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Taxes


  • Ask the readers: Should we get married sooner to lower our taxes? (61 comments)

    This article is by editor Linda Vergon. Landen and his fiancé are planning to get married in the fall of 2015 and they’re starting to think about how to blend their financial lives together as they tie the knot. There are always a lot of decisions to make when you get married: Will you keep your finances separate or merge them together? Will you add each other onto your existing bank accounts or close them…

  • How I paid less in property taxes (17 comments)

    This article is by staff writer April Dykman. Today I present the second and final installment of my property tax saga — the informal hearing. (You can check out the first post here.) To briefly recap, I’m a new homeowner and my assessed property value shot up by 31 percent from last year. So that, along with the fact that I have a tax-protesting father to please, landed me in County Appraiser Brad’s cubicle for an…

  • Homeowners: Could this save you thousands in just a few hours? (32 comments)

    This article is by staff writer April Dykman. You know all those great tactics to save huge chunks of cash — the tactics that don’t require you to scrimp and save? I’m talking about things like lowering the APR on your credit card or getting a better deal on your car insurance — paying less for the stuff that’s kind of a drag to pay for in the first place. Well, as a new homeowner, I’ve…

  • Ask the Readers: 5 questions about your taxes (55 comments)

    It’s that dreaded time of year, but we all must face it. So let’s talk about taxes today. I’ve got some questions (and offer my answers). 1)      Do you get a refund or max out your withholding? A recent Moneyrates.com survey found that 31 percent of the 2,000 people surveyed prefer to get a refund. I confess – I get a refund every year. If you want to stop the refund madness for tax year…

  • 7 year-end tax tips to keep Uncle Sam out of your wallet (26 comments)

    This article is a guest post from Maryalene LaPonsie. Maryalene has been writing professionally for more than a decade on a variety of subjects including life insurance and personal finance. She helps consumers navigate topics such as creating budgets, using credit wisely and protecting income and assets by making smart insurance choices. Prior to her current assignments, Maryalene worked for 13 years as a staff member in the Michigan Legislature and has served as a…

  • Taxes: Don’t rush it (62 comments)

    I was really excited about filing my taxes this year. For once, I wasn’t really in need of any pricey things for the house (though I have plenty of wants. Hello, wood stove!), and was rubbing my hands together with the thought of the emergency savings fund I’d soon have in the bank account! Thanks to my husband’s tax-free military pay, and my lowish freelance income when he’s overseas and full-time caring for the boys,…

  • Tax prep costs: What’s it worth to you? (34 comments)

    This is a guest post from Richard Barrington, the senior financial analyst at our sister site MoneyRates.com. Richard has earned the CFA designation and is a 20-year veteran of the financial industry, including having previously served for more than a dozen years as a member of the Executive Committee of Manning & Napier Advisors, Inc. Richard has written extensively on investment and personal finance topics. Previously at GRS, he shared how to find the right…

  • Reader story: Tax-efficient charitable giving (15 comments)

    This is a guest post from LD, a practicing Certified Public Accountant and Certified Financial Planner who blogs about personal finance at Personal Finance Insider. Some reader stories contain general advice; others are examples of how a GRS reader achieved financial success or failure. These stories feature folks with all levels of financial maturity and income. Want to submit your own reader story? Here’s how. Generosity is exactly this: to give that which is dearest…

  • Ask the Readers: How Much Do You Spend on Charitable Giving? (220 comments)

    The deeper I get into the third stage of personal finance, the more I think about my responsibilities to help others who are in need. For years, Get Rich Slowly readers have been encouraging me to contribute to charity, but I’ve always been reluctant to do so. This wasn’t part of my family culture as a boy (we were the ones in need), so it’s been a struggle to come to terms with it as…

  • Dollar Coins: Or, In Other Words, a New Tax (155 comments)

    This post is by staff writer Sarah Gilbert. “You need 75 more cents!” the woman at our favorite burger joint, Little Big Burger, said brightly after I sent my 9-year-old to order another serving of truffle oil fries with all the change I could find in my bag. Thankfully, I knew I’d sent enough money: I’d stashed a dollar coin in my bag, saving the Abraham Lincoln because, well, Lincoln. These fries were just good…

  • Prepare for the Tax Preparer to Save Money (48 comments)

    This post is from staff writer April Dykman. Tax Day falls on my birthday. This year, I’m giving myself the gift of a tax preparer. Last year, in the days leading up to The Big Day, I locked myself in the home office. I emerged bleary-eyed from staring at a computer screen and mentally exhausted from climbing my way through an avalanche of paperwork and receipts. I also was hopped up on caffeine and paranoid…

  • Tax Prep Tips: Is Cheaper Always Better? (86 comments)

    This is a guest post from Richard Barrington, who has earned the CFA designation and is a 20-year veteran of the financial industry, including having previously served for more than a dozen years as a member of the Executive Committee of Manning & Napier Advisors, Inc. Richard has written extensively on investment and personal finance topics. Previously at GRS, he shared how to find the right CD or money-market account, tips for sound saving and…

  • Reader Story: I Fought the Law (and the Law Won) (84 comments)

    This guest post from Brooklyn Money is part of the “reader stories” feature at Get Rich Slowly. Some stories contain general advice; others are examples of how a GRS reader achieved financial success or failure. These stories feature folks from all levels of financial maturity and with all sorts of incomes. One fine evening late last summer, I came home from a lovely dinner with friends to find a large envelope stuffed into my mailbox….

  • How to Spend a Tax Refund (126 comments)

    This post is from staff writer Sarah Gilbert. For the past two years doing taxes has not been bearable: it’s been terrific! I’ve used an online e-filing service for several years now after many years of taking great pleasure — really! — in filling out the paper forms, just because it gets the money to me far more quickly. Last January I began to fill out the online forms and, at some point, started glancing…

  • Getting The Most From Your Charitable Deductions (35 comments)

    This post is from staff writer Sierra Black. Sierra writes about frugality, sustainable living, and raising children at Childwild.com. Charitable deductions can be a complex and confusing area of your tax return. Understanding what you can deduct and what you can’t deduct can be confusing. Documenting it properly adds yet another layer of difficulty. To help sort it all out, I talked to Kelly Erb, (a.k.a. Taxgirl), and Kay Bell (of Don’t Mess With Taxes)….

  • Tax Tips for the Freelancer (24 comments)

    This post is from staff writer April Dykman. If you’re one of the many freelancers and small-business owners who wait until the last minute to file your taxes, there’s good news in 2011: Tax Day is April 18 this year, which gives you three extra days. Ready for the bad news? That’s less than a month away. I can understand the reluctance to get going. I had most of my documents in one file, but…

  • Tax Prep Costs: How Much Will It Cost to Get Your Taxes Done? (80 comments)
  • A Quick and Easy Way to Check the Status of Your Tax Refund (17 comments)

    This morning I posted my annual review of the Consumer Reports auto issue. Now might be a good time to publish another annual reminder: It’s tax refund season! If you have a refund due this year and you’re getting antsy for it, you can check its status easily with this simple web-based tool from the IRS web site. You’ll need to provide your social security number, marital status, and exact refund amount in order for…

  • The Truth About Tax Deductions (38 comments)

    This is a guest post from GRS reader Greg Braun, a Certified Public Accountant from Nampa, Idaho. Nobody likes to pay taxes. And I think we all get a little kick out of finding ways to save on our tax bill. We smile when we find a deduction we’d been missing. Maybe we think it’s a great deal because we’re sticking it to the man. Maybe the tax deduction tricks us into thinking we’re getting…

  • How to “Cheat” on Your Taxes — Legally (46 comments)

    This is a Guest Post by Richard Close. As a former IRS Revenue Officer, Richard “stole” $10 Million for the IRS. Now he works to help American taxpayers. Richard writes IRS news and updates daily on his website, The IRS Hitman. You can find answers to common tax questions in his knowledge vault. Ah, tax season. That time of year where people grouse about the greedy government. Some folks are so in need that they…

  • Use FreeFile to File Your Tax Return for Free (32 comments)

    Tax season is in full swing, and again this year, the Internal Revenue Service is offering a program that allows many U.S. taxpayers to electronically file their tax returns for free: The Free File program provides free federal income tax preparation and electronic filing for eligible taxpayers through a partnership between the Internal Revenue Service and the Free File Alliance LLC, a group of private sector tax software companies. Many companies offer free or paid…

  • The Tax Protestor FAQ (53 comments)

    Every so often (especially this time of year), someone writes to let me in on a secret. “J.D., did you know you don’t have to pay income taxes?” they’ll say. “It’s true! Income tax is illegal!” I’ve never known how to respond to these folks. Now, I can just point them to the Tax Protester FAQ. This comprehensive collection of tax protester fallacies was put together by Pennsylvania attorney Daniel B. Evans. Evans says that…

  • 2011 Death and Taxes Poster Now Available (22 comments)

    In my posts last summer about understanding the federal budget and the truth about taxes, I pointed to Jess Bachman’s Death and Taxes poster. This monster 24-inch by 36-inch graph shows you just how the government spends your tax money. From the site: “Death and Taxes” is a large representational graph and poster of the federal budget. It contains over 500 programs and departments and almost every program that receives over 200 million dollars annually….

  • How To Check Your Federal IRS Tax Refund Status (44 comments)

    For years, I loved to get a tax refund. In fact, it seemed the only way I could save was by having extra withheld from my paycheck so that I’d get a big refund at the end of the year. Using this method, I was able to buy a new computer, a new bike, and all sorts of other toys. (But, of course, I was never smart enough to use the money to pay down…

  • A Fast, Free Way to File Your Federal Income Taxes (23 comments)

    Tax season is in full swing, and again this year, the Internal Revenue Service is offering a program that allows many U.S. taxpayers to electronically file their tax returns for free: The Free File program provides free federal income tax preparation and electronic filing for eligible taxpayers through a partnership between the Internal Revenue Service and the Free File Alliance LLC, a group of private sector tax software companies. Many companies offer free or paid…

  • Where Your Money Goes: An Interactive Tax Calculator (28 comments)

    Last August, in the midst of a growing debate about taxes in the United States, I decided I’d had enough. I was sick and tired of the histrionics from both sides of the political fence, and I wanted to find the facts. I spent twelve hours researching the federal budget and the U.S. tax system, and in the end wrote two articles: Understanding the federal budget The truth about taxes I didn’t have any political…

  • Energy-Efficiency Tax Credits Could Be Your Personal Government-Bailout Package (38 comments)

    David Kaplan wrote with the following: “A lot of personal finance blogs cover the same material. I’d like to see some quality content on the value added by investing in energy efficiencies. My prime interest is in windows/insulation and other items eligible under the current tax credit, perhaps you can consider several options.” Since I’m not an expert in windows, insulation, or energy tax credits, I asked around and received the following. This is a…

  • The Truth About Taxes (229 comments)

    Note: Although I try to keep GRS a politics-free zone, today’s topic is inherently political. I’ve stayed as neutral as possible in the article, but I know that there’ll be some political discussion in the comments. Please keep conversation civil, as always. Because I was frustrated with my own ignorance about the U.S. federal budget and our tax system, I recently spent twelve hours researching a variety of tax topics. From my research came two…

  • Understanding the Federal Budget (141 comments)

    Note: Although I try to keep GRS a politics-free zone, today’s topic is inherently political. I’ve stayed as neutral as possible in the article, but I know that there’ll be some political discussion in the comments. Please keep conversation civil, as always. Recently at The Simple Dollar, Trent posed the question, “How much do taxes matter to you?” As might be expected, his readers responded with passionate comments from both sides of the political spectrum….

  • How Marginal Tax Rates Work (95 comments)

    Yesterday I hosted a guest article about the mortagage-interest tax deduction. As part of his argument that this tax break should not be used to justify buying a house, CJ from Wise Money Matters looked at the savings by tax brackets. What CJ did not consider (and what escaped my notice, and even that of my accountant) was the concept of marginal tax rates. Although I was mortified to have let such a blatant error…

  • Why You Shouldn’t Keep a Mortgage Just for the Tax Deduction (107 comments)

    This is a guest post from CJ at WiseMoneyMatters.com. This post represents CJ’s viewpoints, which are not necessarily my viewpoints. (Although I, too, hope to pay off my mortgage early.) Note: This is embarrassing. I don’t think I’ve ever had a post with an error like this slip by me before. I apologize. I’ve removed the offending section, not out of any attempt at revisionism, but out of interest in accuracy. Please let me know…

  • Stand Up to the IRS: Free Guide to Tax Audits (and More!) (5 comments)

    After yesterday’s post about taxes, author Fred Daily wrote to point out a free tax resource that he’s posted online. Daily is a tax attorney, and a long-time subscriber to this site. He’s also the author of Stand Up to the IRS and Tax Savvy for Small Business. In an interesting move, Daily has placed the entire content of Stand Up to the IRS online for free. This isn’t a general-interest tax publication — it’s…

  • Top 10 Tips for Preparing Your Tax Return (and Tax Software Giveaway!) (164 comments)

    Tax season is in full swing. Readers are peppering me with questions, and marketers are forwarding promotional material for their products. This seems like a good time to meld the two opposing forces into a single post! Tips for preparing your tax return First up, Roni Deutch, CEO of the nation’s largest tax-resolution law firm, sent me a copy of her new book, The Tax Lady’s Guide to Beating the IRS and Saving Big Bucks…

  • What Tax Season Taught Me About Personal Finance (29 comments)

    This is a guest post from Tara Young. This winter marks my fourth season as a volunteer tax preparer under the Volunteer Income Tax Assistance Program, which provides free tax preparation services for lower income and elderly taxpayers. The experience has been quite rewarding, and I’ve learned more about U.S. personal income taxes than I ever imagined existed — or wanted to know. After completing several hundred returns, the following recurring themes resonate with me…

  • Bankrate’s 2009 Tax Guide (42 comments)

    It’s tax season! I’m a little late getting around to my own taxes this year — I’ve had other things to worry about. One of my goals for this weekend is to begin rounding up all of the necessary documents. And, as usual, one of my first stops for information will be the Bankrate Tax Guide. Every year, they offer the following resources: Tax calendar — “April 15 isn’t the only important day for taxes….

  • Tax-Loss Harvesting: How to Use the Market Downturn to Save on Taxes This Year (26 comments)

    J.D. is on vacation. This is a guest post from Linden Cornett. Linden is a Portland-area professional with an interest in finance. The stock market is down this year, and many people have asked me if I’ve made any changes to my investments as a result. My general strategy is to buy-hold-rebalance my stock and bond investments, so I’ve mainly used this downturn as an opportunity to buy stocks at bargain prices. There is one…

  • The First-Time Homebuyer Tax Credit (68 comments)

    First-time home buyers are now eligible for a tax credit of up to $7,500 under the U.S. Housing and Economic Recover Act of 2008. To qualify for the tax credit, purchasers must close on a home between 09 April 2008 and 01 July 2009. Married couples with incomes up to $150,000 qualify for the full tax credit, as do single taxpayers with incomes below $75,000. (Those with higher incomes may be eligible for a partial…

  • Check the Status of Your Tax Refund (10 comments)

    It’s tax refund season! If you have a refund due this year and you’re getting antsy for it, you can check its status easily with this simple web-based tool from the IRS web site. You’ll need to provide your social security number, marital status, and exact refund amount in order for your request to be processed. If you are receiving a large refund, consider having your employer adjust your W-4 so that less is withheld…

  • Free File: A Fast, Easy Way to File Your Federal Income Taxes (19 comments)

    Tax season is in full swing! Again this year, the Internal Revenue Service is offering a program that allows many U.S. taxpayers to electronically file their tax returns for free. Free File is a free federal income tax preparation and electronic filing program for eligible taxpayers, developed through a partnership between the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) and the Free File Alliance LLC, a group of private sector tax software companies. You may access free commercial…

  • Mr. Lawyer and Mr. Accountant Chat About Taxes (38 comments)

    On Friday, I stopped by the office of my friend, Mr. Accountant. Another friend, Mr. Lawyer, was there, and the three of us fell into conversation. “How’s the web site going,” asked Mr. Accountant. “Good,” I said. “But I’m stuck on something. Maybe you can help. On Monday, I’m supposed to share my best piece of tax advice. I don’t have a best piece of tax advice. I don’t know much about taxes at all….

  • Calculate Your Economic Stimulus Tax Rebate (62 comments)

    President Bush has signed the economic stimulus package into law. This plan provides tax breaks to businesses that invest in capital equipment, temporarily allows larger mortgages through the Federal Housing Administration (and related entities), and provides a personal income tax cut for 2008. Instead of passing this on when we file taxes next year, the IRS will mail a tax rebate check to most Americans this summer. This is an advance on the reduced taxes…

  • Bankrate’s 2008 Tax Guide (0 comment)

    Tax season is upon us. Get Rich Slowly still doesn’t have a body of tax articles, but Bankrate does. Every year, they offer the following resources: Tax calendar — “April 15 isn’t the only important day for taxes. Our tax calendar provides you with many others to circle.” Daily tax tip — “The daily tax tip plus an array of tax tools, terms and training will help you through filing and beyond.” Filing and refunds…

  • Ask the Readers: Should I Prepare My Own Taxes or Go to an Accountant? (90 comments)

    Earlier this month, I mentioned that I haven’t prepared my own taxes since 2001. I pay somebody else to do them. I did them on my own for fourteen years before they became too much for me to handle. This comment prompted several GRS readers to write for advice about finding a good accountant. Here’s an amalgamation of recent questions: I’ve never looked into having an accountant prepare my return — what’s reasonable to pay…

  • A Brief Overview of the Alternative Minimum Tax (34 comments)

    It’s the time of year to start talking about taxes. I used to do my own taxes, but it was always a frustrating experience. Eventually I learned that by paying somebody else to do them, I was actually saving money. Because my accountant actually knows what he’s doing, he gets all the deductions I’m entitled to. This year, I’ve heard a lot of talk about the Alternative Minimum Tax (or AMT). Every time I begin…

  • How to Check the Status of Your Tax Refund (5 comments)

    Are you getting antsy for your tax refund? You can check the status of your refund easily with this simple web-based tool from the IRS web site. You’ll need to provide your social security number, marital status, and exact refund amount in order for your request to be processed. If you are receiving a large refund, consider having your employer adjust your W-4 so that less is withheld from your paycheck. This will, in essence,…

  • Last Minute Tax Tips (15 comments)

    Because I love a big tax refund, I filed my return long ago, received the money, and used it to pay down debt. But like many people, my cousin Nick hasn’t even started. He doesn’t get a refund, so he waits until April to do his taxes. He’s been skulking around the office for the past week muttering, “I need to start my taxes,” and, “You should write an entry reminding people to start their…

  • Free Online Tax Preparation and E-Filing From the IRS (14 comments)

    The Internal Revenue Service offers a program that allows two-thirds of U.S. taxpayers to electronically file their tax returns for free. The Free File program is a free federal tax preparation and electronic filing program for eligible taxpayers developed through a partnership between the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) and the Free File Alliance LLC, a group of private sector tax software companies. Since Free File’s debut in 2003, more than 15.4 million returns have been…

  • Save or Spend? The Tax Refund Dilemma (1 comment)

    Chris at Money Management International — the largest non-profit credit counseling and debt management organization in the U.S. — dropped a line yesterday. He saw my story about tax refunds and wanted to remind me of a new MMI site devoted to the subject: We just released a new tax-themed site, SaveorSpend.com. While it has several cool interactive elements (savings calculator, a mind reading game, blog, etc.) the coolest thing is the ability for visitors…

  • Telephone Excise Tax Refund (4 comments)

    Here’s a quick way to get a few extra bucks. Or, more precisely, to get back a few bucks you’ve already lost. This year the IRS is granting a one-time only Telephone Excise Tax Refund. This refund will return previously collected telephone taxes collected since 2003. According to the IRS web site: [Individual] taxpayers have a choice: a standard refund amount between $30 and $60, based on the total number of exemptions claimed on their…

  • A Contrarian View: Why I Love a Huge Tax Refund (63 comments)

    Kris and I received $2789 in tax refunds this year. Already I can hear the sound of hundreds of heads thumping against hundreds of desks. Many of you are wailing, “Why?! Why?! Why?!” Of all the financial choices a person can make, getting a large refund is universally considered one of the dumbest. Magazines advise against it. Books advise against it. Blogs advise against it. Yet every year, millions of Americans like me use their…

  • Ten Red-Flags That Lead to IRS Audits (33 comments)

    The latest issue of Money magazine has an article by Donna Rosato on how to file a tax return that won’t raise red flags with the IRS. Rosato writes: Some 12 percent of people admit they think it’s acceptable to cheat on their taxes. No wonder IRS Commissioner Mark Everson has made it his top priority to go after those who shortchange the government. These few bad seeds can spell trouble for you, even if…

  • Original Income Tax Form from 1913 (8 comments)

    In 1913, Wyoming ratified the 16th Amendment, providing the three-quarter majority of states necessary to amend the Constitution. The 16th Amendment gave Congress the authority to enact an income tax. That same year, the first Form 1040 appeared after Congress levied a 1 percent tax on net personal incomes above $3,000 with a 6 percent surtax on incomes of more than $500,000. — A Brief History of the IRS It’s February. Tax season is in…

  • Taxpayer Panic: What To Do If You Can’t Pay Uncle Sam (4 comments)

    Here’s a guest post from Brian Brown, C.P.A. He offers advice on what to do if you find you can’t pay your taxes. With enthusiasm and boldness, you head into 2007 with hopes of greater discipline in spending, saving and investing. However, much to your dismay, the first part of 2007 brings the inevitable day of reconciliation with Uncle Sam in the form of filing your annual 1040 tax return. Perhaps your situation worsens further…

  • Bankrate’s 2007 Tax Guide (3 comments)

    Tax season is upon us. Get Rich Slowly doesn’t have a body of tax articles yet, but Bankrate does. Bankrate offers the following resources: Tax calendar — “Think April 16 is the only date that matters? Bankrate’s tax calendar informs you of other important deadlines.” Tax news to use — “A tax tip a day will help keep the IRS away. You’ll find them here, along with lots of good advice on all aspects of…

  • Which Financial Records to Keep (and How Long to Keep Them) (35 comments)

    An AskMetafilter user wonders how long to keep receipts: I have been keeping all of my receipts for some time now. Every day, I enter them into my money tracking system (presently just a text file where I capture date, payee and amount). Then I file the receipts away in folders by month. My question: does it do me any good to save the receipts, or is having the data good enough? [...] I’ve never…

  • The 9 Strangest Tax Write-Offs (4 comments)

    MSN MoneyCentral has a list of somestrange tax write-offs that people have claimed over the years. For example, there’s the disc jockey who claimed his dog as a dependent. Dogs (and cats) may require as much attention as kids sometimes, but they’re not a legal deduction. Then there’s this one: [A client] approached Manhattan CPA Marc Albaum about a very personal tax matter. “He had made some money being a sperm donor and wanted to…

  • The Home Office Tax Deduction (0 comment)

    The home office tax deduction — useful information for those with a small home business [via Andrea]

  • Priciest Places to Smoke and Drive (3 comments)

    CNNMoney has posted a list of the priciest places to smoke and drive. According the list, compiled by CCH (a tax-services firm), the top five cigarette taxes by state can be found in Rhode Island ($2.46/pack), New Jersey ($2.40), Washington ($2.025), Maine ($2.00), and Alaska ($1.80). The top five gas taxes by state are in Washington (34.0 cents/gallon), Pennsylvania (31.2 cents), Wisconsin (30.9 cents), Rhode Island (30.0 cents), and North Carolina (29.9 cents). It’s cheaper…

  • Long-Distance Phone Tax Repealed (0 comment)

    Here’s a piece of news that’s odd but good. The U.S. Treasury Department on Thursday conceded a legal dispute over the 3 percent federal excise tax on long-distance telephone service and said $13 billion would be refunded to taxpayers. One-hundred-six years ago, in 1898, the U.S. Congress implemented a long-distance phone tax to help fund operations in the Spanish-American War. At that time only the wealthy could afford telephones; this tax was designed to them…

  • Organizing Tax Documents (1 comment)

    When preparing taxes, one challenge is collecting all of the necessary documents. Tax-related papers flow into a home at all times of the year, not just in the spring. It’s easy to lose important papers. I’ve found a method to eliminate the headache completely. I have a bill-paying area at my desk: a small cubby-hole specifically designated for bills, financial statements, and receipts. Each January I take a small manilla envelope and label it —…

  • Tax Refund Status (3 comments)

    Check your tax refund status easily with this simple web-based tool from the IRS. You’ll need to provide your social security number, marital status, and exact refund amount in order for your request to be processed.

  • Financial Calculators (0 comment)

    The IRS Withholding Calculator “help[s] employees to ensure that they do not have too much or too little income tax withheld from their pay. It is not a replacement for Form W-4, but most people will find it more accurate and easier to use than the worksheets that accompany Form W-4. You may use the results of this program to help you complete a new Form W-4, which you will submit to your employer.” The…