Strategies for an affordable college education

As you gaze at your newborn or newly adopted son or daughter, one of these thoughts may run through your head:

  • “Will I be able to afford to put you through school?”
  • Am I required to put you through school?
  • “Right now it's all I can do to pay for Pampers and child care. I'll worry about college later.”

Time has a way of sneaking up on us. Seemingly overnight, that gurgling infant morphs into a 12th-grader looking at college or vocational education.

According to The College Board, tuition and fees (but not housing) at U.S. colleges in academic year 2014-15 ranged from $9,139 (state residents at public college) to $22,958 (out-of-state residents at public universities) to $31,231 (private colleges).

Can't afford to pay out of pocket? You're not alone. That's why I think parents should craft not a college plan but rather a college strategya collection of tactics that, taken together, will reduce or even eliminate the need to borrow.

The recent “How America Pays For College” report from Sallie Mae notes that parents are covering 38 percent of college costs (mostly through current income and savings), while students are paying for 27 percent with savings, income and loans. Scholarships, grants and gifts account for the rest.

Strategic planning

Some students reported cost-cutting tactics like choosing less-expensive schools, living at home, seeking scholarships/grants, reducing personal spending and working at least during school breaks (70 percent worked year-round).

These choices could be part of your own family's college strategy. So could one or more of these:

  • Enlist the relatives. When auntie or grandpa asks for gift ideas, request the money be put into savings vs. spent on a toy. Don't most kids already have enough toys?
  • Seek “dual enrollment” programs. Some states let motivated students attend community college while in high school.
  • Take Advanced Placement classes and pass AP exams for credit. The $91 exam fee may be lowered if you can demonstrate need.
  • Check out “top scholar” programs. Alaska students who graduate in the top 10 percent get free tuition at the state university. Other states have similar programs.
  • Get an education from your rich uncle, i.e., join the military. (Not for everyone, obviously.)
  • Become a resident assistant to save on dorm fees. (Again, not for everyone.)
  • Google “colleges with free tuition.” Maybe one would be a good fit.
  • Graduate early! Take summer classes or extra ones during the school year. The National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities has a list of three-year degree programs.
  • Work it off through college loan forgiveness programs from the National Health Services Corps, Teach for America, the U.S. military or AmeriCorps.
  • Pay by the month. Some colleges let you make regular payments. Scholarships plus savings plus work-study plus whatever family contributes could get you through, 30 days at a time. (Again: Supportive relatives might give you $50 — or $500 — in cash on your birthday or at Christmas. It adds up.)

An affordable college education

Have this family discussion early on, not in the middle of 12th grade. I'd bet my paycheck for this piece that some of you 20- and 30-something readers wish you'd had that conversation before signing for all those student loans.

After all, young people are shouldering much of the debt. One-third of students borrowed last year, with federal loans averaging $8,454 (up from $7,788 in 2014) and private loans $12,102 (quite an increase from last year's $9,375).

Run sample numbers through a student loan repayment calculator with your teen. Yes, this seems far away. But try to imagine life with student loans and a starter salary — or maybe no salary for a while, if you graduate into a sluggish economy. (That alone is good cause to open an online savings account and start saving like crazy!)

This advice may fall on semi-stopped ears. After all, young people are 10 feet tall and bulletproof. Clearly they'll get excellent jobs — scratch that, “dream” jobs — before the ink dries on their diplomas.

May that happen! But create a multifaceted college strategy even if you are convinced your Baby Einstein will get multiple degrees on full scholarship.

Best-case scenario: Those scholarships materialize, a relative leaves a huge educational bequest, the family cat's YouTube channel brings in millions or you hit the lottery.

Worst-case scenario: None of the above happens, but the college strategy gets your kid through without undue (or any) loans. Which, come to think of it, is also a best-case scenario.

How did you save for your own education and/or will you save for a child's? Share your tips and challenges in the comments!

More about...Education, Planning

Become A Money Boss And Join 15,000 Others

Subscribe to the GRS Insider (FREE) and we’ll give you a copy of the Money Boss Manifesto (also FREE)

Yes! Sign up and get your free gift
Become A Money Boss And Join 15,000 Others
guest
53 Comments
Oldest
Newest Most Voted
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Maggie
Maggie
5 years ago

These are great tips! I would also add, if you are divorced and your decree does not specify, to start honest and productive conversations with your former spouse and child(ren) as soon as possible. Every state has different laws and you may end up with the unpleasant surprise (as we did) that the court system might expect parents to pay 100% of costs. If you are splitting up, please hash out college tuition and spending in your agreement to save yourself an unhappy surprise later!

slccom
slccom
5 years ago
Reply to  Maggie

Or you can end up with the situation my mother-in-law pulled, lying to her daughter that her ex-husband was refusing to pay for her college. A few years ago “Betty” got a copy of the divorce agreement and saw that her mother was required to pay for college. “Betty” resented her father, who is a saint on earth, for decades because of those lies. I believe that she is transfering her resentment to the one who deserves it.

Tina in NJ
Tina in NJ
5 years ago

My son will graduate with about $30,000 in student loans. He is currently working 3 jobs, but that money is going to his car lease and credit cards. He has rich tastes and no perspective. We consciously had him get loans because this is his education, not ours. He needs some skin in the game. I nearly freaked when he came home with an iPad and a credit card his freshman year, but he has to learn from experience. Now that the end (of college) is near, Mom and Dad are starting to get smart again.

Philip
Philip
5 years ago

A strategy not mentioned that my wife and I have been using for years… Don’t wait until you have a child to begin saving for their college. To the extent you can afford to do so (without sacrificing other, more important goals like saving for retirement), go ahead and open up a 529 plan today and begin funding it aggressively — before you have the expenses of Pampers and child care! Simply make yourself or your spouse the beneficiary, and once your child is finally born and receives a Social Security number, change the beneficiary to him/her. By the time… Read more »

Donna Freedman
Donna Freedman
5 years ago
Reply to  Philip

Save before they’re born — I like that!

Jon
Jon
5 years ago
Reply to  Philip

That is exactly what we did, started a 529 account with bi-monthly contributions and 2% quarterly contributions from our 529 credit card. Recently my wife decided to pursue her Master’s Degree which will increase our income by $40k a year. The degree is going to cost half of that so the ROI is immediate. While trying to figure out how to pay for it without dipping into savings I remembered the 529 can be used for any higher education for anyone in the family, there’s enough to cover it 100%. I’m pulling the money out per semester and putting it… Read more »

JoeM
JoeM
5 years ago

As someone that attended a private out of state university whose yearly cost is now over $50,000/year (was high, but not quite high when I was enrolled) and is also getting a second degree at a $95/credit hour community college, the difference really is negligible. Is there a difference in amenities, campus life, and all the fun stuff that goes with living on campus? Sure. Is it worth $45,000/year more? No. At both schools, there’s lazy druggies and idiots in your 100-200 level classes just scraping by doing the minimum. At both schools, once you hit your higher level major… Read more »

Kate
Kate
5 years ago
Reply to  JoeM

JoeM, I couldn’t agree more. Community College is no longer the “Grade 13” that people used to sneer at. Both of the kids went to the local community college and I was completely satisfied with the education they received (and I teach at the CC level!). I would just caution people to make sure their local state university will accept the credits. The better the student’s grades, the more credits are accepted, as a rule.

Donna Freedman
Donna Freedman
5 years ago
Reply to  Kate

I had one year of college before life intervened. In my late 40s I decided to go back. North Seattle Community College is where I began, and I’m thankful that I did. It give me a chance to ease back into higher ed: smaller classes where the teachers actually recognized me, affordable tuition/fees, a financial aid department that walked me through the process of applying for help. I had some GREAT instructors there, too. Even more important was the existence of a scholarship to the University of Washington available ONLY to students transferring from community colleges. Applied and got one.… Read more »

JoeM
JoeM
5 years ago
Reply to  Kate

The transfer/articulation agreements can be difficult to understand at times, so I definitely recommend talking to an adviser if necessary to make sure all your credits carry over.

When I sign up for three classes (11 credits) and the total cost is $1,000-1,200, I just laugh in comparison to my old school’s tuition. Luckily I’m in a position to pay for the second degree out of pocket while aggressively paying off my first degree’s student loans.

Carla
Carla
5 years ago
Reply to  JoeM

I agree with you regarding CC and evening classes. I am going for dual enrollment at my local CC and state university. Why pay big bucks for basic classes? I love the diversity (age, experiences, etc) that I get at my CC – I don’t feel like the lone “older” student. Older students and veterans tend to offer the most dynamic perspective, especially in my liberal arts classes. I had one class where we had veterans from Korea, Vietnam, Desert Storm and Iraq/Afghanistan. It was a great learning experience for me.

lmoot
lmoot
5 years ago

I was a lazy kid and so I didn’t go after any scholarships (huge regret). Strangely enough I got accepted by every school I applied to. My family paid for my education which was the best gift they could have ever given me, but I wish for their sake that they pushed for the methods listed here. I live near a great community college that I could have gone to for 2 years, though I took a couple AP classes in high school. I would have qualified for certain scholarships but missed the deadline/ didn’t know about it. My family… Read more »

Kayla @ Femme Frugality
Kayla @ Femme Frugality
5 years ago

I’m so lucky that I graduated with very few student loans. My parents helped me pay for college tuition, I got scholarships, and I worked my way through school. I usually took 18 credit hours/semester and worked 30-40 hours/week. It was tough at times, but I’m so glad I didn’t graduate with too much student loan debt.

Jennifer B
Jennifer B
5 years ago

You missed a big one! Choose an in-state public school over an out of state or private school. The difference in cost is remarkable, and the in-state school might be close enough to enable you to live at home which would also cut your housing costs.

Donna Freedman
Donna Freedman
5 years ago
Reply to  Jennifer B

Well, I alluded to it (choosing less-expensive schools and the in-state vs. out-of-state or private college fees) but you’re right: I should have been more specific.

HKR
HKR
5 years ago
Reply to  Jennifer B

I would caution people not to make this assumption; you have to actually look at the numbers for each school and your particular situation. For example, comparing my state’s university to the private school I went to, which are twenty minutes apart: Room & Board for the state school is $20,650 for a resident of the state, while room/board at the private school is $29,800. If this is the only number you look at, it seems like the state school wins hands down. However, this particular private school gives a $5,000/year discount to Every student that participates in its campus… Read more »

stellamarina
stellamarina
5 years ago
Reply to  HKR

I have never heard of a discount for involvement in exta college programs before…..what a fabulous idea and shows that the college really is interested in the wider education of the student.

getagrip
getagrip
5 years ago
Reply to  Jennifer B

Each of my children had an out of state private school the were interested in provide enough in grants and four year scholarship as to make the cost of the private and in state public schools comparable. Gee, think that was an accident? Additionally neighboring states offered in-state prices as compared to our state where their public school tuition and fees were higher. So don’t be too quick to dismiss out of state or private schools out of hand if that is what you really want as long as you realize the comparison is likely a full price comparison to… Read more »

Jason
Jason
5 years ago

The strategy I am using for my son’s post-secondary education is broken into 3 parts: – 25% (about $10k) will come from me through RESP savings and so far I am on target – 25% (about $10k) will come from his mom (most likely through RESPs too) – 0-25% (up to $10k) will come from scholarships / awards / bursaries – 25-50% (up to $20k) will come from my son working during college/university/tech school To enable my son to earn his portion of his education costs, we are giving his lots of swim lessons so that he can be a… Read more »

Short arms long pockets
Short arms long pockets
5 years ago
Reply to  Jason

Those numbers are per year – right?

Doug
Doug
5 years ago

I am not a huge fan of the AP classes. Probably because my tainted experience working that much harder so that I ‘might’ get some college credit. I only took two AP classes in the ’80’s in HS. I think I scored 3’s on both exams, so no credit for me at the institution I started at. I am more of the mindset of just take the classes at the local JC / CC and get the dual credit. Period. I know that it is an option locally. I have witnessed it and experienced it with my oldest son. Probably… Read more »

Kate
Kate
5 years ago
Reply to  Doug

I think the College Level Exam Program (CLEP) is way overlooked. I was able to blast through 24 credits of English, History and Social Studies by taking these exams. It made a real difference for me. Are these exams still available?

Donna Freedman
Donna Freedman
5 years ago
Reply to  Kate

Yep, there’s still CLEP. Follow the link in the article.

getagrip
getagrip
5 years ago
Reply to  Doug

With respect to AP courses, a “3” is not typically accepted for credit however many colleges would also reject a stand alone “C” grade from a community college as well particularly if the course is required for your major. Either path is fine, just get the grade or score the test, but don’t expect what they consider “lower” performance to necessarily be guaranteed for credits.

Karla
Karla
5 years ago
Reply to  getagrip

I tell my high school students only take the AP classes you think you are passionate about. I remember sitting at freshman orientation and the family next to ours was just dumbstruck when told (I paraphrase) “yes, that’s nice that your daughter put all the effort into AP, community college. But we strongly believe our English program is important, and your daughter must hear how we want papers written, so we will grant 3 credits at most.” That, and most colleges will only grant credit in your non-major. Most science schools say the same thing…that’s nice you put all the… Read more »

Alexandra @ Real Simple Finances
Alexandra @ Real Simple Finances
5 years ago

Another benefit of community colleges is that good students can join Phi Theta Kappa, an honors society that offers both scholarship opportunities, as well as automatic grants to attend certain schools. I think 2-year colleges are one of the best options for saving money on college.

Doug
Doug
5 years ago

I agree. My wife was in the honors program at university. The program actually gave her and the other honors folks preferential treatment (e.g. ‘first in line’) at registration time. They never had to fight for the classes that were in demand. They had first pick.

Alexandra, Glad you brought that up. That is an important point that I will have to keep on my radar.

Laura
Laura
5 years ago

The strategy we’ve used is that DH & I both work for universities that provide tuition waiver or reimbursement. I went to night school at the (private) university DH works at (and which I used to work at), and although it took 20 years (with a 10-year break), I finally got my B.A. I don’t remember sunk costs prior to the break; total out-of-pocket cost after the break to do 9 courses was $900 for some tuition and books and fees. DS was accepted to DH’s university as well. DH is grandfathered into the old benefit of 100% tuition waiver… Read more »

Candace
Candace
5 years ago
Reply to  Laura

Couldn’t agree more! After putting one child through a private college, I promptly started looking for a new job at a local state university. Now my second child will attend tuition free at the state college. The fees will add up but we’ve set up a savings plan for them.

Kyle
Kyle
5 years ago

I made it through college with my B.S., but I feel like it’s a touchy subject. I really wouldn’t recommend college unless you have an inkling of what you plan to do. AND make sure you research what people are hiring for and that there is a demand for your degree. Realize there are plenty of great fields of work that don’t require a degree if you’re willing to put some serious work and dedication in(just like college). As much as I wanted to do something else, I’m in a standard engineering field today. *I did go through a community… Read more »

phoenix1920
phoenix1920
5 years ago
Reply to  Kyle

When you buy a home or a car, you research that purchase significantly before spending that much money (including having it inspected if it is used. Tuition alone at $3000/semester results in $24,000 for a 4-year degree, books and living expenses not included. I don’t understand why anybody would go to college and chose a field without researching it completely and seeing what kind of life it leads to, including with job potential and college debt taken into consideration. There are so many sources that provide great outlooks, based both on field and on college expenses. The information is out… Read more »

Jason
Jason
5 years ago

I think we are so far behind the European nations. I learned from an acquaintance who was visiting from Denmark that they not only pay for your post-secondary, they actually PAY YOU to GO TO school. Now how smart is that? Actually support your budding little citizens so they can graduate debt free and begin to contribute to society right away. More stability and better studying occurs there I’m sure since students don’t have to stress about what to eat all the time. Absolutely fascinating to see the different models of education funding on the international scene.

Jason
ADDFinances.org

Mysticaltyger
Mysticaltyger
5 years ago
Reply to  Jason

But what also goes along with that is much higher taxes and also much stricter admissions standards. Personally, I think Denmark is probably a better run country overall than the U.S. Our public sector wastes a lot of money in the U.S.

Carla
Carla
5 years ago

Response to #4 JoeM (you can’t reply to individual comments on the phone.) I agree with you regarding CC and evening classes. I am going for dual enrollment at my local CC and state university. Why pay big bucks for basic classes? I love the diversity (age, experiences, etc) that I get at my CC – I don’t feel like the lone “older” student. Older students and veterans tend to offer the most dynamic perspective, especially in my liberal arts classes. I had one class where we had veterans from Korea, Vietnam, Desert Storm and Iraq/Afghanistan. It was a great… Read more »

Stella Chiu
Stella Chiu
5 years ago

Hi Donna The total amount of money for college will be reduced to affordable level if the kids will go to community college for 1st two years and follow by attending college near by so that there will be no expense for accommodation. No payment is required if they will have the grants. For the real world, when we apply jobs, the managers don’t care much about what schools you coming from; their main concerns are your personality and character. Our jobs as the parents are to let the kids know the above information to target at less famous and… Read more »

Kristin
Kristin
5 years ago

As a threshold issue, parents and students should consider whether college is the best path for them. I heard this interesting piece on career and technical education on the Diane Rehm show earlier this week: http://thedianerehmshow.org/shows/2015-07-28/a-new-push-for-apprenticeship-as-a-path-to-employment My nephew is starting high school on the fall, and will be in a specialized program offered by our district during which he can earn an A.S. in Mechanical Engineering Technology while still technically in high school. If he wants to continue college after, he can. He participated in orientation over the past couple of weeks, and we really think we made the right… Read more »

zzzzzz
zzzzzz
5 years ago

You mentioned “top scholar” programs. In general, you can extrapolate that to “be a great student.” There are lots of scholarship opportunities to outstanding students.

For example, be a National Merit Finalist, and there are quite a few schools that will cover your tuition and fees.

Your numbers are on the low side. Tuition and fees at many private schools now exceeds $50,000.

Rocky
Rocky
5 years ago

I loved the article Donna. Thanks! I have interviewed several college students that have pursued the Community College option. They live at home and pay out of pocket for their education. While they do this, they are clarifying exactly what they want to do with their future, while NOT going into debt. The most recent student is actually working in his chosen field. You allude to working to pay for college in a couple of your bullets. I think it should be encouraged even more. We have all heard the stories of famous/important/successful people that worked full-time to pay for… Read more »

Donna Freedman
Donna Freedman
5 years ago
Reply to  Rocky

For an MSN Money article I interviewed a young woman who really wanted to go to an expensive university but ultimately decided she just couldn’t put her future self into that much debt. She lived in Texas and so went to a state school, working 30 to 40 hours per week. Although she did take out some education loans from the state, she knew they’d be forgiven if she graduated within four years. You guessed it: She did. No loan payments. As for working during her college years, she said it forced her to become very, very organized; in addition… Read more »

Patty
Patty
5 years ago

Several tactics enabled me to graduate from Law School entirely debt free. 1. Admittedly, my parents had about 15k saved in a 529 account for me. Helpful, but in no way did it cover all my expenses. 2. Attend State or Local colleges, especially for undergrad. The Universities I attended from 2006-2009 never had a sticker price of higher than $2200 per semester. 3. Look for overlooked scholarships. I received a departmental scholarship of $1500 one year that a grand total of 3 people applied for! And they granted 2 scholarships! Financial Aid offices often distribute info on available aid… Read more »

Bryan@Just One More Year
[email protected] One More Year
5 years ago

Excellent ideas to help pay for college!

These are all great ways that students can pay for college without necessarily needing to go into debt with student loans. A little creativity can go a long way and put a college student on much better financial footing once they graduate.

Both the student and parents saving early and as much as they can prior to college, would be the best fall back approach in case nothing else comes through to help.

slcccom
slcccom
5 years ago

However you pay for college, graduating debt-free with a useless degree means you threw away a whole bunch of money. If you want to be a writer, then write. If you want to be an artist, then create art. Get the Writer’s Market and Artist’s Market and Photographer’s Market books and study them. Subscribe to magazines. Join groups of peers in your field. Try to sell your work and learn from the experiences. The opinion of an instructor is NOT helpful and is often very destructive. If you want to make a living at it, the only opinion that counts… Read more »

Short arms long pockets
Short arms long pockets
5 years ago
Reply to  slcccom

I’m afraid I have to disagree with you. Getting a degree in the Arts is not the waste of time you seem to think it is (says the woman with the MA in Medieval French :)). There are many companies with jobs out there that will not look at a candidate unless they have a degree – and the degree itself does not matter. In many business related jobs the information that you learned in college is much less valuable than the skills that nobody teaches for credit – people skills, how to speak well, and, as someone else said… Read more »

Donna Freedman
Donna Freedman
5 years ago
Reply to  slcccom

“If you want to be a writer, then write. If you want to be an artist, then create art.” Not everyone can just start from scratch like that — and although both writing and art are subjective, most people WOULD benefit with some instruction on technique, history, etc. For example, someone with strong artistic leanings might never consider becoming a sculptor until s/he takes a sculpting course and finds it’s a perfect fit. The artist-to-be would also benefit from learning about techniques of sculpting, whether that’s welding, molding resins, or using plain old clay or stone. Put another way: A… Read more »

slcccom
slcccom
5 years ago
Reply to  Donna Freedman

Donna, you make my point. High school grads had English courses involving writing. They had newspapers and yearbooks to work on, school literary magazines, etc. So they should not be starting from scratch. Ditto for art classes. They can take additional courses at community colleges and art museums, etc. There are art guilds, organizations needing newsletter writers, and our library has organized writers’ groups. If you want to hone your public speaking abilities, there is Toastmasters. And if you show real interest and passion, you’ll find someone in those groups willing to mentor you. You can do all these things… Read more »

Donna Freedman
Donna Freedman
5 years ago
Reply to  slcccom

My feeling is that relatively few people can become good writers/artists by themselves. Either they’re not motivated enough to get the help they need to improve their work or they don’t know what they don’t know.

Plenty of people with potential wouldn’t be able to harness their abilities without help. No shame in that.

However, I do agree with your idea that college isn’t for everyone either right away or maybe ever. That’s why I advocate for “college or vocational training” and also suggest considering the military as an option (although that’s not for everyone, either).

Frank
Frank
5 years ago
Reply to  slcccom

Slcccom, I am glad somebody said it. It wasn’t the point of Donna’s article but yes, it should be considered whether or not college is even the right pathway for someone BEFORE looking at how to pay for it. Far too many kids get stuck with “do-you-want-fries-with-that” degrees and hefty school debts. I wish as a society we would see that not everyone should go to college and that not having a college degree should not carry a social stigma. I really wish we had more vocational schools, especially at a reasonable price. Also, I wish we had entrepreneurial schools… Read more »

slcccom
slcccom
5 years ago
Reply to  Frank

Frank, you are right. Donna’s article is excellent for the topic she discussed. I think this whole topic would be a good one for a new post, Donna. (Hint, hint).

Community colleges are starting entreprenuership classes, and there are the standard resources such as SCORE, local chambers of commerce, etc. However, my best source of information on the topic is the magazine of that same name. Reading it for years is an awesome education! Or you can look up back issues.

phoenix1920
phoenix1920
5 years ago

One of the things I highly recommend is to research your individual state to see what programs they have for paying for college for your children when your child is still young. I was able to pay for both of my children’s college tuition before they left elementary school based on this program (housing and books are not included). Also, many states have programs to keep their best performing students in state by offering scholarships, but they have to fulfill many requirements (including certain classes, volunteer service, etc)

Funny about Money
Funny about Money
5 years ago

Thank you for listing the community colleges among this excellent list of strategies.

The smartest of my students are young people (and older ones, too) who figure out that racking up two years of lower-division prereqs at a community college saves two years of exorbitant tuition at the local university. If you’re a high-school student who gets an opportunity to start on those requirements early at a nearby community college, grab it!

Christy
Christy
5 years ago

I went to college the first time with jobs, scholarships and pell grants. I worked 20 hours a week and used that money to pay all my utilities, it got cold during the winter, no cable, eating out only once a month, cooked at home, got out with my first degree owing nothing. My second degree I started small and took a few summer classes to see if I could handle a 40 hour work week and school. Because I got all A’s in those few classes, I got an academic scholarship which paid ALL of my further tuition. So… Read more »

slcccom
slcccom
5 years ago

I am thinking of the new high school grads. They do have other opportunities. Community colleges offer two-year degrees in useful areas, including welding, nursing, x-ray tech, machining, etc. Fast food jobs can lead for those who are inclined to food service to training in the franchise. Or a community college culinary degree. Even if they aren’t so inclined, it gives the job experience, which is even more important to get your foot in the door. These kids are usually just plain exploited by 4-year colleges into useless degrees. And I have seen too many art “instructors” who focus on… Read more »

Bill in NC
Bill in NC
5 years ago

I was very clear with both kids from an early age that they would ultimately be responsible for most of their college costs (should they choose to go). Oldest got offered full ROTC scholarships in multiple branches of service. They spent one year at university with ROTC paying nearly 90% of all costs, then decided they wanted a more military experience. So they applied for & received an appointment at the federal service academy of their choice. Youngest is halfway to getting their pilot’s license, told them if they want to fly for a living Uncle Sam wants to pay… Read more »

shares