I’m 21 and pursuing the path to financial independence

This guest post from Cody is part of the "money stories" feature at Get Rich Slowly. Some stories contain general advice; others are examples of how a GRS reader achieved financial success -- or failure. These stories feature folks from all stages of financial maturity.

In January, I attended Camp FI in Florida. While most of the attendees were thirty- or forty-somethings pursuing early retirement, one young man stood out. We were all amazed at the presence of Cody Berman, a 21-year-old hustler who defies the Millennial stereotype. Cody works hard, saves tons, and has a vision for his future. I asked if he'd be willing to share his story with GRS readers. Here it is.

From a young age, my parents instilled the value of saving into me. Throughout my early childhood, my father would match my contributions to my savings account dollar for dollar. This made me excited to save birthday money and miscellaneous earnings because the money would double. (Thanks, Dad!)

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More about...Planning

Could crowd funding help this guy pay off his mortgage?

We get dozens of requests at GetRichSlowly.org every day. They are usually queries such as “Can I guest post to promote my business?” (No.) “Will you share our infographic with your readers?” (No.) Last week we received one that intrigued me. The writer had started a crowd-funding effort to pay off his mortgage and he wanted me to share it with the Get Rich Slowly community. I replied, “Why would anyone want to pay off your mortgage? I'd like other people to pay off my mortgage too. What's in it for them?” His reply and reasoning made me decide to let him tell his story and make his plea to you.

There have been successful crowd-funding efforts in the past couple of years to help people pay their student loans, their personal credit card debt, medical bills and much, much more.

I warned Eric that the attitude of the GRS folks tends toward “be responsible for yourself,” and his request could invoke the wrath of the crowd. (Crowd-sourced vitriol!) But he said he was willing to take it.

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More about...Debt

I bought a foreclosure house on the courthouse steps

This guest post is from Naomi Mannino. Naomi is a freelance consumer personal finance and health journalist who reports on health, medical and personal finance news and how it will affect your life today. You can follow Naomi on Twitter @naomimannino.

Some reader stories contain general advice; others are examples of how a GRS reader achieved financial success or failure. These stories feature folks with all levels of financial maturity and income.

Can you really buy a house at auction on the courthouse steps for $100? Do you have to spend hundreds of thousands of dollars as the house-flipping guys do on TV?

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More about...Investing, Home & Garden

The shocking truth about medical bills that can save you thousands

This reader story is by a longtime GRS reader Sumitha from afineparent.com, a blog founded on the simple belief that "Good Parents Are Made, Not Born."

Some reader stories contain general advice; others are examples of how a GRS reader achieved financial success or failure. These stories feature folks with all levels of financial maturity and income.

How much would you think it would cost to treat an ant bite?

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More about...Health & Fitness

Costs and savings of having a stay-at-home parent

This post comes from Lynn Svenson, who blogs at The Photographer's Wife. Some reader stories contain general advice; others are examples of how a GRS reader achieved financial success or failure. These stories feature folks with all levels of financial maturity and income.

One of the biggest impacts to my wallet (and heart) this past year was having a baby. Of course, there are plenty of expenses that go along with being pregnant and having a baby, like numerous visits to the doctor and the enormous amount of diapers. But in particular, I want to share how making the decision to have a stay-at-home parent has affected our wallets and our way of thinking.

We were overjoyed when we found out I was pregnant in the fall of 2011. However, along with that joy came some sadness. After taking a look at our finances, we realized we wouldn't be able to achieve one of our long-time goals of my husband staying home to raise our children. We do have debt, and my salary alone just wouldn't cut it. We ultimately took a big risk when we decided that my husband would stay home and I would bust my butt to get a new, higher-paying job after the baby was born.

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More about...Budgeting, Frugality

10 financial lessons I learned from my parents’ divorce

This guest post from Sydney is part of the “reader stories” feature at Get Rich Slowly. Sydney blogs about personal finance, entrepreneurship, self improvement, travel and lots of other fun stuff on Untemplater.com. Some reader stories contain general advice; others are examples of how a GRS reader achieved financial success or failure. These stories feature folks with all levels of financial maturity and income.

It's hard to believe it's been about 20 years since my parents first separated, and it's actually a blessing it happened when it did. No parent ever wants to put his or her child through the nastiness, heartache and sadness that comes with divorce, but having lived through my parents' split, I can tell you that it actually can be the best option.

When I was a kid, I didn't understand why my parents couldn't get along. Neither one of them was mean or evil; they didn't cheat on each other. They had jobs, loved me, supported my interests and activities, and they didn't seem that different from my friends' parents. Well, except for the arguing. It got really nasty toward the end of their marriage. There is absolutely nothing positive or healthy for a child of any age who has to live in a house with two yelling parents.

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More about...Debt

How I Use Superfrugality Month to Curb Lifestyle Inflation

This guest post from Marisa Bell-Metereau is part of the "reader stories" feature at Get Rich Slowly. Some stories contain general advice; others are examples of how a GRS reader achieved financial success or failure. These stories feature folks with all levels of financial maturity and income.

Every year in February, once the holidays are over and life is slowly returning to normal, my boyfriend and I undertake a project that helps us stop lifestyle inflation and save on the order of $300 each for the month. We call this exercise “Superfrugality Month” and the rules are pretty simple.

We don't spend any money on non-essentials during the month of February. Once March first rolls around, we can spend money on wants again. That's it in a nutshell.

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More about...Frugality

The bonus of bi-weekly pay

This guest post from Corinne is part of the "reader stories" feature at Get Rich Slowly. Some stories contain general advice; others are examples of how a GRS reader achieved financial success or failure. These stories feature folks with all levels of financial maturity and income.

At my previous job, I was paid on a monthly basis. I loved it. I got all my money for the month upfront, so it didn't matter when I scheduled automatic savings or investment transfers.

When I moved to a job that was on a bi-weekly payroll schedule, I had to make sure the transfers were split across the month so I didn't inadvertently empty my checking account! I was grumpy about it at first, but I've come to discover a wonderful secret about getting paid bi-weekly: If you're on a biweekly payroll schedule, you're getting a couple of "bonus" pay checks every year! Yes, that's right. Bonus checks. Let me explain.

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More about...Planning, Budgeting

I quit my passion and took a boring job

This guest post from long-time GRS reader Knot Theory is part of the "reader stories" feature at Get Rich Slowly. Some stories contain general advice; others are examples of how a GRS reader achieved financial success or failure. These stories feature folks from all levels of financial maturity and with all sorts of incomes.

I'm a consumer of the personal finance blogosphere as much as anyone. I support the efforts of J.D. and others who write about money because I know it's really moved me to make some big changes. But the truth is: I can''t always relate to their situations.

So many of these blogs seem to be written by people who work in their pajamas or by people with no opportunity cost to blog (they're either financially independent already or stay-at-home parents). These are both great things, but I don't hear much from a Joe Sixpack schlub with a 9-to-5 like me. Instead, there's a lot of Tim Ferris-type noise about how us poor saps who go out and punch a clock are the suckers.

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More about...Career

Re-evaluating the rat race

This guest post from Joe is part of the "reader stories" feature at Get Rich Slowly. Some stories contain general advice; others are examples of how a GRS reader achieved financial success or failure. These stories feature folks from all levels of financial maturity and with all sorts of incomes.

Over the last year, some of my friends have left their day jobs to become a full-time bloggers. Their stories are inspirational, but their choice isn't for everybody. For instance, I'm still working at my full time job. It's tough to walk away from a good paycheck with great benefits in this economy.

I'm an engineer at a big tech corporation, and my salary is just into six figures. If I quit my full-time job to become self-employed, I would have to take a huge pay cut. Still, the idea is tempting.

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More about...Side Hustles, Career