here! (tags: self-development productivity lifehacks gtd tips howto)

  • links for 2006-12-30 (0 comment)

    Frugal For Life: Frugality isn’t Voluntary Poverty (tags: frugality philosophy) Getting Finances Done » Sunday Shopping Circulars Online (tags: advertising shopping saving)

  • links for 2006-12-29 (0 comment)

    mileage vs. age in used cars | Ask MetaFilter “All other things being equal, do I pick the older car with lower mileage or the later model with high mileage?” (tags: cars shopping choices)

  • links for 2006-12-28 (0 comment)

    How do you stop feeling guilty for having what you have? | Ask MetaFilter “How do you justify how much to spend on yourself when there are so many out there without? And, how much should you give to charity?” (tags: charity philosophy choices money) The Home Energy Saver A web-based do-it-yourself energy audit tool. [via Consumerist and Curbly] (tags: house energy tools) Is there any benefit to keeping a checking account open? | Ask…

  • How To Protect Yourself From Lifestyle Inflation (37 comments)

    Jonathan at My Money Blog has been writing about personal finance for two years now. Here’s some excellent advice on the standard-of-living trap. One thing I worry about is lifestyle inflation. No matter how little or how much someone earns, their spending tends to match their income. When you’re living the student life, your friends are also broke, and it’s easy to eat frozen pizza for dinner and manage without a car. That was probably…

  • links for 2006-12-27 (4 comments)

    Bank Of America To Charge For “Free” Checking – Consumerist This kind of stuff makes me very, very angry. (tags: banks baitandswitch fees) Q: How can she afford health insurance? – USATODAY.com (tags: youngadults money insurance)

  • Learn to Save by Taxing Yourself (11 comments)

    Vincent forwarded a link to a guide about how to buy nothing, which offers seventeen steps for resisting the urge to splurge. It’s a good list of techniques to reduce spending — leave the money at home, stick to a budget, buy quality — but what caught Vincent’s eye is the last trick in the list: Tax yourself. Every time you make a purchase over $10 (or $50, or whatever limit you choose), take 10%…

  • Money and Values: Shopping Locally (22 comments)

    There’s more to personal finance than raw numbers. If everyone based their personal finance decisions solely on the math, there would be no need for personal finance books. (Or personal finance blogs, for that matter.) We’d all be rich. In reality, our money decisions are influenced by psychology, by emotion, and especially by personal values. For every financial transaction, we each weigh a variety of personal values to arrive at a choice that makes sense…

  • links for 2006-12-21 (0 comment)

    Chicago Tribune news: Lifestyles of the rich don’t necessarily make them famous This article does a better job at summarizing the findings in The Millionaire Next Door than my review did. (I failed to convey the main point.) [Thanks, Vintek!] (tags: millionaires wealth lifestyles reallife) Anti-Shopping Evangelist Hits East Village, Finds Willing Converts (if Briefly) – New York Magazine’s Daily Intelligencer I was going to make a blog entry out of this, but haven’t found…

  • links for 2006-12-20 (2 comments)

    Paycheck to paycheck: Make your dollars stretch further – Dec. 14, 2006 “The Schuetts have an enviable income. So why are they having a hard time making ends meet?” [Thanks, Tim!] (tags: money debt choices lifestyles) altvoices.org – Maxed Out Youth “The Taiwanese government, media, retailers and banks all encourage young people to spend beyond their means. Now rampant consumerism is also creating serious problems.” [Thanks, Su Yin!] (tags: consumerism debt) Q: ‘Buried’ in debt,…

  • links for 2006-12-18 (1 comment)

    Businesspundit: How To Network: For Introverts Networking gets a bad rap. In reality, it’s a key tool for building lasting reciprocal relationships. Seriously. If you practice networking, you’re building a lifetime support network. (tags: career networking business productivity self-development) Serious Eats: Are Expensive Pans Necessarily Better? “Given the price differential ($9.99 for Crestware, $39.95 for All-Clad), Crestware delivered a nicely cooked egg…but Crestware was outclassed in this battle by All-Clad.” (tags: food cooking frugality choices)…

  • links for 2006-12-14 (0 comment)

    Should I pay off my mortgage early? | Ask MetaFilter (tags: homebuying housing mortgage windfall) Making a Financial Turnaround (tags: money goals motivation) Craigslist Meets the Capitalists – New York Times (tags: craigslist capitalism business philosophy)

  • links for 2006-12-13 (2 comments)

    digg – Mac “Quicken-Killer” Receives Impressive GUI Update The dugg “quicken-killer” is apparently no good, but the comments at digg itself provide lots of info on Mac personal finance software. Strange, but true. Read the comments. Don’t follow the link. [via Russell] (tags: software tools)

  • links for 2006-12-12 (2 comments)

    Young and In Debt: USATODAY.com Chat Transcript via Kristina: Chat transcript with Abby Wilners, author of Quarterlife Crisis. She offers advice to young people just out of school, or just starting out in life. (tags: studentloans interviews twentysomethings)

  • links for 2006-12-11 (4 comments)

    VerizonMath Amberlynn wrote to share this gem, which has been making the rounds of the internet. What happens when a big corporation can’t tell dollars from cents? This reminds me of fast food places that post prices of .99 cents for their burgers. Think they’ll really sell you a sandwich for a penny? (tags: funnymoney existentialcomedynightmare) instructables : Homemade instant oatmeal This is a dirt-cheap way to create healthy customized oatmeal. I’m on a low-sugar…

  • links for 2006-12-09 (6 comments)

    Michelle Singletary – It Pays to Do the Math In the Budget Game – washingtonpost.com (tags: budgets money planning)

  • Reminder: Enter the Get-Rich-Slowly Holiday Tips Contest (6 comments)

    What are your favorite ways to save money during the holidays? Check out the amazing frugal Christmas savings spectacular for your chance to win one of two subscriptions to Kiplinger’s Personal Finance magazine. Sunday night I will select my two favorite tips from the comments to that entry. (Kris has informed me that she will be helping me choose the winners.) The winners will each receive a one-year subscription to Kiplinger’s Personal Finance. (You’ll need…

  • links for 2006-12-08 (0 comment)

    Building a home power-monitoring system GRS-reader Christopher writes: “if you like the Kill-A-Watt idea you will love this. Granted a bit overkill be pretty cool none the less.” I’ll say! (tags: DIY energy howto power electrical hacks) What’s the least manipulative stable credit card company? | Ask MetaFilter I *still* don’t like credit cards, but some of you may find this useful (tags: creditcards credit money choices) Making Money Consciously Advice from Steve Pavlina on…

  • links for 2006-12-06 (0 comment)

    Top 25 Web 2.0 Apps for Money, Finance, and Investment I’ve been meaning to put together an entry similar to this. Now I can wait til next year! (tags: web software personalfinance) Ask the Readers: Get your dream job? – Lifehacker (tags: work career planning)

  • Ramit’s Guide to Kicking Ass (4 comments)

    Ramit of I Will Teach You to Be Rich has just published his first ebook: Ramit’s 2007 Guide to Kicking Ass. This little gem features six original essays from Ramit and four from guest authors. (I contributed a piece called “Money Day”, of which I’m rather proud.) The book’s contents include: Who Has the Most Frugal Family? — Crazy stories of extreme frugality. The Key to Running a Great Project — It’s all about momentum….

  • Ask the Readers: Non-U.S. Personal Finance Sites? (27 comments)

    Chris writes with a great question: I am an avid reader of [your site] for a long time now! Since I will start my first full-time job in about four months, I am interested in an investing strategy, especially in retirement funds. You wrote about it before, but of course with the focus for the situation in the U.S. That is why I am looking for other personal finance blogs from Germany. Do you know…

  • links for 2006-12-05 (0 comment)

    Save money with reciprocal museum memberships: Parent Hacks Simple tip to save money while on vacation. (tags: vacation saving) AllFinancialMatters » How The Dow Jones Industrial Average is Calculated Something I’ve always wondered. (tags: stocks investments)

  • Wesabe: a Web-Based Personal Finance Tool (26 comments)

    There’s a fantastic new tool available for those who want to track their spending. Wesabe went public yesterday. Our site is live and available for everyone to use. We set out to build a tool to help people gain control over their money, and we believe we have accomplished our goal. It isn’t perfect and we have a ton of features we want to add, but this product helps people right now. Wesabe is a…

  • Track Your Spending with a Cash Notebook (25 comments)

    I had dinner with my friend TJ tonight. He paid for his meal with cash. After we’d settled the check, he pulled out a small spiral notebook and jotted down some numbers. “What’s that?” I asked. “I’ve started using a notebook to keep track of what I spend,” he told me. “Whenever I pay in cash, I write it down. Otherwise I don’t have any idea where it goes.” “That’s a great idea,” I said….

  • Sniping is the Best Way to Win on eBay (3 comments)

    According to mathematicians, “the best way to win an online auction is to wait until the very last moment before making a bid in the hope no one else will have time to respond.”

  • Absurdly Cool Freebie Finder (3 comments)

    The absurdly cool freebie finder is: …an automated free stuff aggregator. I’ve designed it to collect free stuff offers from top freebie sites, while filtering out most scams and referral pyramids. This site is in beta, and so your suggestions are always welcome. Listed below are the most recent offers found, with their sources to the right. Remember to bookmark the site, it updates every few hours! Please only request freebies you actually need and…

  • My eBay Method: 13 Steps to Profitable Auctions (73 comments)

    A few weeks ago I linked to Stephen Smith’s guide to selling stuff on eBay. Today I’ll share some tips of my own. In February I sold $1500 of geek goods to raise money so that I could make accelerated debt payments. My auctions consistently fetched more money than concurrent auctions for similar items. Something about my method works. I recommend the following steps: Research the hell out of each item you post. Dig through…

  • Ten Garage Sale Tips (17 comments)

    We’re in the midst of the annual neighborhood garage sale, which makes it difficult to find time to post. I have drawn up some garage sale tips, though. This isn’t everything you need to know, but it’s a start: A group sale is better than selling alone. If you can coordinate a weekend with your neighbors, you will draw more traffic. Our street has a sale every May. My neighbor Al places an ad in…

  • Leave Your ATM Card at Home (2 comments)

    Liz Pulliam Weston suggests that you may want to consider using cash instead of a debit card. Weston admits that debit cards offer plenty of advantages, including: They’re convenient. They’re easier to track. They may offer some protection. They may offer some rewards. Despite these advantages, she suggests that it may be better to move to a cash-only system. It’s just too easy to overspend with a debit card. She cites one family that uses…

  • Missing Money (0 comment)

    Missing Money is a database of state unclaimed property records. Common types of unclaimed property include: Bank accounts and safe deposit box contents Stocks, mutual funds, bonds, and dividends Uncashed checks and wages Insurance policies, CD’s, trust funds Utility deposits, escrow accounts Unclaimed property does not include real estate property There are other tools to find unclaimed real estate property.