dcsimg

Travel


  • 9 reasons you may never retire (42 comments)

    This article is by staff writer William Cowie. My mom passed away a little less than a year ago. All her life she was the picture of health: She walked every day and ate super-healthy. The extended family dreaded going there, because they knew there would be no sugary goodies, only healthy (boring) eats. We used to joke and say she was so healthy they’d have to shoot her on the Day of Judgment ……

  • Lifestyle inflation: How to decide if it’s ever okay (81 comments)

    This article is by staff writer Kristin Wong. Despite that I don’t own it, I like my apartment. It’s got a mountainous view, it’s comfortable, and my neighbors are few but friendly. Sure, I’d like to own a home someday. But, unless I move to another city, that probably isn’t going to happen in the next few years. I’m fine with that. Like my neighbor said, I’d rather live here than anywhere else, at least for…

  • Getting a frugal start on summer (30 comments)

    This article is by staff writer Kristin Wong. Last Friday, I had an amazing realization: It was the weekend, the weather was beautiful, and I had absolutely nothing to do. Great feeling. On Saturday morning, my boyfriend and I decided to slap some sandwiches together and head to the beach. It was relaxing and low-key, and it made me anticipate summer. But at the beginning of the year, I made some lofty savings goals for myself, and…

  • The cure for vacation deprivation: A vacation budget (51 comments)

    After a long and brutal winter in parts of the U.S., warmer temperatures and sunshine are finally heading our way. And, although it doesn’t seem possible, an entire quarter of this year is behind us already. In most places, schools are out of session — at least for a few weeks — which means that families are taking their first major hiatus of the year. And everyone seems to be on Spring Break … except for…

  • Thoughts on Financial and Personal Independence (88 comments)

    Note: This article is from J.D. Roth, who founded Get Rich Slowly in 2006. After a year off, J.D. is once again writing here at GRS. His non-financial writing can still be found at More Than Money. ¡Saludos de Ecuador! For the past two weeks, I’ve been enjoying my third trip to that seldom-remembered continent, South America. I love this place, and love it more each time I visit. My past trips have been personal…

  • How to cure a spending hangover (37 comments)

    This post is from staff writer Holly Johnson. A few weeks ago, my husband and I took a somewhat frugal vacation to an all-inclusive resort in Playa del Carmen, Mexico. And while I was very excited to visit a new city and explore, I was equally excited about the financial details of the trip. Since we had chosen an all-inclusive resort, our entire vacation was easy to budget and plan for. A sum of $800…

  • Money speaks the same language, but with different accents (42 comments)

    This post is from staff writer Lisa Aberle, who’s been away for about eight weeks. We’re happy to have her back! The name of her travel destination has been withheld to protect her children’s privacy. I’m ba-ack. While you probably didn’t miss me, my family and I just got back to the U.S. after spending almost two months in Europe. Our trip was unique: While we did a few of the normal touristy things, most…

  • Travel on a budget: The all-inclusive vacation (55 comments)

    This post is from staff writer Holly Johnson. Last year, I was talking with a friend right after she had returned from a relaxing week in the Caribbean. “We did an all-inclusive,” she said to me with a glimmer in her eyes. “A what?” I had no idea what she was talking about. After chatting about it for a quite a while, she clued me in on how an all-inclusive vacation works and what some…

  • Money highlights while traveling (27 comments)

    This post is from staff writer Kristin Wong. Last week, I got back from an amazing 10-day trip. Brian and I saw Stonehenge, sailed the Irish Sea, and I threw up three times. It isn’t a true vacation unless I’ve thrown up. During our journey, we had a few money-related experiences, and I took the time to journal them. We were frugal. We learned about tipping. We talked to bartenders about taxes. I enjoyed these money…

  • How to save money while seeing the world (40 comments)

    This is a guest post from Matt Kepnes, who writes about travel and more at Nomadic Matt. His advice has been featured in The New York Times, CNN, The Guardian UK, Lifehacker, Budget Travel, BBC and Yahoo! Finance among others. Kepnes is the author of the just-published How to Travel the World on $50 a Day. Forget what the magazines say about travel. Forget what you see in commercials. They’re all wrong: Travel isn’t expensive….

  • The value of vacation (57 comments)

    As you read this, my husband and I are just days away from a romantic, kid-free vacation in the Caribbean. Since we weren’t able to take a honeymoon, we spent the last few years saving like maniacs in order to have enough money for this special trip. We reached our savings goal in June and decided to take advantage of an early booking discount on Expedia.com. Since then, we have been eagerly counting down the…

  • 8 reasons you should throw away your cash-back credit card if you love to travel (40 comments)

    This reader post is from Hilary Stockton, who is the founder of TravelSort, which helps savvy travelers earn millions of miles without flying, redeem them for first-class flights, and stay in luxury hotels at wholesale prices. Follow her on Twitter @TravelSort. My husband and I used to think we were savvy, using a cash-back credit card for most of our spending. But given how much we enjoy international and luxury travel, it was actually a huge mistake….

  • A few things to consider before becoming an expatriate (23 comments)

    This post is from Justin Boyle. Justin is an experienced English tutor and writing coach who works as a designer in the tech industry. He lives in Austin, Texas, and finds a lot of things interesting, especially food, finance, education, gadgetry, software, art and travel. He never stops thinking about food. He is probably eating right now. There are plenty of possible reasons you could want to leave the U.S. Perhaps you’ve always dreamed about making the sand…

  • Learning how to work a student discount (18 comments)

    This guest post from Steve Robinson is part of the “reader stories” feature at Get Rich Slowly. Steve writes for Homesales.com.au, an Australian real estate portal that caters to student shared housing. Some reader stories contain general advice; others are examples of how a GRS reader achieved financial success or failure. These stories feature folks with all levels of financial maturity and income. Want submit your own reader story? Here’s how. With the new academic…

  • What I Did On My Summer Vacation (39 comments)

    Note: This post is from Get Rich Slowly founder J.D. Roth. I’ve been traveling for more than a month now. While much of this travel has been for pleasure — I spent three weeks in Turkey with my cousin — there’s been plenty of work involved too. While I’ve been traveling, I’ve also been writing — and networking with other bloggers. Over the past month, I’ve attended two conferences, and spent three days meeting with…

  • Reader Story: Budgeting for Travel (73 comments)

    This guest post from Laura is part of the “reader stories” feature at Get Rich Slowly. Laura is a retired travel agent for AAA and the writer of the new blog, Have List, Will Travel Some reader stories contain general advice; others are examples of how a GRS reader achieved financial success or failure. These stories feature folks with all levels of financial maturity and income. Want submit your own reader story? Here’s how. “One…

  • Why I Love Budget Travel (117 comments)

    This post is by staff writer April Dykman. I love budget travel. Maybe it’s from watching too many episodes of Europe Through the Backdoor and drinking the Rick Steves Kool-Aid, but I wonder if you’ll believe me when I tell you that I wouldn’t travel any other way. Last year I was considering taking a trip with friends — an all-inclusive spa vacation at a fancy resort. Ultimately I declined because all of the selling…

  • A Month of Travel for Less than a Month at Home (65 comments)

    This post is by staff writer Tim Sullivan. It was always my dream to be paid to travel. I thought I’d write guidebooks or be a tour guide. A few years ago, my wanderlust was acting up again, so I crunched some numbers, adding up the cost of living where I was (New York) versus traveling for month. With some careful planning, I spent a month in Paris and ended up with more money than…

  • Reader Story: How I Save Money While Traveling (111 comments)

    This guest post from Matt Kepnes is part of the “reader stories” feature at Get Rich Slowly. Some stories contain general advice; others are examples of how a GRS reader achieved financial success or failure. These stories feature folks from all levels of financial maturity and with all sorts of incomes. You can read more from Matt at Nomadic Matt, where he shows how you can travel the world without being rich. Many people think…

  • Everything You Need to Know about Using Credit Card Bonuses for Free Travel (86 comments)

    The following guest post is by Craig Ford. Craig blogs at Help Me Travel Cheap where he helps newbies turn credit card sign-up bonuses into free travel. To entice you to sign up for a credit card most credit card companies offer a sign-up bonus. The sign-up bonus is the life blood for a growing population of American travelers. They scour the web looking for the best credit cards with sign up bonuses. They get…

  • Reader Story: Working Overseas (57 comments)

    This guest post from Joe Z. is part of the “reader stories” feature at Get Rich Slowly. Some stories contain general advice; others are examples of how a GRS reader achieved financial success — or failure. These stories feature folks from all levels of financial maturity and with all sorts of incomes. I love the premise and the concepts of GRS. The principles that J.D. and the rest of the community espouse here really do…

  • Saving and Spending in South America (77 comments)

    ¡Hola, todos! For the past month, I’ve been on the road — first at a conference of financial bloggers in Chicago, and then trekking through the Peruvian and Bolivian Andes. For most of this time, I’ve been without an internet connection. It’s tough to blog about money when you’re trekking to the top of a 5350-meter (17,650-foot) mountain! The adventurous part of my trip is over. I’m back with the ten million residents of Lima,…

  • Hostels For Adults: Spend Travel Money Where it Counts (163 comments)

    This post is from new staff writer Sarah Gilbert. When I was 23, I stayed at my first (and last) Ritz Carlton, in Palo Alto. It was only a stop on a string of fabulous business hotels from which I’d collected small bars of soap and shoe shine mitts: The Breakers in Palm Beach, Hotel Nikko Beverly Hills, the Pierre and the Plaza and the Waldorf-Astoria and three different W Hotels in New York City…

  • Why I Love the Megabus: A Closer Look at a Seldom-Used (but Cheap!) Way to Travel (128 comments)

    This post is from GRS staff writer Donna Freedman. Donna writes a personal finance column for MSN Money. She also writes about frugality, intentional living, and life in general at her own blog, Surviving And Thriving. I’m in the middle of a month-long trip to the East Coast: a little work, but mostly tourism. Although the conference I attended was in New York City, I flew to Philadelphia because it’ll be easier for me to…

  • Get the Most Mileage from Frequent Flier Rewards (40 comments)

    This post is from staff writer April Dykman, who thinks a pan of paella is probably the next best thing to being in Spain. Four years ago, I became a member of a frequent flier program. I’d just returned from my first trip to Europe, and I had been bitten by the travel bug. My former boss insisted that I sign up — she goes on great vacations every year and always uses miles to…

  • How to Learn a Foreign Language Without Spending a Cent (88 comments)

    Last week at Far Away Places (my new travel blog), I shared some tips on how to learn Spanish fast. The short version: Hire a tutor. But what if you can’t afford a tutor? What if you don’t want to spend money but still want to learn a language? In this guest post from Benny Lewis, the Irish polyglot, he shares tips on how to learn a language on the cheap. For more info, visit…

  • Is Unlimited Air Travel a Good Deal? (37 comments)

    This post is from staff writer Sierra Black. Sierra writes about frugality, sustainable living, and raising children at Childwild.com. Air travel is rarely anyone’s idea of a good time. It’s expensive, time-consuming and difficult. There are the byzantine demands of the ticketing process, in which you have to confirm your exact travel dates and times weeks or months in advance and then pay exorbitant fees if you change your plans. (Or if you buy super…

  • Ask the Readers: I’m Getting Older — Should I Save or Should I Travel? (112 comments)

    Long-time GRS reader Sheila (aka PawPrint) dropped a line earlier this year because she’s facing a financial dilemma. She and her husband want to be responsible — to save for retirement — but they’re afraid that doing so means they won’t be able to pursue other passions, such as travel. Sheila writes: My husband is nearly 60. As we watch friends and relatives succumb to cancer (mostly) in their late sixties, I wonder about our…

  • Pack Smart to Save Money (84 comments)

    This post is from staff writer April Dykman. Most of us travel with a lot of stuff. Even the evangelists of light packing (like me) usually pack our carry-ons and handbags to the hilt. But what we pack (or don’t pack), and how we pack it, often directly affects our finances, especially now that checking baggage often comes with an added fee on most airlines. Packing smart to save money doesn’t necessarily mean traveling around…

  • Free Round-Trip Tickets with British Airways Card (or, J.D. Discovers Travel Hacking) (102 comments)

    Yesterday, I met with a group of local Portland bloggers to plan for world domination. Over the past year, we’ve met regularly to organize an upcoming conference for readers of Chris Guillebeau’s The Art of Non-Conformity. Usually our conversation is focused on gift bags and tour groups and the absolute racket that is event catering. ($15 cups of coffee? Give me that job, please. I could get rich quickly.) Somehow last night, the discussion turned…

  • Follow-Up: Save More or See the World? (29 comments)

    I get a lot of requests for follow-ups to reader stories and reader questions. People want to hear how things turned out. Because I want to know how things turned out, too, I’ve started a semi-regular feature at Get Rich Slowly. Whenever I hear back from a previous poster, I’ll share an update so that we can all know what happened. Max wrote in July of 2009 to ask if he should save more or…

  • From the Rich to the Poor (or, What I Learned in Africa) (151 comments)

    After 36 hours of travel (followed by twelve hours of sleep), Kris and I are back from vacation. For the past three weeks, we’ve been exploring southern Africa. With a tour group, we visited South Africa, Zimbabwe, Botswana, Namibia, and Zambia. We had a great time, and we learned a lot. It was well worth the expense. In fact, I loved what I saw so much, that I’m eager to return. (On my next trip,…

  • Reader Story: Living on Less in Mexico (65 comments)

    This guest post from Louisa Rogers is part of the “reader stories” feature at Get Rich Slowly. Some stories contain general advice; others are examples of how a GRS reader achieved financial success — or failure. These stories feature folks from all levels of financial maturity and with all sorts of incomes. Louisa Rogers is a consultant who provides leadership, management, and communication coaching and training to businesses here, there, and yonder. Previously at GRS,…

  • Geographic Arbitrage: Save Money by Leaving The Country (76 comments)

    This is a guest post from Gary Arndt, who has been traveling around the world non-stop since March 2007 and has visited over 80 countries. He blogs at Everything-Everywhere.com, which was named one of the 25 Best Blogs of 2010 by Time Magazine. Let’s start with the obvious: Costs aren’t the same everywhere. You may already be aware of this on some level, but until you’ve traveled extensively, it isn’t something you really understand. The…

  • Getting Creative with Budget Travel (23 comments)

    This is a guest post from Rebecca Rosenfelt, founder of Inhabit Vacations, a curated travel site. She also blogs about creative approaches to real estate at Real Savvy Real Estate. Previously at GRS, Rebecca has shared how she generates extra money by letting strangers pay her rent and budget-friendly decorating tips. My travel mantra holds that travel should be free — or as close to free as you can get! Budget travel tips usually focus…

  • Cheap Travel: How To Get The Most For Your Travel Dollars (30 comments)

    This post is from staff writer Sierra Black. Sierra writes about frugality, sustainable living, and getting her kids to eat kale at Childwild.com. Travel has always been a priority for me. I love seeing new places, experiencing new cultures, and just getting away from the routines of my daily life. Even more important, my family and close friends are a pretty far-flung crowd. I have loved ones spread from Boston to Buenos Aires. We buy…

  • Reader Story: Sailing Away from the American Dream (52 comments)

    This guest post from Michael Robertson is part of the “reader stories” feature at Get Rich Slowly. Some stories contain general advice; others are examples of how a GRS reader achieved financial success — or failure. These stories feature folks from all levels of financial maturity and with all sorts of incomes. Two years ago, Michael shared a guest post about direct stock purchase plans. Today, he shares his personal story, which is about sailing…

  • Reader Story: How Moving to a Developing Nation Improved Our Financial Situation (79 comments)

    This guest post from Craig Ford is part of the “reader stories” feature at Get Rich Slowly. Some stories contain general advice; others are examples of how a GRS reader achieved financial success — or failure. These stories feature folks from all levels of financial maturity and with all sorts of incomes. Craig writes two blogs: Money Help for Christians and Help Me Travel Cheap. On 16 May 2006, I boarded a Folker 100 aircraft…

  • How to Avoid Sneaky Airline Fees (54 comments)

    This post is from staff writer April Dykman. Last Friday I arrived home from New York City after a week of Broadway, museums, twinkling holiday lights, and more cannoli than any one person should consume. (Thankfully, I spent plenty of time walking them off!) Visiting the city in December was on my life list of things I wanted to do, and it didn’t disappoint. Of course, New York City isn’t inexpensive. But my husband and…

  • Quick and Dirty Vacation Planning (31 comments)

    This post is from staff writer April Dykman. As I write this, I’m in New York City on a trip I spent about two hours planning. Normally, I like to do my research. I firmly believe research work upfront saves a lot of time, money, and hassle while traveling, but this vacation snuck up on me, and I ran out of time. So far we’ve managed to make our way around just fine without spending…

  • How One GRS Reader Saved Over $1,000 on Airfare (12 comments)

    The time has come. I’ve packed as lightly as I know how (which may not be light enough), we’ve installed the housesitter, and I’ve scheduled a month’s worth of great guest posts here at GRS. As you read this, Kris and I are now jetting our way from Portland to New York City to Venice, Italy. We’ll spend the next two weeks exploring Venice, Florence, and Rome. After that, we’ll take the night train through…

  • The Legal Nomad on Saving for Travel (39 comments)

    As you’ve probably noticed, travel has become a priority in my life. There are number of reasons for this. For one, I love it. I love visiting other cities, other states, other countries. I love seeing how different people live, and how they do things. Here in the U.S., we are so myopic — we tend to focus on just our way of life, so that it becomes difficult to imagine that there are billions…

  • Take Only Photographs: Frugal Souvenirs (82 comments)

    This post is from staff writer Sierra Black. Sierra writes about frugality, sustainable living, and getting her kids to eat kale at Childwild.com. Travel is a gift. We get to see new places and cultures, meet new people, and expand our lives. Most of us, when we’ve put the time and money into traveling somewhere special, want to treasure the memories. There’s a large industry to support that desire. Gift and souvenir shops in the…

  • How to Save Money While Traveling (76 comments)

    This post is from staff writer Sierra Black. Sierra writes about frugality, sustainable living, and getting her kids to eat kale at Childwild.com. When I was packing for my trip to Argentina, a friend advised me, “Put everything you’re taking on the bed. Now put back half the clothes, and take twice the money.” Good advice. I tried to follow it and still ended up bringing more clothes than I could possibly need. I didn’t…

  • Is a Weak Euro Good for U.S. Travelers? (52 comments)

    It had to happen eventually! A GRS staff writer has finally submitted an article on a topic I was planning to cover. This post from April Dykman is stronger than the one I’d put together, though, so I’ve just tacked an addendum to the end. Europe’s financial crisis is leading to a weaker euro and more travel deals designed to attract American tourists. According to media reports, the state of the euro might make a…

  • Reader Story: Traveling Cross-Country Dirt Cheap (66 comments)

    This guest post from Michelle Russo is part of the “reader stories” feature here at Get Rich Slowly. Some reader stories contain general “how I did X” advice, and others are examples of how a GRS reader achieved financial success — or failure. These stories feature folks from all levels of financial maturity, and with all sorts of incomes. This story is perfect for Memorial Day weekend, which kicks off the summer holiday season in…

  • Searching for the Cheapest Airfare: Is There a Silver Bullet? (56 comments)

    J.D. is on vacation in Alaska. This guest post by G.E. Miller gives a real-life example of trying to find the cheapest airfare online. For more from G.E., check out 20somethingfinance.com, where he covers personal-finance matters for young professionals. At one time or another, we’ve all been a day late and a few air miles short when purchasing a plane ticket. So we turn to the internet. But with all the bargain travel sites out…

  • In Search of Hotel Bargains (75 comments)

    As a man who foresees a lot of travel in his future, I’ve become interested in ways to save on airfare, hotels, and so on. (I’ve also become obsessed with packing light, but that’s another story.) No surprise then that I was keen to receive the June issue of Consumer Reports, which contains eight pages of info on this very subject. Articles include: Hotels for any budget, which includes a description of the types of…

  • Planning a (Debt-Free) Dream Vacation (58 comments)

    This post is from GRS staff writer April Dykman. Most people agree that a vacation is supposed to be relaxing, but planning for one can be just the opposite. Still, poor planning can cost money and time, causing headaches and frustration when you’re supposed to be getting away from it all. Some people like to book a ticket and see where life takes them. Others prefer cruises or tours where the planning is taken care…

  • 5 Little-Known Websites That Will Save You Time and Money When Booking Airfare Online (34 comments)

    This article is by staff writer Adam Baker. Baker recently reflected on just how much money affects our internal values. When booking airfare online, most people think of the popular online aggregation sites. You know the ones: They have the fancy commercials, catchy jingles, and washed-up celebrity pitchmen. While those sites aren’t inherently bad, there are a few well-documented problems with relying solely on these larger engines: Many of the aggregation sites neglect to include smaller,…

  • Daily Links: Frequent Flyer Master Edition (20 comments)

    As many of you know, my pal Chris Guillebeau is crazy. He’s been to 119 countries, and he just keeps on flying. He wants to see them all before he turns 35 (in April 2013). As you can imagine, Chris has accumulated a hell of a lot of frequent flyer miles over the past few years. He says he currently has 676,583 miles in eight accounts. But not all of these come from flying. Chris…

  • How to Earn Free Plane Tickets and Cash Back by Shopping Online (100 comments)

    This is a guest post from April Dykman, an avid GRS reader, and a writer and editor by trade. April is a potential Staff Writer for Get Rich Slowly. In her first article, April described how she discovered freedom from mindless spending. April is an active commenter at this site. When my husband and I went to Italy in 2006, we spent $2500 on plane tickets. We’re planning to spend much less for our next…

  • How to Use Couchsurfing to See the World (108 comments)

    This is a guest post from Baker, who writes about personal finance at Man vs. Debt. Baker is a potential Staff Writer for Get Rich Slowly. Along with his wife and 15-month-old daughter, Baker has recently moved overseas to New Zealand, where his young family is passionately continuing their own personal “war” on debt. What if I told you there was a different way to travel? A way to see the world outside of the…

  • Lower Your Expectations, Increase Your Happiness (87 comments)

    “Did you listen to Rick Steves this afternoon?” Kris asked me on Sunday. I shook my head. “That’s too bad,” she said. “It was about the relationship between money and happiness. I think you would have liked it — and so would your readers.” “But I just wrote about happiness!” I said. “J.D.,” she said. “You can never write too much about happiness.” And so I tracked down last weekend’s episode of Travel with Rick…

  • The Personal Finance Hour, Episode 16: Moving to Australia (13 comments)

    In the recent GRS reader survey, one common request was to delay the weekly podcast announcement until after the show so that I could provide a brief written summary for those who don’t have the time or the inclination to listen. That means I can’t provide a reminder for people to call in during the show, but it may generate more discussion here on the blog. “I think I’ll move to Australia.” This week, Jim…

  • Ask the Readers: Save More or See the World? (166 comments)

    I’ve written a lot lately about finding balance. It’s important to save for the future, but how do you balance that with enjoying today? Each of us has to address that question in our own way. A reader named Max wrote to share his own dilemma: I’ve been working as a web designer since I was 18. I made a few financial mistakes in my early days: leased a car for four years, bought a…

  • Travel Hacking: Smart Ways to See the World (35 comments)

    I’ve spent a lot of time lately thinking about financial goals. Now that I’m out of debt and have built an emergency fund, I’ve actually decided that maybe I should set a budget. And one of the things I want to budget for is travel. Until recently, I hadn’t traveled much. I grew up in and and around Portland, and that’s where I tended to spend my vacations. But after my wife’s parents took us…

  • My Great Disney World Adventure (108 comments)

    Yesterday I wrote about my recent business trip to Orlando. This is the “rest of the story”, a behind-the-scenes look at how I spent way too much money for a one-day vacation. When Kris and I agreed to fly to Orlando for the unveiling of The Great Piggy Bank Adventure, we hoped to have time to explore the rest of EPCOT Center. But when we received the itinerary, it was clear that all we’d actually…

  • The Great Piggy Bank Adventure (29 comments)

    “If we’re going to have a free-market capitalist society, we’ve got to give people the tools to not be victims” — John Cammack, T. Rowe Price I get a lot of e-mail from PR firms. I ignore most of it, but occasionally something stands out. One recent message invited me to make a trip to Orlando for the debut of The Great Piggy Bank Adventure, a new financial literacy exhibit at Walt Disney’s EPCOT Center….

  • The Personal Finance Hour, Episode 6: Vacation and Travel (5 comments)

    Summer’s approaching, and that means family vacations. What are your best tips for travel and lodging? That’s the topic this week on the sixth episode of The Personal Finance Hour, a BlogTalkRadio program all about personal finance. You can catch it live at 3pm Pacific (6pm Eastern) every Monday. During this episode, Jim and I will be discussing our travel experiences. I just returned from an annual weekend vacation with friends. I’ll also talk about…

  • How to Find Great Deals on Vacation and Travel (56 comments)

    My wife and I have begun to explore the idea of taking a trip later this year. We’re in the preliminary stages of our research and budgeting. Though we aren’t ready to book anything yet, it’s fun to look at what’s available, and to dream of where we might go. Over the weekend, I polled my followers on Twitter to ask their advice for finding great travel deals. Here are some of the tips and…

  • The Razor’s Edge: Lessons in True Wealth (160 comments)

    Our friends have a profound effect on our personal finance habits. Some friends can lead us to spending and to debt. Others offer insight into the virtues of thrift. For me, my friend Sparky has been the latter. Through his example, I learned that frugality can help me achieve my goals. “Develop a plan that is so amazing, so glowing, that you are willing to walk blurry-eyed to work every day to make the money…

  • Grocery Shopping in New Delhi (26 comments)

    This is a guest post from my friend Kris, an American writer living in India. She and her husband are in New Delhi to participate in an educational exchange program. The juxtaposition of cultures has been interesting. When you think of grocery shopping in New Delhi, please don’t imagine your local Safeway or City Market, with aisles wide enough for two pushcarts passing as shoppers stroll, browse, select. Our grocers — or rather, “departmental store” — is…

  • Personal Finance in Japan: An American View (30 comments)

    This is a guest post from Steve in Bibai, Japan. He’s offered, several times, to send some interesting tidbits about how money is handled differently in Japan. Our recent discussion about stashing cash finally prompted him to follow through on his “threat”. One Japanologist said a mouthful when he tried to point out the quintessential difference about Japan — every country knows it is unique from other countries, but the Japanese pride themselves on being…

  • Ask the Readers: Planning a Cheap Road-Trip Vacation? (118 comments)

    Jonathan has an interesting request for Get Rich Slowly readers. He wants to make a month-long cross-country road trip next summer, and he wants to do it on the cheap. But how? He’s hoping that you can help. Here’s an abridged version of his e-mail: I’m trying to figure out how to save money on vacation. My girlfriend and I have always had a dream of spending a month driving out to the Grand Canyon then…

  • Museum Day 2008: Free Museum Admission This Saturday (14 comments)

    Looking for some frugal fun this weekend? Saturday is Museum Day in the United Sates — a chance to get into local museums for free. This event is presented by Smithsonian Magazine and a handful of sponsors. According to the magazine’s website: Enjoy free general admission for you and a guest to hundreds of museums and cultural venues nationwide Saturday, September 27, 2008. Present the Museum Day admission card to receive free general admission at…

  • The Nonconformists’ Guide to Personal Finance (84 comments)

    This is a guest post from Chris Guillebeau at The Art of Non-Conformity. It’s long. It’s good. If you can’t read it all now, bookmark it and come back later. It’s worth it. Earlier this week, Chris released a short (and free) e-book called A Brief Guide to World Domination. It’s all about rejecting mediocrity and pursuing a higher purpose. I recommend it highly. My short life as a daytrader In my second year of…

  • Cheap Vacation: Be a Tourist in Your Own Hometown (56 comments)

    Last weekend, long-time GRS reader Vintek came to Portland. Kris and I joined him and his wife for a Saturday morning culinary tour. On our four-hour trek, we visited a bakery, a cooking store, and a brewery (where I drank beer for the first time — seriously). Along the way, I saw places and learned things about the city that were new to me. Afterward I realized how fun it would be to actually spend…

  • Bargain Summer Vacation Destinations (40 comments)

    My recent series of interviews with author Tim Ferriss has given me the travel bug. I find myself plotting grand vacations (or mini-retirements). But I don’t have the money to spend on a trip to London or a cruise to Alaska. My sights are set a little lower. Fortunately, several recent articles have addressed this subject. On Sunday, The New York Times published a list of 31 places to go this summer. “The summer of…

  • How to Take a Mini-Retirement: Tips and Tricks from Timothy Ferriss (56 comments)

    In his book, The 4-Hour Workweek, Tim Ferriss proposes that we shift our focus from end-of-life “macro” retirements to more frequent mini-retirements, which might be spaced throughout a working career. Though similar to a vacation or a sabbatical, mini-retirements differ in some key ways: A sabbatical is a one-time event. Mini-retirements are meant to recur throughout a lifetime. A vacation is short, and often involves a tourist lifestyle with little immersion in a new way…

  • How to Track Travel Expenses and Stick to a Vacation Budget (37 comments)

    This is a guest post from Debbie Dubrow, who writes about traveling with babies, toddlers, and kids at Delicious Baby. Her site contains personal travel stories, family-friendly city guides, and lots of tips and advice for traveling with children. Most families need to stick to a budget when they travel. But tracking daily expenses, especially in a foreign currency, can be tricky. Here are some easy tips to make it easy to keep track of…

  • Ten Money-Saving Vacation and Travel Tips (55 comments)

    It’s mid-winter here in Oregon — that bleak, grey time of year when it seems like the rain will never end. When I was young, the winter didn’t bother me. But now that I’m firmly entrenched in middle age, January makes me dream of leaving the cold to travel abroad to warmer destinations like Hawaii, or Mexico — or London. I’ve always wanted to travel, but have never been able to afford it. Last summer,…

  • Best Dates for Holiday Travel 2007 (29 comments)

    I hate flying. Not only am I scared of the actual air travel (yes, really), but I don’t like the crowds and, especially, the cost. Flying during the holiday season is a special class of hell. One Get Rich Slowly reader recently forward this handy travel calendar from Hotwire.com: If you must travel over the holiday season, your best bet is to stick close to the green dates. Flights are cheaper and less crowded. The…

  • Traveling to Save: How to Get Paid to Live Overseas (28 comments)

    This is a guest post from Cassie Browne. Cassie writes about discovering food in Japan at Eaten in Translation. J.D. has written about how to save for an overseas trip and how to have a vacation on a budget, but if you have time on your hands and like the idea of living in another culture, traveling overseas can be a financial opportunity, rather than a liability. I’ve spent the last two years working in…

  • A Successful Vacation Budget (16 comments)

    I’m back from vacation. It’s awesome to be home and to not be spending money anymore! Ireland was good. London was great. But New York — wow! New York was amazing. It far exceeded my expectations. I’m a small-town boy, no question, but I can still appreciate the big city. New York is expensive, though. It’s at least as expensive as London or Dublin even without an unfavorable exchange rate. Yet I was able to…

  • Update from the Emerald Isle (21 comments)

    Greetings from Ireland! Earlier this week we flew from London to Dublin, and for the past few days we’ve been exploring the Emerald Isle. My wife’s parents, who have generously funded the bulk of this trip, booked us on a series of rail-and-bus tours of Cork, Cobh (Queenstown), Killarney, Waterford, Kilkenny, and the ring of Kerry. As a result, I’m getting a crash course in rail travel, which is something new to me. (I’m also…

  • What Developing Nations Can Teach Us About Personal Finance (117 comments)

    This guest post from Terry M. contains strong language. Most readers of this blog are from the United States, Canada, or the United Kingdom. We have an extraordinarily high standard of living compared to most of the world, and I feel there are a lot of lessons to be learned from how people live in developing countries. I have traveled a bit, mainly in Latin America, southeast Asia, and India. In most of these regions,…

  • London Calling, and a Disclaimer (22 comments)

    I’ve finally managed to find an internet café near our hotel in London (we’re near Victoria Station), so am checking in for the first time in a week. I love this city, and because of the generosity of my in-laws, my expenses are much lower than they might have been. I’ve spent $628.93. That’s less than my $700 weekly budget, but more than my $350 weekly target. Most of this money was spent in three…

  • The Frugal Traveler: American Road Trip (29 comments)

    Kris and I are deep in preparation for our upcoming trip to England and Ireland. We’ve spent the past two months researching frugal travel options, including digital cameras, walking shoes, and — I kid you not — travel underwear. We meet with our housesitter tonight. A close friend, amused by our packing, pointed me to a series of articles by Matt Gross, the New York Times “frugal traveler”. Last summer, Gross toured the world, chronicling…

  • Reader Story: What My Father Taught Me About Debt (12 comments)

    Happy Father’s Day! Louise from Our Odyssey dropped a line the other day to share a story of how her father taught her about debt. When I was fresh out of college in June of 1985, my Dad gave me $500 to buy furniture and as an apartment rental deposit.  This was an interest-free loan and we were both lax about setting up a payment schedule.  Nothing was in writing.  He said, “Pay me something monthly.” …

  • Financial Tips for Overseas Travel (45 comments)

    Kris and I will make our first trip overseas later this year; her parents are taking us to England and Ireland. We’re excited, but also a little apprehensive. For one thing, the exchange rate isn’t exactly in our favor right now. And how much do we pay our housesitter? Will we be able to prepay all of our bills? Yesterday I was browsing Ask the Advisor and discovered a list of 27 personal finance tips…

  • Hotels and Airfare: It Never Hurts to Ask for a Refund (11 comments)

    Bankrate doesn’t just offer banking information and investment advice; it also has a section of user-submitted frugal tips. Each month, the person who submitted the best tip wins $100. February’s top tip came from Brenda Miller: If you book a flight far in advance of your departure date, monitor the price of your exact flight. If the price happens to fall below what you paid prior to your departure, contact the airline and ask for…

  • How to Save for the Trip of a Lifetime (17 comments)

    Ian publishes an online travel magazine (a.k.a. “a blog”) called Brave New Traveler, which is dedicated to providing information for world adventurers. He pointed me to a recent guest-post from Lucia Byttebier, who has some tips on “saving money for the trip of a lifetime”. The five steps Byttebier recommends are: Reconsider your living situation. Can you find a cheaper living arrangement? Remind yourself that it’s only temporary, that you’re saving for a goal. Byttebeir…

  • WeJustGotBack: A Site for Travelers (11 comments)

    Lori wrote to point out a site designed to help people save money on travel: I’m always on the lookout for ways to save money on travel, since I have three kids and, while we like to get away, it isn’t always easy to save. I just ran across a great article at WeJustGotBack.com called “5 Genius Travel Buys” — the idea is that sometimes you have to buy something small to save big. The…

  • Spend Less and Live More with a Volunteer Vacation (7 comments)

    At Yahoo!Finance, David Bach (author of Start Late, Finish Rich) offers four tips for vacations that give more. According to nonprofit consumer education organization the Myvesta Foundation, the average American planned to spend $2,249 on his or her summer vacation last year. Taking the average family of four to the archetypical American vacation spot — Disney World — can cost $3,000 to $4,000 or more by the time you figure in the cost for flights,…

  • Reader Question: Cheap World Travel? (20 comments)

    In a recent entry on life after graduation, one tip was to “see the world”. A Get Rich Slowly reader commented: I belong to that 93% of students who wanted to study abroad but didn’t. I’d love to have a gap year to travel — but where are grads expected to get the money to afford it, if they haven’t already worked for a while to save up? This is a subject with which I…