Honey Smith

Honey Smith

Staff Writer

Honey Smith has been reading GRS since at least 2008, right when she got her first “real” job and started getting serious about finances. She and her husband Jake are in their mid 30s and recently bought a home together. Currently, she manages graduate programs at a large state institution, and he is an attorney at a mid-sized firm.

Between them, they have paid off approximately $30,000 in consumer debt since she started writing for GRS in 2012. However, they still have nearly $200,000 of student loan debt, so she will continue to chronicle their debt-paydown journey. In addition to personal finance, Honey is interested in vegetarianism and cooking, gardening (despite living in the desert and having a black thumb), issues in higher education (including the student loan bubble and the slow death of tenure), and animal rights; however, her heart lies with fantasy novels, trashy TV, and Skyrim.

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Recent Posts
Meal plans and delivery programs — costly or cost-effective?
This article is by staff writer Honey Smith.

The three biggest items in most people’s budgets are usually housing, transportation, and food. That’s because they are needs; but like most needs, costs can range from the inexpensive, no-frills version to the outrageously expensively extravagances seen on some reality TV shows. For example, you could live in a studio apartment or a mansion, take shanks’ mare or drive a luxury car, slap a PB &…

5 ways to pay yourself first
This article is by staff writer Honey Smith.

Recently, we discussed the benefits of paying yourself first. But exactly how do you go about doing that (especially if you feel like you’re living paycheck to paycheck already)? If you are just starting to manage your money or you simply struggle when it comes to budgeting in the first place, paying yourself first may seem like one of those personal finance concepts that sounds good…

5 ideas for a productive staycation
This article is by staff writer Honey Smith.

According to a recent blog by the Wall Street Journal, Americans leave $52.4 billion on the table each year in unused paid time off (not including sick or personal leave). This lowers employee productivity and can lead to burnout and retention issues. It is also quite expensive for companies themselves, since the time and money associated with PTO are liabilities on their balance sheets. Sometimes, though,…