Employee or entrepreneur? The pros and cons of self-employment

In my recent review of Pam Slim's Escape from Cubicle Nation, Chett left the following comment:

I was talking with a good friend last week who is self-employed. I told him I envied his entrepreneurial spirit and the ability to “go it alone.” He told me he envied my work as a teacher and the set hours and guaranteed pay check and insurance. (I told him there was nothing “set” about the hours, so I guess we both misunderstood each others work.)

So many people dream of working for themselves and only find out the true benefits and heartaches after they make the leap. Take you for instance, what do you miss the most from the box factory in terms of security, or interaction? What bothered, (or motivated) you the most to drive you to self-employment and what have you learned about your decision over the past year and a half?

In the same thread, Caitlin wrote:

Every time I real an article like this I wonder if I'm really that unusual because I love my job. I'm a molecular biologist, and it's just not something I could do on my own…I've had a small side business for over 5 years. In that time, interesting and educational though it was, I've learned that I don't particularly want to run a business.

I am not one who believes that everyone should be an entrepreneur. I think there's a sort of continuum: Some folks should absolutely work for somebody else, others should definitely work for themselves, and many should do a little of both.

Although I tend toward entrepreneurial endeavors, I don't consider myself a die-hard entrepreneur. The best job I ever had was actually flipping burgers at McDonald's when I was in high school. I'm not kidding. I loved that job. My fellow employees were smart and fun. Together, we made serving burgers and fries a game; we tried to do the best job we could. Our manager was great, and she fostered this attitude instead of stifling it with bureaucracy.

Since then, I've had jobs I loved and jobs I hated, and many that just paid the bills. I've also tried self-employment twice: once as a computer consultant, and now as a professional blogger.

Here are my responses to Chett's specific questions:

What Do I Miss From the Box Factory?

I miss daily interaction with my family. My father began the business almost 25 years ago, and since then there have always been several family members involved with the daily operations. I also miss talking with my customers. As much as I disliked the actual sales portion of my job, I genuinely liked many of the customers I dealt with. I find myself wondering how Robert is doing, and whether Lance finished building his house.

There is almost no social aspect to the life of a professional blogger; I sit here alone in my office typing all day. While this is intellectually challenging, I miss seeing people and being a small part of their lives. This is one reason I've struggled with my restaurant spending over the past year. I often go out to lunch simply to be near other people. It's also one reason I rented office space.

Note: Trent and I both discussed this loneliness on last Monday's episode of The Personal Finance Hour. How bad does this loneliness get? Very bad. It's Thursday afternoon as I write this. A couple of hours ago, I had a near panic attack from the loneliness. No joke. To cope, I came down to the coffee shop for a couple of hours.

What Motivated Me to Self-Employment?

There were a couple of things. First, I did not like my work at the box factory. I did not like sales. I wasn't good at it, it didn't interest me, and I found it frustrating.

Meanwhile, I wanted to write. I've always wanted to be a writer; I just never knew how to make money from this desire. When I stumbled into personal-finance blogging, I was startled to learn I could make an income from it. It seemed natural to make the leap to professional blogger once that income sustained at a level that could support me.

What Have I Learned About My Decision Over the Last Year-and-a-Half?

There's a difference between blogging as a hobby and blogging as a job. When you're blogging as a hobby and the income is “extra” income, the process is fun. It's a lark. But when you throw the switch and it becomes your sole means of making a living, some of that fun vanishes.

I still love what I do — no question — but sometimes I feel as if I've lost the spontaneity I used to have. That's one reason I'm hoping to reduce my workload around here a little. I'd like to pursue other projects: write a book, dabble with other blogs, possibly promote financial literacy education.

There's a lot of pressure when you are required to generate your own income. Sure, there's pressure when you work for somebody else, too, but there's also a sense of freedom. You're not responsible for the daily decisions. And if you don't like the job, you can leave. Plus, the actual source of income is not your responsibility.

I often think that working for somebody else is like renting an apartment; working for yourself is like owning your home. Both have their rewards, but they each have drawbacks, too.

Conclusion

As Caitlin mentions, not everyone is cut out to run a business. It just doesn't interest them. My wife is a perfect example. Kris loves her job. It's challenging and fulfilling, and she enjoys the interaction with her co-workers. She has no desire to strike out on her own.

As always, I think it's important to do what works for you.

Trivia: According to the U.S. Small Business Administration, on average, self-employed people make more than those who work for others [PDF]. But there's a wider variance in incomes among the self-employed. Also, earnings for the self-employed are lower at first, but tend to grow more quickly until they surpass that of traditional workers.

Now I'd love to hear from you. Have you ever been self-employed? Did you love it, or did you hate it? What prompted you to pursue entrepreneurship? What do you envy about those who work for somebody else? Or, if you work for somebody else, are you content with where you are, or do you envy about the self-employed? What is it that keeps you doing what you're doing?

McDonald's photo from DRB62.

Update: Erin from Unclutterer (one of my favorite blogs) has posted an article that seems related to this — at least in my mind. She explains how to have it all.

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Travis
Travis
11 years ago

Interesting look at the pros and cons of working for yourself.

My father started his own business when I was seven. I barely saw him after that, as he put all his time into making the business work. He finally closed the business when I was 25. It was a long 18 years for the family. Let me have someone else worry about all the issues of business, I want to have some time for enjoyment in this life.

Van
Van
11 years ago

I’m an employee (writer) working to be an entrepreneur (freelance writing, web design, photography, art). I took the first steps by taking freelance jobs, volunteering for nonprofits, and selling art at a local art market. It takes discipline. I sleep three hours a night most of the time, and the investments haven’t paid off yet. I know being an entrepreneur is completely exhausting, but I feel like it will be worth it to get paid to work on projects I love.

PB
PB
11 years ago

I’ve done both. What I learned when I was independent for ten years was that to be successful, one has to be very well-rounded. The primary work needs to be done, but so does purchasing, accounting, contracting, benefits, etc.

I finally realized that I’m not well-rounded. I’m a focused specialist. I now work for the man and do just what I love all day everyday. Then I go home.

Great learning experience though — everyone should try both.

Charles Hughes
Charles Hughes
11 years ago

Interesting Post. I struggle with the isolation issue issue all the time. And there are times I miss the regular paycheck, but wouldn’t trade the illusion of freedom I have for anything.
Here are two blog posting I have written on self employment as an artist..one is about isolation.

http://hughespottery.blogspot.com/2009/06/morning-coffee-and-isolation.html

http://hughespottery.multiply.com/journal/item/889/Making_a_living

Jason
Jason
11 years ago

Great article. There’s definitely a spirit of entrepreneurship in a lot of the personal finance blogs that I read, but it’s refreshing to see a perspective that includes some of the negative factors that come into play with doing so. I am employed at a privately held software company. The management is very progressive, the company culture is great, the business is debt-free and I (and others) receive regular bonus checks from profit sharing. The company has been consistently profitable since inception and has no plans or need to ever go public, so we completely control our own destiny. I’ve… Read more »

ObliviousInvestor
ObliviousInvestor
11 years ago

I’m self-employed for now (also as a work-at-home writer).

I absolutely love it.

That said, I definitely know what you mean about the loneliness. I’ve found that interacting with other bloggers helps that to some extent. But face to face interaction can’t be replaced with online text.

Les
Les
11 years ago

I am now just retiring after 30+ years of self-employment in graphic design, publishing, photography, film and video. In the early 70s I left a management position at a prestigious academic press, and more recently I spent 3 years with a government contractor. In contrast to these positions, above all else, I appreciated the ability to control the ethics and morality of my business. My wife assisted from time to time, but I did not hire employees. We retire without great wealth, but we have savings and investments, two homes, cars and a motorhome, with zero debt. And we spent… Read more »

oersawv
oersawv
11 years ago

“I often think that working for somebody else is like renting an apartment; working for yourself is like owning your home. Both have their rewards, but they each have drawbacks, too.”

Nice analogy. Will use. Thx.

Wesley
Wesley
11 years ago

I’m self-employed, working as a software developer, and I certainly echo your issues with loneliness and fatigue when it comes to sales. I’ve been on my own for about 3 years. The first year and a half was great. I tripled my old salary and had more work than I could handle. Now that the economic climate has changed, so have my clients’ budgets, and thereby my income. I plan to tough it out, to see what the future holds. My wife and I have made some decent financial decisions (a big thanks to GRS for help with that!), and… Read more »

Miller
Miller
11 years ago

I had a software business. I was making more than twice what I do working for someone else, doing the same work. I relied on someone else to do the accounting. Though I instructed them to put 25% of all income into an account for taxes, they did not. When 9/11 happened, the financial destruction that followed destroyed my business. That poor accounting is still affecting me due to the extreme amount of taxes i am paying off in the aftermath. I loved the money, the freedom, and the prestige of being my own boss, and I will pursue it… Read more »

Redeeming Riches
Redeeming Riches
11 years ago

I am currently a self employed financial advisor. There are many great advantages like freedom and creating your own schedule etc, however there are also a host of stresses that many people don’t realize.

I have to wear many different “hats”. I am not only the financial advisor but I am the marketing guy, CEO, & manager. It is sometimes hard to juggle all of them. When I am on vacation, I still have to worry about things getting done.

Hogan
Hogan
11 years ago

I have a part-time job and several of my own businesses, all of them small and very different from one another, so I have a lot of variety. This works incredibly well for me. Working only at home alone was excrutiatingly lonely, and working only at a company was exhausting and boring. Working this way has given me enough control over my time to allow me to improve my health, save money, THINK, and appreciate my work colleagues as well as my private clients. I am grateful to my boss for having to shoulder all the responsibility for running his… Read more »

Colleen in MA
Colleen in MA
11 years ago

I work full time in graphic design and have started a freelance business on the side from contacts I’ve made in the business. I love the stability of being an employee and interacting and learning from my coworkers, yet know that I can make more money doing freelance. So next year I plan to ask my employer if I can switch to part time and then use my other hours to devote to the freelance business. A big factor in this decision has been health insurance. I got married last year and am now under my husband’s health insurance. If… Read more »

Chett
Chett
11 years ago

JD, Thank you for addressing the question I asked. When I wrote the question last week I had been wondering, if your transition from blogging on the side to full time work as a blogger and entrepreneur was as glamorous as it sounds to the general public. Nearly everywhere you look working at home, and working as little as possible is glamorized and sold as if you’re not on that track you’re a fool. I have never worked for myself full time. My website and the knowledge that I have gained in construction and home improvement have been my only… Read more »

Jared
Jared
11 years ago

I owned a snow cone stand and t-shirt business at one point. I now work as engineer and miss the freedom and pure fun of my businesses. I’d like to get my hand back into it.

I understand the loneliness thing. When I was in engineering school I would be in the lab by myself for 40 hours a week. I often went to coffee shops to study just so I could talk to the baristas.

Someone
Someone
11 years ago

I’ve done both (currently self-employed) and I just want to comment that most discussions of this question tend to oversimplify and dichotomize. There are a host of pros and cons that each of us has to weigh and it is, as you imply, often much to do with personality and preference, but as the molecular biologist points out for example, not all endeavors have practical paths for loners. Also, in this country there’s a definite prejudice toward “entrepreneurs.” The phrases “not cut out for” and such always imply that you’re simply a lesser being if you’re not a proprietor, that… Read more »

Bre
Bre
11 years ago

I’m with Hogan – I’m the type of person who needs variety, but I’ve learned over the past few years that I really value stability and human interaction as well. Being fully self-employed would cause me more anxiety than exhilaration, but I do crave flexibility. So, a combination of part-time work for someone else (steady income, less responsibility in terms of keeping the business afloat) and a side business of my own would be ideal. Now, to make that happen… 🙂

Dathan in AL
Dathan in AL
11 years ago

JD,
Thanks for always being so honest with your day-to-day emotions!! That’s very hard to do so publicly (and rare), but I guarantee you people won’t forget what you write because of it. It really does help!

Tyler
Tyler
11 years ago

I’m in an interesting place at work now where I am pretty good at what I do and I really like my co-workers, but I don’t particularly care for the work itself. Like you mentioned with your sales gig,I don’t find it interesting and am regularly frustrated by it. Interestingly enough, I love doing all the little administrative tasks that come with running your own business. It might actually be my favorite part, as funny as that might sound. It provides a lot of variety in the breadth of tasks that you’re exposed to and keeps things interesting. Working for… Read more »

JKC
JKC
11 years ago

JD, Schedule lunch dates! I have been self employed and largely working from home for the past four years – after leaving a more traditional ’employee-type’ relationship where I had co-workers and health insurance. I do often go stir-crazy from the tedium of working alone. But if I schedule lunch dates with friends, or former co-workers, or clients – I get the social interaction I need during the day. Even if I don’t do it every day, just seeing the dates on my calendar – for tomorrow or later in the week – helps me keep on track during my… Read more »

AD
AD
11 years ago

“Have you ever been self-employed? Did you love it, or did you hate it?” I was self-employed for a year, and I liked being self-employed, but I was in the wrong line of work (sales). I wanted out of my last office job so badly that I didn’t do the soul-searching required to figure out what would pay the bills AND would be a good fit for my personality and strengths. “What prompted you to pursue entrepreneurship?” I hated my job. And I thought that I’d hate any other job, too. I simply am not programmed to deal with bureaucracy… Read more »

Meoip
Meoip
11 years ago

I’ve been effectively self employed for 18 months. By that I mean I’ve been working as a bookkeeper for a small business (with 3 locations), I have the stress of being on the constant verge of not getting paid and the duties of a beyond full time job. I’m basically in charge of making sure other people work so I get my income. I’ve decided for the level of stress and work I put in I’m not getting enough out so I’m going out on my own in a few weeks.

Lorraine
Lorraine
11 years ago

Years ago, I had a mutual parting of ways with my employer, a not-for-profit counseling center. I took my clients and started a private practice, which was wonderful for 5 years and agony for the next 5. It was the isolation that got me, especially after I moved the office into my home. Also the administrative details. I began to feel like my world was growing smaller and smaller, closing in around me. So on a whim, I took a job as a dialysis social worker and I’ve loved so many things about it, especially the wonderful diverse people I’ve… Read more »

Mary
Mary
11 years ago

Great post. It’s nice to see some coverage of the good points of having a job working for a company. I like where I work and what I do and the life it leads me lead.

TeresaA
TeresaA
11 years ago

Yes, there is a great amount of freedom that comes with being an entrepeneur. I love the flexibility, I love being able to work from home, I love the creativity involved and I love providing a service to people that brings them happiness and makes them smile. Most of all, I like doing something that is meaningful to me, and I enjoy the interesting people that I meet. One great challenge, I think, to being an entrepreneur, especially if you are small and cannot employ people, is taking a real vacation! My business involves custom orders and deadlines, so I… Read more »

Scott Lovingood
Scott Lovingood
11 years ago

I don’t think the line can be drawn so neatly between employee and self employed. Many times we blend across those lines and forget categories. I have written an article covering more ground on it and referring back to yours. http://www.askthewealthsquad.com/blog/is-self-employed-all-its-cracked-up-to-be/ I have been an employee, self employed and a business owner as well as a volunteer. Many times I have been in all four categories at the same time. Makes life interesting to say the least. Risk and responsibility tends to be the major separator between employee and self employed. As anyone who has been laid off recently, being… Read more »

Karawynn @Pocketmint
Karawynn @Pocketmint
11 years ago

Very briefly, before I head out the door to the Escape from Cubicle Nation workshop (irony): The ‘loss of fun’ in the shift from hobby to profession is a story I’ve heard a lot. For example, I had a girlfriend who loved video games. She networked herself into a career reviewing them. In the space of just a few months, she found that she had started to hate games. All the joy of playing them had been sucked right out. She stopped reviewing, got her CPA, and is now happily doing corporate accounting. However, having experience on both sides of… Read more »

Dave G.
Dave G.
11 years ago

When I’m not writing blog comments I do accounting for an employer in the town where I live. I can ride a bike to work every day and this is something that really feels good to me. I don’t love my job nor do I hate it. It’s ok, but most days it doesn’t feed my spirit. For the past 10 years I’ve also done bookkeeping work on the side for one or two other businesses. I do this work to help others and also for the extra income. Additionally, I started a clock repair business about 5 years ago.… Read more »

Jason B
Jason B
11 years ago

“According to the U.S. Small Business Administration, on average, self-employed people make more than those who work for others”

“make” is a pretty vague statement. Obviously the gross income could be much higher if you charge $50/hr for your services, but what is the net income after paying things like health insurance, self employment tax, etc? Buying equipment and software? Renting office space?

LDK
LDK
11 years ago

My husband and I both became self-employed quite young; I opened a retail store when I was 24 and he became an independent consultant at 25…we already had a mortgage, 2 kids and 2 dogs. We cannot imagine it being any other way…HOWEVER, it is certainly not for everyone. We spent a full decade without taking a vacation longer than 5 days and a lot of our time was spent engaging in tasks outside our chosen fields. (ie. as a retail store owner I was able to choose what to buy and sell, hire staff and decide on merchandising displays… Read more »

Jen Roberts
Jen Roberts
11 years ago

The timing of this article for me couldn’t be more perfect. Today is my last day of a 10 year carrer in corporate marketing before I officially leap into entrepreneurship. I’ve been running a specialty cake & chocolate side business on nights, weekends and “vacation” time for the past 5 years while enduring 3+ hours of commuting and a 9+ hour workday five days a week. I worry that I’ll miss the daily interactions with my co-workers, and I sometimes question if I’m totally nuts to be a solo entrepreneur, but I guess only time will tell. My husband &… Read more »

bluntmoney
bluntmoney
11 years ago

I have a day job now and a couple of side businesses, but have been completely self-employed in the past. For me, it’s more a matter of not being cut out for corporate work. Who I AM is an entrepreneur. Lonliness isn’t a problem for me as I don’t get much interaction at my job anyway, but when I was strictly self-employed I did crave a change of scenery quite frequently. I did things like running errands during the day, taking walks, and going to work out.

kaitlyn
kaitlyn
11 years ago

I am not even a little bit interested in being self-employed. I get bored very easily. My current position as a floating chemist (I’m backup for whatever department is currently too busy to handle) has me doing different things every day. I don’t have to deal with the minutia of departments, either. My job is to put out fires. Plus, my place of employment lets us set our own hours! My MIL is one of those people who thinks that if you don’t own a business, you’ll never be successful. She wants my SO to open a business and have… Read more »

Karen
Karen
11 years ago

I’ve been self-employed for over 12 years as a free-lance graphic designer. Prior to striking out on my own, I was working in an in-house creative services department at a state university. Because I had such regular hours working for a state university, I was able to build my freelance business. I did my full-time gig, and freelance on the side for 5 years, before I decided it was time to freelance full-time. During those 5 years, I saved all the money I made on the side. I’ve found working as a full-time freelance graphic designer very fulfilling. I’m making… Read more »

Ann
Ann
11 years ago

I have been self-employed (working from home) for almost 13 years. I fell into it, in that I was laid off from my previous job for a large insurance company, my kids were young (1 & 3) and I wanted to be at home with them for a while. So here I am, still working at home (full-time now) and probably will be until the kids are done with H.S. I’m not doing what I want to do in terms of employment, but I can bring in a decent salary & have been and am still able to be available… Read more »

ebyt
ebyt
11 years ago

I have a good job now. I am a year of out university and making a really good income. My job is temporary, though – possible of extension – so that always worries me. Sometimes the work is fun, other times it is not. I want to start my own business, though, and am doing research on the side and saving money. I’ve always had the entrepreneurial spirit, and something about calling the shots and making my own hours thrills me. I want to do what I REALLY want to be doing. This job is great for now, but years… Read more »

carla | green and chic
carla | green and chic
11 years ago

I am currently self employed and I love it. I started my web store back in November while I was still working full time. My idea was to keeping working at my day-job until we relocate or I am able to quit my job from my business. Life had different plans for me and I had to go on full-time disability in March. I wasn’t able to put that much time into the business because of what I was dealing with physically, but now I am able to put more time into it now that I am doing a little… Read more »

rkt88edmo
rkt88edmo
11 years ago

The part about the loneliness is very interesting. You have thousands of readers who feel very connected to you, but the portal is not running both ways.

I haven’t listened to the podcast but I wonder if this is also because you and Trent are more family and home oriented?

Brenda
Brenda
11 years ago

I do both part-time. For me, the things I like about being self-employed as a freelance graphic designer is that I can set my own hours, and stay in the comfort of my room to work. I don’t have to worry about a long commute or any strife with other co-workers, and I feel independent and in control of my work. The cons of self-employment for me are lack of health insurance, sporadic pay, high self-employment taxes and being responsible for my own social security taxes, and the lack of other employee interaction. The things i like about my part-time… Read more »

Michael
Michael
11 years ago

You’ve already went out and got your own office space. How about finding other bloggers in your area to share a space with? It would be great for socializing and collaborating with other people on ideas. I’ve read a blog post about it not too long ago….I’ll see if I can find it again.

Here it is:
http://lifehacker.com/5191974/the-pros-and-cons-of-coworking

J.D.
J.D.
11 years ago

So many great comments. Instead of addressing them individually, I’m going to sort of ramble. Kris and I had a great talk about this last night, about my continued loneliness. During the conversation, I mentioned that two of the issues I have right now are (a) loneliness and (b) a lack of material to write about. These actually stem from the same source. When I’m closed up in an office all day, I’m not interacting with people. This interaction is what stems the loneliness, and it’s also what gives me inspiration for some of my best posts. “My favorite articles… Read more »

Tyler Karaszewski
Tyler Karaszewski
11 years ago

I’m an engineer at a silicon valley tech company. It’s one of these progressive companies with no set work hours, an unlimited vacation policy, fantastic health insurance, and $100k+ salaries (I don’t say six-figure because that includes up to $999,999, and probably 90%+ of people with ‘six-figure’ salaries make between $100k and $200k). I have great co-workers and am around interesting people whenever I go into the office, which is only three days a week. There are plenty of other perks, too. I don’t actually own a computer, since work supplies me with new ones whenever I decide my current… Read more »

Eric
Eric
11 years ago

I have been toying w/ this same issue for years. My father when he retired from the military became an entrepreneur. He was very successful, but i never saw him or my mom outside of work again after that. They both worked 80+ hours a week but we never sat down to dinner together or took a family vacation where we ALL went together and every summer and wkd I was home was spent pitching in to the family business in some capacity. This wasn’t all bad, i lived a very comfortable childhood. My parents shipped me off to California… Read more »

Dlyn
Dlyn
11 years ago

I absolutely dream of having my own business or at least a position that allows me to make my own schedule. Currently I work for a college and can take classes for free which helps with the boredom of my job (secretary to an arrogant dean who thinks secretaries don’t have brains). I already have a degree but I love learning. My major setback for having my own business is Health care benefits. My husband is a diabetic and I have an 8 year old that seems to need a doctor a few times more than just the one for… Read more »

Brian
Brian
11 years ago

I’ve been laid off recently and have been struggling to find another job. I have also been toying with starting my own business in computer repair. I would love a full-time job at a company with benefits. But at the same time I would love to be in control of my own business. Sure the investment and the work from the start will be a struggle, but I see the potential for rewards and success to be better than if I pursued a full-time position. Only problem with that would be responsibility for things like insurance and taxes. Working for… Read more »

Nina
Nina
11 years ago

Wow Tyler #42, I’m so happy for you. I hope your dream job lasts in an economy that can and has easily go to shit at the blink of an eye. I hope you’re not putting all your eggs in one basket as so many people do in their comfy, cozy jobs while laughing a the rest of us “wage slaves” that actually have to WORK and not play to earn a living.

AD
AD
11 years ago

@JD–Have you thought of volunteering regularly? I know some organizations help people get back on their feet with finance education, interviewing and resume assistance, etc. Or maybe doing something completely unrealted to PF would offer more inspiration. Either way, you’d interact with fellow volunteers and with those who benefit from the cause.

Monica
Monica
11 years ago

I am a self employed piano teacher. I love the teaching but hate the money collecting aspect because it can really affect the relationship the parents have with you. I am easy going with payments, but people get weird when they owe you money. So this year I am offering one free month payment if they pay a yearly fee by November so I can just keep track of the amount of lessons. One Mom did this last year and our friendship blossomed. Our discussions focused on her child without conflict about money. I feel my time is better spent… Read more »

Wesley
Wesley
11 years ago

I’m with AD…perhaps a research topic would work well. You could work or volunteer at various places, post on your research periodically and use that to make a new series. Topics like ‘Poor in America’ that deal with the realities and poor choices being made are interesting, but also the new stigma of class warfare brewing (you know, the whole “down with the rich, let them pay the taxes, let’s punish successful folks” stuff) would be an interesting read given your writing style and amount of thought you put into your articles. And I agree with you JD. I really… Read more »

TC
TC
11 years ago

I’ve done three stints as a freelance writer. Each time, I returned to an office for a different reason. The first time, it was the loneliness. I needed other people to talk to. I applied for a job I was interested in, got it, and was happy to be there. The second time, it was the unpredictability of freelancing. I was making good money, definitely enough to support us, and yet, there was a month where I had to use a credit card to pay my mortgage, because several of my clients were behind in paying me…to the tune of… Read more »

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