Should I sell my car on eBay Motors?

Over the last few months, I've spent countless hours researching the process of selling items online for a large project I've been compiling. It's taught me that as much as I thought I knew about selling online, there's so much more that I have no clue about!

For example, a family member recently asked for my help selling an unneeded car on the internet. “Sure!” was my first thought. “Heck, maybe I'll even use this as a case study!” However, there's one major problem with this situation: I'm completely ignorant when it comes to cars.

Actually, I shouldn't say completely ignorant. That's not correct. I'm inexcusably ignorant when it comes to cars.

As a younger member of the male population of American society, I feel like I've failed to inherit this basic knowledge that was supposed to written into my DNA. In fact, my inability to prioritize the maintenance and regular care of my own car is likely one of my biggest financial weaknesses. Maybe that's one reason I enjoyed our recent year without owning any vehicle at all!

Even with this blatant gap in knowledge, I actually have had some success selling cars online through Craigslist. Before we left for our year abroad, we sold both of our cars using their online classifieds. However, those were a couple of clunkers. If I remember correctly, we sold one for $1,000 and one for $2,000 after negotiations.

Because we were leaving, our priority was to just get our cars sold. We didn't want to give the cars away for free, but we weren't trying to squeeze out an extra 10% or additional $100. We were more concerned with not being stuck with a set of wheels parked in Indiana while our bodies were in New Zealand!

The situation with this car is different. The family member I'm assisting doesn't need to sell the car — he wants to sell the car. He has no delusions about getting top retail dollar, but is willing to take the time to obtain a fair private-party offer.

Plus, this isn't anything close to a clunker. It's a 2003 Honda Accord EX Coupe. It's been driven 150,000 miles, but still has only a few minor bumps, blemishes, or flaws. It runs very smoothly and has been taken care of by someone more responsible than me for the majority of its years!

Giving eBay Motors a Fair Shake

Normally, I'd take the same approach with this car as I have with the others I've sold. I'd take plenty of photos, research the competition, and write a detailed description. I'd present the price and the process for getting more information in a firm, but politely worded manner. I'd then upload the info to Craigslist and wait for the phone to ring!

In other words, normally I would never give eBay a passing glance. I know that for the last few years they've had some form of classified through what used to be Kijiji.com, but for one reason or another I never considered it a viable option. I've also heard stories of people buying and selling cars through traditional eBay auctions (non-classified formats), but that process seems too risky and intimidating.

Recently, however, eBay has started a huge push on its newly re-branded classified section, eBayClassifieds.com. They're heavily promoting this, and they seem to be incorporating the classified listings much more fluidly with the general automobile searches for the main site. Classified listings within a certain distance (200 miles by default) are now included alongside the national listing in searches when logged into your eBay account.

In addition, constructing a classified ad in eBay has several benefits over its competitors. It's a more guided process, with eBay providing reminders and recommendations along the way. For example, they supply a fantastic, printable Sell Your Car Checklist [219kb PDF] to help gather everything you'll need to create a detailed listing. Currently, your first six classified ads in the eBay Motors section are free during a 12-month period.

The process of creating a classified ad to sell a car is so smooth that, for the first time, I'm going to construct my classified ad in eBay first. I'll then take my description, pictures, and relevant details, and copy them into my trusty Craigslist format, as well. The more I research and tinker with eBay's classified section, the more I'm starting to view this as a necessary part of giving the car adequate online exposure.

Step It Up with a National Auction?

Selling via a classified ad isn't the only way you can list your car on eBay. You also have the option to list it through the eBay Motors site under a standard auction format. With classifieds, you list your contact information and have to work out the details of the transaction with potential buyers (just as if you were listing on Craigslist). However, using eBay's standard auction format, interested parties from all of the U.S. can view and place bids on your vehicle, just like they would any other item on eBay.

Currently, eBay is allowing you to post your first four automobile auctions of this type for free, too. As long as you pass on all the extra upgrades and add-ons, you can create a national listing at any starting price for free. With this format, you can eliminate a lot of the grunt work that accompanies a classified listing. (Grunt work includes answering phone calls, negotiating, showing the car, etc…)

So, I could simply list my car with a starting price equal to what I'd normally offer in my classified ads. It's unlikely that I'd get any bids, but as a free 7-day listing, it's hard to pass up taking a shot. I'll already be compiling the info for my classified ads, so it'd only take an extra 15 minutes or so to upload the data into a standard auction of this type.

Is the extra 15 minutes worth taking an unlikely shot at selling my car outside of my local market? I'm not sure. eBay will automatically compile and offer shipping options to someone who may want to have the car transported. These ranged from $300-$700 on some of the sample cars I looked through. Would someone actually pay that? Again, I'm not sure.

Edmunds.com featured an article about a couple that sold cars online to people from all around the country, people who would fly in to inspect the cars. I like to keep a fairly open mind, but I just can't imagine someone wanting to buy plane tickets to come check out a potential car from across the country. (In the story, the couple even picked them up from the airport and made breakfast!)

Deciding What To Do…

Many times when I write a post, I explore a topic I'm experienced with. I look for areas where I've had either success or failure that may be valuable if I were to share it. This isn't one of those posts.

On this topic, I'm still clueless. I'd actually like to know what you think! Have any of you bought or sold vehicles using eBay (either classified or standard listing formats)? Do you know anyone who has? Am I missing any huge gaps in my thought process? If you were in my shoes, what would you do to maximize the exposure for your car online?

I love Craigslist, but I'm convinced I may be leaving money on the table if I don't seriously consider eBay for selling my car. If there's interest in this topic, I'll be sure to post a follow-up describing any successes or failures!

How to Sell Your Car on eBay Motors

A representative of eBay Motors e-mailed me to ask if I'd like to interview their Manager of Dealer Training, Clayton Stanfield. Stanfield spends his days educating and training automobile dealerships across the country how to better market their cars and trucks using eBay Motors.

Many of you commented that you'd love to see a follow-up with more specific tips on how to better use eBay Motors to sell a car. Since I'm going through the process for the first time, I jumped at the chance to chat with Stanfield about his top tips and tricks.

Create a Great-Looking Listing

On the call, I asked Stanfield the primary question, “What are the top areas where the average consumer can have the biggest impact in improving their listings?” In other words, I was looking for Stanfield to show me the low-hanging fruit. I wanted to know the areas where you and I could get the biggest bang for our time and effort.

The first words out of Stanfield's mouth were: “You've got to create a great-looking listing.” He was the first to admit this is common advice, but reiterated that not enough people take it heart.

“Seventy percent of cars that sell, sell to a buyer outside of state lines,” Stanfield said. “Out-of-town buyers need to be able to visualize the car. Focus more on pictures than anything else.”

Stanfield suggested creating a “virtual test drive” for potential buyers. I've since fallen in love with that phrase. One of the first principles Stanfield teaches is that dealerships can do a better job of this by always including 24 high-quality images (eBay's maximum) with every listing. Thorough images help the buyer really get to know the vehicle, similar to being able to test drive it themselves in person.

Titles vs. Subtitles

Another way to improve the average listing is through the smart use of titles and subtitles. When listing an everyday item on eBay, creating a subtitle costs extra money and isn't searchable by default. This means that when a potential buyer searches for an everyday item, the information you provide in the subtitle won't help them find your listing.

eBay Motors works differently. When listing your car or truck, eBay Motors generates a basic title for your listing automatically. Usually this includes the year, make, and model. For example, my car's automatic title is “2003 Honda Accord”. eBay Motors then provides a subtitle where you can fill in more specific information. In contrast, when selling an automobile the subtitle is free and is included in searches by potential buyers.

Stanfield says that one of the biggest mistakes people make is that they repeat information in the title (generated by eBay Motors) again in the subtitle. There is no need to repeat the information in the title! In other words, eBay has already provided me with 2003 Honda Accord. It makes no sense for me to repeat that information in the subtitle (which I actually did the first time!).

Instead, Stanfield urges customers to use every available character in the valuable subtitle to help your listing appear in more searches. He suggests thinking for terms that a buyer may search for, but that aren't already included in title. Some possibilities:

  • “Chevy” – Most of the time the title will say Chevrolet XYZ, but buyers may search for “Chevy”.
  • “5-Speed”
  • “Leather”
  • “DVD”
  • “Heated”

According to Stanfield, appearing in more searches is the number one way to increase the final price you receive for the auction!

A Personalized, Friendly Description

When it comes to creating a description, the most important factor is being thorough and including as much detail as possible. But if you want to maximize the amount of bidders, simply listing the facts isn't enough. Stanfield encourages dealers and individual sellers to personalize their descriptions by including background information on the car.

For example, you may include information such as when you bought the car, how long you've driven it, or why you are selling it. “You don't just have to list details and facts; try sharing the background and history of the automobile, if you can” Stanfield says. He points out that sharing details not only allows people to identify with the car, but also makes you seem more personable and down to earth.

Most importantly, Stanfield suggests being brutally honest in your descriptions. It's not only the ethical thing to do, but will result in better results and far less hassle. On one particular listing, Stanfield even went so far as to offer up this in bold: “This car is in worse shape than you think!” (I laughed out loud when he told that story on the phone!)

J.D.'s note: I think personalized, friendly descriptions are key to most eBay auctions. My auctions almost all go for more than similar items sell for. I'm certain it's because I try to convey a chatty, friendly persona.

Reserve and Starting Price

At the end of the interview, I asked Stanfield for his suggestions on setting a reserve price and a starting price. Stanfield recommends setting the reserve at “the bare minimum you'd accept for the vehicle.” He notes that almost every listing sees an increase in activity and bidding once the reserve price is exceeded. Buyers are much more willing to bid on automobiles that are no longer protected by reserves. The quicker your reserve price is met, the more exposure your listing will get!

When it comes to starting price, Stanfield suggests starting low as well. “The most important bid is the very first one,” he says. “It gets the ball rolling and increases exposure in the search engine results.” He suggests starting the bidding at between 10-20% of your reserve price as a rule of thumb. For example, if you set a minimum reserve of $5,000, placing the starting bid at $500 would be a good idea. Most of the time, this will allow for bidding to initiate much earlier than a higher starting price!

Thanks to eBay Motors

I enjoyed interviewing Clayton Stanfield and appreciate him taking the time to share his expertise! Special thanks also goes to the eBay Motors team for reaching out to me on Twitter and making the introduction to Clayton.

As for me, I learned several specific tips during this interview that will help me spruce up my listing and try my hand at some national exposure. If there's anything you'd add, let me know below!

More about...Transportation, Side Hustles

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Rob
Rob
10 years ago

A friend of mine bought a used Harley for $10,000 a few years ago; he knew it was worth more and could sell it for more. So he rode it for a few months then listed it on eBay. He was able to sell it for $12,000. Not too shabby. The guy that bought it came all the way from Oklahoma (to Ohio). He bought a one way ticket and then rode it all the way back down to Oklahoma. Another friend drove all the way out to the West coast from Ohio to buy an old 1970s Ford pickup.… Read more »

David
David
10 years ago

I bought a car using ebay almost 10 year ago. It was a 1993 Saturn SW2 with 130,000 miles. From a buyer’s perspective, I was looking for something affordable and somewhat reliable. I also didn’t want to travel too far for this fairly common car. After looking through the listings this car struck my eye. The auction price was running well under the Blue Book value and the listing was loaded with pictures and a complete description of the car. I figured “what the hell”, I’ll bid on it. Much to my surprise I won the auction. I had communicated… Read more »

andyg8180
andyg8180
10 years ago

If yuore not in a rush, just put it up on craigslist… more and more people are moving to that area to search for goods..

Also try carmax if you have one near you. =I’ve been hearing nothing but good things about them and its a quick and easy sale…

Matt
Matt
10 years ago

We’ve been burned before as sellers on eBay – buyer claimed the item never arrived – we refunded – buyer still left negative feedback. Fortunately it was only a $30 item, but still not pleasant!

Obviously a car-selling scenario will be different – but I think I’d still be a bit leery of eBay unless it was an in-person pickup.

Jason
Jason
10 years ago

My sister and brother in law bought a car off eBay. It was rather old and has developed some gremlins, but I think the deal went pretty smoothly. I can understand why someone might offer a unique or hard to find automobile on a national auction — you can get a larger audience who knows what they want and understands what they are buying. Antiques, limited run things, performance cars and so on come to mind. But for a plain vanilla Accord, I’d look at what the value is supposed to be, list it on Craigslist, or sell it at… Read more »

Steve R
Steve R
10 years ago

My brother tried to sell a car on Ebay a few years ago. It was an ’80’s version of a Celica with a digital dash. Anyhow, among the numerous questions he received, people kept asking if was willing to “part it down” meaning strip key components out and sell them instead of the entire car. He wasn’t going to do that. He finally received one bid (with a lot of watchers). Once the auction was over and the bidder won the car, he pulled out saying he didn’t want to pay to ship the car. In my brothers defence, his… Read more »

Dean
Dean
10 years ago

As a buyer, you should never buy a car sight-unseen and without inspection. So, expect that most reasonable buyers will want to either be local or travel to you to finalize the transaction. I have bought a nearly-new expensive luxury/sports car on ebay nearly across-country, and flew out and drove it back. It was new enough to trust it wouldn’t be a clunker and strand me on the return. A specialty-used dealer, great experience. Local new-car dealer didn’t have the attention span to find the car I wanted, and ebay had the nationwide market to satisfy. Four years later, I… Read more »

sue
sue
5 years ago
Reply to  Dean

i have just read this 2010 email response to marketplace car sales
ebay, craiglist.
this was very helpful for me as I have not sold a car in this manner
I will try the trader site
I foolishly purchased a car and now 2000 miles into this new car I know I need to sell it. I made a huge mistake for a lot of money. thanks for the hints

Terry
Terry
10 years ago

I’ve sold 4 cars on eBay and found it much easier than trying to sell on Craigslist. I live in NE Ohio and selling a car on Craigslist is an open invitation to get insulted by lowball offers and oddball trades. Would I really trade my Nissan Maxima for a 1988 LeBaron convertible?

eBay has it’s problems though – the car I recently sold took 3 times to sell. First 2 bidders were morons and in eBay’s new feedback system you can’t leave them negative feedback as a buyer, but they left negative feedback for me as the seller. Lovely.

econobiker
econobiker
10 years ago

I sold a motorcycle and parts via ebay several years back along with selling two of a similar model via craigslist. Generally ebay is for enthusiasts and craiglist is for the lower priced local sales. Ebay = fees and paypal while craiglist = free and cash. I asked for a non refundable deposit for about 10% of the selling price and the rest in cash when selling via ebay. Craiglist is all cash money deals. Scammers abound on both services so absolutely require a telephone contact number from anyone wanting to buy or winning the bid. It helps to list… Read more »

Everyday Tips
Everyday Tips
10 years ago

A friend of mine sold his car on ebay and had a great experience!

Baker
Baker
10 years ago

Thanks for all the help!

I’ve never ever heard or considered AutoMax. I’ll check into that. Both Edmunds and KBB list the car between $6900-$7000 in “clean” condition.

Being a fairly standard car, even if a decent one, I agree that it’s rare anyone would want to come out of town. It’s just that darn FREE, that’s drawing me in! 😉

Thanks again!

Brad
Brad
10 years ago

I’ve sold one car on ebay and one through a message board, both bought sight unseen. They were mustangs, not rare by any means, but great condition. I’ve also sold cars to carmax. You may get a little less with them but it is so much easier and you don’t have to worry about shipping, fees, test drives, etc. I like to avoid craigslist anymore. Its about 99% scams and lowballers and 1% actual buyers. The local paper is still a good place to advertise.

HKWC
HKWC
10 years ago

We recently tried to auction our (non-running; broken timing belt) 2000 Cadillac Catera through TWO eBay Motors auctions – NEITHER buyer actually sent the money (and yes, the listing clearly said what was wrong with it), so we were out several weeks of waiting for the supposed “check in the mail,” as well as the red tape of getting the successful auction fee (around $150) taken off our account by eBay before we could re-list. We ended up posting it on Craigslist, and after about a month, someone drove from 8 hours away to pay the same amount, in cash,… Read more »

Robin L.
Robin L.
10 years ago

Seems to me with ordinary vehicles that are in good shape the local classifieds would be best but I would never pass up an opportunity for a free ad! I think for specialty items eBay would be the way to go because people can’t find what they are looking for without going national. I’ve been watching auctions and sales for camping vans like Eurovan and Vanagon campers, and Sportsmobiles. It is really rare to see any of those sit on the market for long and really rare to see any of them in my local lots.

Mike Crosby
Mike Crosby
10 years ago

I do like this post and would like more. Not so much about selling cars, but selling other items. Or how to offer services.

I’m getting interested in Craigslist, and I’ve always stayed away from ebay because I’m not one to bid and spend a lot of time purchasing an item.

Icebear-NY
Icebear-NY
10 years ago

I tried selling a truck locally. I drove it to higher income neighborhoods and parked it in public places along with a “for sale” sign in the windshield. Got several calls but not the $2k we wanted. With the help of a friend the truck sold on ebay motors. We took about 50 photos of the truck, inside, outside, under the hood, etc.

Another truck I had I felt would only last another year or so. This one was posted on Craiglist for $300 and sold in 24 hours. We also sold our house on Craiglist!

Steve
Steve
10 years ago

I have been trying to sell a classic muscle car for my grandfather on craigslist, but he’s only had a few bites and one guy just wanted the 440 engine out of it. It was used for drag racing and is missing a few parts to be street legal – should I try ebay and/or AutoTrader? I don’t think the one-way flight/drive it back will work because it’s missing mirrors and wipers.

Jen
Jen
10 years ago

I have a friend who sold his car on eBay. The buyer made a last minute bid, flew out to check on the car, and drove it home that day. No muss, no fuss, except for dealing with changing the plates.

When listing the car be sure to price it fairly – really examine what other cars are going for, especially considering the mileage. And be thorough in describing the car. You don’t want to come off as making it sound too good to be true. People seem to be willing to accept defects as long as their disclosed.

Turling
Turling
10 years ago

Weird timing, as I just listed my car on E-Bay last night. It’s my first to sell, so we’ll see how it goes.

I did buy one car on E-Bay, only to have the seller back out. The car I did buy was listed on E-Bay, but didn’t go for the reserve, so I contacted the seller and negotiated something.

Jason
Jason
10 years ago

@Baker — Edmunds and KBB are fine resources, but don’t be disappointed if the numbers they quote are optimistic. I would agree that CL and other services turn up a lot of scammers. Do what CL says on every page, and deal locally and in CASH. Or alternatively if you go for the cashier’s check, have it drawn at the bank in front of your eyes, as others have indicated. Another thing regarding this family member you are helping — are they available to complete the sale? If they are not, be sure to get the details worked out prior… Read more »

Kevin M
Kevin M
10 years ago

I’m guessing people aren’t going to fly in from out of town to check out a 2003 Accord – that behavior is probably indicative of a classic or specialty car. I’d probably stick with Craigslist and see what you can get. If you’re not happy with the result, try eBay.

Carol@inthetrenches
10 years ago

In your research have you by chance done anything about creating an online store and have any how-tos?

Budgeting in the Fun Stuff
Budgeting in the Fun Stuff
10 years ago

Ebay has too many fees in general.

I’ve sold three cars – 1 with Thrifty Nickel (classifieds paper) and 2 with Craigslist. I would highly recommend Craigslist. You’ll get the deal you’re looking for without the hassle of delivery anywhere…your buyers can meet you and test drive and pay in cash. Yep, Craigslist is the only place I’d sell now.

BTW, the Thrifty Nickel car took 3 weeks to sell. The two Craigslist cars all sold within 2 days.

Carla
Carla
10 years ago

For a Honda, I don’t think eBay is worth it. Craigslist for me was hit or miss. In the Bay Area, Craigslist used to be THE place to buy and sell cars, but now you have way too many scammers, spammers and people trying to get something for nothing. In 2009, I sold a 2007 Acura TL Type S on AutoTrader.com and received more than my fair share of legitimate, serious responses. The car was sold one day after it was listed online. The buyers drove up to Berkeley from Bakersfield (4 hour drive) and paid cash (you can imagine… Read more »

Carla | Green and Chic
Carla | Green and Chic
10 years ago

For a Honda, I don’t think eBay is worth it. For me, Craigslist was hit or miss. In the Bay Area, Craigslist used to be THE place to buy and sell cars, but now you have way too many scammers, spammers and people trying to get something for nothing. In 2009, I sold a 2007 Acura TL Type S on AutoTrader.com and received more than my fair share of legitimate, serious responses. The car was sold one day after it was listed online. The buyers drove up to Berkeley from Bakersfield (4 hour drive) and paid cash (you can imagine… Read more »

Chicilia
Chicilia
10 years ago

Have you ever considered selling your car on Autotrader.com? If you take alook at the site you will see they have lots of cars listed for sale from thousands of auto dealers and private sellers. Or now you can sell your car to local dealerships thru this program called TIM. Take a look the webstie.

MutantSupermodel
MutantSupermodel
10 years ago

Hmmm I wonder if you can run it simultaneously on Craigslist and Ebay? AutoTrader is awesome. This is a great post and I’d love to know the result as I’m planning on selling my own car in a year or two!

Zuwi
Zuwi
10 years ago

I bought my Honda CRV in Iowa from eBay motors. I live in Boston. Paid to have it shipped to me. I bought the car for $3,500 under Blue Book value, and I bid in the last 2 minutes of the auction. I had the car checked out by a mechanic in iowa, a service eBay hooked me up with. My car was in perfect condition, and I saved a bundle. My mother bought a car on eBay, and it didn’t go as well. The car pictures did not reflect extensive damage, and she didn’t have it checked out by… Read more »

quinsy
quinsy
10 years ago

I sold a car when I was 16 years old on Yahoo Motors, but since that was over 10 years ago I am guessing that not many people are looking there anymore. It was totally easy though, I had listed it every other free place I could find, and as soon as I listed it on Yahoo, I had a buyer who came up and paid cash on the spot for it. Last car I sold I used Craigslist. It was basically an easy transaction, except that I hadn’t done it in so long, I forgot to get some sort… Read more »

quinsy
quinsy
10 years ago

p.s. I would post everywhere you can post for FREE first, then give it about 2 weeks, and then post in places you have to pay if necessary. When I sold my house, I posted in the newspaper etc. which cost several hundred dollars, and it turned out I got my buyer from Craigslist. I could have saved a nice bit of money if I only advertised for free first, then ramped up the advertising if needed. I just thought when selling a house that you pretty much had to post in the newspaper to reach most buyers. Turns out… Read more »

Erica Douglass
Erica Douglass
10 years ago

“I just can’t imagine someone wanting to buy plane tickets to come check out a potential car from across the country.”

I have flown to buy a car (my current car), and my ex bought one off eBay years ago and also flew to pick it up and drive it back.

It works better for “rare” cars (not the ones you’re probably picturing in your head, but unusual color combinations or used cars in excellent condition where they don’t make a newer version of that model any more.)

-Erica

Stephan
Stephan
10 years ago

i would stick with local craigslist ads. ebay is certainly a great website and very effective at selling goods around the country, but a 7 year old honda accord will not tempt anyone from outside your area to travel and test drive it. dont waste your time with ebay

Jason
Jason
10 years ago

Also, don’t discount your personal network when it comes to selling cars, especially if they are in good shape and still running well. You might have a friend (or a friend might know of someone) who is looking for a quality used car. Dealing with friends, family or acquaintances has the huge upside benefit of not having to worry that you are getting scammed with a fake check. You might even be able to take a personal check and the transaction will be a lot lower stress than meeting a stranger and having to develop enough trust to sell the… Read more »

jim
jim
10 years ago

If its free to try then it can’t hurt to list on eBay classified. Taking a few minutes to put up a listing won’t hurt. But they don’t seem to be nearly as popular as Craigslist.

Mike - Saving Money Today
Mike - Saving Money Today
10 years ago

I’m actually getting ready to sell a car too and it’s also a 2003 Accord! Mine is the sedan though. I was planning on using Craigslist and hadn’t even considered eBay, but I’ll check out the links and use their checklist at least. thanks!

Curtis
Curtis
10 years ago

I have sold and bought cars through ebay, and generally, its a great idea. The only negatives are, you really have to demand cash only and the people may require you to arrange shipping. There are so many ways for people to screw you with money orders or checks. Craigslist is generally much faster than ebay for a sale, but you can lose a bit of money because everyone is looking for a quick deal. The only other negative to ebay is the service fee based on the value of the car, but its not too hefty if you get… Read more »

the other Tammy
the other Tammy
10 years ago

We sold our car on Ebay, and it was so easy! No idiots coming to look at the car when they weren’t really serious about buying it. We had the thing sold and gone in a week. On the other hand, as a banker, here’s my two cents on internet car sales. Take CASH ONLY. If someone is wanting to pay with money orders or even a cashier’s check, wait until those things clear the bank before you deliver that car, no matter how much the buyer gripes. We’ve seen so many scams and counterfeit money orders and cashier’s checks… Read more »

dan
dan
10 years ago

about 2 years ago i listed my car for sale on both cars.com and craigslist. i literally sold the car within 48 hours from a response to the cars.com ad. I also had several others interested from the cars.com advertisement. it helped that i did my homework and presented correct and good info about the car. Good photos is key.

Techbud
Techbud
10 years ago
Frances
Frances
10 years ago

As someone who bought a car on ebay, I do recommend you list there. I liked ebay for two reasons, I knew the exact car I wanted and you can set up automatic notifications when the car you want comes up for sale. They also offer some amount of protection for the buyer, which made me feel more comfortable than buying off Craigslist. We did buy locally, and you may run into a local buyer on ebay. If it’s free, why not?

Janice
Janice
10 years ago

We sold a Ford F250 Diesel PU on EBay after first trying to sell it locally. Had an interested buyer almost immediately. He flew from Alabama to Texas to pick it up and drive it home. No problems whatsoever.

Mike
Mike
10 years ago

Hi Adam,

I’ve bought 2 cars from E-Bay and sold one as well. One of the things I’ve come to expect from all E-Bay ads (especially the car ads) is great pictures and thorough descriptions. One of the reasons is E-Bay provides plenty of tutorials to assist potential sellers.

The “friendly description” really goes a long way; not only for the initial purchase but more importantly, having repeat business, if desiered. Reputation is key on E-bay.

Good and informative post!

Mike

Nicole
Nicole
10 years ago

Neat. I was only marginally aware of this service.

Budgeting the fun stuff had an interesting post on how to sell your car on craigslist recently.

DeborahM
DeborahM
10 years ago

Think of the image you want to project, too, if the car or vehicle has character. If it’s a truck, I’d make the effort to pose it in a related environment… a gravel pit or a job site (crane in background?).
I sold my old sports car very quickly online (not ebay, but the same principle applies), by making sure it looked every inch a sports car: polished and buffed, front tires turned towards viewer dynamically on the 45 degree view, parked in an “aspirational” neighbourhood (not mine! lol!).

Turling
Turling
10 years ago

Sold my car on E-Bay about a month ago. Took three shots at relisting it to get it to go, perhaps I should have heeded some of his advice. Also, I live in California and sold it to a gentleman in Tennessee, so the out of state quote held true in my case. Now, one thing I wasn’t aware of. I thought E-Bay took out the fees for the sale at the time of the sale. They don’t. They bill you monthly, so I got a little surprise weeks later. Also, between E-Bay and PayPal, it cost me nearly $350… Read more »

Chris at yardsalequeen.com
Chris at yardsalequeen.com
10 years ago

Another way of being personable, is to have a free ebay “Me” page which you can tell a little bit about yourself to allow potential buyers get to know you a little better and be more comfortable buying from you. Of course ebay is going to say to use all 24 pictures for your description – the more pictures you have, the more ebay gets in picture fees. There is a legitimate way around this by using your own photo hosting and doing a bit of HTML code – no fees that way and you can have as many pics… Read more »

Techbud
Techbud
10 years ago

I have had great experiences with eBay in general when buying and selling things. Photos are important for any items. I sold a car using eBay motors years ago. I’m in NY and the buyer came from CA. The story was such a good one I dedicated a full page on my blog to it.

Chett
Chett
10 years ago

Here is a “personable” listing that was on Craigslist a few years ago. I’ll bet if this would have been on ebay it the bid price would have increased. (If for no other reason than the *MC Hammer Pants* “NINJA HAULER: 2005 Nissan Xterra – $12900 (Ronan / Lake County) OK, let me start off by saying this Xterra is only available for purchase by the manliest of men (or women). My friend, if it was possible for a vehicle to sprout chest hair and a five o’clock shadow, this Nissan would look like Tom Selleck. It is just that… Read more »

Kathy F
Kathy F
10 years ago

I use Photobucket to host my images for things I sell on Ebay. They provide the HTML code with each picture that you can then copy and paste into your item’s auction description. This way I can use many photos on Ebay without paying any fees.

Sherry
Sherry
10 years ago

HAHAH! I remember that Craigslist posting!
I have sold one vehicle, and bought another off of Craigslist, and was happy – but these both were vehicles that were $500 or less. If I had a car that was unique or in very excellent shape and worth more than $1000 I would consider eBay motors. Good piece.

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