How I Purchased Private Health Insurance

Finding affordable health insurance was one of the biggest obstacles we faced when I quit my job. My husband is a self-employed performing artist (juggler/musician). We had always relied on my job to pay for our insurance.

Health Insurance is a complicated issue. We knew we needed to have health insurance because without it we could face financial ruin; but I didn't want health insurance to stop me from quitting a job I hated to pursue my dream of working for myself.

Before I quit, I spent hours researching different health care options. This post is about what I learned.

Note: This post is not about what we should do with our health care system; it's about my experience in finding health insurance. Everyone's experience will be different!

Finding the Right Health Insurance Plan

There were so many plans with so many options it was hard to keep everything straight. Our best option was to keep my newborn son on a separate plan. It would allow him to have much better coverage and let my husband and me purchase a cheaper plan for us, to save money.

At that point we lived in the state of New Hampshire. There was a program through the state that allowed you to buy in to their insurance program for kids. The coverage was excellent. At the time the payment was about $100 per month for just my son.

The plans for my husband and me were limited and expensive. I spoke to a few qualified agents. I researched and found reviews on the internet. I needed to make sure the plan fit our budget, had benefits that fit us, and had a good reputation.

It seemed like we had two options:

  • A PPO/HMO plan which had a lot of benefits and a high monthly cost.
  • A high-deductible plan that didn't have a lot of benefits but was less expensive.

With the high deductible plan, we could also sign up for a Health Savings Account. An HSA is a savings account that allows individuals to save for medical expenses tax-deferred.

We seemed like perfect candidates for the high-deductible plan. We were 25 years old and very healthy. We rarely went to the doctors. We were frugal and could pay attention to the cost of our health care.

In 2007, a high-deductible plan for two adults was $192 per month with a $5,000 deductible. We had over $20,000 in our emergency fund, so we figured we could pay for most health emergencies. Our total cost per month for health insurance for our family would be $292.

After thinking about it more, I realized I had to take into account the possible loss of income too. If my husband injured his hand, he couldn't juggle. If either of us had a serious injury and couldn't work, we'd need our emergency fund to pay for bills. We decided to save an additional $5,000 to put in our HSA to help with that risk.

A Problem with the Plan

We had the plan for a year before I realized we were losing money. I had signed up for the preventative option so we could have regular health check-ups covered for my son. It turned out that the option had a cap of $200 per year. I was paying an extra $22 per month. That meant I was losing at least $64 per year.

I thought I had inspected every inch of that plan. There were just too many options and rules. Needless to say, I canceled the preventive option.

New State, New Insurance

When we moved to Maine, we had to find new insurance. I had to spend hours researching again. There are only three health insurance companies here, and the premiums are a lot more expensive because Maine doesn't discriminate. Everyone has the ability to get coverage.

The high-deductible plan and HSA seemed to work well before. Since the prices were so much higher here (our previous plan would have been almost $600 per month), we increased our deductible to $10,000. To avoid more risk, we increased the amount of money in our HSA to $10,000. Our current plan costs $483 for a family of four. (We welcomed a new little girl last year!)

Paying for Visits

Having a high deductible means we have to pay for doctors visits. Many people I talk with have no idea what a doctor's visit costs. A normal doctor visit costs us $92. If we pay within 21 days, we receive a 10% discount.

I've realized how great it is to pay attention to costs. I feel so much more involved in the process of our health. My daughter's doctor wanted to do a test, so I asked how much it would cost. She said that she never looks at the cost of the procedures. The test was $2,000 and it wasn't medically necessary. If a procedure is important to your health, you need to spend money on it; but I was able to save $2,000 because I did my due diligence to research and ask for second opinions about my daughters care.

Last year we spent about $2,800 on medical expenses. That included all wellness visits for my one-year-old daughter, about seven appointments for illnesses, and two emergency room visits.

J.D.'s note: This is one of my pet peeves with the modern medical system. Nobody seems to know how much anything costs. Back when I started Get Rich Slowly, I posted a rant about how ridiculous it is that doctors don't know how much their services cost, but it's not just doctors. It's the entire system.

A Learning Process

Figuring out what fit for us has been a learning process. Since I can't predict the future, I don't know if this plan will fit us 100%. If I have a big disaster come up and my plan lacks adequate coverage, I'll have to learn from it and adjust.

There's a delicate balance of living the life you want and mitigating risk. I'm still finding the balance, but I do my best to keep my family debt-free, healthy and living the life we want.

Do you have any ideas or suggestions for my plan? What has worked for you, and what hasn't?

More about...Insurance, Health & Fitness

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Rick Cohn
Rick Cohn
10 years ago

You may already know this, but it cost me thousands of dollars to find out. If you have insurance, even with a $10,000 deductible, you save a ton of money. That’s because the insurance company negotiates the amount that their customers pay. For example, the $2,000 procedure the author mentions may well have been $3,000 if she did not have coverage and offered to pay cash.

KathyinMN
KathyinMN
10 years ago

“The test was $2,000 and wasn’t medically necessary.” Interesting comment. Why not? Because the result of the test wouldn’t change the treatment? I mean, I myself have refused an MRI, because the outcome of the MRI wouldn’t have changed my treatment plan, so that made the test unnecessary (in my opinion). Just curious how a layman can figure out if a test is medically necessary or not. What did the author base that opinion on? I’m all for watching costs/making sure claims are paid, etc. And I work in the medical field, so can do my own research amongst the… Read more »

Evelyn
Evelyn
10 years ago

I’m in Missouri, and I pay $160/mo for a $3k deductible plan with no maternity. It has already paid for itself, as my doctor (whom I trust, and I’m picky!) strongly recommended a colonoscopy because of my family history. I called around for the cost, saved up, and then after the procedure discovered that my insurance paid 100% because it was preventive care. When the hospital pre-authorized, they weren’t even told this, and I wrote them a big fat check before I left after the procedure, so they had to refund me. Yes, it is awful that docs have no… Read more »

Nicole
Nicole
10 years ago

Thanks so much for this post! It’s a very nice example of getting non-group health care coverage for a healthy family.

It’s interesting that your plan was cheaper than covering just my son was last year on a group plan in a different state ($500+/mo– I was paying full cost for him and nothing for me).

David
David
10 years ago

Thanks for the post, this is such an incredibly important topic and vast numbers of people have no idea how complex and expensive our health care ‘system’ is. As a physician, I have tried to be cognizant of what it costs to order tests which I think are important for my patients, but the complexities of the insurance industry make it nearly impossible to answer questions about cost when patients ask me. I don’t know their co-pays, the % coverage for tests, whether of not tests will be covered, and then billing departments for the places I work for have… Read more »

Michael Kaply
Michael Kaply
10 years ago

Great post. We have private insurance as well. Recently we took my daughter to the emergency room. When we first received the bill, it wasn’t itemized at all. Just a bill. I can’t believe they thought I was going to pay it like that. (I guess most people do) So we requested an itemized bill, and on the bill was a generic item “Intermediate care” for 600 dollars. Since she didn’t need much care, I thought “What determines intermediate vs. a lower option?” I called billing and noone could explain to me why it was called “intermediate care” vs. “basic… Read more »

Molly On Money
Molly On Money
10 years ago

Until 3 years ago I always had private health insurance. It was a major medical plan and fit the needs of our healthy family that didn’t need more then a yearly visit to the doctor. My husband got a job that offered a ‘great’ health plan and they employer paid 60%. We blindly went forward and after the first year I realized we were paying more in insurance + out of pocket expenses then we had ever before. I researched the plan, made a few changes and brought our costs down. In year 2 and 3 the cost were still… Read more »

Jenny
Jenny
10 years ago

My husband and I were turned down for insurance repeatedly (both in good health, no medical issues on records, regular physicals) because we’re overweight. We ended up using our state’s High Risk Health insurance, and opted for a high deductible plan for similar reasons to the guest blogger – we’re generally healthy, and can predict our medical care needs per year pretty easily. Group insurance isn’t an option where I work (my husband doesn’t work), so we were glad that there was an option available for us (or we’d still be insurance-free). I’ve tried to explain to friends why the… Read more »

Anna
Anna
10 years ago

When I read a post like this, I am SO HAPPY to be living in Canada where our health costs are covered…when I go to the doctor I don’t have to pay anything. I’m also very fortunate to have an excellent plan (for dental, orthodontic, paramedical, prescriptions) through my workplace (and it’s a job I still love most days, so I’ll stay put!). I’m a cancer survivor (over 10yrs now!) and cannot imagine how much my treatment would have cost me had I lived in the US and had to pay for it myself!

Jamison
Jamison
10 years ago

My pet peeve: Government won’t let health insurance companies compete over state lines… when you live in one state with 3 health insurance companies, basic economics tells you prices will be higher than if you were free to choose from the almost 1,500+ insurance companies in America. I don’t blame the health insurance companies for this. Sure, maybe they had lobbyists asked our politicians (who look out for our best interests -rolling eyes-) to make this law, but if our government really wants us to be healthy and save money, they will ditch this state lines law and let us… Read more »

Rachel211
Rachel211
10 years ago

Wow – I don’t know a lot of the ins/outs of health insurance, but would this example be right then? That, lets say in December and you had paid for a full year, an emergency happened and ended up costing $17,000 – that this family would have to pay $16,000 first and only THEN would the insurance company contribute $1,000 to the cost? Because it sounds like even though there is a high deductible that you aren’t even getting like an 80/20 option on what you do pay. Ouchy. God forbid that your year roll over the next month and… Read more »

Chickybeth
Chickybeth
10 years ago

I find it truly frustrating to try to find private insurance in Michigan. There are many plans but most are at least $200/month/person with $5k deductible. The problem for me is that none of them have exactly the same features or costs so it it impossible to compare them on a level field. The note J.D. left about no one knowing the true cost of their services is so true! The insurance company wants you to “shop around” for the best price, but most places I call can’t even give me an estimate until it is submitted to the insurance… Read more »

Everyday Tips
Everyday Tips
10 years ago

It is too bad that insurance is so difficult to figure out. I bet that is a new job in the making- a health insurance broker. Someone that you could pay some money to that could find the absolute best insurance plan that would work for your circumstances. Maybe that person already exists and I am just not aware of them. My husband works for a large company, and we still have to pay 600/month for our family for insurance. (They pay half, we pay half.) It is not like the old days, that is for sure. When my husband… Read more »

Jen B
Jen B
10 years ago

My husband and I had to find private health insurance when I quit my job (for similar reasons to the article writer), and we found a high deductible plan with a $5,000 deductible for the entire family. Surprisingly, it paid off. The second year we were on it, my son had an emergency appendectomy on January 1. We hit the deductible in that first week, and for the rest of the year, all our medical services were covered. I was grateful to be on the plan that year, because it paid for itself. As long as you have enough in… Read more »

Heather Caliri
Heather Caliri
10 years ago

We went through this research and headache, with this additional twist: we got denied when we applied. Several times. My husband had already quit his job to found a company, and it took nearly a year to sort through the red tape and get him covered. I shudder to think of the choice we’d have to have made had our denial been based on actual health problems: go without health insurance or not stick with the business (a successful one).

David
David
10 years ago

Wow. I always thought it was an either / or thing: either you pay a premium or you have a high deductible. It looks like private health insurance users really get screwed (big surprise).

I love it how this country’s politicians (both sides) play lip service to the self-employed, entrepreneurs, and small business owners, but when it comes down to doing anything to help them—silence.

Rachel211
Rachel211
10 years ago

I think they don’t know how much stuff cost because I honestly think they just change it whenever they feel like it. I’m pregnant right now and I have diabetes so I have to go in for ultrasounds every two weeks. I received bills for last months apts (THAT WERE EXACTLY THE SAME – same time, same doc, same room, same equipment) and both I had to pay a $50 copay for. BUT when I looked at the breakdown that they charged the insurance company for, the first apt cost was $325 and the second was for $675. There wasn’t… Read more »

tas
tas
10 years ago

Chickybeth, have you tried http://www.healthcare.gov? It lists how many plans are available in your area, links to http://www.michigan.gov/dleg/0,1607,7-154-10555_12902_35510—,00.html (which is michigan’s insurance department website), and coming in October will list price estimates for each policy. I don’t know how detailed the policy information is, but it seems like a good start.

leslie
leslie
10 years ago

My biggest problem with the way health insurance is handled in this country is the way it is tied to your job for so many people (I have a lot of other issues with it, believe me…this is just the biggest one). It is insane that people have to take jobs/stay with jobs simply because of health insurance. It so limits many peoples work options. Want to work part time for some reason…sorry, you lose your health benefits (not in every case but in a lot of them). As this post points out, going out on your own for insurance… Read more »

Ethiope
Ethiope
10 years ago

I’m a doctor, and it’s not that we don’t know what OUR services costs. I can just look on my computer at my fee schedule and tell you how much anything I do will cost. This is not the same thing as how much any individual insurance company will pay since that depends on the contracted payment. What we don’t tend to know is how much a test we send you OUT for costs, like lab work and radiology tests. That’s because there is no one price. It depends on where you go and how much your insurance company will… Read more »

Cheryl
Cheryl
10 years ago

Health insurance is a real landmine because one policy does not fit all and circumstances can change what your needs are. I have a high deductible plan written on a group basis. I need to fund our HSA, but with the current economy it has been hard to have the funds. I have a son with chronic health issues and we pay the full $3,000 deductible plus the additional $1,000 out of pocket maximum every year. This is when it becomes very hard to handle the cost of health care. Finding affordable coverage and funding an HSA is much easier… Read more »

joe
joe
10 years ago

>>how ridiculous it is that doctors don’t know how much their services cost, but it’s not just doctors. It’s the entire system.

Ok, let’s get real here. The reason that no one in the health care system knows what the costs are is BECAUSE IT IS DESIGNED to be that way.

It is designed to be confusing, so you cannot compare costs.

It is designed to be confusing so people are dependent on the insurance companies.

… so what happens when there is any effort to fix the situation? Extreme hostility. Boggles the mind.

Leah
Leah
10 years ago

I have private health insurance, and I found it on http://www.ehealthinsurance.com — I pay $140 per month (but I pay every 3 months — I think it’d be a bit more if I paid monthly). I get $1k worth of office visits covered at 100% per year, then I have a $5k deductible, and then everything is covered at 100%. I also get free generic prescriptions. It’s a fabulous plan for me (but I am keeping my fingers crossed that costs don’t go up too much next year!). The one drawback is that there’s no maternity coverage. Even if my… Read more »

Linus
Linus
10 years ago

I think this is a great post to show the confusing and frustrating process of health insurance. This is intentional on the part of the insurance companies to increase confusion which in turn increases profit. In response to JD’s comment, I am an emergency medicine physician and would like to provide atleast my insight on the “cost” game. Most practicing physicians don’t know about the cost because it is an artifical system setup by hospitals and insurance companies. Most insurance companies reimburse a fraction of the amount billed, so is the true cost the amount billed or the amount reimbursed?… Read more »

Andrew
Andrew
10 years ago

Another resource for finding private healthcare plans is NASE, the National Association for the Self Employed

NASE

AC
AC
10 years ago

I have an HSA and I guess this article confused me a little bit. I thought BY LAW that an insurer with dependents can only contribute up to $6,050 to their HSA a year and that an individual only does $3,050. That also include employer contributions. With that said, I pay only $2,300 tax deferred and my employer pays the rest. I had done the math and I am really only paying $3-4 a month for health insurance and the rest goes into my HSA where I can actually set up various investments similar to a 401K. The only difficulty… Read more »

Bananen
Bananen
10 years ago

Government regulations have destroyed what used to be a good, private health care system. It’s such a shame.

Ahzz
Ahzz
10 years ago

Be thankful that you were in progressive states. In Texas, 2 adults married 1 working would have run $1400/mo for 5k deductible due to smoking and 1 with epilepsy (well managed with $35/mo prescription and no event for 20+ years). $2300/mo for HMO low deductible and preventative care coverage.

Ed
Ed
10 years ago

I just had to comment on the Doctors not knowing what services (prescriptions) cost as spot on. I work in a pharmacy and I will get quite a few people who have been ‘told’ by their Dr. that the med will only cost $XX, not $XXX.
A big one is the antibiotic Levaquin, the patient gets #10 pills and the cash price is $190. “But my Dr said it would only be $40”

Well ask him/her where they are getting it b/c I would like to get some too. 😉

Rosa Rugosa
Rosa Rugosa
10 years ago

The lack of cost transparency for medical services also makes it difficult to optimize one’s Flexible Spending Account. Not only do I have to guess what my medical needs will be next year, but I have to guess the prices. This has always struck me as bizarre, since I don’t have to guess on any of my other tax-deductible expenses, which would be far easier to do (e.g. property taxes, wages).

sue
sue
10 years ago

We have ins thru my husband’s employer. He’s 56, a heart/diabetes patient. I’m 48 with BP & thyroid issues. Our 14 y.o son is healthy. We are carrying our 23 y.o son as a disabled dependent due to a childhd degenerative hip disease. Our monthly ins premium is more than our house payment. We consider this a necessity, with incurred med expenses of <$1million over the past 17 years. I am not surprised to hear that drs are unaware of procedural costs. We just went thru a hip replacement for our son – 2 weeks ago. Cost was not mentioned… Read more »

Nicole
Nicole
10 years ago

@14 You are completely wrong on every point. The private health care system has never been functioning and cannot actually exist without government regulation. It is a classic, canonical example of a market failure from adverse selection. Our blog post today expresses my frustration at comments such as yours, and I believe tomorrow’s will touch on some of the theory as to why you’re wrong, though in the context of the used car market.

Nancy Hess
Nancy Hess
10 years ago

I have been in business for myself for many years and have watched my premiums rise with my age as well as the times. I know the experience of calling around to compare prices for a mammagram and an annual check up and NOBODY being able to give me information. I also have a high deductible plan and HSA, and make it a point to let doctors know my situation and interestingly enough, they often give me options or recommend alternative ways to address a health situation. The uninsured in this country really need to organize and go to Washington.… Read more »

Kyra
Kyra
10 years ago

I suspect that the lack of transparency of health care costs is one of the biggest factors in our high healthcare prices. With costs hidden, there’s no way to shop around for a good prices, no healthy competition to keep costs down, no restraint mechanism or accountability for performing useless procedures just to get paid for them. This adds to the power imbalances caused by the nature of much of health care being so urgent and so life-and-death important and so expertese-based—you are vastly limited in your ability to put off a treatment while you shop around, do it yourself,… Read more »

James
James
10 years ago

As a medical professional, I wish I could offer something helpful, but I can’t because it really is a mess out there. The government bears much of the blame due to regulations, for example the fact that you can’t purchase insurance from outside of your state. That’s not to take the industry off the hook, they are also to blame. Their plans are complex to use and compare. And then there are the users, who abused third party payers as money trees and have milked the system dry. Don’t let anyone place all the blame on any of the three… Read more »

Wes Y
Wes Y
10 years ago

One of the things that frustrates me the most about health insurance is the lack of rewards (i.e. lower cost) for those of us in very low-risk categories. I’m single, male, 24, never smoked, no family health issues, and extremely fit. $5000 deductible HSA through my employer is $1550 annually.

Compare health insurance to car insurance: if I buy a Lamborghini and live in downtown Chicago, I pay MUCH higher premiums than someone with a Corolla in Idaho. Why doesn’t health insurance work the same way?

Ken LaVoie
Ken LaVoie
10 years ago

Hi There, I have nothing but compliments for your plan. I’m VERY curious if you are using one of the non traditional plans such as Mega? We have Anthem (I’m self employed and buy my own plan) — My coverage costs $425 give or take with a $15,000 per person / $30,000 per family out of pocket / deductible. We, like you, discovered that the riders costs more than the typical coverage they provide. I’m surprised to hear you were eligible for the HSA — we are NOT because, not many people know this — the has’s actually have an… Read more »

Ken LaVoie
Ken LaVoie
10 years ago

To rachael211, yes, at least MY plan is like that. Mine is actually higher than the contributors — 15k per person (30k max per year for family), so we would pay 100% percent of the first 30k of medical expenses for my family, with NO COPAYS whatsoever. And we pay $425 per month for this privelage of paying all our medical costs out of pocket. The ONE benefit we do get is that by “running the bills” through the insurance, we end up getting a bit of a discount.

elisabeth
elisabeth
10 years ago

I think I’m glad my doctors aren’t thinking about what a treatment costs. I am happy to discuss with them what is medically necessary and what is not, but I don’t want them making decisions based on what they think I can afford OR what they will earn from doing a particular procedure. That’s one reason I’m happy to be working with doctors at a University hospital/major medical school who are on salary and whose salaries don’t depend on number of patients or procedures etc. Medical insurance strikes me as unlike other insurance, because health care isn’t really “optional” [I… Read more »

Janette
Janette
10 years ago

#14- obviously you have not been outside of the insurance fold for a while. I am guessing you are with a large corporation or over 65 and covered by the government. Ten years ago a hospital could not find my daughter’s insurance when she was checked in by a friend. She had surgery IN the emergency room and was discharged as soon as she was conscience and could walk on her own- six hours after surgery. We called about insurance. They charged our insurance company $17,000 for the emergency room, $10,000 for the doctor and about $4000 for the rest… Read more »

SZ
SZ
10 years ago

Managing risk is what the Jaimie is asking about and it’s not an easy theme. You might want to google the idea and see what pundits in different fields say to understand different approaches to it. It’s as much about knowing facts as about understanding what they mean to your ever changing situation. I take different risks now than when I was 30 (I’m 50). However the landscape changes as well. For example, I had a part-time job that offered affordable insurance in 1990 so that I could comfortably be a musician too. One thing we can expect is that… Read more »

s
s
10 years ago

I think HSAs are good IF you are young and healthy but for anyone with a chronic condition???

One med alone in our household is $1500 a month (that is $18,000 annually) and, with insurance, we pay $25. Our annual premium for family HI is about $22,000 a year with 90% paid for by the employer.

Jaime @ Eventual Millionaire
Jaime @ Eventual Millionaire
10 years ago

@AC We put in about $5,000 per year. Right now it has $10,000 in it, not $10,000 per year. @Ahzz Wow! I thought Maine was pretty bad, but I had no idea how bad it can be. That is crazy. I remember asking my agent what the top plan was. She said it was $2700 per month. I couldn’t believe it. @Ken LaVoie Ah a fellow Mainer! And you might be right about the illegal HSA. We are still trying to figure that out without any luck. Our health insurance agent wasn’t sure but neither was the bank when I… Read more »

Rachel211
Rachel211
10 years ago

Wow. I am inclined to think that anyone these days who doesn’t think that insurance at the very, very least needs some regulations (if not a full overhaul) have just lucked out and not had to deal with a major insurance bill that was ‘questionable’ to be covered. Of the three friends I know who have had cancer (all of them young) they have all had horrible, horrible times trying to get the insurance to pay for treatment. One friend even had a HUGE amount in savings from being single and having a very lucrative job, and now is bankrupt… Read more »

andrew
andrew
10 years ago

#18 Nicole – you may wish to do some research on fraternal organization, mutual aid societies and lodge doctors. It was a way for the the immigrants and minorities to take care of each other in the age before government services.
I’d provide links, but a simple google search with the terms above will bring up enough resources.

Nicole
Nicole
10 years ago

@26 Yes, dear. I know all about the history of health care in the US in enormous detail (and quite a bit about 19th century England, France and Germany’s systems while we’re at it). If you would like to engage me in a long discussion on this topic, I suggest you enroll at the university where I teach as I keep having to remind myself that I’m not getting paid to remove ignorance from the internet. It is quite lovely to think that fraternal organizations, mutual aid societies and charity would solve all our world problems if only the dratted… Read more »

zoranian
zoranian
10 years ago

Just having insurance for the discount and paying out of pocket would totally be worth it if you ever ended up in the hospital. I had a very routine vaginal birth with absolutely NO medication and less than two days in the hospital. I was pretty much ignored most of the time while I was there unless and until I asked for assistance and got checked on about twice a day. For this, I was billed over $10,000 initially. By the time the insurance company adjusted for their rates, the insurance company paid about $3,000 and I was responsible for… Read more »

Jennifer
Jennifer
10 years ago

The issue about how much procedures cost brought back an interesting thing I noticed when I moved from Canada to the US: In Canada, where I grew up, procedures were never about cost. The choices were always more about side effects, time it will take to recover, long term expectations, etc etc. You worked with your doctor to determine the right treatment for you, and that was what you got. When I moved to the US, all of a sudden it was a menu: Procedure A cost X, Procedure B costs Y. You decide what you want. I remember thinking… Read more »

AC
AC
10 years ago

@#14- how exactly has government regulation “destroyed” good public health care system? I would like to agree with you, but just making that single statement hardly constitutes a position on the matter and it’s a tad anachronistic in my opinion. On a macro econ perspective with the government’s already heavy involvement in health care through Medicare, medicaid, and CHIP it is in the public’s interest that health care costs are exposed and properly regulated and managed. Obama is considering prolonging the Bush tax cuts until 2020. That seems reasonable given we are on our way out of the recession, unfortunately… Read more »

Anna
Anna
10 years ago

Reading all the comment and the reader story make me VERY HAPPY that I live in Canada and enjoy excellent medical care that I don’t have to pay crazy money for! I’m equally happy that I’ve got excellent additional coverage through my employer (for prescriptions, dentist/orthodontal, paramedical services etc). I am a 10yr cancer survivor and I never experienced any kind of delays with my treatment at all, and the only thing I had to pay for was parking at the hospital. Had I lived in the US, I would have very high medical bills to try to pay.

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